The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Bazelon in NYT: NYC Needs More Illegal Handguns on the Street
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

Here’s a pretty classic “Who? Whom?” op-ed from the Bazelon Legal Dynasty, relentlessly working to get more black males shot by other black males for three generations now.

New York City during the 12 year mayorship of crime-fighting billionaire Michael Bloomberg offered a spectacular success story for gun control by aggressively stopping and frisking young punks for illegal handguns. Pretty soon, carrying an illegal handgun was seen by the more murderous classes as a ticket to prison, so New York City homicide rates fell much further than almost anyone had anticipated.

On the other hand, the Bloomberg NYPD targeting the most likely murderers had severe adverse impact on black criminals, just as it had wonderful beneficial impact on those who would have been murdered by black criminals.

De Blasio is vastly more liberal. But he’s not a Bazelon-level fool, so he appointed Giuliani’s old police chief Bill Bratton, and has kept up trying to jail guys carrying illegal handguns.

De Blasio Doesn’t Get It. Not Everyone Who Carries a Gun Is a Shooter.

A model Brooklyn program to keep young people out of jail runs afoul of the mayor and the police.

By Emily Bazelon
Ms. Bazelon, a staff writer at The New York Times Magazine, is the author of “Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incarceration.”

July 11, 2019

Mayor Bill de Blasio took a break from his long-shot presidential campaign this week to attack a program in Brooklyn that keeps young people who’ve been convicted of having an unlicensed gun out of prison. It was a strange move. Brooklyn’s diversion program is doing good, not harm, the evidence shows. It’s an effort the mayor could showcase on the national stage, an example of the city’s success at incubating reforms.

But at a news conference on Monday, Mr. de Blasio sounded anything but visionary.

The trouble started when the New York Police Department chief, Terence Monahan, suggested at the same gathering that the blame for a rise in shootings so far this year lay with plea deals in Brooklyn “that result in little or no jail time.” It’s true that a small fraction of young people charged with illegal gun possession in Brooklyn — but not for shooting anyone or even brandishing a gun — are accepted into a yearlong program, run by the office of District Attorney Eric Gonzalez, called Youth and Communities in Partnership, or Y.C.P. Participants meet weekly with a social worker, adhere to a curfew, and must work or take classes and complete dozens of hours of community service. If they graduate from the program, they are spared prison and the burden of a felony record.

In other words, the new program in Brooklyn gives you one Get Out of Jail Free card for carrying an illegal handgun. It’s not like there’s a law against felony murder, is there?

Y.C.P. offers a narrow escape hatch from New York’s punitive gun laws, which are among the harshest in the country. The state imposes a 3½-year mandatory minimum prison sentence for people who are convicted of the maximum charge for possessing a loaded gun without a license. In some states, possessing a gun without a permit isn’t even a crime. Other states treat the offense as a misdemeanor or make exceptions for having an unlicensed gun in one’s home. But in New York, gun control has taken a form that includes mandatory prison sentences.

The New York Police Department has long credited “Guns = Prison,” as the slogan goes, for much of New York’s amazing crime drop. And it is amazing: Crime has fallen steeply in New York over a quarter century, to a level not seen since the 1950s. In 1990, there were 2,245 killings in the city. In 2018, there were fewer than 300. …

Y.C.P. started in 1997, in partnership with some Brooklyn churches, out of a recognition that “not everyone who carries a gun is a shooter,” as Anthony Newerls, who runs a violence-prevention program in Brownsville, told me. “In many cases, we see the carrier is carrying the gun for someone else.”

What’s so bad about handing the gun to the trigger-puller as long as you don’t pull the trigger yourself?

… To reduce and someday end mass incarceration, the country is very much in need of models like this one. But Mayor de Blasio doesn’t get it. …

Emily Bazelon is a staff writer at the Magazine and the Truman Capote Fellow for Creative Writing and Law at Yale Law School. She is also a best-selling author and a co-host of the “Slate Political Gabfest,” a popular podcast. @emilybazelon • Facebook

 
Hide 89 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. Lot says:

    “by aggressively stopping and frisking young punks for illegal handgun”

    That violates the Black Privilege of intimidating random people in public places by dressing like a guy who carries an illegal concealed firearm, even if you actually aren’t.

    A penumbra of this privilege is the right to should obscene rap lyrics playing loudly on your phone on the subway and buses, or really any commons you feel like tragedying.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    , @El Dato
  2. Bazelon my wayward son
    There’ll be peace when you are done

    In some states, possessing a gun without a permit isn’t even a crime.

    In most states.

    The Costs of Owning a Gun: A State-by-State Permit Breakdown

    In other words, the new program in Brooklyn gives you one Get Out of Jail Free card for carrying an illegal handgun.

    Which Mr Mitchell of Fife wishes he had.

    Man jailed for ordering gun on dark web

    Let’s “unpack” this, so to speak. Jatavious is stopped on the way to robbing a candy store, but pays no price other than some extracurricular education at taxpayer expense.

    Derb, though, risks prison for driving to the shooting range in Saratoga or Valley Forge, unless he takes a ferry across the Sound.

    Anarchotyranny in action.

  3. Kronos says:

    Is it possible to directly increase black crime to decrease real estate prices? Sort’ve like a “controlled burn.” If the Bazelons are working for a real estate firm that might be profitable. “Hey, I got this great idea to drop prices by 10%!” Buy low during high crime years then sell high during low crime years.

  4. TWS says:

    Let everyone carry. God will sort it out

  5. I suspect now that her hubby has aged way past four times a week, and she no longer has to worry about biracial children in real life…

    her finger now creeps downstairs thinking about very fit 21 year old bold coal black skin males with strong personalties and a few guns and knives. Maybe a tat or two as well appears in the vision as things down there get a little faster.

  6. newrouter says:

    > a narrow escape hatch from New York’s punitive gun laws, which are among the harshest in the country. <

    A gun grabbers utopia and still the proggtarded aren't happy.

  7. JohnnyD says:

    “And it is amazing: Crime has fallen steeply in New York over a quarter century, to a level not seen since the 1950s.”

    We obviously can’t have that. We should not go back to the dark ages of Eisenhower’s America!

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @AndrewR
  8. Steve, speaking of Bazelon, there could be glitch in the archives, where Cloudflare is blocking access to some April 2019 iSteve articles (paging Ron Unz!):

    April 10, 2019

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/a-theory-about-why-judge-bazelon-could-empathize-with-criminals/

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/presidential-height/

    April 11, 2019

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/british-bobbies-crack-down-on-limerick-hate/

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/coyw-ruled-a-racist-license-plate/

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  9. No one seems interested in how Iceland and Japan have “reduced and ended” – well, that’s not quite right; they really just avoided it in the first instance – “mass incarceration….”

    • Replies: @Altai
    , @bigdicknick
  10. An Aussie says:

    Is this author from the same ideological group demanding the disarming of US citizens in general?

  11. @TWS

    Amen.

    An armed society is a polite society.

  12. unit472 says:

    Richmond, Virginia had a crackdown on carrying a unlicensed handgun when its murder rate soared in the 1990’s. 5 year mandatory sentence. There were billboards put up with a dotted square representing ‘actual size of prison cell” and some of the city buses were painted black with the warning of ‘5 years’ painted on the sides and PSA on TV . Doug Wilder and Tim Kaine were the mayors back then. It actually worked too. Homocides fell by a lot.

    The question is was the reduction just a temporary lull because police, prosecutors and judges knew who the bad guys were and could jail them for 5 years on a gun charge. Take a couple of hundred known thugs off the street and put them in prison so they can’t shoot each other ( or anyone else) has got to have some impact in a city of 200,000.

  13. bucky says:

    Yeah it is always about catering to blacks and making excuses for them. There is a reason why many libs were unironically for Danyaries Targaryen–she leads an army of African savages, she concocts a convenient fiction that they are free even though they functionally behave as slaves, she even has a high yellow best friend.

    Whites are bad, blacks are good, gays are best. That is it in a nutshell.

    • Replies: @guest
  14. @JohnnyD

    Not to Eisenhower’s America, Emily Bazelon wants to go back to the glory years of David Bazelon’s America, when he was the chief judge of the DC Court of Appeals, 1962-1978, and conspired with his best friend William Brennan to tee up cases for the Warren Court.

    Granted, the homicide rate doubled and many American cities were devastated, but that’s a small price to pay for the Bazelons having their way.

    • Replies: @JohnnyD
    , @Lot
  15. Anonymous[388] • Disclaimer says:
    @TWS

    Let everyone carry. God will sort it out

    You’ll find out who loves ya baby.

  16. Just another facet of decriminalizing negro criminality.

    Chicago has actually been actively implementing a “catch and release” of sorts on negros arrested for unlawful possession of a firearm. (among other offenses)

    True story: An acquaintance of mine was arrested and charged with unlawful possession of a firearm for taking a hand gun in its case from his car into a friend’s house in Cook County. (this is the extreme short story) The ASA refused to drop the charges or agree to a plea deal. This individual (white male, no criminal record, FOID carrying, legally registered and owned firearm) ended up pleading guilty and was sentenced to 2 years probation, paid over 14k in legal fees, and was prohibited from being in possession of a firearm for some length of time that I don’t recall.

    Why might he of had the book thrown at him, one might ask? Pure and shameless stat padding. The more whites convicted of IPF makes the high number of negros convicted of the same offense look less bad. The guy was the Petty White Defendant.

    Repatriation is the only way. Steve doesn’t think so, but his blog posts routinely make the case that integration is not possible.

  17. I am with the negroes on this one. They should be allowed to kill as many of each other as they damn well please.

    • Agree: Laurence Whelk
  18. @MikeatMikedotMike

    I would think your friend would be able to present a case for wrongful prosecution given the current guidelines at work. If they’re prosecuting whites while letting blacks walk, that’s a clear violation of due process. I know, forget it Jake, it’s Chicago.

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
  19. Dr. X says:

    Y.C.P. offers a narrow escape hatch from New York’s punitive gun laws, which are among the harshest in the country. The state imposes a 3½-year mandatory minimum prison sentence for people who are convicted of the maximum charge for possessing a loaded gun without a license. In some states, possessing a gun without a permit isn’t even a crime. Other states treat the offense as a misdemeanor or make exceptions for having an unlicensed gun in one’s home. But in New York, gun control has taken a form that includes mandatory prison sentences.

    Why, Bazelon practically sounds like an NRA Life Member.

    And you know what? She’s 100% correct. In New York it is a felony to possess an unregistered or unlicensed handgun in your own home for self-defense, in direct violation of District of Columbia vs. Heller. But NYC just DGAF.

    Getting a permit in NYC is so harsh and arbitrary as to be close to impossible, and very costly and onerous if you do succeed. Last year NYPD cops in the pistol licensing bureau were arrested for accepting bribes from a Jewish fixer who was collecting $18,000 in bribe money per license from Jewish neighborhood patrol members who wanted permits.

    And they were paying it. That’s how difficult it is to get a license in NYC.

    Y.C.P. started in 1997, in partnership with some Brooklyn churches, out of a recognition that “not everyone who carries a gun is a shooter”

    I think that’s true. In a lot of black neighborhoos, there are people who are actually out there trying to kill you, but you are denied the right of self-defense by NYC. So if you want to protect yourself, you have to break the law. That’s what “Subway Gunman” Bernhard Goetz did back in the 1980s. He had been mugged a bunch of times and applied for a permit, and they pretty much laughed at him and told him “Fuggeddit.” So he got an “illegal” gun to carry, and sure enough he was mugged again. And he defended himself.

    NYC gun laws have been on the books for over a century. Crime levels have waxed and waned during that time, but it has been a felony to carry an unlicensed gun in NYC since 1911.

    The only reason this is a big deal now is that NYC has become a majority-minority city, populated by a white minority of hipsters, gays, women, and bitchmade punks who would rather eat broken glass for breakfast than own a gun, and by a majority of blacks and browns who live in the real world where you need to defend yourself — and it shows up in the crime stats.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Pericles
  20. guest says:

    “Not everyone who carries a gun is a shooter”

    I am mightily sick of the journalist game known as Make Up a Myth to Pop. We were talking about *illegal* carrying, you deceitful cow.

    People who carry guns illegal are probably more apt to break other laws. Such as those against discharging firearms and against murder. Furthermore, when murderers suddenly get the urge to do murder, they are less likely to shoot anyone if for fear of frisking they’re not illegally carrying a gun.

    But that’s too obvious, isn’t it?

  21. Kronos says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    Like to Liberia? Wakanda? Where would you relocate them?

    • Replies: @dfordoom
  22. @TWS

    Not everyone.

    Sec. 1. Be it enacted,…That no freedman, free negro or mulatto, not in the military service of the United States government, and not licensed so to do by the board of police of his or her county, shall keep or carry fire-arms of any kind, or any ammunition, dirk or bowie knife, and on conviction thereof in the county court shall be punished by fine, not exceeding ten dollars, and pay the costs of such proceedings, and all such arms or ammunition shall be forfeited to the informer; and it shall be the duty of every civil and military officer to arrest any freedman, free negro, or mulatto found with any such arms or ammunition, and cause him or her to be committed to trial in default of bail.

  23. Mayor Bill de Blasio took a break from his long-shot presidential campaign this week to attack a program in Brooklyn that keeps young people who’ve been convicted of having an unlicensed gun out of prison.

    Ok, maybe it’s petty and pedantic, but if you’re the NYT, you should try to avoid unintentional puns like using “long shot” in a sentence about gun control.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
  24. Anon[328] • Disclaimer says:

    I wonder if this non-legal Bazelon is any relation?:

    Irwin Bazelon (b. Evanston, Illinois, June 4, 1922; died August 2, 1995) was an American composer of contemporary classical music. In total, Bazelon composed nine symphonies and over sixty orchestral, chamber, and instrumental works. Bazelon’s music lacks any regular pulse, instead it is characterized by unpredictable syncopation, irregular groupings, unexpected triplets, and off-beat accents. His theme music for NBC News opened the show from 1962 to 1977.

    His wife:

    Cecile Gray Bazelon (born September 25, 1927, Cleveland, Ohio) is an American painter living in New York City. Bazelon is best known for her perspectives of unpeopled New York cityscapes, and her depictions of interior spaces framed in geometric patterns.

    The two lesser known sisters:

    Dana Bazelon Criminal Defense/Civil Rights/Owner, Law Offices of Dana Bazelon

    Wow, a Bazelon with a law degree who didn’t wash out as a practicing attorney.

    I have a solo practice, focusing primarily on criminal defense and civil rights work in the Philadelphia area. I am passionate about protecting the rights of those whose voices are usually unheard in our courts. I represent people charged in both state and federal court in all types of criminal cases, both felonies and misdemeanors. I also bring actions against state and federal prisons and police and federal agents for abusing individuals held in their custody.

    It sounds like she’s operating a privately funded public defenders office. Where does the money come from? Why can’t she interest any other lawyers in joining her “firm”?

    Jill Bazelon, who founded an organization that provides financial literacy classes free of charge to low-income high school students and individuals in several cities.

    You see, the problem with black people is that they don’t know about financial planning. White people talk about financial planning and regattas around the dinner table, while black parents are too busy giving “The Talk.”

    Our goal is to increase wealth in underserved communities by teaching key concepts like how to repair credit, how to save money and reduce debt, how to understand and navigate mutual funds, and how to protect savings and plan for the future. We teach these skills over a six-hour course, and then we try to make the concepts stick, and build social support for saving and investing, by setting up groups for our graduates that meet every two weeks.

    This might be a good thing to teach in middle school. But kids who sign up voluntarily and then return for biweekly meetings are self-selecting as non-dumbasses. A UBI is the only thing that could possibly work with the dumbasses.

    Which reminds me of the recent Glenn Loury-Coleman Hughes Bloggingheads podcast: They mentioned research that said that blacks waste money on shoes and clothes and hair because in their world this display of consumption makes sense. They don’t envision being in the future when having saved money, to buy a house, would be a more powerful display of success. Hughes had written in Quillette about some funny Neilsen data on comparative black-white expenses. Anyway, the shoes, for instance, signify success for a young, black punk. I wonder if an effective counter to that would be some sort of campaign to ridicule (Saul Alinksy #5) anyone who wears expensive basketball shoes or hair extensions. This will be perceived as racist or anti-Nike, but it might have an effect.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  25. R.G. Camara says: • Website
    @Lot

    A penumbra of this privilege is the right to should obscene rap lyrics playing loudly on your phone on the subway and buses, or really any commons you feel like tragedying.

    To be fair to blacks: vile thugs of all races enjoy taking over a space via as-loud-as-possible noise pollution (among other techniques).

    White biker gangs from the 1950s onward have enjoyed revving their engines as loud as possible to let people know a certain space is theirs (the Sturges biker rally being a great example) or blaring Skynyrd or country.

    Hispanics are not immune to this at all as well. I went to a Halloween event a few years ago at a haunted house/fair, and the Hispanic thugs were walking around with backpack-mounted speakers blaring their spanish rap and salsa to drown out everyone’s conversation around them and laughing about it.

    These days, technology is helping the thugs. Despite everyone having earbuds and cellphones, companies have seen fit to create bluetooth hand-held speakers with more decibel power than the old boom boxes and yet small enough to fit in pockets. Now they can slip into a car undetected and suddenly take it over with very loud music coming out of nowhere.

    Of course blacks far outkick their coverage when it comes to these incidents, but hey, you’re racist for noticing….

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @Redneck farmer
    , @AndrewR
  26. fnn says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    I’m old enough to remember when Chicago cops were almost all ethnic Irish from the Bridgeport neighborhood who operated with impunity. Mostly that was OK-if not altogether good. Then there guys at the critical level (both Irish and Italian) who were connected with “The Outfit.” And more overt corruption was widespread (see the Marquette Ten and William Hanhardt).

    BTW, I was with Jon Burge at High School ROTC at Bowen HS. He didn’t make a big impression and neither did I.

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
  27. There’s certainly a wedge here to drive into law abiding peoples, for creatures with resentments such as the Bazelons’. If I were sentenced to 3.5 years in New York state prison for possessing something that shouldn’t need a license in the first place, a loaded gun, I would make my life a crusade to punish and humiliate the people and ideologies responsible.

    On the other hand, a 17-year-old member of an intergenerational underclass with a loaded gun is a very dangerous thing, which is probably best addressed by removing the young man from his social circle for several years.

    • Replies: @Fidelios Automata
  28. AndrewR says:
    @JohnnyD

    President Forced Integration? Agreed

  29. JohnnyD says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Maybe, Ms. Bazelon is a big fan of the Death Wish movies.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  30. Lot says:
    @Steve Sailer

    “and conspired with his best friend William Brennan to tee up cases for the Warren Court.”

    Maybe that happened, but all of the major “rights for criminals” cases involved conservative or moderate states’ practices being stopped. Two that were big enough to enter police jargon were Terry v Ohio (“a Terry stop”) and of course Miranda v Arizona.

    Some other majors:

    4th Amendment applies to the states:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mapp_v._Ohio

    state inmates had the right to file a writ of habeas corpus challenging both the legality and the conditions of their imprisonment (Virginia case)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jones_v._Cunningham

    Expansion of the fruit of the poisonous tree doctrine, FBI California case:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wong_Sun_v._United_States

    Right to a criminal defense attorney if you cannot afford one, Florida case

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gideon_v._Wainwright

    Prosecutors are required to provide defendants’ counsel with exculpatory evidence:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brady_v._Maryland

    Fifth amendment right to remain silent applies to states, Connecticut case:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malloy_v._Hogan

    Evidence seized in an unlawful arrest cannot be used against a defendant:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beck_v._Ohio

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    , @Autochthon
  31. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dr. X

    The Sullivan Law was passed by Irish corrupt and insane Big Tim Sullivan so the Irish could throw Italians in jail at will. Especially among “velocipedists”, as bicycle riders were then called, everyone carried a gun because of rabid dogs as much as anything else. There was even a special “.22 Velo Dog” revolver sold in bicycle shops. In those days, getting bit by a rabid dog was a likely excruciating and certain slow death.

    When Italians replaced the Irish as the dominant pole in the power filter, they kept it so they could jail blacks who got out of line. New York blacks were in those days a better grade of black than commonly found elsewhere, a situation that changed drastically after WWII, but they still had an above average rate of crime as compared to Italians, who themselves were a little crime prone-but theirs tended to be a little more, shall we say, organized. When you got shot by an Italian you usually did something a prudent person might not have, whereas blacks were more likely to explode at random.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
  32. Marty says:

    In many cases, we see the carrier is carrying the gun for someone else.

    Steve, just day before yesterday an interesting felon-in-possession opinion issued from the Cal. Court of Appeal. A Napa cop investigating an illegally parked car saw a backpack behind the driver’s armrest, equidistant between the 3 occupants. Since the driver was on felony probation, the cop was entitled to search. Weed was in the small pocket, a gun in the large one. The driver admitted knowing about the weed, but everyone denied knowledge of the gun. Neither the backpack nor the gun bore any fingerprints, and DNA was never sent for testing.

    The gun was registered to a dead man. The driver had no connection with him, but the rear passenger was the dead guy’s brother, and the front passenger had been his girlfriend. Amazingly (to me), the driver’s conviction for “possessing” the gun was affirmed, on the theory that knowledge of what’s in the front pocket = constructive possession of whatever’s in the other pockets. I had no idea the law works like this.
    https://www.courts.ca.gov/opinions/documents/A154498.PDF

  33. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Kronos

    Like to Liberia? Wakanda? Where would you relocate them?

    It’s a silly fantasy. Best to ignore it.

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
  34. @unit472

    Project Exile was about illegally carrying as a prohibited person and using a gun in a crime.

    Virginia doesn’t license guns and we have open carry without a permit.

    Kaine is an idiot and didn’t do a single thing to lower crime.

    The weird thing is that it was supported AND opposed by gun rights groups.

  35. Kronos says:
    @JohnnyD

    But why do they support such policies? Do they profit from it financially or politically? Or, are they just ideologically stubborn? It’s likely not lost on them that they’re responsible for the rise of Bloomberg and Giuliani. Also, for the “Death Wish” and “Dirty Harry” films. Why would the Democratic establishment support them now after all these years?

  36. @MikeatMikedotMike

    Pure and shameless stat padding.

    I think you’re exactly right, and there’s going to be a lot more of it, all across the country. It’ll essentially be a ‘zero-tolerance’ policy for whites, and (as we’ve seen) reduced enforcement for negroes and other POC criminals, with the infamous “$750 threshold” paving the way. It’s only $750 for now.

    So we have the authorities pretty much ignoring ‘flash mobs’ robbing stores but hey, isn’t that a crack in your taillight lens, white boy? What’s that? Okay, we’re hauling you in.

    But repatriation? No, they’re not going to be doing that. They’re not even going to permit the slightest bit of separation, which is what we all desperately need.

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
  37. Lot says:
    @R.G. Camara

    There’s no foul language in Skynyrd and they use actual musical instruments!

    • Replies: @ben tillman
  38. @Anon

    One of the reasons I support an UBI is so we can unleash the criminal justice system on the underclass. If you’re getting enough to cover basic expenses, there’s no “reason” to break the law due to poverty.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
  39. @R.G. Camara

    Hayden is an effective counter.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    , @Lot
  40. Execution, Not Incarceration.
    Three strikes and you’re dead.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  41. Pericles says:
    @Dr. X

    Getting a permit in NYC is so harsh and arbitrary as to be close to impossible, and very costly and onerous if you do succeed.

    So if someone gets shot in NYC, plain statistics suggest you can start your investigation by assuming the shooter is a celebrity or a Jew.

  42. this chart looks about the same as a chart of how good music was.

    has the same steady rise from 1960 to 1970, then the explosion from 1970 to 1980. the first major peak in the early 80s, slight decline in the mid 80s, then the all time peak in the early 90s. then a serious drop in the mid 90s, a small peak around 2000, then a slow and steady decline.

    10 years ago, there used to be a poster here who would post about how the violent crime level tracked the creativity level well. and it’s not totally wrong. guys in their 20s and 30s do most of the creative stuff. that’s also when criminals do most of their crime.

    youtube producer Rick Beato actually picked 1996 as the year the big drop began.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  43. does anybody here carry? imagine having to deal with state by state, and county by county, rules. and trying to comply with them. urgh.

    i’m thinking about carrying the new Sig P365 XL. but thinking about accidentally stepping into the wrong democrat controlled state or county while traveling makes me think twice.

    i have a long time friend from west virginia who is a traveling estate planner and does well for himself, but always carries a gun on all his sales calls. listening to him talk about checking the laws in 8 states as he drives across half the country sounds like a giant headache i don’t want.

    at least you can carry firearms into national parks now. i went to Denali 20 years ago and the video they make you watch before you can go into the park, about what to do if the bears come for you, was not that reassuring.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  44. @Lot

    Maybe that happened, but all of the major “rights for criminals” cases involved conservative or moderate states’ practices being stopped.

    I don’t get it. Why does it matter which states’ practices are involved?

    • Replies: @Lot
  45. @Lot

    And I guess they owned Knebsworth Park back in ’76.

    But the thing that I can’t get past is that in the plane crash those who died survived the impact with the ground only to be killed by their equipment flying forward from the back of the passenger compartment.

    • Replies: @Lot
  46. Anonymous[135] • Disclaimer says:

    Sadiq Khan, (‘mayor of London’), please take note.

    • Replies: @Digital Samizdat
  47. “… not everyone who carries a gun is a shooter…”

    Carrying an unlicensed gun meets both the requisite actus reus and mens rea for guilt of the crime of illegally possessing a firearm.

    “… as Anthony Newerls, who runs a violence-prevention program in Brownsville….

    Maybe he has Stockholm Syndrome. Check out this review of The Ville.

    The Ville is about the ghetto of Brownsville in Brooklyn, one of the most murderous neighborhoods in the world, meaner than Mogadishu and probably better armed; and Gred Donaldson, like no one before him, has gotten into the tragic, bullet-ridden heart of the place, learned to love its people and come out with their stories . . . The result is vivid, in-your-face journalism. . . Source: ―Men’s Journal, from the first edition

    “In many cases, we see the carrier is carrying the gun for someone else.”

    Still a crime.

    Like the old song goes,

    Don’t do the crime
    If you don’t want the time.
    Don’t do it.

  48. eah says:

    Are they no longer stopping as many to look for (illegal) guns? — or is that happening about as much as before?

    Assuming the latter:

    …the blame for a rise in shootings so far this year lay with plea deals in Brooklyn “that result in little or no jail time.”

    This is knowable to some degree, isn’t it? — presumably if stopped and an illegal gun is found, it is taken and the person goes thru YCP; there must be a record of this — re the recent uptick in shootings, how many suspects have been apprehended? — how many of them earlier went thru YCP?

    Did you ask her directly via Twitter whether YCP is worth continuing if the price is an increase in the number of shootings? — especially if it can be shown a significant number of shooters who are apprehended went thru YCP — but also regardless (I know ‘correlation is not causation’, but when people are getting shot perhaps you should not be so nitpicky about that).

  49. El Dato says:
    @Lot

    A penumbra of this privilege is the right to should obscene rap lyrics playing loudly on your phone on the subway and buses, or really any commons you feel like tragedying.

    As it is frowned upon to politely ask to turn that glorious noise off, some problem people resort to extreme active measures:

    Listening to rap music is not a crime.

    It’s a dangerous industrial activity. Sudden Defense Moves seem to become more popular.

    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
  50. @prime noticer

    I don’t disagree that 1996 was the year rock and roll died.

    Grunge/alternative rock had several built-in stylistic limitations, and it had begun bumping up against them by 1994 or so.

    In 1996 Cobain had been gone for nearly two years and Pearl Jam was well into its project of converting itself into a simulation of a 70s rock band.

    Ultimately, the bullet in the head for rock that year was the release of the Spice Girls single, “Wannabe,” on July 7th. There were many UK press wags who called it as such.

    Popular music is living with the fallout 23 years later, as proved by the creatively sterile trash on the charts these days.

  51. Altai says:
    @Autochthon

    There was that nastiness of jailing the 26 bankers unlike any other country (Small homogeneous community alongside a sense of actual ownership of their country led to big public protests) but fortunately the United Sates of Goldman Sachs was on hand to make extraordinary moves to get Iceland to free them. In the end lawfare won out and they served less than a year in what was by all accounts a pretty nice minimum security setup. Was it the US? Who knows.

  52. Flip says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    What part was illegal if he had an FOID card? That it was loaded while being transported?

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
  53. @The Wild Geese Howard

    Couple of years ago, an afternoon crew was talking about music.
    Sidekick #1: I was listening to Smashing Pumpkins’ G.IS.H. a few days ago, and it could be released today, if it hadn’t in 1991, and still sound fresh.
    Host: Yeah, AND THAT’S THE PROBLEM.

  54. @Bragadocious

    He might have a chance in a county where the criminal justice system isn’t completely run by negros.

  55. @dfordoom

    Yes, better we keep pretending peaceful coexistence is the more realistic option.

    One can understand what the best solution is while simultaneously realizing that it will never happen. That rule applies to a great many topics of discussion here at isteve.

  56. @fnn

    My mother was born and raised in Bridgeport. I lived there for a few years as well. My godfather was an Irish Bridgeport cop and his youngest son is also, but the latter now lives in Bridgeport South, aka Beverly.

    “…I was with Jon Burge…”

    My guy!

  57. @Mr McKenna

    Agreed. I harbor no delusions about repatriation. I mention it to illustrate just how much all other options are futile.

  58. slumber_j says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    Yeah, I thought that was pretty rich too. In a similar vein:

    Emily Bazelon is a staff writer at the Magazine and the Truman Capote Fellow for Creative Writing and Law at Yale Law School.

    Shouldn’t that be “the Truman Capote Fellow for Destructive Writing”?

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
  59. @Lot

    Every single case you cite was decided correctly. Protecting liberty and punishing crime are not by any means mutually exclusive.

    I may be wrong, and of course I don’t presume to speak for him, but I don’t think Mr. Sailer has these cases in mind when he bemoans the trend of that time to be more lenient to criminals. Rather, I reckon he is criticising (inter alia, but especially) lenient sentences for the duly convicted, the dismantling of the system for involuntarily institutionalising the (dangerously) mentally ill, the demand that even those attempting evasion or violently resisting arrest be handled with kid gloves (as white people know, the way to handle unjust harassment is by cooperating, telling it all to the judge, then filing a lucrative §1983 case for good measure, not by fighting the police then bitching when you get bloodied or shot for it), and all the rigamorole about scrutinising the races of those accused.

    I could be wrong, of course. But I don’t think Steve thinks that, for example, ensuring suspects know their rights or providing legal counsel to poor people are bad ideas. Hell, I don’t think they can objectively, in good faith, be argued to be bad ideas by any rational and decent person.

    • Replies: @Lot
  60. Emily Bazelon:”Truman Capote Fellow for Creative Writing and Law at Yale Law School.”

    Need any more be said?

  61. @The Wild Geese Howard

    (I thought it died on February 3, 1959).

  62. Kronos says:
    @Redneck farmer

    But it will of course lead to a “disparate impact.”

  63. AndrewR says:

    Only a white supremacist would think reducing the number of black people murdered is a good thing.

  64. AndrewR says:
    @Anonymous

    I’m amused at how many sperged out WN LARPtards see nothing wrong with how many Irish and Italians we let in. Those two groups have done more harm to the US than Mexicans could ever hope to do.

    • LOL: Autochthon
  65. Lot says:
    @ben tillman

    Bazelon Sr was on the DC Circuit.

    That is the Circuit Court with the lowest number and lowest percentage of criminal appeals in the USA.

    So the idea he teed up some great pro-criminal appeals for the Warren Court I think is false. Maybe once on a less important issue. But they were largely about forcing states to apply standards already used in federal prosecutions.

  66. @El Dato

    nypost.com

    Outrage over Arizona man who killed teen for listening to rap music

    A white Arizona man is accused of stabbing a black 17-year-old

    grisly slaying

    But social media users railed against the defense, flooding Twitter with the hashtag #JusticeforElijah.

    Dog bites man.

    Title contains the word “outrage”. High resolution mug of the white guy at the very top of the article, after the title and before the body. First line reads “A white Arizona man is accused of stabbing a black 17-year-old”. Body contains the word “grisly slaying”. Would not be so if races wer reversed.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  67. @prime noticer

    I carry. Sig Sauer P238; Yes, I know all the reasons other calibers are preferred to the .380. I chose it because it fits well even in the front pocket of fishing shorts and is very light. I used to carry the S&W 1911 .45. but its just too heavy.

    There are tactical reasons a smaller caliber is sufficient and even preferred, we can discuss offline if you’d like.

    As far as neighboring states go, there are a number of resources where you can check which states honor other states’ permits. The NRA website has good resources. Also see:

    https://www.usconcealedcarry.com/resources/ccw_reciprocity_map/

    Your friend in WV seems to be in okay shape with his neighbors except into MD. As far as you go, I believe in most if not all states, the permit applies statewide. NY and CA may be an exception, I’m not sure. Make sure you do your homework and know exactly what you are and are not allowed to do. You definitely do not want to get any sort of firearms charge.

    In addition to where you can and can’t carry, be aware of what you’re allowed to do with it. Example: It used to be illegal in FL (where I live) to “brandish”. The legislature eventually realized its better for someone to be able to use the weapon to dissuade a criminal while not actually shooting them. I know a guy who a few years back was getting gas late at night. Not a bad area but mostly light industrial so not many people around. 3 black guys on crotch rockets pulled in, one parked behind him and another was scanning the gas station and pump area (my friend assumed looking for cameras). My friend simply lifted his shirt and showed the butt of his weapon (Glock 9mm) and the guys got back on their bikes and left. Under the old law, that could be interpreted as brandishing, however waiting for them to start the robbery and then shooting them would have been okay.

    Another example is: You’re driving and are stopped by police. Do you or do you not need to tell the police officer you’re carrying? It varies by state.

    Also I highly recommend a tactical handgun course. There are a lot of things people don’t necessarily think about that would come in really handy if you really needed to engage someone. Again, happy to discuss offline if you’d like.

  68. I’d like to see the murders graphed out all the way back to pre-WWII to get more context.

    what the heck happened in 1960 that this inexorable rise in murder reigns supreme? Weren’t the gangs shooting each other in prior decades? It’s just too sudden; it almost looks like a plan. Sort of like the rise in college tuition.

    • Replies: @Lot
  69. @Autochthon

    There are almost no DEMOCRATS in Japan.

  70. El Dato says:
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    Best are Twitter comments from people being tired of black youth being gunned down daily standing around, driving, phoning, doing nothing. Or the “white supremacist” (“CALL IT WHAT IT IS: WHITE SUPREMACISM” … yup it’s not Novichock!) apparently getting “sympathy from the meedja because he white”.

  71. @unit472

    “Homocides fell by a lot.”

    And all the queers heaved a collective sigh of relief.

  72. Lot says:
    @Autochthon

    It was Steve badmouthing the Warren court as increasing crime, not me. I agree most of these decisions were right when you look at them individually.

    Not the right to a public defender however.

    As a matter of good local government policy, yes we usually should have some system of public defenders.

    But I don’t agree that it is a Constitutional right. Did the Founding Fathers think so, for federal courts at least? It isn’t like it is a high tech thing they couldn’t have conceived of.

    Once it became a Constitutional right, suddenly states have no discretion to ever deny indigents public defenders, and every single convict can gum up the system with appeals claiming “ineffective assistance.”

    “lenient sentences for the duly convicted, the dismantling of the system for involuntarily institutionalising the (dangerously) mentally ill”

    The first has nothing to do with the Warren Court. Federal sentences are crazy long. Closing the crazy bins was mostly a state decision because they are really costly to run.

    Overall it is mostly state law trends that resulted in higher crime rates, not liberal Supreme Court decisions, other than the awful Gideon and its progeny.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  73. Lot says:
    @stillCARealist

    “I’d like to see the murders graphed out all the way back to pre-WWII to get more context.”

    Good book on that:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Better_Angels_of_Our_Nature

    1950s crime rates were lower than 1900-1930.

  74. Lot says:
    @Redneck farmer

    Auto: I think RF meant Haydn or Handel, the composers.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  75. @Lot

    Nah – bogus, interminable appeals as of right – foe claims of ineffective assistancw of counsel or otherwise – are shite and part of the problem; the bad stuff Warren’s court facilitated; but Joe Suspect’s being entitled to counsel for his trial as part of due process os a good thing. No layman can be expected to stand a chance against an gaggle of prosecutors in the convoluted, modern system.

    Things were not so convoluted back in the day. Why, there were not even law schools and bar exams; the statutes were not so voluminous as to be inadvertantly violated by anyone farting and coughing; regulations did not even exist….

  76. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Redneck farmer

    One of the reasons I support an UBI is so we can unleash the criminal justice system on the underclass. If you’re getting enough to cover basic expenses, there’s no “reason” to break the law due to poverty.

    But it’s not poverty that leads to crime. That’s wrongthink and might lead to socialism which is the last thing our masters want.

    Crime is caused by institutional racism and institutional sexism and institutional homophobia and institutional transphobia. Everybody knows that.

  77. @Lot

    Thank’ee. I was actually hoping it was a trademark for some handy jammer or scrambler to disable Bluetooth connections in a small area. I hopefully looked for such a product by that name – alas, without success.

    (Get back to work, wily Russian hackers; those of us tormented by troglodytes using spread spectrum technology to blast mumble-rap are depending upon you!)

  78. @Flip

    This is kind of a long story: He was attending a party at his friend’s house. It was large and he didn’t know many of the other guests. A fight broke out (acquaintance not involved) and the police were called. They entered and searched the house (I am not clear on cause here). Found the gun. Questioned the homeowner and then my acquaintance. When he was asked how/why he brought the gun into the house, acquaintance made the mistake (that he admitted to me) of telling the police he stuck the gun under his jacket (again, in its case) as he walked from his car into the house to avoid it being seen. He had no concealed carry permit. So in an attempt to be straight with the police he incriminated himself and had the book thrown at him.

  79. Lot says:
    @ben tillman

    I think the clip I posted from Oakland is their best concert on youtube.

    Just watched another one they did in England last night, what great showmen they were.

  80. @slumber_j

    Emily Bazelon is a staff writer at the Magazine and the Truman Capote Fellow for Creative Writing and Law at Yale Law School.

    WTF!? Why does Yale Law School teach creative writing? I guess it’s an admission that their leftist social justice arguments are really just fiction:

    “Your Honor, in support of our motion to release this murderer, I will now read a prose poem about the imaginary knapsack of white privilege . . . .”

  81. Ah yes. Is this the same ((Bazelon)) from Ron Unz’s article?

Current Commenter
says:

Leave a Reply - Comments are moderated by iSteve, at whim.


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
Submitted comments become the property of The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
Which superpower is more threatened by its “extractive elites”?
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?