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Atlantic: "Hardy Boys" Are Intersectionally Problematic
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  1. First they came for Laura Ingalls Wilder, then the Hardy Boys, then …..

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/26/books/laura-ingalls-wilder-book-award.html

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I hate these stifling PC bitches around now even more than I hated Nellie Olson's Mom! (Of course, I'd only seen one side of the story, on TV - probably fake news.)
  2. Not even bothering to read this from the the “Beards Are Racist” publication. Is that what these outlets will be doing for the next decade- inventorying every bit of culture from the last 200 centuries and slapping a kind of Op Ed Generator algorithm?

  3. Anonymous[257] • Disclaimer says:

    The Hardy Boys… I loved those books. I also read a lot of Biggles books growing up. I think reading a multigenerational, multi-national library in your formative years gives the great insight that what is regarded as truth is in part fashion, and consequently you have less respect for the holy cows of any given generation, especially our own.

    No doubt this is (((realized))) and hence the history destroying attempts to rewrite/burn such earlier works.

    • Agree: TelfoedJohn, AndrewR
  4. On this topic, from Gavin’s (he has his moments…) old site, Street Carnage:

    http://streetcarnage.com/blog/hardy-boys-mysteries/

    #4 is particularly relevant to today’s batch of iSteve posts, btw.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    Has street-fighter Gavin and his fancy moustache come out as transgender yet? He's a cabaret act.
  5. I fondly remember “The Hardy Boys Detective Handbook.” I put the tradecraft I learned from it to good use, conducting surveillance on random housewives in the market aisles, and I was never detected.

    I never got the hang of lifting fingerprints.

  6. We are living in Cultural Marxism. It is as big a series of lies as Stalinism or Maoism, and many signs indicate that it is even worse in terms of worthwhile culture being able to survive it.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    You got that right. Hollywood and publishing are mostly controlled by white SJWs who are desperate to prove they aren't racist. What is even more chilling is the ascent of unqualified black women into the executive ranks of the two above industries. They essentially serve as kommissars, policing potential and existing content creators.
  7. ONE character is gay?! Get off!

    We are talking about the same Hardy Boys, right?

  8. The underlying point about the Hardy Boys:

    The revolution starts in the year zero.

  9. Books are revised all the time without readers realizing. A publisher holding the rights can change not just an individual word here or there, but sentence after sentence to lower the required reading level, remove religious imagery, change race or sex of characters.

    There’s no way for you to know without comparing line for line.

    It’s worse with Kindles, because you don’t own the book, you merely have a license to it, so if they change the language, it’s gone. And they do it automatically without telling you (if they find typos in a book you self published, they’ll update it the next time your device talks to them.)

    Expect more seamless changes in the future. Can’t let those offensive ideas hurt anyone!

    • Agree: dfordoom
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    This, they've revised Richard Scarry's books, adding female characters and updating technology. I don't want the technology updated. Scarry was my first view of a Strurmpanzerwagen A7V.
    , @Bies Podkrakowski
    Personally I am only using Kindle for PC to download books, then I move them to independent reader. Calibre is quite good.
    , @Kratoklastes
    It's reasonably easy to 'crystallise' an e-book; find a non-DRM version of the same thing on a torrent site and save it locally (there are plenty of e-readers that enable "side-loading" of content, too).

    As I understand it, torrent sites are P2P "distributed-libraries".

    The way they work (again, my understanding of it) is that people loan other people their legitimately-acquired copies of things for free, so that the recipient can read/view/listen to some small part of it and decide whether or not to buy the whole thing.

    It all happens on the understanding that only one person uses it at any point in time.

    It's very nice: more or less exactly the same thing as someone letting you borrow their Kindle for a few minutes, but without the hassle of having to visit their place.

    Like all good ideas, it gets abused by some people (so I'm told)... I'll get agitated about that, the same day that States find a permanent mechanism to stop themselves from predictably, systematically degenerating into corrupt favour-trading mechanisms.
  10. To be followed by The Hardy Non-Binaries.

  11. The publishers of the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew mysteries have recently announced they will be issueing a series of non-cishetnormative childrens stories featuring LGBT youth solving crimes:

    The Nancy Boys mysteries.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    Pitch perfect!
    , @South Texas Guy
    I LOL'd, but it's probably not far from the truth. I get that with the multiple entertainment outlets now available, having a gay supporting character can make marketing sense. But I don't care how far to the left, touchy-feely, whatever you are, if you are straight, you have no interest in seeing/reading about a gay protagonist a piece of fiction.
    BTW, gay chicks don't count because they are always hotties who feed into fanboy fantasies. Identifying with a gay male protagonist who saves the day, then goes home to be the bottom for his bear man is a different story.
  12. I would imagine a review of The Atlantic subsciber list would demonstrate that The Atlantic itself is intersectionally problemmatic.

  13. someone better warn that cracka tom swift

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    In the 80s updated version, he had a black friend.
    , @Olorin
    "I was in command of an army of German Myrmecia!" Tom said exuberantly.

    No? How about

    "It is true: there were 1,459,240,281 individual toothpicks in that truck," Tom recounted.

    And the classic (more related to the topic at hand):

    "Are you light in the loafers, then?" Tom inquired gaily.

    [And for our host:

    "I'm about to hit this golf ball!" Tom forewarned.)

  14. I hear that the publishers of the Hardy Boys mysteries and Nancy Drew mysteries are going to issue a new series of childrens stories, featuring gay and transgendered youths who solve crimes:

    The Nancy Boys Mysteries

    • Replies: @Henry's Cat
    It was funnier the first time.
    , @jon
    @iSteve: If you manually approve all comments, why do you allow duplicate posts?
  15. Meh, I always take the opposite stance

    If leftists like a certain book, movie, or game, that means something is wrong with it and it should be changed until it appeals more to right wingers

  16. The Hardy’s were diverse. Frank was dark haired (not brunette- dark haired) and Joe was blonde. Chet was fat and Tony Prito was Italian.

  17. The author, who normies never heard of, is talking from his perspective as an obvious gay man about his personal conflict with the series. On one hand, he thoroughly enjoyed its storylines and literary elements that made it a classic. On the other hand, he is bitterly disappointed that their experiences represent a society that he was not part of due to his sexuality. Regardless, HE has the issue here, not those who read the books back then or are exposed to the original works now.

    Today’s fathers can make their own decisions whether or not to read those books to their sons while offering social commentary. I prefer to keep the past of the Hardy Boys firmly intact. Now, should that “old school” content expunged to reflect “modern values”? Well, I am certain that writers and film producers will take it upon themselves to put their own stamp on these characters.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Corvinus, Excellent comment. The author has a problem so we should change.
  18. Our esteemed author, Brandon Tensley, who worries about a lot of really stupid things.

    Here’s a list of his writings. TLDR version: black black blackity gay.

    • Replies: @Anon

    Our esteemed author, Brandon Tensley
     
    https://brandontensleycom.files.wordpress.com/2016/09/dsc_3565.jpg?w=200&h=300

    What's the deal with his skull bossing? Juvenile rickets? Crouzon syndrome? Congenital syphilis?
  19. Deep inside, Brandon is enough Fullbright to sense that donlemoning his benefactors is not a result of liberation, but a sign of plantation mentality.

    Good music, good times;

    https://mobile.twitter.com/BrandonTensley/status/1087885367246811136?p=v

  20. For all degenerately rectum-obssessed smartest men in the editing room, having hardy on boys is the ultimate litmus test on ‘who-we-are’ mantra.

    Brandon:

  21. “What’s Keeping Black Students From Studying Abroad?”

    By Brandon Tensley

    Only 5 percent of those in the U.S. who travel internationally for college are African American—and that’s a problem for everyone.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2015/03/why-black-students-dont-study-abroad/387679/

    No, it’s not.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Anonymous, Another reparation for my list... all blacks should be able to study abroad. Start them in pre-k. Find the countries and work the deal. Then find them jobs over there too. Works for me. Oh, and by the way Mr. Tensley I doubt you will find any overseas schools offering African American Studies or Gender Studies.
    , @Mr McKenna

    why-black-students-dont-study-abroad
     
    URLs you won't be seeing:

    why-black-students-dont-study

    , @International Jew
    This actually speaks well of black college students for recognizing "semester abroad" for the scam it is.

    Either that, or this is just another sign of blacks' notorious indifference to anything that's not about them.
  22. If they want homos, just watch any of the CW superhero shows like Flash, Supergirl, Arrow…

  23. Well i guess there is no mystery why he was still reading Hardy Boys books through middle and into high school.

    My two cents to these drama queens: go away!

  24. If Jussie Smollett’s descriptions of the two assailants match those of Frank and Joe, there’ll be a pleasing intersectionality to things.

    • LOL: fish
  25. My daughter collects old books and we have some early non-revised editions of some Hardy Boys stories. There are some strikingly non-PC phrases casually uttered, such as “There’s a n*gg*r in the woodpile” meaning “there’s something fishy about this situation.”

    But neither sexual nor racial content is part of what the stories are really about.

    • Replies: @Forbes

    But neither sexual nor racial content is part of what the stories are really about.
     
    Exactly. But if you're a gay black adult, apparently, you want every children's book to be about sex and race (gay and black), otherwise your very existence has been erased.

    I read every one in print when I was a young reader. Perhaps a dozen or so were revised by the time I read them, but I probably read originals borrowed from a lending library collection. Were the stories filled with sexual and racial content, I wouldn't have cracked the spine.
  26. Chet? Come on. Chet was about as gay as President James Buchanan, or Leonardo da Vinci or Alexander the Great.

  27. And what about Nancy Drew? Among the many women who cite Nancy Drew as a formative influence are Sandra Day O’Connor, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Sonia Sotomayor; Oprah Winfrey and Barbara Walters; Barbra Streisand and Beverly Sills; actresses Ellen Barkin and Emma Roberts; Hillary Rodham Clinton and former First Lady Laura Bush.

    Just how bad was it?

    In the original 1930 version of The Secret of the Old Clock, the first book of the series, Nancy chases a clue to a lake bungalow. There, she interrupts a burglary in progress and is thrown into a closet and left to starve by one of the thieves. Eventually, she is freed by the bungalow’s caretaker, Jeff Tucker. Jeff Tucker is an African-American man who is portrayed as a child-like, speaking in dialect and easily fooled into intoxication by the robbers. Nancy scolds him for abandoning his post at the bungalow and grows frustrated when he slows her down by hosing himself off to sober up before they go to the police. At the station, Nancy marches to the front desk and demands to report a robbery, resulting in the marshal and several officers immediately emerging to hear her tale. Even when Jeff Tucker corroborates her story, they pile questions upon Nancy to clarify what he says. Tucker is “gently” pushed back from the car and left behind at the station while the rest, including Nancy, go after the thieves.

    The contrast between Nancy and Jeff’s treatment at the police station is particularly disconcerting to me today. It brings to mind Emmett Till and the many instances of white women accusing Black men of various slights with deadly consequences. While Nancy only reports the robbery, her privilege as a wealthy white woman, demonstrated again and again in the book, is never as clear as this moment in the police station.

    And how did they fix it?

    In the revised 1959 version of The Secret of the Old Clock, Jeff Tucker is white, and he hasn’t been tricked into drinking by the thieves, but is instead locked up in a shed. Nancy comforts him when he frets over losing his job rather than scolding him. At the police station, Jeff Tucker shares his version of the story with no trouble and is advised to call his son for a ride back home. This revision is emblematic of how Grosset & Dunlap chose to deal with the racism in the original texts — simple erasure. River Heights became mono-color.
    (From The Not-So-Hidden Racism of Nancy Drew)

    All of the women cited above should be forced to recant, and express their disgust for their childhood heroine Nancy.

  28. The Atlantic reports that “The Hardy Boys” books for little boys, even though they were revised in Civil Rights Eras, are still intersectionally problematic.

    They were also dumbed-down. The vocabulary was simplified and the texts were reduced in length (Same thing also happened to the Nancy Drew books). I guess that PC and and being simpleminded go together…

    Call it the Mystery of the Missing Brain Matter. Here’s the plot: Frank and Joe Hardy, a.k.a. “The Hardy Boys,” notice that much of the character description, good chunks of story line and lots of dialogue have disappeared from volumes of their popular adolescent detective novels.

    “What gives, Joe?” Frank wonders.

    The case is solved, sort of, in the Reports and Comment section of the June Harper’s. It seems that way back in 1959, the president of the syndicate that owned the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew series ordered the books revised. The result, according to Harper’s writer Cullen Murphy, was a subtle dumbing down of the series.

    Little remained in the books to discomfit anyone after their revision, “such as dialogue rendered in dialect, humor at the expense of policemen and big words that might have to be looked up.”

    No one has ever claimed that the Hardy Boys or Nancy Drew were great literature, but Murphy makes a good case that the old versions were “good bad books” and that the newer fare is mediocre bad fiction at best. His only comfort is that the publisher is re-releasing the first three volumes in the series in original form.

    http://articles.latimes.com/1991-05-30/news/vw-3502_1_kiddie-lit

    True Nancy-ites (Drew-ids?) know that, beginning in about 1959, the series was rewritten, ostensibly to get rid of racist language and bring the books “up to date.” Unfortunately, “up to date” went hand in hand with “dumbed down”; the language of the rewritten books is noticeably more simplistic and less nuanced.

    https://felonyandmayhem.com/blogs/gunpowder-treason-plotz/nancy-we-hardly-knew-ye-nancy-drew-revised

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    Still more reasons why actual, bound hard copies of old books will become more valuable than ever. Unfortunately, valuable only to a small subset of people who care.
  29. @Stephen Paul Foster
    First they came for Laura Ingalls Wilder, then the Hardy Boys, then .....

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/26/books/laura-ingalls-wilder-book-award.html

    I hate these stifling PC bitches around now even more than I hated Nellie Olson’s Mom! (Of course, I’d only seen one side of the story, on TV – probably fake news.)

  30. Next up, the obscure Terry and the Pirates.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    Indeed. Can't have kids reading stuff like this:


    https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Vxs4b3HlZyw/V03iSOlOerI/AAAAAAAAEy4/r2MaCPtgcSY3EAeBb7nLMmZnuJRKzS9RQCKgB/s1600/Caniff_speech_9_17_43.jpg
  31. I distinctly remember struggling with reading as a boy, till a kindly old neighbor gave my parents a slew of old Hardy Boys books. I was hooked. Whenever I see a cover, I get a wave of sweet nostalgia, for the stories themselves, but for helping me love reading too.

  32. We had a susbtantial number of the original editions…the ones by Edward Stratemeyer etc from the 20s-50s that were passed down to me. I started reading them in first grade and they really advanced my use of the English language. I still have them and hope to pass them onto my children…whenever it is that I have children. Actually, I’ll confess to rereading a few of them and they are still pretty engaging.

    Stuff like this makes me wonder if I’m going to have to conceal them in a wall behind an outer book case containing “Daddy’s Roommate” and the collected works of Junot Diaz and The Nasty Coates to hide them from the Book Police.

  33. @Spaulding Smails
    On this topic, from Gavin’s (he has his moments...) old site, Street Carnage:

    http://streetcarnage.com/blog/hardy-boys-mysteries/

    #4 is particularly relevant to today’s batch of iSteve posts, btw.

    Has street-fighter Gavin and his fancy moustache come out as transgender yet? He’s a cabaret act.

  34. Sometimes I ask myself, “Why don’t these journalists write their own books? Why don’t they create characters of their group who solve mysteries or do whatever?” Or that young Asian lady who wrote about how she felt ignored by ’80s teen flicks and wanted to see an Asian Ferris Bueller or Claire Standish, and I ask myself, “Why doesn’t she write a script?”

    Now I get it. They can’t. They have no creative ability. They probably couldn’t even hold a conversation about their day for five minutes without making the other person want to gnaw their own limbs off. And it pisses them off no end. They hate creative people who don’t look like them. They love Shonda Rhimes and Ryan Coogler, but resent the fact that they’re not them.

    I know damn well I could never write short stories like Isaac Bashevis Singer or direct movies like Steven Spielberg. But I don’t go around insisting that every book, movie, or comic have a Jewish character. I just take in what I like.

  35. @Jake
    We are living in Cultural Marxism. It is as big a series of lies as Stalinism or Maoism, and many signs indicate that it is even worse in terms of worthwhile culture being able to survive it.

    You got that right. Hollywood and publishing are mostly controlled by white SJWs who are desperate to prove they aren’t racist. What is even more chilling is the ascent of unqualified black women into the executive ranks of the two above industries. They essentially serve as kommissars, policing potential and existing content creators.

  36. Anyone have pointers to where to purchase the classic version of these books?

    • Replies: @RickinJax
    Try Alibris. Also used book stores often have some.
  37. @Mr. Anon
    I hear that the publishers of the Hardy Boys mysteries and Nancy Drew mysteries are going to issue a new series of childrens stories, featuring gay and transgendered youths who solve crimes:

    The Nancy Boys Mysteries

    It was funnier the first time.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    I thought it hadn't gone through the first time.
  38. @Alice
    Books are revised all the time without readers realizing. A publisher holding the rights can change not just an individual word here or there, but sentence after sentence to lower the required reading level, remove religious imagery, change race or sex of characters.

    There's no way for you to know without comparing line for line.

    It's worse with Kindles, because you don't own the book, you merely have a license to it, so if they change the language, it's gone. And they do it automatically without telling you (if they find typos in a book you self published, they'll update it the next time your device talks to them.)

    Expect more seamless changes in the future. Can't let those offensive ideas hurt anyone!

    This, they’ve revised Richard Scarry’s books, adding female characters and updating technology. I don’t want the technology updated. Scarry was my first view of a Strurmpanzerwagen A7V.

  39. @Alice
    Books are revised all the time without readers realizing. A publisher holding the rights can change not just an individual word here or there, but sentence after sentence to lower the required reading level, remove religious imagery, change race or sex of characters.

    There's no way for you to know without comparing line for line.

    It's worse with Kindles, because you don't own the book, you merely have a license to it, so if they change the language, it's gone. And they do it automatically without telling you (if they find typos in a book you self published, they'll update it the next time your device talks to them.)

    Expect more seamless changes in the future. Can't let those offensive ideas hurt anyone!

    Personally I am only using Kindle for PC to download books, then I move them to independent reader. Calibre is quite good.

  40. @anon
    someone better warn that cracka tom swift

    In the 80s updated version, he had a black friend.

  41. @Corvinus
    The author, who normies never heard of, is talking from his perspective as an obvious gay man about his personal conflict with the series. On one hand, he thoroughly enjoyed its storylines and literary elements that made it a classic. On the other hand, he is bitterly disappointed that their experiences represent a society that he was not part of due to his sexuality. Regardless, HE has the issue here, not those who read the books back then or are exposed to the original works now.

    Today's fathers can make their own decisions whether or not to read those books to their sons while offering social commentary. I prefer to keep the past of the Hardy Boys firmly intact. Now, should that "old school" content expunged to reflect "modern values"? Well, I am certain that writers and film producers will take it upon themselves to put their own stamp on these characters.

    Corvinus, Excellent comment. The author has a problem so we should change.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "The author has a problem so we should change."

    No, we should NOT change. The Hardy Boys, the Boxcar Children, the Great Brain series, Johnny Quest, hell, even the old Looney Tunes characters...the children of today can read those books or watch those shows without having to be bludgeoned with PC claptrap at a young age. These works are a product of the times. They represented the norms of that society during a particular era. Right now, kids should be kids. Then their parents can make the choice when they get older to discuss the historical context, with their children deciding how they want to represent their literary or television heroes.

  42. Anonymous[786] • Disclaimer says:

    Meanwhile, hardy to take seriously 16 year old Sweedish girl diagnosed with Asperger, OCD, selective mutism, and ADHD is telling to the room full of 2%ers…in Davos:

    “I don’t want you to be hopeful;

    I want you to panic.

    I want you to feel the fear that I feel everyday…”

    Cause nothing shouts Neo-feudalism more than sending a deranged minor on a children’s crusade:

    Just wait for Ivanka firstdaughtersplaining to her Dad how he should, instead of the Covington Wild Bunch, invite this brave Emissions Survivor to the White House.

  43. @Anonymous



    "What's Keeping Black Students From Studying Abroad?"

    By Brandon Tensley

    Only 5 percent of those in the U.S. who travel internationally for college are African American—and that's a problem for everyone.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2015/03/why-black-students-dont-study-abroad/387679/

     

    No, it's not.

    Anonymous, Another reparation for my list… all blacks should be able to study abroad. Start them in pre-k. Find the countries and work the deal. Then find them jobs over there too. Works for me. Oh, and by the way Mr. Tensley I doubt you will find any overseas schools offering African American Studies or Gender Studies.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Anonymous, Another reparation for my list… all blacks should be able to study abroad.
     
    Air is the most environmentally destructive form of travel. So this is one case where blacks are doing the earth a favor.

    I'd recommend ocean liners (one way, if possible), but having just visited a Titanic museum, I'm a little wary of the mode.
  44. @Anonymous



    "What's Keeping Black Students From Studying Abroad?"

    By Brandon Tensley

    Only 5 percent of those in the U.S. who travel internationally for college are African American—and that's a problem for everyone.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2015/03/why-black-students-dont-study-abroad/387679/

     

    No, it's not.

    why-black-students-dont-study-abroad

    URLs you won’t be seeing:

    why-black-students-dont-study

  45. @syonredux

    The Atlantic reports that "The Hardy Boys" books for little boys, even though they were revised in Civil Rights Eras, are still intersectionally problematic.
     
    They were also dumbed-down. The vocabulary was simplified and the texts were reduced in length (Same thing also happened to the Nancy Drew books). I guess that PC and and being simpleminded go together...

    Call it the Mystery of the Missing Brain Matter. Here's the plot: Frank and Joe Hardy, a.k.a. "The Hardy Boys," notice that much of the character description, good chunks of story line and lots of dialogue have disappeared from volumes of their popular adolescent detective novels.
     

    "What gives, Joe?" Frank wonders.

    The case is solved, sort of, in the Reports and Comment section of the June Harper's. It seems that way back in 1959, the president of the syndicate that owned the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew series ordered the books revised. The result, according to Harper's writer Cullen Murphy, was a subtle dumbing down of the series.
     

    Little remained in the books to discomfit anyone after their revision, "such as dialogue rendered in dialect, humor at the expense of policemen and big words that might have to be looked up."

     


    No one has ever claimed that the Hardy Boys or Nancy Drew were great literature, but Murphy makes a good case that the old versions were "good bad books" and that the newer fare is mediocre bad fiction at best. His only comfort is that the publisher is re-releasing the first three volumes in the series in original form.
     
    http://articles.latimes.com/1991-05-30/news/vw-3502_1_kiddie-lit

    True Nancy-ites (Drew-ids?) know that, beginning in about 1959, the series was rewritten, ostensibly to get rid of racist language and bring the books “up to date.” Unfortunately, “up to date” went hand in hand with “dumbed down”; the language of the rewritten books is noticeably more simplistic and less nuanced.
     
    https://felonyandmayhem.com/blogs/gunpowder-treason-plotz/nancy-we-hardly-knew-ye-nancy-drew-revised

    Still more reasons why actual, bound hard copies of old books will become more valuable than ever. Unfortunately, valuable only to a small subset of people who care.

  46. @anon
    someone better warn that cracka tom swift

    “I was in command of an army of German Myrmecia!” Tom said exuberantly.

    No? How about

    “It is true: there were 1,459,240,281 individual toothpicks in that truck,” Tom recounted.

    And the classic (more related to the topic at hand):

    “Are you light in the loafers, then?” Tom inquired gaily.

    [And for our host:

    “I’m about to hit this golf ball!” Tom forewarned.)

    • Replies: @Weltanschauung
    "I've sometimes thought I might be inclined that way," said Tom, half in earnest.
    , @RickinJax
    “That does take me back” said Tom memorably
  47. The early Bobbsey Twins books (starting in 1904) were far more problematic, especially the Negro cook Dinah and her husband the handyman, Sam, who both spoke in dialect that made The Little Rascals’ / Our Gang’s Buckwheat seem practically Shakespearean.

  48. @Olorin
    "I was in command of an army of German Myrmecia!" Tom said exuberantly.

    No? How about

    "It is true: there were 1,459,240,281 individual toothpicks in that truck," Tom recounted.

    And the classic (more related to the topic at hand):

    "Are you light in the loafers, then?" Tom inquired gaily.

    [And for our host:

    "I'm about to hit this golf ball!" Tom forewarned.)

    “I’ve sometimes thought I might be inclined that way,” said Tom, half in earnest.

  49. @Mr. Anon
    I hear that the publishers of the Hardy Boys mysteries and Nancy Drew mysteries are going to issue a new series of childrens stories, featuring gay and transgendered youths who solve crimes:

    The Nancy Boys Mysteries

    @iSteve: If you manually approve all comments, why do you allow duplicate posts?

  50. @Mr. Anon
    The publishers of the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew mysteries have recently announced they will be issueing a series of non-cishetnormative childrens stories featuring LGBT youth solving crimes:

    The Nancy Boys mysteries.

    Pitch perfect!

  51. @Cloudbuster
    My daughter collects old books and we have some early non-revised editions of some Hardy Boys stories. There are some strikingly non-PC phrases casually uttered, such as "There's a n*gg*r in the woodpile" meaning "there's something fishy about this situation."

    But neither sexual nor racial content is part of what the stories are really about.

    But neither sexual nor racial content is part of what the stories are really about.

    Exactly. But if you’re a gay black adult, apparently, you want every children’s book to be about sex and race (gay and black), otherwise your very existence has been erased.

    I read every one in print when I was a young reader. Perhaps a dozen or so were revised by the time I read them, but I probably read originals borrowed from a lending library collection. Were the stories filled with sexual and racial content, I wouldn’t have cracked the spine.

  52. @Buffalo Joe
    Corvinus, Excellent comment. The author has a problem so we should change.

    “The author has a problem so we should change.”

    No, we should NOT change. The Hardy Boys, the Boxcar Children, the Great Brain series, Johnny Quest, hell, even the old Looney Tunes characters…the children of today can read those books or watch those shows without having to be bludgeoned with PC claptrap at a young age. These works are a product of the times. They represented the norms of that society during a particular era. Right now, kids should be kids. Then their parents can make the choice when they get older to discuss the historical context, with their children deciding how they want to represent their literary or television heroes.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    The politicians for whom you vote think otherwise.
  53. @Alice
    Books are revised all the time without readers realizing. A publisher holding the rights can change not just an individual word here or there, but sentence after sentence to lower the required reading level, remove religious imagery, change race or sex of characters.

    There's no way for you to know without comparing line for line.

    It's worse with Kindles, because you don't own the book, you merely have a license to it, so if they change the language, it's gone. And they do it automatically without telling you (if they find typos in a book you self published, they'll update it the next time your device talks to them.)

    Expect more seamless changes in the future. Can't let those offensive ideas hurt anyone!

    It’s reasonably easy to ‘crystallise’ an e-book; find a non-DRM version of the same thing on a torrent site and save it locally (there are plenty of e-readers that enable “side-loading” of content, too).

    As I understand it, torrent sites are P2P “distributed-libraries”.

    The way they work (again, my understanding of it) is that people loan other people their legitimately-acquired copies of things for free, so that the recipient can read/view/listen to some small part of it and decide whether or not to buy the whole thing.

    It all happens on the understanding that only one person uses it at any point in time.

    It’s very nice: more or less exactly the same thing as someone letting you borrow their Kindle for a few minutes, but without the hassle of having to visit their place.

    Like all good ideas, it gets abused by some people (so I’m told)… I’ll get agitated about that, the same day that States find a permanent mechanism to stop themselves from predictably, systematically degenerating into corrupt favour-trading mechanisms.

  54. @Olorin
    "I was in command of an army of German Myrmecia!" Tom said exuberantly.

    No? How about

    "It is true: there were 1,459,240,281 individual toothpicks in that truck," Tom recounted.

    And the classic (more related to the topic at hand):

    "Are you light in the loafers, then?" Tom inquired gaily.

    [And for our host:

    "I'm about to hit this golf ball!" Tom forewarned.)

    “That does take me back” said Tom memorably

  55. Still have 30-35 of the original HB series bought 1958-62. I would always get my Mom to buy me one when I faked being sick to skip school. Loved them and learned much from them.
    Also, Rick Brant, Chip Hilton, Tom Swift Jr , and Ken Holt. Looking back the Rick Brant series was best followed by the HB. Tom Swift was the weakest by far.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    How about Tom Corbett, Space Cadet!

    I didn't know there was a TV series, but I remember all the books.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Corbett,_Space_Cadet
  56. @Buffalo Joe
    Anonymous, Another reparation for my list... all blacks should be able to study abroad. Start them in pre-k. Find the countries and work the deal. Then find them jobs over there too. Works for me. Oh, and by the way Mr. Tensley I doubt you will find any overseas schools offering African American Studies or Gender Studies.

    Anonymous, Another reparation for my list… all blacks should be able to study abroad.

    Air is the most environmentally destructive form of travel. So this is one case where blacks are doing the earth a favor.

    I’d recommend ocean liners (one way, if possible), but having just visited a Titanic museum, I’m a little wary of the mode.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad

    Air is the most environmentally destructive form of travel. So this is one case where blacks are doing the earth a favor.
     
    Not compared to a ship.

    Ships are way more efficient for ton-mile. But on a ship you are shipping not just the passenger, but his cabin and a his share of the rest of a big heavy ass ship and fuel, which will amount to several tons.

    On a plane its your fat, your luggage, about 1000 lbs of plane/person and--depending on length of flight an average of up to a few hundred pounds of fuel. The whole package < 1 ton.
  57. @peterike
    Our esteemed author, Brandon Tensley, who worries about a lot of really stupid things.

    https://brandontensleycom.files.wordpress.com/2016/09/dsc_3565.jpg?w=200&h=300

    Here's a list of his writings. TLDR version: black black blackity gay.

    Our esteemed author, Brandon Tensley

    What’s the deal with his skull bossing? Juvenile rickets? Crouzon syndrome? Congenital syphilis?

  58. “..the Atlantic excitedly hopes one character was gay…” In the 1950s Disney version (shown on “The Mickey Mouse Club”), one character was: Tommy Kirk, who was later given the boot by Walt when he was caught in flagrante delicto with a member of the same sex. I rewatched that fondly-remembered-from-childhood serial a while back and found him genuinely creepy without knowing why till I looked up his bio.

  59. Quick, everybody, off the top of your head… were the Bobbsey Twins identical or fraternal? And how many were there?

    Just testing your “cultural competence”.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    Anyone who is unacquainted with LITTLE NEMO is truly benighted....


    https://locustmoon.files.wordpress.com/2014/06/little-nemo-19080726-s.jpeg

    , @Rex Little

    Quick, everybody, off the top of your head… were the Bobbsey Twins identical or fraternal? And how many were there?
     
    As a little kid in the mid-1950s, I read all the Bobbsey Twins books my local library had, so I remember this very well. There were four (two sets), and they were fraternal, each set consisting of a boy and a girl.

    They were also genetically impossible. Each set was identical except for sex, as if the boy's DNA was created by taking the girl's and replacing one X chromosome with a Y. The odds against this happening naturally (once, never mind twice) are trillions to one.

    Moreover, the younger twins (Freddie and Flossie) were so different from the older ones (Bert and Nan) that it's hard to believe they came from the same parents. Bert and Nan were thin and dark-haired; Freddie and Flossie were round and blond.

    Oddly, while I remember the twins' names and descriptions very well, I don't remember any of the other characters (like Dinah and Sam, mentioned above) at all.
  60. @Reg Cæsar
    Quick, everybody, off the top of your head... were the Bobbsey Twins identical or fraternal? And how many were there?

    Just testing your "cultural competence".

    Anyone who is unacquainted with LITTLE NEMO is truly benighted….

  61. The Hardy Boys were great . They got me into boating and camping and other outdoor adventures . Their boat The Sleuth was ultra cool to a twelve year old and Aunt Gertrude was hilarious in a Sam Kinison kind of way . The Atlantic should be used as kindling .

  62. I used to wonder why people who found some art work “problematic” didn’t just mak their own art. You don’t like the fact that there’s no Black people in something? Write your own story.

    Now I know. All these “thinkpiece” generators have no artistic chops. They couldn’t tell someone about their day without boring them to death. So they whine about being marginalized.

    You don’t see Shonda Rhimes or Amy Tan caterwauling, do you? No. They’re too busy doing.

  63. @Reg Cæsar

    Anonymous, Another reparation for my list… all blacks should be able to study abroad.
     
    Air is the most environmentally destructive form of travel. So this is one case where blacks are doing the earth a favor.

    I'd recommend ocean liners (one way, if possible), but having just visited a Titanic museum, I'm a little wary of the mode.

    Air is the most environmentally destructive form of travel. So this is one case where blacks are doing the earth a favor.

    Not compared to a ship.

    Ships are way more efficient for ton-mile. But on a ship you are shipping not just the passenger, but his cabin and a his share of the rest of a big heavy ass ship and fuel, which will amount to several tons.

    On a plane its your fat, your luggage, about 1000 lbs of plane/person and–depending on length of flight an average of up to a few hundred pounds of fuel. The whole package < 1 ton.

  64. Some years back, I bought the entire older sets of Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew for my children. So they will always live on in my household as they were and, God willing, through the ages via my progeny.

    The funny thing is, I first read them in East Asia (translated into the local language, of course). It was a rather natural progression from the Hardy Boys to the Sherlock Holmes stories.* I went through the whole detective phase in my early childhood. One of the pictures from that period is on a wall at my house – me in a hat, a fake mustache, a suit, and a toy gun (of course) with my dog dressed similarly.

    *I still have most of the stories collected in a single volume with the early illustrations – one of my most treasured books.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    I was buying children's books for a much younger audience recently and was happy to find that most old series are available in one-volume collections with original illustrations (AA Milne, Beatrix Potter, Babar, Madeline, and so on). However, on the way I found that modern children's books look like absolute trash. It's not anything political (not immediately): Ruth Heller's artistry is gone. Everything is sloppy and computerized. Later I found a shelf of "Waldorf School endorsed" material at a unique book shop, which was much better, but most of what I give the kids is either stuff I had or as old.
    , @syonredux
    I've still got the copy of William S. Baring-Gould's Annotated Sherlock Holmes that my mother got me for my 13th birthday





    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/28/Professor_Moriarty_-_The_Final_Problem_-_Sidney_Paget.jpg

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/0a/Sherlock_Holmes_-_The_Man_with_the_Twisted_Lip.jpg
  65. @Twinkie
    Some years back, I bought the entire older sets of Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew for my children. So they will always live on in my household as they were and, God willing, through the ages via my progeny.

    The funny thing is, I first read them in East Asia (translated into the local language, of course). It was a rather natural progression from the Hardy Boys to the Sherlock Holmes stories.* I went through the whole detective phase in my early childhood. One of the pictures from that period is on a wall at my house - me in a hat, a fake mustache, a suit, and a toy gun (of course) with my dog dressed similarly.

    *I still have most of the stories collected in a single volume with the early illustrations - one of my most treasured books.

    I was buying children’s books for a much younger audience recently and was happy to find that most old series are available in one-volume collections with original illustrations (AA Milne, Beatrix Potter, Babar, Madeline, and so on). However, on the way I found that modern children’s books look like absolute trash. It’s not anything political (not immediately): Ruth Heller’s artistry is gone. Everything is sloppy and computerized. Later I found a shelf of “Waldorf School endorsed” material at a unique book shop, which was much better, but most of what I give the kids is either stuff I had or as old.

  66. @Mr. Anon
    The publishers of the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew mysteries have recently announced they will be issueing a series of non-cishetnormative childrens stories featuring LGBT youth solving crimes:

    The Nancy Boys mysteries.

    I LOL’d, but it’s probably not far from the truth. I get that with the multiple entertainment outlets now available, having a gay supporting character can make marketing sense. But I don’t care how far to the left, touchy-feely, whatever you are, if you are straight, you have no interest in seeing/reading about a gay protagonist a piece of fiction.
    BTW, gay chicks don’t count because they are always hotties who feed into fanboy fantasies. Identifying with a gay male protagonist who saves the day, then goes home to be the bottom for his bear man is a different story.

  67. @Anonymous



    "What's Keeping Black Students From Studying Abroad?"

    By Brandon Tensley

    Only 5 percent of those in the U.S. who travel internationally for college are African American—and that's a problem for everyone.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2015/03/why-black-students-dont-study-abroad/387679/

     

    No, it's not.

    This actually speaks well of black college students for recognizing “semester abroad” for the scam it is.

    Either that, or this is just another sign of blacks’ notorious indifference to anything that’s not about them.

  68. @notbob
    Anyone have pointers to where to purchase the classic version of these books?

    Try Alibris. Also used book stores often have some.

  69. @Reg Cæsar
    Quick, everybody, off the top of your head... were the Bobbsey Twins identical or fraternal? And how many were there?

    Just testing your "cultural competence".

    Quick, everybody, off the top of your head… were the Bobbsey Twins identical or fraternal? And how many were there?

    As a little kid in the mid-1950s, I read all the Bobbsey Twins books my local library had, so I remember this very well. There were four (two sets), and they were fraternal, each set consisting of a boy and a girl.

    They were also genetically impossible. Each set was identical except for sex, as if the boy’s DNA was created by taking the girl’s and replacing one X chromosome with a Y. The odds against this happening naturally (once, never mind twice) are trillions to one.

    Moreover, the younger twins (Freddie and Flossie) were so different from the older ones (Bert and Nan) that it’s hard to believe they came from the same parents. Bert and Nan were thin and dark-haired; Freddie and Flossie were round and blond.

    Oddly, while I remember the twins’ names and descriptions very well, I don’t remember any of the other characters (like Dinah and Sam, mentioned above) at all.

  70. @Henry's Cat
    It was funnier the first time.

    I thought it hadn’t gone through the first time.

  71. @Corvinus
    "The author has a problem so we should change."

    No, we should NOT change. The Hardy Boys, the Boxcar Children, the Great Brain series, Johnny Quest, hell, even the old Looney Tunes characters...the children of today can read those books or watch those shows without having to be bludgeoned with PC claptrap at a young age. These works are a product of the times. They represented the norms of that society during a particular era. Right now, kids should be kids. Then their parents can make the choice when they get older to discuss the historical context, with their children deciding how they want to represent their literary or television heroes.

    The politicians for whom you vote think otherwise.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "The politicians for whom you vote think otherwise."

    We, as white Americans, vote for many politicians who have a wide range of views.
  72. @Dwright
    Next up, the obscure Terry and the Pirates.

    Indeed. Can’t have kids reading stuff like this:

  73. @Twinkie
    Some years back, I bought the entire older sets of Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew for my children. So they will always live on in my household as they were and, God willing, through the ages via my progeny.

    The funny thing is, I first read them in East Asia (translated into the local language, of course). It was a rather natural progression from the Hardy Boys to the Sherlock Holmes stories.* I went through the whole detective phase in my early childhood. One of the pictures from that period is on a wall at my house - me in a hat, a fake mustache, a suit, and a toy gun (of course) with my dog dressed similarly.

    *I still have most of the stories collected in a single volume with the early illustrations - one of my most treasured books.

    I’ve still got the copy of William S. Baring-Gould’s Annotated Sherlock Holmes that my mother got me for my 13th birthday

  74. @RickinJax
    Still have 30-35 of the original HB series bought 1958-62. I would always get my Mom to buy me one when I faked being sick to skip school. Loved them and learned much from them.
    Also, Rick Brant, Chip Hilton, Tom Swift Jr , and Ken Holt. Looking back the Rick Brant series was best followed by the HB. Tom Swift was the weakest by far.

    How about Tom Corbett, Space Cadet!

    I didn’t know there was a TV series, but I remember all the books.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Corbett,_Space_Cadet

  75. Racism is everywhere…..

    How a Twitter Mob Derailed an Immigrant Female Author’s Budding Career
    Months away from publishing her debut novel, a young Asian author and rising star of YA fiction just killed her own book to appease a social media mob condemning her work as racist despite the fact that they most likely hadn’t read it

    “In a world where the princess is the monster, oppression is blind to skin color, and good and evil exists in shades of gray….” “….someone explain this to me. EXPLAIN IT RIGHT THE FUQ NOW,” she tweeted. “I don’t give a good god damn that this is an author of color,” she said later in the tweetstorm. “Internalized racism and anti-blackness is a thing and I…no.” The argument, such as it is, appears to be that because in our world, oppression isn’t blind to skin color, to write about a fantasy world in which it is is an act of “anti-blackness.” (McKinney didn’t respond to a request for comment submitted via her agent.)

    https://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-news-and-politics/279806/how-a-twitter-mob-destroyed-a-young-immigrant-female-authors-budding-career

    But perhaps the most damaging, drawn-out broadside came from Ellen Oh, an established YA writer who is herself of Asian descent, and who co-founded We Need Diverse Books. Oh published an extended tweetstorm to her 11,000-plus Twitter followers in which she noted that “colorblindness is extremely tone deaf.” Then she proceeded to address Zhao without mentioning her by name. “Now I’m going to talk directly to Asian writers,” she wrote, particularly “Asian writers who did not grow up in western countries” like Zhao. “Your lack of awareness may not be your fault given your lack of cultural context, but it IS your fault if you do not educate yourself when it is expressly brought up to you.” The admonishment continued, “And if you have the luxury of getting this important criticism before your book is actually published, it is YOUR responsibility to make it right. Do right by the audience that your book will be reading. Do right by the kids who will be reading your book.”

    While the colorblindness accusation was part of the campaign against Zhao, the most potent claims of antiblack racism stemmed from a rumor that swept through the community based on the advanced copies of Blood Heir that had already been released. It was alleged that the novel contains scenes involving chattel slavery, or something like it, including one in which a black character named May sings to the protagonist Ana immediately before dying. The assumption that May is black fueled a lot of anger—the criticism seemed to be that Zhao was positioning a black character as disposable, as a plot device.

    Others complained about the fact that the book seemed to be about chattel slavery, although, based on the published tweets, no one could explain exactly what it was about Zhao’s treatment of the subject that was offensive. “[I]t is also HIGHLY troubling that no one in the process of publishing or editing Blood Heir saw a story about slavery, trafficking, and race relations and thought to bring in a sensitivity reader, or even several,” noted one member of the community who didn’t level any specific critiques about the book’s handling of these subjects. “[T]o put something that resembles chattel slavery SO CLOSELY is distasteful,” opined another, the implication being this simply isn’t a subject to be written about. Among other critics, there seemed to be lack of understanding that “slavery” doesn’t mean “American slavery” and that the concept has a broader context and history than that. “[R]acist ass writers, like Amélie Wen Zhao, who literally take Black narratives and force it into Russia when that shit NEVER happened in history—you’re going to be held accountable,” said one contributor to the pile-on. “Period.”

    None of these details mattered to YA Twitter, anyway. Soon, many in the community, or those within it tweeting publicly about the controversy, at least, had reached the consensus that Blood Heir was undeniably, obviously racist, that it was a sign of something deeply wrong within YA publishing that it was going to be unleashed on the world, and that Zhao should be held responsible. “Agents, editors, publishers, YOU are the gatekeeper as much as writers!” explained the tweeter who was unfamiliar with Russian history.

    After a week or so of being held accountable, Zhao apparently had had enough. On Wednesday she announced that she had chosen to withdraw her already completed novel from being published. Her statement is quite telling:

    According to Zhao’s own account, she simply wasn’t writing about anything like American-centered chattel slavery. Rather, the slavery references in her book stemmed from her concern with modern-day indentured servitude and human trafficking in the part of the world she grew up in. This, of course, renders even more questionable many of the critiques of her supposedly hamfisted treatment of (the fantasy equivalent of) American slavery, and makes it even less likely she intended for May to be the approximate fantasy equivalent of a black character, rather than the approximate fantasy equivalent of (perhaps) an Asian one.

  76. @Mr. Anon
    The politicians for whom you vote think otherwise.

    “The politicians for whom you vote think otherwise.”

    We, as white Americans, vote for many politicians who have a wide range of views.

  77. We, as white Americans, vote for many politicians who have a wide range of views.

    There is no “we”; you are a pustule whom I want nothing to do with. Anyway, I wasn’t talking about “we”, I was talking about you, a**hole. And the politicians you vote for want to ban old books, and you help them to do so by voting for them.

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