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"As Honest as a Turk"
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That’s not a common saying, but maybe it should be:

The Turkish Statistical Institute reported in 2015 that 94.6 percent of Turks say watching television is their favorite activity.

Perhaps in Turkey, disgraced executives and politicians announce, “I’m resigning to spend more time with my TV” …

 
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  1. I would say, with no statistical evidence, that 94.6 percent of millennials would say that Facebook, Snapchat and Twitter are their favorite activity.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Luke Lea

    I would say, with no statistical evidence, that 94.6 percent of millennials would say that Facebook, Snapchat and Twitter are their favorite activity.
     
    And the other 5.4 percent are liars.
    , @Wency
    Well, those are the conclusions you'll reach if you use Facebook to observe what millennials are doing.

    For 95%+ of healthy young men in all times and places, and a very high percentage of young women, sex is their favorite activity, or it would be if they could have sex the way they want with who they want.

    I notice that about 95% of the activity on my Facebook is generated by 5% of the people. For that 5%, Facebook may be their favorite activity. Women certainly seem to enjoy it more than men, or at least they do it compulsively, whether they enjoy it or not. It's more important to them to check on what other people are doing, even if it's to despair over how their lives come up short relative to the friends of theirs who are having the most fun at any given point in time.

    I'd guess that millennial men enjoy video games more than social media on average.

    , @Alec Leamas

    I would say, with no statistical evidence, that 94.6 percent of millennials would say that Facebook, Snapchat and Twitter are their favorite activity.
     
    I don't know that they consider any of these things as an activity per se so much as the frame through which they interact with the world and one another now. It would probably fall upon their ears like "my favorite activity is blue" would to you.
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  2. I wonder if marriage between Armenians and Turks is as taboo as marriage between Jews and Palestinians?

    If I was an Armenian father I wouldn’t be pleased if my daughter brought home a Turk boyfriend.

    Read More
    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    I'm not Armenian, yet I wouldn't be pleased if one of our girls brought home a Turk either.
    , @AnotherGuessModel
    Don't know what the case is in the diaspora of the two ethnicities, but today, it's not too big a deal among secular, urban Turks and what few Armenian-Turks and other minorities are left in the country. But Turkey is regressing, so I imagine old hostilities could easily be reignited.
    , @Dieter Kief

    But Turkey is regressing, so I imagine old hostilities could easily be reignited.
     
    Turkish society does not work linear. That's not only bad.

    For deep insights, I recommend the novel "Snow" by Orhan Pamuk and - for the retired who are not on facebook and don't like TV: Pamuk's "Museum of Innocence".

    , @John Derbyshire
    "It is a common saying, and likely has some basis in fact: that it takes the wit of four Turks to overreach one Frank; two Franks to cheat one Greek; two Greeks to cheat one Jew; and six Jews to cheat one Armenian." -- Samuel Cox (19C British diplomat).
    , @AP

    I wonder if marriage between Armenians and Turks is as taboo as marriage between Jews and Palestinians
     
    I knew of an Armenian-American girl who studied at college on the other coast, fell in love with a Turkish guy, married him and had kids while keeping all of this a secret from her parents. This was in the early 90s, before facebook.
    , @Anatoly Karlin
    Armenians are some of the most ethnonationalistic people in the world, so yes, absolutely.
  3. @Buffalo Joe
    I would say, with no statistical evidence, that 94.6 percent of millennials would say that Facebook, Snapchat and Twitter are their favorite activity.

    I would say, with no statistical evidence, that 94.6 percent of millennials would say that Facebook, Snapchat and Twitter are their favorite activity.

    And the other 5.4 percent are liars.

    Read More
  4. Istanbul was Constantinople
    Now it’s Istanbul, not Constantinople
    Been a long time gone, Constantinople
    Why did Constantinople get the works?
    That’s nobody’s business but the Turks

    ****sorry I cannot resist posting. So kindly buzz off you transphobic, transAtlantic, Islamophobes.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lurker
    One could argue it was very much the business of the Byzantine Empire.

    I did wonder if I should write to They Might be Giants and point this out.
    , @Autochthon
    Some words are incredibly difficult to incorporate into song.

    Eminem famously rhymes "oranges" with an ellided pronunciation of "or hinges" in "Let's Get Down to Business," but that kind of stuff can be a bit easier to pull of with rap than with conventional song.

    Writing a song (that scans decently) all about both Istanbul and and Constantinople is no mean feat. Had they worked in as well the other name, Byzantium, it'd have been the ultimate hat trick (they are Canadian after all, I think, or is that only the Barenaked Ladies?; I always get these two bands confused because of their similarly whimsical material...).

    Honorable mention must also be made of the Bee Gees' "Massachusetts."
  5. @Jefferson
    I wonder if marriage between Armenians and Turks is as taboo as marriage between Jews and Palestinians?

    If I was an Armenian father I wouldn't be pleased if my daughter brought home a Turk boyfriend.

    I’m not Armenian, yet I wouldn’t be pleased if one of our girls brought home a Turk either.

    Read More
  6. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Related topic: Ingraham and Coulter continue to righteously bash Trump & family for the dishonest campaign. These two ladies cannot be bought off.

    Ingraham has major contacts on white house staff and she reamed Kushner today and accused him of being a big leaker maybe the big leaker.

    Dr Udge left the Coulter interview at the top of the page all day to send another frigging message to bubble boy Trump.

    But the core problem remains: Trump did this all to himself by filling his govt with neocons and lib dems.

    Apparently Trump is not getting the message as Roger Stone said today that every name on the real Comey replacement list is some version of nevertrumper… WTF.

    Read More
  7. Could this be a result of TV being a safe option rather than the correct answer? Would you tell a Turkish survey-solicitor thst you liked activities associated with apostasy, Kurdish nationalism, or criticizing Ankara? One of Jakob Marian’s maps has Turkey far higher than any Europeans for washing their hands every time they use the bathroom. I am tempted to call that either lying or over-crediting wudu (Muslim ritual cleaning).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pericles
    I've heard that hand rubbing comes very naturally to those in the Middle East.
  8. From

    Visits to Monasteries in the Levant
    By Robert Curzon.

    It takes,
    4 Turks to cheat one Frank
    2 Franks to cheat one Greek
    2 Greeks to cheat one Jew
    And 6 Jews to cheat an Armenian.

    Read More
    • Replies: @slumber_j

    2 Greeks to cheat one Jew
    And 6 Jews to cheat an Armenian.
     
    I've always wondered why there's an Armenian Quarter in Jerusalem. It's the sort of thing I periodically look up and then forget.
    , @BenKenobi
    Interesting. I've seen the line "trust snake before a Jew, and Jew before a Turk, but never trust an Armenian."
    , @bored identity
    And a half dozen of Kardashians to cheat on bunch of men or women of various ethnic, racial, or even gendeneric origin.
  9. Doesn’t strike me as honest at all. Most people’s favorite activities have to do with their naughty bits. Some are more into drugs.

    Read More
  10. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Erdogan knows which way the winds are blowing: The West is dying intellectually and spiritually. He has grasped this fully due to the shocking reign of Obama/Hillary/Kerry flanked by the craven EU.

    (Many other world leaders came to same conclusion.)

    So it is what is. And Erdogan knows we are mentally ill at the top levels of government, so why should he respect us? His recent comments regarding “flooding Jerusalem” are a turning point…

    Read More
  11. @Jefferson
    I wonder if marriage between Armenians and Turks is as taboo as marriage between Jews and Palestinians?

    If I was an Armenian father I wouldn't be pleased if my daughter brought home a Turk boyfriend.

    Don’t know what the case is in the diaspora of the two ethnicities, but today, it’s not too big a deal among secular, urban Turks and what few Armenian-Turks and other minorities are left in the country. But Turkey is regressing, so I imagine old hostilities could easily be reignited.

    Read More
  12. OT

    US: Syria Is Secretly Executing Detainees And Burning The Remains

    The State Department told reporters it believes the “building of a crematorium is an effort to cover up the extent of mass murders taking place in Saydnaya prison.”

    [Taylor Swift Okay .gif]

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pericles
    I suppose they are burning Kuwaiti babies killed by Saddam?
  13. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Maybe Turkish TV is just really good?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I was very impressed with the commercials on Turkish TV when I was there in 2009. They looked 98% as flashy as American commercials.

    Mexico has great TV commercial directors too.

    , @C. Van Carter
    It is really good.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j4mZYmlS95A
    , @druid
    The series on Sultan Suleiman on Netflix was mesmerizing. Can't wait for season 2
  14. @anon
    Maybe Turkish TV is just really good?

    I was very impressed with the commercials on Turkish TV when I was there in 2009. They looked 98% as flashy as American commercials.

    Mexico has great TV commercial directors too.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Zachary Latif
    Excessive TV watching is an epidemic in the third world. I guess as they are stuck between the classic "low public space" environment that characterises much of the East and the dissolving joint family structures (the size of the home is reducing).

    It will probably/hopefully level off as prosperity comes about; the only exception for TV I make is for Pakistani dramas (which are astonishingly good and I say this as someone who partook very heavily in the London theatre until I moved to Cambridge). Also Pakistani dramas safe renowned for the lyricism of their language, melancholy and hyper-realism tradition (very similar to Iranian films). Indian serials are far more outlandish and saccharine even though Bollywood is in a class of its own (there are some spectacular movies out there like Dangal released last year starring Amir Khan).

    Turkish serials are renowned for their high quality, my in-laws were watching Hindi-dubbed "Feriha", which was set in istanbul. Usually Pakistani drama serials (especially since the PAK cultural Renaissance in 2010) are very popular in India but since Indo-Pak are so high Turkish serials have filled the gap (I've heard that three famous soap opera producing countries in the third world are Brazil, Turkey & the Philipines; in Uganda English dubbed Brazilian & Filipino shows were on all the time). I don't know about Mexico but it is certainly possible after all Mexico is always (unfairly) compared to its Northern neighbour but compared to the Rest of the Third & emerging world it's almost a first world nation!

    I spent a lot of time in Istanbul & Turkey in 2015/16 and Turkish TV is very exciting and glamorous. I remember sitting with my friend in a cafe and being mesmerised by their version of the "Voice" (a show I never bother to watch in the UK", even though I couldn't understand the language, the energy and electricity of the participants was simply magnetic!
    , @Pericles
    Also, Memri TV still beats C-SPAN.
    , @bored identity
    Modest bored proposal:


    Wanna watch" Tijuana Desperate Drug Lord's Machadoss" in your native language?

    It's gonna be $ 299 per month.



    1. Build a Guberment Pay Wall arond all foreign language blubbering, Turkomexican or other TV cable/satelite outlets, and let the Cricket Test Failing domestic audience to pay the price of non-assimilation.


    2. Tell to Nice White TV Audience that all proceeds are going to be used to cover for the cost of English Speaking Big Bird's life support.
  15. …that 94.6 percent of Turks say watching television is their favorite activity.

    An entire nation of Donald Trumps.

    Now add eating and playing golf and all they need would be orange wigs.

    Read More
  16. @Steve Sailer
    I was very impressed with the commercials on Turkish TV when I was there in 2009. They looked 98% as flashy as American commercials.

    Mexico has great TV commercial directors too.

    Excessive TV watching is an epidemic in the third world. I guess as they are stuck between the classic “low public space” environment that characterises much of the East and the dissolving joint family structures (the size of the home is reducing).

    It will probably/hopefully level off as prosperity comes about; the only exception for TV I make is for Pakistani dramas (which are astonishingly good and I say this as someone who partook very heavily in the London theatre until I moved to Cambridge). Also Pakistani dramas safe renowned for the lyricism of their language, melancholy and hyper-realism tradition (very similar to Iranian films). Indian serials are far more outlandish and saccharine even though Bollywood is in a class of its own (there are some spectacular movies out there like Dangal released last year starring Amir Khan).

    Turkish serials are renowned for their high quality, my in-laws were watching Hindi-dubbed “Feriha”, which was set in istanbul. Usually Pakistani drama serials (especially since the PAK cultural Renaissance in 2010) are very popular in India but since Indo-Pak are so high Turkish serials have filled the gap (I’ve heard that three famous soap opera producing countries in the third world are Brazil, Turkey & the Philipines; in Uganda English dubbed Brazilian & Filipino shows were on all the time). I don’t know about Mexico but it is certainly possible after all Mexico is always (unfairly) compared to its Northern neighbour but compared to the Rest of the Third & emerging world it’s almost a first world nation!

    I spent a lot of time in Istanbul & Turkey in 2015/16 and Turkish TV is very exciting and glamorous. I remember sitting with my friend in a cafe and being mesmerised by their version of the “Voice” (a show I never bother to watch in the UK”, even though I couldn’t understand the language, the energy and electricity of the participants was simply magnetic!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Laugh Track

    I spent a lot of time in Istanbul & Turkey in 2015/16 and Turkish TV is very exciting and glamorous. I remember sitting with my friend in a cafe and being mesmerised by their version of the “Voice” (a show I never bother to watch in the UK”, even though I couldn’t understand the language, the energy and electricity of the participants was simply magnetic!
     
    A lot of things are simply magnetic after 10 glasses of strong tea with 3 sugar cubes in each.

    But I do agree Turkish TV has slick glamour down solid.
  17. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    From Derbyshire’s current article:

    Mr. Macron, for example, is childless. So is German leader Angela Merkel. So is British Prime Minister Theresa May. The President of Italy has three kids, but Italy’s Prime Minister is childless. So is Mark Rutte, Prime Minister of Holland. Mark has some fun with Belgium: the current Prime Minister has two kids, but the previous one was a childless homosexual.

    So Erdogan sees this and he knows what to do.

    This week Erdogan visits the Great Satan. At least Trump has a brood! Erdogan can respect that. But Trump was in a wapo oval office pic with his Jewish advisors huddled in the background last week…so it’s a wash.

    Read More
  18. In much of Europe Turkish soap operas are now the most popular, having taken over from Mexican soap operas which ruled the airwaves for over two decades.

    A deliberate policy concocted by the Turks in the pursuit of soft power.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ussr andy

    A deliberate policy concocted by the Turks in the pursuit of soft power.
     
    Russia has a burgeoning TV drama industry. The shows are getting more sophisticated year by year.
    I think it's not so much soft power (how much soft power does Nollywood give Nigeria?), but making TV shows is just one of those things that are relatively easy to get off the ground (unlike a chip foundry or an auto factory) yet still relatively high in added-value, esp. if you can sell them abroad.
    I also think there's a natural ceiling as to how much soft power Russia and Turkey can acquire among Westerners simply due to them being Russia and Turkey.
    Europeans watch American shows for giggles but they don't really "get" them like an American does. We don't really have people like Ned Flanders etc.
    Actually, Americans themselves don't "get" their shows, for example someone's observation that L&O SVU is basically women's r** porn, but try telling it someone.
  19. I’m guessing that Romanians would have answered the same way in the 1980s. I foresee a Ceaușescu-like end for Erdogan.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Erdogan is more like Putin than Ceausescu. He has genuine public popularity with a large segment of the popularity (might or might not be >50% in a free and fair election with a free press but still a significant %). Communist rule in Romania existed for as long as the Soviets were able to impose it and not one minute longer. Ceausescu was particularly detestable and lacking in genuine popular support (people bused into rallies by their workplace don't count) but no Communist could have lasted in any of the satellites.

    This is not to say that this could not change (for both Putin and Erdogan) - see Maduro in Venezuela. But first the economic situation would have to get a lot worse.
  20. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Re Gulen: Trump gonna do some ArtoftheDeal with Erdo this week, right?

    MIC/CIA wacked Qaddafi. Meanwhile they have Gulen just sitting up there in the woods (and occasionally writing op-eds). What’s a Turk to do? Besides calling for Jerusalem to be flooded and arresting half his country?

    Media coverage will be interesting. Some of Trump’s foreign state guests get zero coverage.

    Read More
  21. Erdogan is playing a very risky game. He ran afoul of the allies of convenience, the Persians and Russians who historically have teamed up to reduce Turkish power but have their own issues, and China which is busy making inroads in Central Asia to rival both Russia and Turkey (not to mention Iran).

    Like Putin’s main nemesis being Navalny who to the horror of Europeans, is even more a nationalist than Putin (you can tell by the amount of energy Russian media expends on demonizing Navalny and labeling him a Nazi); Erdogan’s main rivals are young and hungry Islamists who can always promise MOAR ISLAM as the solution and point to tired, sick, old Erdogan as the problem. Why, a Holy War with traditional enemies Greece (easy prey) and Russia (not so much) is just the solution to the problem of not enough Jihad and Ottoman Empire!

    Turkey lives in a bad neighborhood.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pericles

    Turkey lives in a bad neighborhood.

     

    Like all those poor inner city blacks, I guess.
    , @Lurker

    Turkey lives in a bad neighborhood.
     
    Poor old Turkey and it's tragic dirt.
    , @bored identity
    Why bored identity always has to fix things around here?

    Turkey IS lives in a bad neighborhoodn
  22. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Seth Rich coming back from the dead at the top of Drudge tonight…

    Maybe this festering wound will turn the tide against the donks big time.

    Read More
  23. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Apparently, that late, great ‘lewd’ English comedian, Benny Hill, was one of the biggest stars ever on Turkish television.

    Read More
    • Replies: @CJ
    Benny Hill was a star, seriously, around the world - Caribbean, Africa, Middle East, Australia, Philippines. At one time versions of his shows were running on television in 96 countries. His cancellation by the politically-correct BBC was one of the stupidest own goals ever scored.
  24. It’s a good answer to a loaded question..

    You really don’t want to say you read a lot of books or something like it that as it invites a knock on the door at some ungodly hour with hard men intent on asking hard questions.

    Read More
  25. @Jefferson
    I wonder if marriage between Armenians and Turks is as taboo as marriage between Jews and Palestinians?

    If I was an Armenian father I wouldn't be pleased if my daughter brought home a Turk boyfriend.

    But Turkey is regressing, so I imagine old hostilities could easily be reignited.

    Turkish society does not work linear. That’s not only bad.

    For deep insights, I recommend the novel “Snow” by Orhan Pamuk and – for the retired who are not on facebook and don’t like TV: Pamuk’s “Museum of Innocence”.

    Read More
  26. @Zachary Latif
    Excessive TV watching is an epidemic in the third world. I guess as they are stuck between the classic "low public space" environment that characterises much of the East and the dissolving joint family structures (the size of the home is reducing).

    It will probably/hopefully level off as prosperity comes about; the only exception for TV I make is for Pakistani dramas (which are astonishingly good and I say this as someone who partook very heavily in the London theatre until I moved to Cambridge). Also Pakistani dramas safe renowned for the lyricism of their language, melancholy and hyper-realism tradition (very similar to Iranian films). Indian serials are far more outlandish and saccharine even though Bollywood is in a class of its own (there are some spectacular movies out there like Dangal released last year starring Amir Khan).

    Turkish serials are renowned for their high quality, my in-laws were watching Hindi-dubbed "Feriha", which was set in istanbul. Usually Pakistani drama serials (especially since the PAK cultural Renaissance in 2010) are very popular in India but since Indo-Pak are so high Turkish serials have filled the gap (I've heard that three famous soap opera producing countries in the third world are Brazil, Turkey & the Philipines; in Uganda English dubbed Brazilian & Filipino shows were on all the time). I don't know about Mexico but it is certainly possible after all Mexico is always (unfairly) compared to its Northern neighbour but compared to the Rest of the Third & emerging world it's almost a first world nation!

    I spent a lot of time in Istanbul & Turkey in 2015/16 and Turkish TV is very exciting and glamorous. I remember sitting with my friend in a cafe and being mesmerised by their version of the "Voice" (a show I never bother to watch in the UK", even though I couldn't understand the language, the energy and electricity of the participants was simply magnetic!

    I spent a lot of time in Istanbul & Turkey in 2015/16 and Turkish TV is very exciting and glamorous. I remember sitting with my friend in a cafe and being mesmerised by their version of the “Voice” (a show I never bother to watch in the UK”, even though I couldn’t understand the language, the energy and electricity of the participants was simply magnetic!

    A lot of things are simply magnetic after 10 glasses of strong tea with 3 sugar cubes in each.

    But I do agree Turkish TV has slick glamour down solid.

    Read More
  27. The television set imposes the elite’s disinformation into the publics’ generational mind, consciously and unsconciously. Its their superweapon. The ‘abomination that causes desolation’, each racial and age demographic at-a-time.

    Read More
  28. For some reason a few comments here reminded me of the funniest thing I remember from I Hope They Serve Beer In Hell (yes, i spent a whole hour of my life reading it on a buddy’s couch).

    Author is hanging out with some good old boys somewhere. They are sitting around getting drunk and doing nothings like laugh at the three legged dog. Said dog starts licking its balls, and the author says “Man, I wish i could do that”. One good old boy says “well, I’m not sure he’d let you.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @donut
    The punch line I remember was : "don't you think you should introduce yourself first" .
    , @Jim Don Bob
    No, the punch line is, "I dunno, he looks kinda mean".
  29. Steve are you going to make a blog about Trayvon Martin receiving an honorary aeronautical science degree from Florida Memorial University? By the way it is a Historically Black College University. So that explains why they set the academic bar extremely low, because it’s not run by Jews or WASPs. It’s run by Blacks. Their academic bar is so low you don’t even need a working pulse to get a bachelor’s degree from a HBCU, since Trayvon’s pulse obviously does not work anymore.

    Read More
  30. @J.Ross
    Could this be a result of TV being a safe option rather than the correct answer? Would you tell a Turkish survey-solicitor thst you liked activities associated with apostasy, Kurdish nationalism, or criticizing Ankara? One of Jakob Marian's maps has Turkey far higher than any Europeans for washing their hands every time they use the bathroom. I am tempted to call that either lying or over-crediting wudu (Muslim ritual cleaning).

    I’ve heard that hand rubbing comes very naturally to those in the Middle East.

    Read More
  31. @27 year old
    OT

    US: Syria Is Secretly Executing Detainees And Burning The Remains

    The State Department told reporters it believes the "building of a crematorium is an effort to cover up the extent of mass murders taking place in Saydnaya prison."
     

    [Taylor Swift Okay .gif]

    I suppose they are burning Kuwaiti babies killed by Saddam?

    Read More
  32. @Steve Sailer
    I was very impressed with the commercials on Turkish TV when I was there in 2009. They looked 98% as flashy as American commercials.

    Mexico has great TV commercial directors too.

    Also, Memri TV still beats C-SPAN.

    Read More
  33. @Whiskey
    Erdogan is playing a very risky game. He ran afoul of the allies of convenience, the Persians and Russians who historically have teamed up to reduce Turkish power but have their own issues, and China which is busy making inroads in Central Asia to rival both Russia and Turkey (not to mention Iran).

    Like Putin's main nemesis being Navalny who to the horror of Europeans, is even more a nationalist than Putin (you can tell by the amount of energy Russian media expends on demonizing Navalny and labeling him a Nazi); Erdogan's main rivals are young and hungry Islamists who can always promise MOAR ISLAM as the solution and point to tired, sick, old Erdogan as the problem. Why, a Holy War with traditional enemies Greece (easy prey) and Russia (not so much) is just the solution to the problem of not enough Jihad and Ottoman Empire!

    Turkey lives in a bad neighborhood.

    Turkey lives in a bad neighborhood.

    Like all those poor inner city blacks, I guess.

    Read More
  34. @Clyde
    Istanbul was Constantinople
    Now it's Istanbul, not Constantinople
    Been a long time gone, Constantinople
    Why did Constantinople get the works?
    That's nobody's business but the Turks


    ****sorry I cannot resist posting. So kindly buzz off you transphobic, transAtlantic, Islamophobes.

    One could argue it was very much the business of the Byzantine Empire.

    I did wonder if I should write to They Might be Giants and point this out.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde
    That is way too Byzantine for They Might be Giants. Check out the original from the early 1950s by The Four Lads. Clean and high spirited with zero ennui. It swings baby! As Frank Sinatra would say.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wcze7EGorOk
  35. @Whiskey
    Erdogan is playing a very risky game. He ran afoul of the allies of convenience, the Persians and Russians who historically have teamed up to reduce Turkish power but have their own issues, and China which is busy making inroads in Central Asia to rival both Russia and Turkey (not to mention Iran).

    Like Putin's main nemesis being Navalny who to the horror of Europeans, is even more a nationalist than Putin (you can tell by the amount of energy Russian media expends on demonizing Navalny and labeling him a Nazi); Erdogan's main rivals are young and hungry Islamists who can always promise MOAR ISLAM as the solution and point to tired, sick, old Erdogan as the problem. Why, a Holy War with traditional enemies Greece (easy prey) and Russia (not so much) is just the solution to the problem of not enough Jihad and Ottoman Empire!

    Turkey lives in a bad neighborhood.

    Turkey lives in a bad neighborhood.

    Poor old Turkey and it’s tragic dirt.

    Read More
  36. Based on an annual OECD communications survey,Turkey ranks #4 in the number of hours of TV watched per day per household, a little over 4 hours a day.

    The United States is #1 with households watching over 8 hours of TV a day, on average.

    The data is a little old, from 2011, but it is similar to data from an Economist magazine report from 2005, so I would expect that the viewing hours and rankins are relatively stable over a decade or two, leaving aside technological disruption.

    http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/science-and-technology/oecd-communications-outlook-2013/broadcasting-and-audiovisual-content_comms_outlook-2013-8-en#.WRrCqrjSldI#page10

    dx.doi.org/10.1787/888932799418

    Read More
  37. @Anonymous
    Related topic: Ingraham and Coulter continue to righteously bash Trump & family for the dishonest campaign. These two ladies cannot be bought off.

    Ingraham has major contacts on white house staff and she reamed Kushner today and accused him of being a big leaker maybe the big leaker.

    Dr Udge left the Coulter interview at the top of the page all day to send another frigging message to bubble boy Trump.

    But the core problem remains: Trump did this all to himself by filling his govt with neocons and lib dems.

    Apparently Trump is not getting the message as Roger Stone said today that every name on the real Comey replacement list is some version of nevertrumper... WTF.

    … and Beta people …

    Read More
  38. @Niccolo Salo
    In much of Europe Turkish soap operas are now the most popular, having taken over from Mexican soap operas which ruled the airwaves for over two decades.

    A deliberate policy concocted by the Turks in the pursuit of soft power.

    A deliberate policy concocted by the Turks in the pursuit of soft power.

    Russia has a burgeoning TV drama industry. The shows are getting more sophisticated year by year.
    I think it’s not so much soft power (how much soft power does Nollywood give Nigeria?), but making TV shows is just one of those things that are relatively easy to get off the ground (unlike a chip foundry or an auto factory) yet still relatively high in added-value, esp. if you can sell them abroad.
    I also think there’s a natural ceiling as to how much soft power Russia and Turkey can acquire among Westerners simply due to them being Russia and Turkey.
    Europeans watch American shows for giggles but they don’t really “get” them like an American does. We don’t really have people like Ned Flanders etc.
    Actually, Americans themselves don’t “get” their shows, for example someone’s observation that L&O SVU is basically women’s r** porn, but try telling it someone.

    Read More
  39. Actually, eating nuts and seeds is their favorite activity. That would sound silly in a survey, though, and they eat nuts whilst watching TV, so they replied “watching TV” instead…

    Read More
  40. In Turkey, a lot of people keep the TV on even when they aren’t really paying attention. It’s just a sort of background noise, or they might look up if something “exciting” happens.

    For that matter, a lot of Americans do the same. My mom always had the TV on when she was puttering around in the kitchen. I suspect that most of the time she wasn’t following it, but she might’ve paid attention if a news story caught her interest.

    Does that count as “watching?”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    For that matter, a lot of Americans do the same. My mom always had the TV on when she was puttering around in the kitchen. I suspect that most of the time she wasn’t following it, but she might’ve paid attention if a news story caught her interest.

    Does that count as “watching?”
     
    My MIL was that way; CNN was on 24/7.

    I'd bet she was counted as "watching". There is NFW that the average American watches TV 8 hours a day every day.
  41. @AKAHorace
    From

    Visits to Monasteries in the Levant
    By Robert Curzon.

    It takes,
    4 Turks to cheat one Frank
    2 Franks to cheat one Greek
    2 Greeks to cheat one Jew
    And 6 Jews to cheat an Armenian.

    2 Greeks to cheat one Jew
    And 6 Jews to cheat an Armenian.

    I’ve always wondered why there’s an Armenian Quarter in Jerusalem. It’s the sort of thing I periodically look up and then forget.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder
    Armenia was long one of those nations that neither Rome nor Persia conquered, but instead traded back and forth as a vassal. At one point, the two agreed that Persia could choose the King of Armenia but Rome would have the right to crown him (and thus, implicitly, the right to veto a bad choice), or some kind of similar compromise. The nation was difficult to subdue and keep subdued due to it's geography, much like Afghanistan, and so it's had a lot more independence than a lot of nations around it. That's why it's church was so independent and the nation set up it's own quarter in Jerusalem different from regular Christian quarter.
  42. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    I was listening to a podcast with Scott Adams as a guest. The host asked Adams what’s the best book he’s read in the past year. Adams said he hadn’t read a book in the past year and while he reads voraciously he doesn’t read books. Books, he said, are one chapter of content and eleven chapters of filler.

    Read More
    • Replies: @CJ

    Books, he said, are one chapter of content and eleven chapters of filler.
     
    Actual, genuine quote from Keith Richards: "An album is a hit single and ten tracks of sh**."
  43. I would advise everybody to click on the link in Steve’s note to get some real beef about current Turkish TV and the not-so-subtle messages it is conveying.

    Further anecdotal material about Turkish TV exports: A friend of mine living in Ethiopia (which, believe it or not, often is a most charming place) tells me that Turkish soap operas, broadcast over satellite to East Africa, recently have been making great inroads with the female Ethiopian audience.

    Finally, Turkey is playing games and flexing its muscle again vis-a-vis Germany: About 220 German soldiers are currently being stationed, in a NATO context, at the notorious Incirlik airbase in southeast Turkey. From there, they participate in NATO’s anti-IS operations, mostly only, alas, through reconnaissance and refueling missions.

    Anyhow, some little thingy in German politics has now displeased Sultan Recep Tayyip, so his government currently refuses to let German parliamentarians visit their soldiers in Incirlik. Same thing happened once before in 2016. A formidable Muslim NATO member they are, those Turks.

    Read More
  44. @Jefferson
    I wonder if marriage between Armenians and Turks is as taboo as marriage between Jews and Palestinians?

    If I was an Armenian father I wouldn't be pleased if my daughter brought home a Turk boyfriend.

    “It is a common saying, and likely has some basis in fact: that it takes the wit of four Turks to overreach one Frank; two Franks to cheat one Greek; two Greeks to cheat one Jew; and six Jews to cheat one Armenian.” — Samuel Cox (19C British diplomat).

    Read More
  45. @PiltdownMan
    Fethullah Gulen has written a piece in the Washington Post op-ed section today.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/global-opinions/the-turkey-i-no-longer-know/2017/05/15/bda71c62-397c-11e7-8854-21f359183e8c_story.html?utm_term=.9cb75417a78e

    Thank you for the link!

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  46. @Buffalo Joe
    I would say, with no statistical evidence, that 94.6 percent of millennials would say that Facebook, Snapchat and Twitter are their favorite activity.

    Well, those are the conclusions you’ll reach if you use Facebook to observe what millennials are doing.

    For 95%+ of healthy young men in all times and places, and a very high percentage of young women, sex is their favorite activity, or it would be if they could have sex the way they want with who they want.

    I notice that about 95% of the activity on my Facebook is generated by 5% of the people. For that 5%, Facebook may be their favorite activity. Women certainly seem to enjoy it more than men, or at least they do it compulsively, whether they enjoy it or not. It’s more important to them to check on what other people are doing, even if it’s to despair over how their lives come up short relative to the friends of theirs who are having the most fun at any given point in time.

    I’d guess that millennial men enjoy video games more than social media on average.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde

    I notice that about 95% of the activity on my Facebook is generated by 5% of the people. For that 5%, Facebook may be their favorite activity. Women certainly seem to enjoy it more than men, or at least they do it compulsively, whether they enjoy it or not.
     
    I knew a guy five years ago whose wife was addicted to Facebook. While out driving she (passenger) would be madly flipping through Facebook on her iPhone.
  47. @Clyde
    Istanbul was Constantinople
    Now it's Istanbul, not Constantinople
    Been a long time gone, Constantinople
    Why did Constantinople get the works?
    That's nobody's business but the Turks


    ****sorry I cannot resist posting. So kindly buzz off you transphobic, transAtlantic, Islamophobes.

    Some words are incredibly difficult to incorporate into song.

    Eminem famously rhymes “oranges” with an ellided pronunciation of “or hinges” in “Let’s Get Down to Business,” but that kind of stuff can be a bit easier to pull of with rap than with conventional song.

    Writing a song (that scans decently) all about both Istanbul and and Constantinople is no mean feat. Had they worked in as well the other name, Byzantium, it’d have been the ultimate hat trick (they are Canadian after all, I think, or is that only the Barenaked Ladies?; I always get these two bands confused because of their similarly whimsical material…).

    Honorable mention must also be made of the Bee Gees’ “Massachusetts.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @jamie b.
    "...easier to pull of with rap..."

    Due to an absence of any esthetic standards whatsoever: "She got a big booty so I call her big booty" (actual rap lyric).
    , @Clyde

    Honorable mention must also be made of the Bee Gees’ “Massachusetts.”
     
    Very nice tune plus the way they sing in a bit of trembling voice adds to it. You might like the Bee Gees tune "To Love Somebody" as done by Graham Parsons and The Flying Burrito Brothers. Easily found on youtube.
    https://www.bing.com/search?q=%22To+Love+Somebody%22+as+done+by+Graham+Parsons&pc=MOZI&form=MOZCON
    , @Matra
    Eminem famously rhymes “oranges” with an ellided pronunciation of “or hinges” in “Let’s Get Down to Business,” but that kind of stuff can be a bit easier to pull of with rap than with conventional song.

    I just listened to the song. Eminem pronounces "oranges" like "or-in-gis", the way non-Americans do, rather than the more typical American ways so it does kind of rhyme, though it's still a bit awkward.

    , @anonymous
  48. OT: The New York Times cheerleading for Puerto Rican statehood.

    Tell them that it seems impossible, and they will conjure the long moral arc of the universe and how it bends toward Puerto Rican statehood.

    I wonder if the rest of the Presidential statues look as bad as the ones of Obama and Gerald Ford.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/16/us/puerto-rico-statehood.html?_r=0

    Read More
    • Replies: @Romanian
    And it says nothing about Puerto Rican terrorism in the US perpetrated by groups who wanted independence and are still lionized today.
  49. @slumber_j

    2 Greeks to cheat one Jew
    And 6 Jews to cheat an Armenian.
     
    I've always wondered why there's an Armenian Quarter in Jerusalem. It's the sort of thing I periodically look up and then forget.

    Armenia was long one of those nations that neither Rome nor Persia conquered, but instead traded back and forth as a vassal. At one point, the two agreed that Persia could choose the King of Armenia but Rome would have the right to crown him (and thus, implicitly, the right to veto a bad choice), or some kind of similar compromise. The nation was difficult to subdue and keep subdued due to it’s geography, much like Afghanistan, and so it’s had a lot more independence than a lot of nations around it. That’s why it’s church was so independent and the nation set up it’s own quarter in Jerusalem different from regular Christian quarter.

    Read More
  50. OT: Trump’s luck again. Although non-Fox MSM so far refusing to report on. http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2017/05/16/slain-dnc-staffer-had-contact-with-wikileaks-investigator-says.html


    A federal investigator who reviewed an FBI forensic report detailing the contents of DNC staffer Seth Rich’s computer generated within 96 hours after his murder, said Rich made contact with WikiLeaks through Gavin MacFadyen, a now-deceased American investigative reporter, documentary filmmaker, and director of WikiLeaks who was living in London at the time.

    “I have seen and read the emails between Seth Rich and Wikileaks,” the federal investigator told Fox News, confirming the MacFadyen connection. He said the emails are in possession of the FBI, while the stalled case is in the hands of the Washington Police Department.

    The federal investigator, who requested anonymity, said 44,053 emails and 17,761 attachments between Democratic National Committee leaders, spanning from January 2015 through late May 2016, were transferred from Rich to MacFadyen before May 21.

    Read More
  51. @Buffalo Joe
    I would say, with no statistical evidence, that 94.6 percent of millennials would say that Facebook, Snapchat and Twitter are their favorite activity.

    I would say, with no statistical evidence, that 94.6 percent of millennials would say that Facebook, Snapchat and Twitter are their favorite activity.

    I don’t know that they consider any of these things as an activity per se so much as the frame through which they interact with the world and one another now. It would probably fall upon their ears like “my favorite activity is blue” would to you.

    Read More
  52. @Jefferson
    I wonder if marriage between Armenians and Turks is as taboo as marriage between Jews and Palestinians?

    If I was an Armenian father I wouldn't be pleased if my daughter brought home a Turk boyfriend.

    I wonder if marriage between Armenians and Turks is as taboo as marriage between Jews and Palestinians

    I knew of an Armenian-American girl who studied at college on the other coast, fell in love with a Turkish guy, married him and had kids while keeping all of this a secret from her parents. This was in the early 90s, before facebook.

    Read More
  53. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    OT, meanwhile in old Saxony:

    A groper has been given a prison sentence in Germany, probably for the first time since the tightening of the sexual harassment law.

    On Wednesday the jury in Bautzen, Saxony, convicted a 27-year-old Libyan to a four-month custodial sentence without probation for grabbing a 34-year-old woman’s buttocks three times against her will on a public street.

    “It may be the first conviction Germany-wide under the new regulation,” said Judge Dirk Hertle.

    Paragraph 184(i) was implemented in the criminal code after the incidents in front of Cologne Cathedral on New Year’s Eve 2015, when hundreds of women reported that young men from North Africa sexually assaulted or robbed them.

    The new paragraph became law in November 2016 and two weeks later, the crime in Bautzen took place, said Hertle.

    “The faith in the constitutional state will only be strengthened if we consistently punish these sorts of crimes,” he added.

    “The sentence is indeed exorbitant, but that’s how the lawmakers wanted it,” said Hertle on Thursday to DPA.

    The defendant denied the charge in court, stating that he had wanted to invite the woman to coffee, only touching her on the upper arm.

    The 34-year-old victim gave the court a different account.

    “First he wanted to know if he could borrow a lighter, then he wouldn’t leave my side. He grabbed me three times between the buttocks, even though I had told him that I didn’t want that,” she said.

    The sentence also included a count of shoplifting.

    Hertle referred to the high “rate of criminality” of the asylum seeker, who had only been living in Germany since March 2016 and who had also received a sentence for fare-dodging.

    “He needed a warning shot,” said the judge.

    In his conviction, the judge met the punishment demanded by public prosecutors.

    Is Libya sending its best?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    N.B. that four months in prison for sexual assault is now deemed "exhorbitant" even by the very judges meting it out, as though eager to place the blame for such crazed ideas as the punishment of crimes at the feet of those mean, old legislators.

    The handsy perverts should be given a choice, if they think the brief incarceration so cruel: they can instead opt to have their noses broken or, better still, spend a week being used for practice in courses teaching women's defense tactics: hours and hours on the receiving end of the very effective "grab, twist, and pull" technique will set them to rights straightaway, and if it causes any permanent damage affecting their libidos, all the better for society.
  54. @Lurker
    One could argue it was very much the business of the Byzantine Empire.

    I did wonder if I should write to They Might be Giants and point this out.

    That is way too Byzantine for They Might be Giants. Check out the original from the early 1950s by The Four Lads. Clean and high spirited with zero ennui. It swings baby! As Frank Sinatra would say.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lurker
    Thanks! I had no idea the song didn't originate with TMBG.
  55. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    OT, dateline 16 May 2017 16:38 CEST+02:00, in now vibrant Westphalia:

    A 32-year-old Iraqi refugee was found guilty on Tuesday of the rape of two Chinese students at a university in western Germany. The initial arrest fired off a national debate about sexual violence by asylum seekers.

    Ziyad K. admitted to the charges late in the trial, after initially refusing to make a statement to the court.

    The court found that he had almost strangled one of the women to death during an attack at the Ruhr University Bochum. When assaulting her in August, he wrapped a shoelace around her throat and threatened her with a stick so that she would not move.

    The 22-year-old victim, who flew back from Beijing for the proceedings, told the court: “I thought I was going to die.”

    Police arrested the man after a friend of one of the victims took a picture of him lurking behind a bush in the same spot that he had attacked her.

    Evidence gathered at the crime scenes linked his DNA to both victims, leading the court to the near certain conclusion that he was the attacker, Der Westen reports.

    “Eleven years is a very hefty sentence. But it is the price for what you have done to these blameless victims,” said judge Volker Talarowski.

    “We haven’t put refugees in general on trial. We have put on trial a man who was an asylum seeker, and we judged his guilt based on the evidence in this case, no more and no less.”

    The 32-year-old defendant arrived in Germany in 2015 with his wife and two children after fleeing from Iraq.

    The man was arrested in November shortly after a teenage asylum seeker from Afghanistan was arrested for the rape and murder of a young woman in Freiburg.

    Critics of the government said that Chancellor Angela Merkel’s open-door refugee policy was to blame for the assaults. But Merkel rounded on critics, calling the attacks “terrible isolated incidents.”

    “The fact that some people want to exploit them is something we have to withstand and defend ourselves against,” she said in December.

    Heckuva job Merkie!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Escher

    “Eleven years is a very hefty sentence. But it is the price for what you have done to these blameless victims,” said judge Volker Talarowski.

     

    Eleven years for raping 2 girls is a hefty sentence? There is truly no hope for Germany.
  56. @AKAHorace
    From

    Visits to Monasteries in the Levant
    By Robert Curzon.

    It takes,
    4 Turks to cheat one Frank
    2 Franks to cheat one Greek
    2 Greeks to cheat one Jew
    And 6 Jews to cheat an Armenian.

    Interesting. I’ve seen the line “trust snake before a Jew, and Jew before a Turk, but never trust an Armenian.”

    Read More
  57. OT

    Sorry to share this week-old article with you, but this is a gem. It’s impossible to distinguish reality from The Onion.

    Read More
  58. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Re Seth Rich murdered by DNC mafia:

    Wikileaks was a winning issue for Trump until he reversed himself. Idiot.

    Judging from CIA director Pompeo’s comments on Assange we can assume Pompeo strongly approves of Seth Rich getting snuffed out. Asshole.

    “Sad!”

    Read More
  59. OT, but looks like there’s fire there:

    http://voxday.blogspot.com/2017/05/a-troublesome-staffer.html

    If you are going to hire someone to kill a troublesome staffer, make sure they know to wipe his computer clean with more than a cloth!

    Read More
  60. @Clyde
    That is way too Byzantine for They Might be Giants. Check out the original from the early 1950s by The Four Lads. Clean and high spirited with zero ennui. It swings baby! As Frank Sinatra would say.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wcze7EGorOk

    Thanks! I had no idea the song didn’t originate with TMBG.

    Read More
  61. @Intelligent Dasein
    I'm guessing that Romanians would have answered the same way in the 1980s. I foresee a Ceaușescu-like end for Erdogan.

    Erdogan is more like Putin than Ceausescu. He has genuine public popularity with a large segment of the popularity (might or might not be >50% in a free and fair election with a free press but still a significant %). Communist rule in Romania existed for as long as the Soviets were able to impose it and not one minute longer. Ceausescu was particularly detestable and lacking in genuine popular support (people bused into rallies by their workplace don’t count) but no Communist could have lasted in any of the satellites.

    This is not to say that this could not change (for both Putin and Erdogan) – see Maduro in Venezuela. But first the economic situation would have to get a lot worse.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    The problem with both Putin and Erdogan is that they have no long term fixes. Both of them are stealing and borrowing to create the illusion of prosperity. Putin by selling off Russia's natural resources at fire sale prices, and Erdogan by literally running up debts and taking businesses from his political enemies. Those strategies aren't sustainable forever, and Russia has already been badly damaged by cheap oil. The sanctions have done Putin a huge favor, in fact, by protecting local industry. The Turks are better businessmen than the Russians, and have built a few impressive companies, but Erdogan's greed seems to getting the better of him.

    Moreover both Putin and Erdogan are trying to revive dead-end pre-industrial ideologies - Orthodox Slavophilia and Islam. Both the Russian and Ottoman Empires collapsed because those ideologies have been hollow for a long time.

    Probably the only sustainable way forward for civilization is the East Asian model - a combination of racial homogeneity and technophilia. Unfortunately for the West (or Russia or Turkey) our societies are far too heterodox, even the white populations, to adopt to East Asian style conformity and unity of purpose.
    , @inertial

    Communist rule in Romania existed for as long as the Soviets were able to impose it and not one minute longer. Ceausescu was particularly detestable and lacking in genuine popular support (people bused into rallies by their workplace don’t count) but no Communist could have lasted in any of the satellites.
     
    This is propaganda nonsense. There had been plenty of genuine popular support for Communism in the Eastern block countries. It has been memory-holed but it existed.

    As for Ceausescu, he remains popular in Romania even today: Survey: 66% of the Romanians would vote for Ceausescu.
    , @Uebersetzer
    In Turkey, measures have been taken to boost attendance at Erdogan rallies, like public transport being temporarily free, workplaces get transportation laid on and the day off to go to AKP rallies and Turkish students abroad were "encouraged" to gather outside the White House when Erdogan met Trump (with just a hint that it can be bad for your prospects if you do not avail yourself of the opportunity).
  62. @Anonymous
    Apparently, that late, great 'lewd' English comedian, Benny Hill, was one of the biggest stars ever on Turkish television.

    Benny Hill was a star, seriously, around the world – Caribbean, Africa, Middle East, Australia, Philippines. At one time versions of his shows were running on television in 96 countries. His cancellation by the politically-correct BBC was one of the stupidest own goals ever scored.

    Read More
    • Agree: donut
    • Replies: @Romanian
    I watched him all the time as a kid.
    , @Anonymous
    It was Britain's commercial TV network, ITV, which hosted - and then sadly 'terminated' - poor old Benny.
  63. @Anonymous
    I was listening to a podcast with Scott Adams as a guest. The host asked Adams what's the best book he's read in the past year. Adams said he hadn't read a book in the past year and while he reads voraciously he doesn't read books. Books, he said, are one chapter of content and eleven chapters of filler.

    Books, he said, are one chapter of content and eleven chapters of filler.

    Actual, genuine quote from Keith Richards: “An album is a hit single and ten tracks of sh**.”

    Read More
  64. OT: Crickets here on the Great Trump Security Leak. Who is the “Middle Eastern Ally”? If the “crime” was causing the ally to lose faith in trusting us with future secrets, aren’t the real guilty parties the WashPo and the leakers inside the White House who spread this story. Who are the leakers? Why is OK for leakers to leak stories which damage national security to the press, so long as the damaged party is a Republican President, but the President isn’t allowed to do any “leaking” of his own?

    It’s nice work if you can rig the rules of the game (which you yourself make up) so that you are allowed to wield a weapon but the other side has to fight you bare handed. This is why Twitter drives the press nuts – Trump is not supposed to be able to speak directly to the American people without being appropriately “filtered” by the press. Likewise, one of the complaints of the bureaucracy is that the President, when meeting with foreign leaders, is supposed to stick to “talking points” given to him by the REAL government as if he is the Queen of England reading the speeches given to her by the ruling party. Sorry guys, the President is the Commander in Chief and he tells YOU what to say, not vice versa.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    If the “crime” was causing the ally to lose faith in trusting us with future secrets, aren’t the real guilty parties the WashPo and the leakers inside the White House who spread this story

    Not if the ally is already well aware of the leak because our military had to notify that ally that a source was compromised. That would seem like Trump's crime. If our allies have lost faith in the President, that would normally be considered newsworthy.

    It is hard to believe that American conservatives are willing to follow an elderly blowhard/reality TV star off the edge off the cliff just because some annoying liberals don't like the guy, but that is where we seem to be. Only Ann Coulter has any sense left.

  65. @Autochthon
    Some words are incredibly difficult to incorporate into song.

    Eminem famously rhymes "oranges" with an ellided pronunciation of "or hinges" in "Let's Get Down to Business," but that kind of stuff can be a bit easier to pull of with rap than with conventional song.

    Writing a song (that scans decently) all about both Istanbul and and Constantinople is no mean feat. Had they worked in as well the other name, Byzantium, it'd have been the ultimate hat trick (they are Canadian after all, I think, or is that only the Barenaked Ladies?; I always get these two bands confused because of their similarly whimsical material...).

    Honorable mention must also be made of the Bee Gees' "Massachusetts."

    “…easier to pull of with rap…”

    Due to an absence of any esthetic standards whatsoever: “She got a big booty so I call her big booty” (actual rap lyric).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    C'mon; your example is like one saying all country music is horrible by citing a song from Shania Twain or all ballads are insufferable by citing Color Me Badd's "I Wanna Sex You Up." (Or is it "...U Up?")
  66. @Jack D
    Erdogan is more like Putin than Ceausescu. He has genuine public popularity with a large segment of the popularity (might or might not be >50% in a free and fair election with a free press but still a significant %). Communist rule in Romania existed for as long as the Soviets were able to impose it and not one minute longer. Ceausescu was particularly detestable and lacking in genuine popular support (people bused into rallies by their workplace don't count) but no Communist could have lasted in any of the satellites.

    This is not to say that this could not change (for both Putin and Erdogan) - see Maduro in Venezuela. But first the economic situation would have to get a lot worse.

    The problem with both Putin and Erdogan is that they have no long term fixes. Both of them are stealing and borrowing to create the illusion of prosperity. Putin by selling off Russia’s natural resources at fire sale prices, and Erdogan by literally running up debts and taking businesses from his political enemies. Those strategies aren’t sustainable forever, and Russia has already been badly damaged by cheap oil. The sanctions have done Putin a huge favor, in fact, by protecting local industry. The Turks are better businessmen than the Russians, and have built a few impressive companies, but Erdogan’s greed seems to getting the better of him.

    Moreover both Putin and Erdogan are trying to revive dead-end pre-industrial ideologies – Orthodox Slavophilia and Islam. Both the Russian and Ottoman Empires collapsed because those ideologies have been hollow for a long time.

    Probably the only sustainable way forward for civilization is the East Asian model – a combination of racial homogeneity and technophilia. Unfortunately for the West (or Russia or Turkey) our societies are far too heterodox, even the white populations, to adopt to East Asian style conformity and unity of purpose.

    Read More
  67. @Jack D
    OT: Crickets here on the Great Trump Security Leak. Who is the "Middle Eastern Ally"? If the "crime" was causing the ally to lose faith in trusting us with future secrets, aren't the real guilty parties the WashPo and the leakers inside the White House who spread this story. Who are the leakers? Why is OK for leakers to leak stories which damage national security to the press, so long as the damaged party is a Republican President, but the President isn't allowed to do any "leaking" of his own?

    It's nice work if you can rig the rules of the game (which you yourself make up) so that you are allowed to wield a weapon but the other side has to fight you bare handed. This is why Twitter drives the press nuts - Trump is not supposed to be able to speak directly to the American people without being appropriately "filtered" by the press. Likewise, one of the complaints of the bureaucracy is that the President, when meeting with foreign leaders, is supposed to stick to "talking points" given to him by the REAL government as if he is the Queen of England reading the speeches given to her by the ruling party. Sorry guys, the President is the Commander in Chief and he tells YOU what to say, not vice versa.

    If the “crime” was causing the ally to lose faith in trusting us with future secrets, aren’t the real guilty parties the WashPo and the leakers inside the White House who spread this story

    Not if the ally is already well aware of the leak because our military had to notify that ally that a source was compromised. That would seem like Trump’s crime. If our allies have lost faith in the President, that would normally be considered newsworthy.

    It is hard to believe that American conservatives are willing to follow an elderly blowhard/reality TV star off the edge off the cliff just because some annoying liberals don’t like the guy, but that is where we seem to be. Only Ann Coulter has any sense left.

    Read More
  68. @Jack D
    Erdogan is more like Putin than Ceausescu. He has genuine public popularity with a large segment of the popularity (might or might not be >50% in a free and fair election with a free press but still a significant %). Communist rule in Romania existed for as long as the Soviets were able to impose it and not one minute longer. Ceausescu was particularly detestable and lacking in genuine popular support (people bused into rallies by their workplace don't count) but no Communist could have lasted in any of the satellites.

    This is not to say that this could not change (for both Putin and Erdogan) - see Maduro in Venezuela. But first the economic situation would have to get a lot worse.

    Communist rule in Romania existed for as long as the Soviets were able to impose it and not one minute longer. Ceausescu was particularly detestable and lacking in genuine popular support (people bused into rallies by their workplace don’t count) but no Communist could have lasted in any of the satellites.

    This is propaganda nonsense. There had been plenty of genuine popular support for Communism in the Eastern block countries. It has been memory-holed but it existed.

    As for Ceausescu, he remains popular in Romania even today: Survey: 66% of the Romanians would vote for Ceausescu.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Romanian
    Nostalgia goggles, plus they blame his wife for the crummy turn the country took in the 1980s.
  69. @Autochthon
    Some words are incredibly difficult to incorporate into song.

    Eminem famously rhymes "oranges" with an ellided pronunciation of "or hinges" in "Let's Get Down to Business," but that kind of stuff can be a bit easier to pull of with rap than with conventional song.

    Writing a song (that scans decently) all about both Istanbul and and Constantinople is no mean feat. Had they worked in as well the other name, Byzantium, it'd have been the ultimate hat trick (they are Canadian after all, I think, or is that only the Barenaked Ladies?; I always get these two bands confused because of their similarly whimsical material...).

    Honorable mention must also be made of the Bee Gees' "Massachusetts."

    Honorable mention must also be made of the Bee Gees’ “Massachusetts.”

    Very nice tune plus the way they sing in a bit of trembling voice adds to it. You might like the Bee Gees tune “To Love Somebody” as done by Graham Parsons and The Flying Burrito Brothers. Easily found on youtube.

    https://www.bing.com/search?q=%22To+Love+Somebody%22+as+done+by+Graham+Parsons&pc=MOZI&form=MOZCON

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  70. @anon
    Maybe Turkish TV is just really good?

    The series on Sultan Suleiman on Netflix was mesmerizing. Can’t wait for season 2

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  71. @Wency
    Well, those are the conclusions you'll reach if you use Facebook to observe what millennials are doing.

    For 95%+ of healthy young men in all times and places, and a very high percentage of young women, sex is their favorite activity, or it would be if they could have sex the way they want with who they want.

    I notice that about 95% of the activity on my Facebook is generated by 5% of the people. For that 5%, Facebook may be their favorite activity. Women certainly seem to enjoy it more than men, or at least they do it compulsively, whether they enjoy it or not. It's more important to them to check on what other people are doing, even if it's to despair over how their lives come up short relative to the friends of theirs who are having the most fun at any given point in time.

    I'd guess that millennial men enjoy video games more than social media on average.

    I notice that about 95% of the activity on my Facebook is generated by 5% of the people. For that 5%, Facebook may be their favorite activity. Women certainly seem to enjoy it more than men, or at least they do it compulsively, whether they enjoy it or not.

    I knew a guy five years ago whose wife was addicted to Facebook. While out driving she (passenger) would be madly flipping through Facebook on her iPhone.

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    I was waiting to get off a plane recently and the woman behind me got on Facebook as soon as cell phones were allowed. "OMG, I just landed in Denver!"
  72. @Autochthon
    Some words are incredibly difficult to incorporate into song.

    Eminem famously rhymes "oranges" with an ellided pronunciation of "or hinges" in "Let's Get Down to Business," but that kind of stuff can be a bit easier to pull of with rap than with conventional song.

    Writing a song (that scans decently) all about both Istanbul and and Constantinople is no mean feat. Had they worked in as well the other name, Byzantium, it'd have been the ultimate hat trick (they are Canadian after all, I think, or is that only the Barenaked Ladies?; I always get these two bands confused because of their similarly whimsical material...).

    Honorable mention must also be made of the Bee Gees' "Massachusetts."

    Eminem famously rhymes “oranges” with an ellided pronunciation of “or hinges” in “Let’s Get Down to Business,” but that kind of stuff can be a bit easier to pull of with rap than with conventional song.

    I just listened to the song. Eminem pronounces “oranges” like “or-in-gis”, the way non-Americans do, rather than the more typical American ways so it does kind of rhyme, though it’s still a bit awkward.

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  73. anonymous says: • Website     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Lurker
    Thanks! I had no idea the song didn't originate with TMBG.

    Mark Steyn just had Istanbul (Not Constantinople) as his song o’ the week.

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  74. anonymous says: • Website     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Autochthon
    Some words are incredibly difficult to incorporate into song.

    Eminem famously rhymes "oranges" with an ellided pronunciation of "or hinges" in "Let's Get Down to Business," but that kind of stuff can be a bit easier to pull of with rap than with conventional song.

    Writing a song (that scans decently) all about both Istanbul and and Constantinople is no mean feat. Had they worked in as well the other name, Byzantium, it'd have been the ultimate hat trick (they are Canadian after all, I think, or is that only the Barenaked Ladies?; I always get these two bands confused because of their similarly whimsical material...).

    Honorable mention must also be made of the Bee Gees' "Massachusetts."
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  75. @Barnard
    OT: The New York Times cheerleading for Puerto Rican statehood.

    Tell them that it seems impossible, and they will conjure the long moral arc of the universe and how it bends toward Puerto Rican statehood.
     
    I wonder if the rest of the Presidential statues look as bad as the ones of Obama and Gerald Ford.


    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/16/us/puerto-rico-statehood.html?_r=0

    And it says nothing about Puerto Rican terrorism in the US perpetrated by groups who wanted independence and are still lionized today.

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  76. @CJ
    Benny Hill was a star, seriously, around the world - Caribbean, Africa, Middle East, Australia, Philippines. At one time versions of his shows were running on television in 96 countries. His cancellation by the politically-correct BBC was one of the stupidest own goals ever scored.

    I watched him all the time as a kid.

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  77. @inertial

    Communist rule in Romania existed for as long as the Soviets were able to impose it and not one minute longer. Ceausescu was particularly detestable and lacking in genuine popular support (people bused into rallies by their workplace don’t count) but no Communist could have lasted in any of the satellites.
     
    This is propaganda nonsense. There had been plenty of genuine popular support for Communism in the Eastern block countries. It has been memory-holed but it existed.

    As for Ceausescu, he remains popular in Romania even today: Survey: 66% of the Romanians would vote for Ceausescu.

    Nostalgia goggles, plus they blame his wife for the crummy turn the country took in the 1980s.

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  78. @JeremiahJohnbalaya
    For some reason a few comments here reminded me of the funniest thing I remember from I Hope They Serve Beer In Hell (yes, i spent a whole hour of my life reading it on a buddy's couch).

    Author is hanging out with some good old boys somewhere. They are sitting around getting drunk and doing nothings like laugh at the three legged dog. Said dog starts licking its balls, and the author says "Man, I wish i could do that". One good old boy says "well, I'm not sure he'd let you."

    The punch line I remember was : “don’t you think you should introduce yourself first” .

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  79. @JeremiahJohnbalaya
    For some reason a few comments here reminded me of the funniest thing I remember from I Hope They Serve Beer In Hell (yes, i spent a whole hour of my life reading it on a buddy's couch).

    Author is hanging out with some good old boys somewhere. They are sitting around getting drunk and doing nothings like laugh at the three legged dog. Said dog starts licking its balls, and the author says "Man, I wish i could do that". One good old boy says "well, I'm not sure he'd let you."

    No, the punch line is, “I dunno, he looks kinda mean”.

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  80. @black sea
    In Turkey, a lot of people keep the TV on even when they aren't really paying attention. It's just a sort of background noise, or they might look up if something "exciting" happens.

    For that matter, a lot of Americans do the same. My mom always had the TV on when she was puttering around in the kitchen. I suspect that most of the time she wasn't following it, but she might've paid attention if a news story caught her interest.

    Does that count as "watching?"

    For that matter, a lot of Americans do the same. My mom always had the TV on when she was puttering around in the kitchen. I suspect that most of the time she wasn’t following it, but she might’ve paid attention if a news story caught her interest.

    Does that count as “watching?”

    My MIL was that way; CNN was on 24/7.

    I’d bet she was counted as “watching”. There is NFW that the average American watches TV 8 hours a day every day.

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  81. @Clyde

    I notice that about 95% of the activity on my Facebook is generated by 5% of the people. For that 5%, Facebook may be their favorite activity. Women certainly seem to enjoy it more than men, or at least they do it compulsively, whether they enjoy it or not.
     
    I knew a guy five years ago whose wife was addicted to Facebook. While out driving she (passenger) would be madly flipping through Facebook on her iPhone.

    I was waiting to get off a plane recently and the woman behind me got on Facebook as soon as cell phones were allowed. “OMG, I just landed in Denver!”

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  82. @jamie b.
    "...easier to pull of with rap..."

    Due to an absence of any esthetic standards whatsoever: "She got a big booty so I call her big booty" (actual rap lyric).

    C’mon; your example is like one saying all country music is horrible by citing a song from Shania Twain or all ballads are insufferable by citing Color Me Badd’s “I Wanna Sex You Up.” (Or is it “…U Up?”)

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    • Replies: @jamie b.
    My example was fairly representative. "Rhyming" a word with itself is completely normal in rap, and so are classy topics like "big booty."
  83. @Autochthon
    C'mon; your example is like one saying all country music is horrible by citing a song from Shania Twain or all ballads are insufferable by citing Color Me Badd's "I Wanna Sex You Up." (Or is it "...U Up?")

    My example was fairly representative. “Rhyming” a word with itself is completely normal in rap, and so are classy topics like “big booty.”

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  84. @anonymous
    OT, meanwhile in old Saxony:

    A groper has been given a prison sentence in Germany, probably for the first time since the tightening of the sexual harassment law.

    On Wednesday the jury in Bautzen, Saxony, convicted a 27-year-old Libyan to a four-month custodial sentence without probation for grabbing a 34-year-old woman’s buttocks three times against her will on a public street.

    “It may be the first conviction Germany-wide under the new regulation,” said Judge Dirk Hertle.

    Paragraph 184(i) was implemented in the criminal code after the incidents in front of Cologne Cathedral on New Year’s Eve 2015, when hundreds of women reported that young men from North Africa sexually assaulted or robbed them.

    The new paragraph became law in November 2016 and two weeks later, the crime in Bautzen took place, said Hertle.

    “The faith in the constitutional state will only be strengthened if we consistently punish these sorts of crimes,” he added.

    "The sentence is indeed exorbitant, but that's how the lawmakers wanted it,” said Hertle on Thursday to DPA.

    The defendant denied the charge in court, stating that he had wanted to invite the woman to coffee, only touching her on the upper arm.

    The 34-year-old victim gave the court a different account.

    “First he wanted to know if he could borrow a lighter, then he wouldn’t leave my side. He grabbed me three times between the buttocks, even though I had told him that I didn’t want that,” she said.

    The sentence also included a count of shoplifting.

    Hertle referred to the high “rate of criminality” of the asylum seeker, who had only been living in Germany since March 2016 and who had also received a sentence for fare-dodging.

    “He needed a warning shot,” said the judge.

    In his conviction, the judge met the punishment demanded by public prosecutors.

     

    Is Libya sending its best?

    N.B. that four months in prison for sexual assault is now deemed “exhorbitant” even by the very judges meting it out, as though eager to place the blame for such crazed ideas as the punishment of crimes at the feet of those mean, old legislators.

    The handsy perverts should be given a choice, if they think the brief incarceration so cruel: they can instead opt to have their noses broken or, better still, spend a week being used for practice in courses teaching women’s defense tactics: hours and hours on the receiving end of the very effective “grab, twist, and pull” technique will set them to rights straightaway, and if it causes any permanent damage affecting their libidos, all the better for society.

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  85. @whorefinder
    Armenia was long one of those nations that neither Rome nor Persia conquered, but instead traded back and forth as a vassal. At one point, the two agreed that Persia could choose the King of Armenia but Rome would have the right to crown him (and thus, implicitly, the right to veto a bad choice), or some kind of similar compromise. The nation was difficult to subdue and keep subdued due to it's geography, much like Afghanistan, and so it's had a lot more independence than a lot of nations around it. That's why it's church was so independent and the nation set up it's own quarter in Jerusalem different from regular Christian quarter.

    So is that why the Kardashians are so ornery?

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  86. @anonymous
    OT, dateline 16 May 2017 16:38 CEST+02:00, in now vibrant Westphalia:

    A 32-year-old Iraqi refugee was found guilty on Tuesday of the rape of two Chinese students at a university in western Germany. The initial arrest fired off a national debate about sexual violence by asylum seekers.

    Ziyad K. admitted to the charges late in the trial, after initially refusing to make a statement to the court.

    The court found that he had almost strangled one of the women to death during an attack at the Ruhr University Bochum. When assaulting her in August, he wrapped a shoelace around her throat and threatened her with a stick so that she would not move.

    The 22-year-old victim, who flew back from Beijing for the proceedings, told the court: “I thought I was going to die.”

    Police arrested the man after a friend of one of the victims took a picture of him lurking behind a bush in the same spot that he had attacked her.

    Evidence gathered at the crime scenes linked his DNA to both victims, leading the court to the near certain conclusion that he was the attacker, Der Westen reports.

    “Eleven years is a very hefty sentence. But it is the price for what you have done to these blameless victims,” said judge Volker Talarowski.

    “We haven’t put refugees in general on trial. We have put on trial a man who was an asylum seeker, and we judged his guilt based on the evidence in this case, no more and no less.”

    The 32-year-old defendant arrived in Germany in 2015 with his wife and two children after fleeing from Iraq.

    The man was arrested in November shortly after a teenage asylum seeker from Afghanistan was arrested for the rape and murder of a young woman in Freiburg.

    Critics of the government said that Chancellor Angela Merkel’s open-door refugee policy was to blame for the assaults. But Merkel rounded on critics, calling the attacks “terrible isolated incidents."

    "The fact that some people want to exploit them is something we have to withstand and defend ourselves against," she said in December.

     

    Heckuva job Merkie!

    “Eleven years is a very hefty sentence. But it is the price for what you have done to these blameless victims,” said judge Volker Talarowski.

    Eleven years for raping 2 girls is a hefty sentence? There is truly no hope for Germany.

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  87. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @CJ
    Benny Hill was a star, seriously, around the world - Caribbean, Africa, Middle East, Australia, Philippines. At one time versions of his shows were running on television in 96 countries. His cancellation by the politically-correct BBC was one of the stupidest own goals ever scored.

    It was Britain’s commercial TV network, ITV, which hosted – and then sadly ‘terminated’ – poor old Benny.

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  88. @Jefferson
    I wonder if marriage between Armenians and Turks is as taboo as marriage between Jews and Palestinians?

    If I was an Armenian father I wouldn't be pleased if my daughter brought home a Turk boyfriend.

    Armenians are some of the most ethnonationalistic people in the world, so yes, absolutely.

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    • Replies: @Avery
    {Armenians are some of the most ethnonationalistic people in the world}

    If your ethnos came so very close to being completely exterminated from the face of the earth, you would be most ethnonationistic too.

    Would a Russian father in say 1943 in an occupied Russian village be pleased if his daughter brought home a Nazi SS German boyfriend?

    And the invadonomad Turks have not given up their goal of wiping out Armenians from their ancestral lands. I am sure you have heard of Nagorno-Karabagh, where Caspian Turks of Turkbaijan attempted in 1988-1994 to wipe out indigenous Armenians of Artsakh aka NKR. Thankfully they failed that time, but they will keep trying.

  89. @Anatoly Karlin
    Armenians are some of the most ethnonationalistic people in the world, so yes, absolutely.

    {Armenians are some of the most ethnonationalistic people in the world}

    If your ethnos came so very close to being completely exterminated from the face of the earth, you would be most ethnonationistic too.

    Would a Russian father in say 1943 in an occupied Russian village be pleased if his daughter brought home a Nazi SS German boyfriend?

    And the invadonomad Turks have not given up their goal of wiping out Armenians from their ancestral lands. I am sure you have heard of Nagorno-Karabagh, where Caspian Turks of Turkbaijan attempted in 1988-1994 to wipe out indigenous Armenians of Artsakh aka NKR. Thankfully they failed that time, but they will keep trying.

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    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    Avery:

    Just a reminder that the Armenian Genocide was actually carried out by the Kurds, America's present day ally in democracy. Of course the Ottoman Turks gave the Kurds the go ahead for carrying out the actual dirty work.
  90. @Jack D
    Erdogan is more like Putin than Ceausescu. He has genuine public popularity with a large segment of the popularity (might or might not be >50% in a free and fair election with a free press but still a significant %). Communist rule in Romania existed for as long as the Soviets were able to impose it and not one minute longer. Ceausescu was particularly detestable and lacking in genuine popular support (people bused into rallies by their workplace don't count) but no Communist could have lasted in any of the satellites.

    This is not to say that this could not change (for both Putin and Erdogan) - see Maduro in Venezuela. But first the economic situation would have to get a lot worse.

    In Turkey, measures have been taken to boost attendance at Erdogan rallies, like public transport being temporarily free, workplaces get transportation laid on and the day off to go to AKP rallies and Turkish students abroad were “encouraged” to gather outside the White House when Erdogan met Trump (with just a hint that it can be bad for your prospects if you do not avail yourself of the opportunity).

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  91. @AKAHorace
    From

    Visits to Monasteries in the Levant
    By Robert Curzon.

    It takes,
    4 Turks to cheat one Frank
    2 Franks to cheat one Greek
    2 Greeks to cheat one Jew
    And 6 Jews to cheat an Armenian.

    And a half dozen of Kardashians to cheat on bunch of men or women of various ethnic, racial, or even gendeneric origin.

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  92. @Steve Sailer
    I was very impressed with the commercials on Turkish TV when I was there in 2009. They looked 98% as flashy as American commercials.

    Mexico has great TV commercial directors too.

    Modest bored proposal:

    Wanna watch” Tijuana Desperate Drug Lord’s Machadoss” in your native language?

    It’s gonna be $ 299 per month.

    1. Build a Guberment Pay Wall arond all foreign language blubbering, Turkomexican or other TV cable/satelite outlets, and let the Cricket Test Failing domestic audience to pay the price of non-assimilation.

    2. Tell to Nice White TV Audience that all proceeds are going to be used to cover for the cost of English Speaking Big Bird’s life support.

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  93. @Avery
    {Armenians are some of the most ethnonationalistic people in the world}

    If your ethnos came so very close to being completely exterminated from the face of the earth, you would be most ethnonationistic too.

    Would a Russian father in say 1943 in an occupied Russian village be pleased if his daughter brought home a Nazi SS German boyfriend?

    And the invadonomad Turks have not given up their goal of wiping out Armenians from their ancestral lands. I am sure you have heard of Nagorno-Karabagh, where Caspian Turks of Turkbaijan attempted in 1988-1994 to wipe out indigenous Armenians of Artsakh aka NKR. Thankfully they failed that time, but they will keep trying.

    Avery:

    Just a reminder that the Armenian Genocide was actually carried out by the Kurds, America’s present day ally in democracy. Of course the Ottoman Turks gave the Kurds the go ahead for carrying out the actual dirty work.

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  94. The Turkish Statistical Institute reported in 2015 that 94.6 percent of Turks say watching television is their favorite activity.

    The 94.6% figure is pretty astounding, but I’m also fascinated by the description of TV-watching as an activity.

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  95. Men in dark suits beat, kick anti-Erdoğan protesters outside Turkish embassy in Washington.

    http://theweek.com/speedreads/699454/men-dark-suits-beat-kick-antierdogan-protesters-outside-turkish-embassy-washington

    The video shows guys in black suits walloping Kurdish anti-Erdoğan protestors in Washington, DC.

    The New York Times reports that they are from Erdoğan’s security detail, but given the nature of Turkish politics, perhaps these were Gulenists in a false-flag operation designed to embarrass Erdoğan during his state visit to the US.

    I’m just trying to view Turkish politics with the appropriate conspiracist/Byzantine mindset.

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  96. @Whiskey
    Erdogan is playing a very risky game. He ran afoul of the allies of convenience, the Persians and Russians who historically have teamed up to reduce Turkish power but have their own issues, and China which is busy making inroads in Central Asia to rival both Russia and Turkey (not to mention Iran).

    Like Putin's main nemesis being Navalny who to the horror of Europeans, is even more a nationalist than Putin (you can tell by the amount of energy Russian media expends on demonizing Navalny and labeling him a Nazi); Erdogan's main rivals are young and hungry Islamists who can always promise MOAR ISLAM as the solution and point to tired, sick, old Erdogan as the problem. Why, a Holy War with traditional enemies Greece (easy prey) and Russia (not so much) is just the solution to the problem of not enough Jihad and Ottoman Empire!

    Turkey lives in a bad neighborhood.

    Why bored identity always has to fix things around here?

    Turkey IS lives in a bad neighborhoodn

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