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Here’s a long article from the Daily Beast recounting a former West Point lady cadet’s claim to have been raped by the Army football team’s star quarterback:

Cadet Run Out of West Point After Accusing Army’s Star Quarterback of Rape

He was cleared by the school and the Army—and became captain of the football team. She says she was shamed by fellow cadets and disrespected by the academy’s leaders.

BRANDY ZADROZNY
JAMES LAPORTA
12.08.17 7:02 PM ET

Lots of perennial iSteve themes in this such as black jocks and white coeds, what colleges will do to win at football, and even down to some minor ones like straight women who want to become military officers are usually following in dad’s or grandpa’s footsteps, and that women are more prone to knee injuries than men.

By the way, Army beat Navy today 14-13. Ahmad Bradshaw ran for 94 yards and threw for 20 yards. Army is now 9-3, it’s best record since 1996.

 
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  1. Women in the military is a mistake, one that cultures across the world and throughout history have never had the means to persist with.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bugg
    Putting 18 year old men and women in close proximity on a daily basis is going to end up with a lot of them having sex with each other. You can have all the honor codes and PC rules you want, but you cannot repeal human nature. Only an idiot thinks otherwise. Or a government bureaucrat.
    , @El Dato
    Germans say no problem:

    https://www.welt.de/politik/deutschland/article12381421/Warum-Frauen-fuer-die-Marine-unersetzlich-sind.html
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  2. Running the triple option was probably only way for this young man to play quarterback in college given that he’s 5’10”.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The military academies like to recruit quarterbacks of average height who are excellent athletes but not tall enough to have a shot at the NFL (because you have to spend 4 years in the military when you get out of an academy).

    Indeed, they like cadets who don't play football for the academy who had been running/option quarterbacks in high school but who are too small to play college football, because those kind of guys are thought to make good combat leaders.

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  3. Let’s not loose track of what’s important now. Winning football games. Fooooootbaaaaaawwwwwwwllllll.

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  4. @Felix Fischer
    Running the triple option was probably only way for this young man to play quarterback in college given that he's 5'10''.

    The military academies like to recruit quarterbacks of average height who are excellent athletes but not tall enough to have a shot at the NFL (because you have to spend 4 years in the military when you get out of an academy).

    Indeed, they like cadets who don’t play football for the academy who had been running/option quarterbacks in high school but who are too small to play college football, because those kind of guys are thought to make good combat leaders.

    Read More
    • Replies: @PV van der Byl
    My recollection from the late 1970s was that the better Ivy League football teams were competitive with or superior to West Point.

    Both the service academies and the Ivies also fielded "lightweight" football teams (155 lb. max), however. When the lightweight Ivy teams played Army or Navy, they usually lost by scores like 63-7.

    Tbe service academies are filled with very fit, very athletic welterweights and middleweights.

    Too small to interest the NFL.

    But sized just right for the interior of tanks, fighter jet cockpits, and submarines.
    , @Lagertha
    yeah. A comment of mine years ago about the HS pipeline: smaller players (excellent ones who want to continue to play) have no choice but to play Div 3/Ivy/military academies. Football at Div 1 level/or to be a pro, requires height and a type of athleticism that few Ivy types/Academy types have. There are some small players in the NFL, but, as teens, they wanted to play football...not give 5 years to a military academy once the academy part is over...and, it is well known that the Ivy & Div 3 teams are mediocre compared to Alabama or Ohio State. This stuff matters to talented teens...Ivy & Academy make no sense to them; and prestige is of little interest to them. They want to be on the best teams. Army & Navy are just so-so to most recruits. And, you only get NFL notice at 22-25, not, 27-29 these days.
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  5. Well if you make a false accusation like that, I think getting run out of West Point is an appropriate response.

    Also, Ahmad Bradshaw was also the name of a Giant running back who was on their last two Super Bowl teams, scoring the winning touchdown in the most recent one.

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  6. By the way, Army beat Navy today 14-13. Ahmad Bradshaw ran for 94 yards and threw for 20 yards. Army is now 9-3, it’s best record since 1996.

    Someone named “Ahmad Bradshaw’ has no business being at West Point…..

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    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Especially since he retired from the NFL four years ago.
    , @Anonymous

    Ahmad Bradshaw???
     
    So people all over the South and rural America are sending their sons to defend this system?

    Really?
    , @anon
    Ahmad Bradshaw was born in Bluefield, Virginia to Diana Davis and James Bradshaw.
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  7. @Trelane
    Women in the military is a mistake, one that cultures across the world and throughout history have never had the means to persist with.

    Putting 18 year old men and women in close proximity on a daily basis is going to end up with a lot of them having sex with each other. You can have all the honor codes and PC rules you want, but you cannot repeal human nature. Only an idiot thinks otherwise. Or a government bureaucrat.

    Read More
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  8. @syonredux

    By the way, Army beat Navy today 14-13. Ahmad Bradshaw ran for 94 yards and threw for 20 yards. Army is now 9-3, it’s best record since 1996.
     
    Someone named "Ahmad Bradshaw' has no business being at West Point.....

    Especially since he retired from the NFL four years ago.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    Especially since he retired from the NFL four years ago.
     
    And to think, my great-grandfather lived his entire life without reading about a single American named "Ahmad"....now we have two quasi-famous football players named "Ahmad Bradshaw".....How I envy my great-grandfather....
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  9. where are the feminists?

    if anything smacks of a power imbalance, this does.

    this not only has isteve themes, it has all the elements feminist complain about.

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  10. Not your best effort.
    You get a pass since Saturday.

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  11. and what about the army’s current record in land wars? not too hot… but hey, football right?

    Read More
    • Replies: @David Davenport
    and what about the army’s current record in land wars? not too hot… but hey, football right?

    Please tell us which war or wars the United States Army has lost since 1945.
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  12. @Steve Sailer
    The military academies like to recruit quarterbacks of average height who are excellent athletes but not tall enough to have a shot at the NFL (because you have to spend 4 years in the military when you get out of an academy).

    Indeed, they like cadets who don't play football for the academy who had been running/option quarterbacks in high school but who are too small to play college football, because those kind of guys are thought to make good combat leaders.

    My recollection from the late 1970s was that the better Ivy League football teams were competitive with or superior to West Point.

    Both the service academies and the Ivies also fielded “lightweight” football teams (155 lb. max), however. When the lightweight Ivy teams played Army or Navy, they usually lost by scores like 63-7.

    Tbe service academies are filled with very fit, very athletic welterweights and middleweights.

    Too small to interest the NFL.

    But sized just right for the interior of tanks, fighter jet cockpits, and submarines.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    David Robinson was 6'5" when he entered the Naval Academy but then grew to be 7 feet tall, which is too big for most ships: you bang your head on bulkheads. It was said that if he wasn't a famous athlete they just would have discharged him upon graduation. But they made him serve two years before going to the NBA.
    , @EriK

    Tbe service academies are filled with very fit, very athletic welterweights and middleweights.
     
    Back in the early 1980's I played college baseball and our team played Army (a few times) and Navy (once). I had a similar takeaway at the time.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    PeeVee, when I was young, graduated HS in '64, Army, Navy, Syracuse, Cornell,UB and a number of what should now be DIII schools played entertaining football. Army and Navy used to field teams where you had to be 150 or less, sort of like JV football. Remember, years ago, there was freshman football, freshman could not play varsity ball.
    , @PSR
    I don't know. I watched the Army-Navy game yesterday and was surprised at how big some of the linemen were. Made me wonder if they could actually pass a military fitness test, much less fit in a sub or tank.
    , @ScarletNumber
    "Lightweight" football is properly known at Sprint Football. The current maximum weight is 178 with a body-fat percentage of 5%.

    Jimmy Carter played for Navy.

    The funny thing about weight limits is that youth football always had weight limits. Now, the only college sport with weight limits is wrestling. Even the heavyweight division has a maximum weight of 285, up from 275 from 1986-98. Before instituting a weight limit, you had guys weighing 191 and guys weighing 450 wrestling each other as heavyweights. The late Tab Thacker won the heavyweight wrestling championship at NC State in 1984. He went on to play Finch in Wildcats.
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  13. This guy’s record stinks. If he couldn’t run with a football he’d be out. But who cares? The usma has produced open Marxists who hate America. If that’s not enough to prove our military needs an enema this should be.

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    • Replies: @Rod1963
    Ahh yes the Rapone case. From what I know of the of it, Rapone had a black Muslim professor who radicalized him while at WP and it was a open secret. The fact the commandant didn't do squat to either him or the Muzzie professor shows how badly WP is infected with PC/MC.

    The sad fact the Rapone is still at the 10th Mountain Division and has suffered no judicial sanctions whatsoever.

    Very bad sign that our military is rotting from the inside and that Mattis has turned out to be a dud instead of a reformer.
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  14. An excellent book about Army football is ‘Soldiers First,’ by Joe Drape. He talks about how football training is not complementary with army training, among many other things.

    I know Joe a little bit. He also wrote a great book about small-town H.S. football called ‘Our Boys.’ Good old American subject matter.

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  15. @PV van der Byl
    My recollection from the late 1970s was that the better Ivy League football teams were competitive with or superior to West Point.

    Both the service academies and the Ivies also fielded "lightweight" football teams (155 lb. max), however. When the lightweight Ivy teams played Army or Navy, they usually lost by scores like 63-7.

    Tbe service academies are filled with very fit, very athletic welterweights and middleweights.

    Too small to interest the NFL.

    But sized just right for the interior of tanks, fighter jet cockpits, and submarines.

    David Robinson was 6’5″ when he entered the Naval Academy but then grew to be 7 feet tall, which is too big for most ships: you bang your head on bulkheads. It was said that if he wasn’t a famous athlete they just would have discharged him upon graduation. But they made him serve two years before going to the NBA.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy
    The Admiral provided a lot of free advertising for the Navy. Even bureaucrats see beyond the end of their noses or rules at times.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    The Navy made 5'10" Phil McConkey serve 5 years after Annapolis before he went to the NFL.
    , @Karl
    13 Steve Sailor > too big for most ships: you bang your head on bulkheads

    on the overheads, I hope

    I "award" 50 hours of "additional military instruction" as "mess crank" to iSteve

    After he "secures from" that, he can have a "Navy Good Conduct" ribbon


    Overheads don't move, iSteve, so you shouldn't salute them..... you should paint them.

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  16. @Desiderius
    Especially since he retired from the NFL four years ago.

    Especially since he retired from the NFL four years ago.

    And to think, my great-grandfather lived his entire life without reading about a single American named “Ahmad”….now we have two quasi-famous football players named “Ahmad Bradshaw”…..How I envy my great-grandfather….

    Read More
    • Replies: @Truth
    Hey, on the other hand, Syndy, he lived without internet porn as well.

    What would you do with the extra four daily hours?
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  17. @BenKenobi
    and what about the army's current record in land wars? not too hot... but hey, football right?

    and what about the army’s current record in land wars? not too hot… but hey, football right?

    Please tell us which war or wars the United States Army has lost since 1945.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    David Davenport:

    The proper question to be asked is which war or wars have the United States Army won since 1945.

    General MacArthur: In war there is no substitute for victory.
    , @anon
    Tell me which land wars they have won.

    Spending a decade in some unimportant country and failing to win decisively is a strategic loss. It is trivially true the we haven't lost a war in over a century which involved being invaded and conquered. But these 'non losses' killed a lot of soldiers and cost a fortune.

    Korea? After 50 years of winning, they have nukes.
    Vietnam? We are now allies with the Commies that run the place.
    Iraq 1? It worked for a while, but it was determined that we needed a Mulligan.
    Iraq 2? Not so much.
    Afganistan?

    I'm convinced that our affirmative action Military isn't planning on fighting a large conventional war ... ever. Otherwise it wouldn't be tolerated. It is all going to be Special Forces and drones and low intensity stuff. The Naval accidents are inexcusable. I suppose that ships will be running on the same technology used in autonomous vehicles in a decade -- so no one cares.
    , @BenKenobi
    Trick question: no wars have been declared.

    But hey, football, right?
    , @bomag

    which war or wars... lost
     
    The culture war; the demographic war.
    , @Hibernian
    Are you pushing the notion that we really won in Vietnam? I'd say that Korea was a stalemate and Gulf War I was a victory frittered away in the peace after the war. Winning the war and losing the peace conferences (h/t Will Rogers) goes back to WWI.
    , @Mr. Anon

    Please tell us which war or wars the United States Army has lost since 1945.
     
    Everyone except Korea (a draw) and GWI; both of those had fairly limited aims.

    If your war involves being involved in a foreign theatre of war for - essentially - forever, then you will - essentially - ultimately lose.
    , @MarkinPNW
    Especially if you're a major defense contractor, or even an officer aspiring to flag/general rank.
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  18. Also this is an atypical he said / she said college rape allegation in that the female is claimimg that he basically just burst in amd raped her, while the male is claiming consensual sex. There is no grey area their stories agree on like they were exchanging text messages and drinking at a party and agreed to go back to his dorm to watch Netflix.

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  19. @Steve Sailer
    David Robinson was 6'5" when he entered the Naval Academy but then grew to be 7 feet tall, which is too big for most ships: you bang your head on bulkheads. It was said that if he wasn't a famous athlete they just would have discharged him upon graduation. But they made him serve two years before going to the NBA.

    The Admiral provided a lot of free advertising for the Navy. Even bureaucrats see beyond the end of their noses or rules at times.

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    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Unfortunately, long-since retired Robinson now suffers from bulkhead-related CTE.
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  20. “Please tell us which war or wars the United States Army has lost since 1945.”

    Well, the ones where the other side shot back…

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  21. So she had sex with a “few” other cadets (presumably not including Bradshaw since she says that was rape) in the two years she was at West Point despite spending quite a bit of her time on crutches and/or in forced confinement to her room.

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    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    Practical logistics and time management. Excellent officer material!
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  22. @David Davenport
    and what about the army’s current record in land wars? not too hot… but hey, football right?

    Please tell us which war or wars the United States Army has lost since 1945.

    David Davenport:

    The proper question to be asked is which war or wars have the United States Army won since 1945.

    General MacArthur: In war there is no substitute for victory.

    Read More
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  23. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    This is a pretty interesting look at what’s going on at West Point. The back story is that a former cadet was a commie and doing things like posting pictures of himself in a che guevara shirt on his twitter account.

    Dear Sir/Ma’am,

    Every fall, the Superintendent addresses the staff and faculty and lies. He repeatedly states that “We are going to have winning sports teams without compromising our standards,” and everyone in Robinson Auditorium knows he is lying because we routinely admit athletes with ACT scores in the mid-teens across the board. I have personally taught cadets who are borderline illiterate and cannot read simple passages from the assigned textbooks. It is disheartening when the institution’s most senior leader openly lies to his own faculty-and they all know it.

    The cadet honor code has become a laughingstock… l was unfortunate enough to experience this first hand during my first tour on the faculty, when the Commandant of Cadets called my office phone and proceeded to berate me in the most vulgar and obscene language for over ten minutes because I had reported a cadet who lied to me and then asked if “we could just drop it.”…

    Even the curriculum itself has suffered. The plebe American History course has been revamped to focus completely on race and on the narrative that America is founded solely on a history of racial oppression. Cadets derisively call it the “I Hate America Course.” Simultaneously, the plebe International History course now focuses on gender to the exclusion of many other important themes. On the other hand, an entire semester of military history was recently deleted from the curriculum (at West Point!). In all courses, the bar has been lowered to the point where it is irrelevant. …

    Sincerely and Respectfully,

    Robert M. Heffington

    LTC, U.S. Army (Retired), West Point Class of 1997

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    • Replies: @Triumph104
    A few months ago, I got criticized when I said that the military academies will admit anyone with a pulse. More from Heffington's letter:


    However, during my time on the West Point faculty (2006-2009 and again from 2013-2017), I personally witnessed a series of fundamental changes at West Point that have eroded it to the point where I question whether the institution should even remain open. (LINK)
     
    Professor Bruce Fleming has written about the low standards at the Naval Academy. (LINK)
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  24. @Steve Sailer
    David Robinson was 6'5" when he entered the Naval Academy but then grew to be 7 feet tall, which is too big for most ships: you bang your head on bulkheads. It was said that if he wasn't a famous athlete they just would have discharged him upon graduation. But they made him serve two years before going to the NBA.

    The Navy made 5’10″ Phil McConkey serve 5 years after Annapolis before he went to the NFL.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The NFL Raiders about 25 years ago had a naval officer on the team who was assigned to a navy base near the stadium and given weekend passes to play.

    But then they changed the rules that academy grads couldn't play professionally for 4 or 5 years.

    Back during the draft it was not uncommon for drafted players to play on weekends. Elgin Baylor served in the military and played over half the Laker's schedule one year by taking all sorts of flights around the country to catch up with the team.
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  25. @Steve Sailer
    The military academies like to recruit quarterbacks of average height who are excellent athletes but not tall enough to have a shot at the NFL (because you have to spend 4 years in the military when you get out of an academy).

    Indeed, they like cadets who don't play football for the academy who had been running/option quarterbacks in high school but who are too small to play college football, because those kind of guys are thought to make good combat leaders.

    yeah. A comment of mine years ago about the HS pipeline: smaller players (excellent ones who want to continue to play) have no choice but to play Div 3/Ivy/military academies. Football at Div 1 level/or to be a pro, requires height and a type of athleticism that few Ivy types/Academy types have. There are some small players in the NFL, but, as teens, they wanted to play football…not give 5 years to a military academy once the academy part is over…and, it is well known that the Ivy & Div 3 teams are mediocre compared to Alabama or Ohio State. This stuff matters to talented teens…Ivy & Academy make no sense to them; and prestige is of little interest to them. They want to be on the best teams. Army & Navy are just so-so to most recruits. And, you only get NFL notice at 22-25, not, 27-29 these days.

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  26. @syonredux

    By the way, Army beat Navy today 14-13. Ahmad Bradshaw ran for 94 yards and threw for 20 yards. Army is now 9-3, it’s best record since 1996.
     
    Someone named "Ahmad Bradshaw' has no business being at West Point.....

    Ahmad Bradshaw???

    So people all over the South and rural America are sending their sons to defend this system?

    Really?

    Read More
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  27. @syonredux

    By the way, Army beat Navy today 14-13. Ahmad Bradshaw ran for 94 yards and threw for 20 yards. Army is now 9-3, it’s best record since 1996.
     
    Someone named "Ahmad Bradshaw' has no business being at West Point.....

    Ahmad Bradshaw was born in Bluefield, Virginia to Diana Davis and James Bradshaw.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Right: Bastard Negroes with Mohamadden names – and, possibly, a predilection for rape – have no business in the military (much less its academies).
    , @syonredux

    Ahmad Bradshaw was born in Bluefield, Virginia to Diana Davis and James Bradshaw.
     
    Chart the cultural decline of Black America via first names: from James to Ahmad in a single generation....
    , @Brutusale
    Not this Ahmad Bradshaw. He was raised in Chicago by a single mother named Kizzy Collins. His grandmother must have been a fan of Leslie Uggams in Roots.
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  28. >>“Cadet Bradshaw is currently a below-average cadet physically and militarily,”

    He might be fit enough to sprint hard for 5-50 yards, and bowl over tacklers, but I’ll bet he couldn’t run 5 miles with an 80 pound pack in the August heat to save his life. He is fit for football, but not for the army. Lots of sprinters can barely run a mile.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Why should the ability to run 5 miles with an 80lb pack be of any interest to an army? What sort of shape to fight in are you going to be in after that?

    The moronic obsession with endurance over all else is, I suspect, partly due to the U.S. Army's intstitutional memory about its disastrous retreat in the Korean War, and partly due to Dr. Kenneth Cooper's influence, which got perpetuated as officers who liked to run tended to stay in and reinforce the status quo. There are a few field grade officers who are Mark Rippetoe-certified Starting Strength coaches who have been pushing back against this.
    , @psmith

    Lots of sprinters can barely run a mile.
     
    Name three.

    (inb4 "oh, I once knew this guy" yeah, ok)
    , @Hibernian
    In high school the good sprinters were often good basketball and/or football players whereas the good distance runners didn't have another sport.
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  29. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @David Davenport
    and what about the army’s current record in land wars? not too hot… but hey, football right?

    Please tell us which war or wars the United States Army has lost since 1945.

    Tell me which land wars they have won.

    Spending a decade in some unimportant country and failing to win decisively is a strategic loss. It is trivially true the we haven’t lost a war in over a century which involved being invaded and conquered. But these ‘non losses’ killed a lot of soldiers and cost a fortune.

    Korea? After 50 years of winning, they have nukes.
    Vietnam? We are now allies with the Commies that run the place.
    Iraq 1? It worked for a while, but it was determined that we needed a Mulligan.
    Iraq 2? Not so much.
    Afganistan?

    I’m convinced that our affirmative action Military isn’t planning on fighting a large conventional war … ever. Otherwise it wouldn’t be tolerated. It is all going to be Special Forces and drones and low intensity stuff. The Naval accidents are inexcusable. I suppose that ships will be running on the same technology used in autonomous vehicles in a decade — so no one cares.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    From the tone of this article, our Special Forces are on track to be chick-ified and dumbed down, as well. Which leaves us with what, exactly?

    https://sofrep.com/94786/careerism-cronyism-malfeasance-special-warfare-center-end-special-forces-capability/
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  30. @David Davenport
    and what about the army’s current record in land wars? not too hot… but hey, football right?

    Please tell us which war or wars the United States Army has lost since 1945.

    Trick question: no wars have been declared.

    But hey, football, right?

    Read More
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  31. @TWS
    This guy's record stinks. If he couldn't run with a football he'd be out. But who cares? The usma has produced open Marxists who hate America. If that's not enough to prove our military needs an enema this should be.

    Ahh yes the Rapone case. From what I know of the of it, Rapone had a black Muslim professor who radicalized him while at WP and it was a open secret. The fact the commandant didn’t do squat to either him or the Muzzie professor shows how badly WP is infected with PC/MC.

    The sad fact the Rapone is still at the 10th Mountain Division and has suffered no judicial sanctions whatsoever.

    Very bad sign that our military is rotting from the inside and that Mattis has turned out to be a dud instead of a reformer.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    Mattis is essentially a "Cold War Liberal", he's on record as being disappointed that liberals weren't joining the military in proportion to their share of the population.

    You can't advance past O-6 in the military without facing Senate confirmation, which means anyone that can't play the political game is out. That includes anyone known to vocally oppose Cultural Marxism.

    Lt. Rapone committed treason, the evidence of guilt is overwhelming, and he should face the firing squad. I would offer him exile in North Korea if he agreed to plead guilty. Sadly, the ACLU and friends will move mountains to keep him from facing justice.
    , @bomag
    The army countenanced Nidal Hasan (Ft. Hood shooter), which was pretty bad.

    Gramsci said to march through the institutions; so it goes.
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  32. @Rod1963
    Ahh yes the Rapone case. From what I know of the of it, Rapone had a black Muslim professor who radicalized him while at WP and it was a open secret. The fact the commandant didn't do squat to either him or the Muzzie professor shows how badly WP is infected with PC/MC.

    The sad fact the Rapone is still at the 10th Mountain Division and has suffered no judicial sanctions whatsoever.

    Very bad sign that our military is rotting from the inside and that Mattis has turned out to be a dud instead of a reformer.

    Mattis is essentially a “Cold War Liberal”, he’s on record as being disappointed that liberals weren’t joining the military in proportion to their share of the population.

    You can’t advance past O-6 in the military without facing Senate confirmation, which means anyone that can’t play the political game is out. That includes anyone known to vocally oppose Cultural Marxism.

    Lt. Rapone committed treason, the evidence of guilt is overwhelming, and he should face the firing squad. I would offer him exile in North Korea if he agreed to plead guilty. Sadly, the ACLU and friends will move mountains to keep him from facing justice.

    Read More
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  33. @anon
    Tell me which land wars they have won.

    Spending a decade in some unimportant country and failing to win decisively is a strategic loss. It is trivially true the we haven't lost a war in over a century which involved being invaded and conquered. But these 'non losses' killed a lot of soldiers and cost a fortune.

    Korea? After 50 years of winning, they have nukes.
    Vietnam? We are now allies with the Commies that run the place.
    Iraq 1? It worked for a while, but it was determined that we needed a Mulligan.
    Iraq 2? Not so much.
    Afganistan?

    I'm convinced that our affirmative action Military isn't planning on fighting a large conventional war ... ever. Otherwise it wouldn't be tolerated. It is all going to be Special Forces and drones and low intensity stuff. The Naval accidents are inexcusable. I suppose that ships will be running on the same technology used in autonomous vehicles in a decade -- so no one cares.

    From the tone of this article, our Special Forces are on track to be chick-ified and dumbed down, as well. Which leaves us with what, exactly?

    https://sofrep.com/94786/careerism-cronyism-malfeasance-special-warfare-center-end-special-forces-capability/

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  34. @Daniel H
    >>“Cadet Bradshaw is currently a below-average cadet physically and militarily,”

    He might be fit enough to sprint hard for 5-50 yards, and bowl over tacklers, but I'll bet he couldn't run 5 miles with an 80 pound pack in the August heat to save his life. He is fit for football, but not for the army. Lots of sprinters can barely run a mile.

    Why should the ability to run 5 miles with an 80lb pack be of any interest to an army? What sort of shape to fight in are you going to be in after that?

    The moronic obsession with endurance over all else is, I suspect, partly due to the U.S. Army’s intstitutional memory about its disastrous retreat in the Korean War, and partly due to Dr. Kenneth Cooper’s influence, which got perpetuated as officers who liked to run tended to stay in and reinforce the status quo. There are a few field grade officers who are Mark Rippetoe-certified Starting Strength coaches who have been pushing back against this.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Discard
    A soldier who who has just run 5 miles with an 80 pound back may not be in the best condition to fight, but he will be much better off than the soldier who collapsed at mile three, or the soldier who dumped half his ammo to lighten the load.

    Do you imagine that endurance was unimportant to American soldiers in Vietnam? To NVA soldiers? To Roman Legionaires, the defenders of Bastogne, Taliban fighters, and US troops in Afghanistan? Infantry fighting is mostly drudge work.
    , @Daniel H
    >>What sort of shape to fight in are you going to be in after that?

    Maybe in shape enough to stay alive. Endurance touches on many aspects of military fitness. Digging foxholes and bunkers, until the job is done right. Continued, intense movement while under fire. Hand to hand combat, then continue to fight afterwards.

    Sprinting is for pussies.
    , @Hibernian
    Endurance, muscular strength, and arerobic capacity are all necessary conditions; none is sufficient by itself.
    , @International Jew
    Maybe the running with packs is about developing toughness, and identifying the soldiers who have it. If there's no war going on, you have to simulate stress, exhaustion and discomfort somehow.

    Of course you need to give heavier packs to the fitter guys, to ensure that those five miles are a challenge for everyone.

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  35. @Dave Pinsen
    The Navy made 5'10" Phil McConkey serve 5 years after Annapolis before he went to the NFL.

    The NFL Raiders about 25 years ago had a naval officer on the team who was assigned to a navy base near the stadium and given weekend passes to play.

    But then they changed the rules that academy grads couldn’t play professionally for 4 or 5 years.

    Back during the draft it was not uncommon for drafted players to play on weekends. Elgin Baylor served in the military and played over half the Laker’s schedule one year by taking all sorts of flights around the country to catch up with the team.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonymous
    Was that Napoleon McCallum?
    , @David In TN
    That was the 1961-62 NBA season. I think Elgin Baylor averaged 38 points a game during the time he played that season.

    The Berlin Crisis was why several big-name pro athletes were called up by their reserve units.

    At the same time, Green Bay Packers Golden Boy Paul Hornung was called up by his army reserve unit. During the 1961 season, Hornung got weekend passes to play, as did the Cleveland Browns' Bobby Mitchell.

    Packer coach Vince Lombardi had endorsed John F. Kennedy during the 1960 election and JFK had given Lombardi a phone number to call if he needed anything. Lombardi called JFK and asked if he could authorize a pass for Hornung to play in the 1961 NFL Championship game. The President did so and Hornung got the MVP award in the Packer 37-0 blowout over the Giants.

    BTW, Hornung was named MVP for the regular season also.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    The military should let them play professionally after they graduate and serve as reserve officers in the off-season, maybe doing recruiting. They'd only use a tiny handful of grads to the pros, and each one would give them free PR.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    BTW, something I hadn't known before checking that Wikipedia entry: McConkey's coach at Annapolis was Bill Belichick's father. That's who he called when he wanted an intro to the NFL (Bill was the Giants' defensive coordinator at the time).
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  36. @Ivy
    The Admiral provided a lot of free advertising for the Navy. Even bureaucrats see beyond the end of their noses or rules at times.

    Unfortunately, long-since retired Robinson now suffers from bulkhead-related CTE.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Polynikes
    Huh? I think you're thinking of a different athlete. Former NBA star David Robinson is known for his discipline and focus on education...most notably at his self funded academy. His son just dropped football at ND to run for student body president.
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  37. @Dave Pinsen
    Why should the ability to run 5 miles with an 80lb pack be of any interest to an army? What sort of shape to fight in are you going to be in after that?

    The moronic obsession with endurance over all else is, I suspect, partly due to the U.S. Army's intstitutional memory about its disastrous retreat in the Korean War, and partly due to Dr. Kenneth Cooper's influence, which got perpetuated as officers who liked to run tended to stay in and reinforce the status quo. There are a few field grade officers who are Mark Rippetoe-certified Starting Strength coaches who have been pushing back against this.

    A soldier who who has just run 5 miles with an 80 pound back may not be in the best condition to fight, but he will be much better off than the soldier who collapsed at mile three, or the soldier who dumped half his ammo to lighten the load.

    Do you imagine that endurance was unimportant to American soldiers in Vietnam? To NVA soldiers? To Roman Legionaires, the defenders of Bastogne, Taliban fighters, and US troops in Afghanistan? Infantry fighting is mostly drudge work.

    Read More
    • Replies: @WJ
    After my time in the USMC, the Corps had a commandant, General Gray, who made the comment "I think if we would run a little more each day we'd be the best looking outfit ever to get run off a hill" regarding many of his fellow officer's love of running and exercising the enlisted Marines in shorts and sneakers. Running is better than nothing but there was no comparison to hiking (humping we called it) with full gear in combat boots, flak jacket, personal weapon and crew served weapon.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    In what scenario would it make sense to run 5 miles with a pack on? In retreat? You're going to outrun tanks and APCs at 5mph? In attack? Arriving at your objective rally point a half hour earlier will make up for getting there in much worse condition than marching? It doesn't make much sense.

    I would be surprised if any American troops ran five miles with full packs on during a war in the last 50 years.
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  38. Forgive me for being a bit slow, but is the rapist an affirmative-action football player, and is he affirmative-action and off-the-hook because he can play football, or is he affirmative-action and off-the-hook on other “merits?”

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  39. @Dave Pinsen
    Why should the ability to run 5 miles with an 80lb pack be of any interest to an army? What sort of shape to fight in are you going to be in after that?

    The moronic obsession with endurance over all else is, I suspect, partly due to the U.S. Army's intstitutional memory about its disastrous retreat in the Korean War, and partly due to Dr. Kenneth Cooper's influence, which got perpetuated as officers who liked to run tended to stay in and reinforce the status quo. There are a few field grade officers who are Mark Rippetoe-certified Starting Strength coaches who have been pushing back against this.

    >>What sort of shape to fight in are you going to be in after that?

    Maybe in shape enough to stay alive. Endurance touches on many aspects of military fitness. Digging foxholes and bunkers, until the job is done right. Continued, intense movement while under fire. Hand to hand combat, then continue to fight afterwards.

    Sprinting is for pussies.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    I'd rather have Usain Bolt on my side in hand to hand combat or foxhole digging than Mo Ibrahim.

    And by the way, does anyone still dig foxholes by hand? We did it when I was in infantry training in the last century, and it takes forever using regular shovels and pick axes. With the little collapsable shovel (E-tool) that came with the standard kit it would have taken even longer.
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  40. @Trelane
    Women in the military is a mistake, one that cultures across the world and throughout history have never had the means to persist with.
    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve in Greensboro
    Germans (or at least the German Ruling Class) also say it is a great idea to import huge numbers of Middle Eastern and African "refugees".
    , @Bill B.
    I read the article on Google Translate. The last par ends:

    The integration of the "weaker sex" in the "Strong troop" but seems - at least officially - succeeded. The statement that "the Bundeswehr is only a mirror of society" already existed before women were allowed into the German Armed Forces and, when it comes to gender-specific grievances, points to unsolved problems in German society - and they have long been not only in the military.
     
    Yes armies do reflect the societies from which they emerge but this is silly.

    In the modern way every organisation must be twisted, or painted over to pretend, to conform to the current ideology.
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  41. @David Davenport
    and what about the army’s current record in land wars? not too hot… but hey, football right?

    Please tell us which war or wars the United States Army has lost since 1945.

    which war or wars… lost

    The culture war; the demographic war.

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  42. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    The GI Jockery on this thread is pretty deep. It seems worthwhile to share that what riles some of the other commenters both saddens and pleases me. Given the degeneracy of our rulers, I don’t even want Uncle Sam in good fighting condition beyond the national borders.

    Has anyone else here come to see the scandalization of big time sports and the USG’s military institutions as cathartic in getting our country past a shameful, imperial era?

    Read More
    • Replies: @WJ
    There is a lot of "GI Jockery" here. The problem is that despite the insanity of many of our military ventures, especially Iraq, military hardware and action is powerfully intoxicating to many young and old men. Watching and being relatively close to a 155 mm artillery barrage saturating a hillside, witnessing fighter bombers(A- 7, A -6 and F-4s in my day) dropping 1,000 lb bombs, popping off a 10,000 dollar/round TOW missile or even shooting an M 16 rifle on full auto are just very cool things.

    No matter what you think of the morality of the cause, you can't help but be enchanted by the hardware and the big booms. Many anti war authors out of Vietnam or other wars have noted this contradiction.
    , @Bleuteaux
    Big time sports and the military used to be mainstays of conservative worship. I know they were for me, as a kid, growing up. In some ways, for the former at least, I'm happy to see that the pedestal we put them on is coming down. Both have been completely captured by the Left.

    If you need any evidence, look at the Left's wholehearted embrace of both. I began to notice at least 5+ years ago that following and rooting for professional sports became very popular among liberal friends and colleagues. I attribute it to the massive marketing push among (almost always) childless women and NAMs. Look at the people used in advertisements, for God's sake. The military is the same thing. Look at that puke inducing ad that keeps running with military planes unloading boxes that say "AID," as if the sole reason to sign up is the opportunity to babysit some sad sack dumpster fire overseas.
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  43. @Rod1963
    Ahh yes the Rapone case. From what I know of the of it, Rapone had a black Muslim professor who radicalized him while at WP and it was a open secret. The fact the commandant didn't do squat to either him or the Muzzie professor shows how badly WP is infected with PC/MC.

    The sad fact the Rapone is still at the 10th Mountain Division and has suffered no judicial sanctions whatsoever.

    Very bad sign that our military is rotting from the inside and that Mattis has turned out to be a dud instead of a reformer.

    The army countenanced Nidal Hasan (Ft. Hood shooter), which was pretty bad.

    Gramsci said to march through the institutions; so it goes.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    The thing that finished off Joe McCarthy's career was his claim that the US Army was protecting known Communists.
    Now, the US Army really is protecting known Communists.
    LOL
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  44. @Steve Sailer
    The NFL Raiders about 25 years ago had a naval officer on the team who was assigned to a navy base near the stadium and given weekend passes to play.

    But then they changed the rules that academy grads couldn't play professionally for 4 or 5 years.

    Back during the draft it was not uncommon for drafted players to play on weekends. Elgin Baylor served in the military and played over half the Laker's schedule one year by taking all sorts of flights around the country to catch up with the team.

    Was that Napoleon McCallum?

    Read More
    • Replies: @David In TN
    Yes, it was Napoleon McCallum. It was then Navy Secretary Jim Webb who ruled in 1987 McCallum couldn't play pro football and be a Navy officer at the same time. McCallum came back to the Raiders later but had a bad knee injury.
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  45. @Daniel H
    >>“Cadet Bradshaw is currently a below-average cadet physically and militarily,”

    He might be fit enough to sprint hard for 5-50 yards, and bowl over tacklers, but I'll bet he couldn't run 5 miles with an 80 pound pack in the August heat to save his life. He is fit for football, but not for the army. Lots of sprinters can barely run a mile.

    Lots of sprinters can barely run a mile.

    Name three.

    (inb4 “oh, I once knew this guy” yeah, ok)

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    • Replies: @David In TN
    "Name three."

    I can name one. He was on the Southern Cal track team (maybe the best in the country) as a sprinter in 1967-68. He was part of a world record relay team and also played on the USC football team.

    In 1973 he had a fairly good year running the football in the NFL. After the season, he competed in the ABC Superstars. Although entered in the half-mile run, he decided not to try it, telling writer John Devaney (who was writing a book on him), "I'm afraid I would die out there in the half mile in front of everybody."

    Devaney himself had done the half mile in high school and told him it wasn't hard to pace yourself and he could pick up a few points. "No," the ex-Southern Cal sprinter replied, "We aren't that good at distance."

    What was the name of this world class sprinter, who by his own account couldn't run a half-mile, much less a mile?

    O.J. Simpson.

    , @SteveRogers42
    #2.

    Bo Jackson (10.39 in the 100 meters, 4.12 in the NFL Combine 40 yard dash) won the Alabama state high school decathlon title, despite sitting out the mile.

    "Anything over 400 yards and he's ready to cash it in."

    http://articles.latimes.com/1988-03-30/sports/sp-136_1_bo-jackson/3
    , @ScarletNumber
    According to his agent Ricky Simms, "Usain [Bolt] has never run a mile."
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  46. @El Dato
    Germans say no problem:

    https://www.welt.de/politik/deutschland/article12381421/Warum-Frauen-fuer-die-Marine-unersetzlich-sind.html

    Germans (or at least the German Ruling Class) also say it is a great idea to import huge numbers of Middle Eastern and African “refugees”.

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  47. @anonymous
    Was that Napoleon McCallum?

    Yes, it was Napoleon McCallum. It was then Navy Secretary Jim Webb who ruled in 1987 McCallum couldn’t play pro football and be a Navy officer at the same time. McCallum came back to the Raiders later but had a bad knee injury.

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  48. @Discard
    A soldier who who has just run 5 miles with an 80 pound back may not be in the best condition to fight, but he will be much better off than the soldier who collapsed at mile three, or the soldier who dumped half his ammo to lighten the load.

    Do you imagine that endurance was unimportant to American soldiers in Vietnam? To NVA soldiers? To Roman Legionaires, the defenders of Bastogne, Taliban fighters, and US troops in Afghanistan? Infantry fighting is mostly drudge work.

    After my time in the USMC, the Corps had a commandant, General Gray, who made the comment “I think if we would run a little more each day we’d be the best looking outfit ever to get run off a hill” regarding many of his fellow officer’s love of running and exercising the enlisted Marines in shorts and sneakers. Running is better than nothing but there was no comparison to hiking (humping we called it) with full gear in combat boots, flak jacket, personal weapon and crew served weapon.

    Read More
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  49. @Steve Sailer
    The NFL Raiders about 25 years ago had a naval officer on the team who was assigned to a navy base near the stadium and given weekend passes to play.

    But then they changed the rules that academy grads couldn't play professionally for 4 or 5 years.

    Back during the draft it was not uncommon for drafted players to play on weekends. Elgin Baylor served in the military and played over half the Laker's schedule one year by taking all sorts of flights around the country to catch up with the team.

    That was the 1961-62 NBA season. I think Elgin Baylor averaged 38 points a game during the time he played that season.

    The Berlin Crisis was why several big-name pro athletes were called up by their reserve units.

    At the same time, Green Bay Packers Golden Boy Paul Hornung was called up by his army reserve unit. During the 1961 season, Hornung got weekend passes to play, as did the Cleveland Browns’ Bobby Mitchell.

    Packer coach Vince Lombardi had endorsed John F. Kennedy during the 1960 election and JFK had given Lombardi a phone number to call if he needed anything. Lombardi called JFK and asked if he could authorize a pass for Hornung to play in the 1961 NFL Championship game. The President did so and Hornung got the MVP award in the Packer 37-0 blowout over the Giants.

    BTW, Hornung was named MVP for the regular season also.

    Read More
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  50. @David Davenport
    and what about the army’s current record in land wars? not too hot… but hey, football right?

    Please tell us which war or wars the United States Army has lost since 1945.

    Are you pushing the notion that we really won in Vietnam? I’d say that Korea was a stalemate and Gulf War I was a victory frittered away in the peace after the war. Winning the war and losing the peace conferences (h/t Will Rogers) goes back to WWI.

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  51. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    I was always under the apparently mistaken assumption that to graduate from “The Point” (or any of the service academies for that matter) you had to major in one of the “STEM” curricula (after taking prerequisites in English, History, a foreign language similar to, say, MIT or CalTech) but now I’m hearing that such is not the case and that even though graduates are awarded a B.S. it doesn’t necessarily have to reflect something in the STEM field.

    Anyone out there know if this is true. iSteve??

    Read More
    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    That is correct. For instance, at USAFA, one can graduate with a B.S. in Psychology.
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  52. @anonymous
    The GI Jockery on this thread is pretty deep. It seems worthwhile to share that what riles some of the other commenters both saddens and pleases me. Given the degeneracy of our rulers, I don't even want Uncle Sam in good fighting condition beyond the national borders.

    Has anyone else here come to see the scandalization of big time sports and the USG's military institutions as cathartic in getting our country past a shameful, imperial era?

    There is a lot of “GI Jockery” here. The problem is that despite the insanity of many of our military ventures, especially Iraq, military hardware and action is powerfully intoxicating to many young and old men. Watching and being relatively close to a 155 mm artillery barrage saturating a hillside, witnessing fighter bombers(A- 7, A -6 and F-4s in my day) dropping 1,000 lb bombs, popping off a 10,000 dollar/round TOW missile or even shooting an M 16 rifle on full auto are just very cool things.

    No matter what you think of the morality of the cause, you can’t help but be enchanted by the hardware and the big booms. Many anti war authors out of Vietnam or other wars have noted this contradiction.

    Read More
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  53. @Daniel H
    >>“Cadet Bradshaw is currently a below-average cadet physically and militarily,”

    He might be fit enough to sprint hard for 5-50 yards, and bowl over tacklers, but I'll bet he couldn't run 5 miles with an 80 pound pack in the August heat to save his life. He is fit for football, but not for the army. Lots of sprinters can barely run a mile.

    In high school the good sprinters were often good basketball and/or football players whereas the good distance runners didn’t have another sport.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    None of the cross country guys at my school did anything but CC and distance running during the indoor and outdoor track seasons. All the shot putters, of course, were football players.
    , @Marty T
    I ran track. In my high school some sprinters played football but the distance runners had cross country during the fall. There was no overlap between basketball and track (for boys).
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  54. @Dave Pinsen
    Why should the ability to run 5 miles with an 80lb pack be of any interest to an army? What sort of shape to fight in are you going to be in after that?

    The moronic obsession with endurance over all else is, I suspect, partly due to the U.S. Army's intstitutional memory about its disastrous retreat in the Korean War, and partly due to Dr. Kenneth Cooper's influence, which got perpetuated as officers who liked to run tended to stay in and reinforce the status quo. There are a few field grade officers who are Mark Rippetoe-certified Starting Strength coaches who have been pushing back against this.

    Endurance, muscular strength, and arerobic capacity are all necessary conditions; none is sufficient by itself.

    Read More
    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Sure, but they work at cross purposes, so you have to prioritize somewhat. Long distance running is catabolic. That's why marathon runners often look like concentration camp inmates.
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  55. @anon
    Ahmad Bradshaw was born in Bluefield, Virginia to Diana Davis and James Bradshaw.

    Right: Bastard Negroes with Mohamadden names – and, possibly, a predilection for rape – have no business in the military (much less its academies).

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  56. bored identity just can’t remember anymore is it because of Mustapha Mond, or Ahmad Bradshaw, or both, but The American Army Fußball is certainly an expensive sport that so far could have paid for a Hundreds of Big, Beautiful Walls:

    Pentagon To Undergo First Ever Audit After Decades Of Sloppy Accounting And Missing Trillions

    (…)

    ” On September 10th, 2001, Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld announced that “According to some estimates we cannot track $2.3 trillion in transactions,” after a Pentagon whistleblower set off a probe.

    A day later, the September 11th attacks happened and the accounting scandal was quickly forgotten.”

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-12-10/pentagon-undergo-first-ever-audit-after-decades-sloppy-accounting-and-missing-trilli

    Should Grover Norquist’s brother start cheking break pads on his vehicle?

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  57. @Anon
    This is a pretty interesting look at what's going on at West Point. The back story is that a former cadet was a commie and doing things like posting pictures of himself in a che guevara shirt on his twitter account.

    Dear Sir/Ma’am,

    ...

    Every fall, the Superintendent addresses the staff and faculty and lies. He repeatedly states that “We are going to have winning sports teams without compromising our standards,” and everyone in Robinson Auditorium knows he is lying because we routinely admit athletes with ACT scores in the mid-teens across the board. I have personally taught cadets who are borderline illiterate and cannot read simple passages from the assigned textbooks. It is disheartening when the institution’s most senior leader openly lies to his own faculty-and they all know it.

    The cadet honor code has become a laughingstock... l was unfortunate enough to experience this first hand during my first tour on the faculty, when the Commandant of Cadets called my office phone and proceeded to berate me in the most vulgar and obscene language for over ten minutes because I had reported a cadet who lied to me and then asked if “we could just drop it.”...

    Even the curriculum itself has suffered. The plebe American History course has been revamped to focus completely on race and on the narrative that America is founded solely on a history of racial oppression. Cadets derisively call it the “I Hate America Course.” Simultaneously, the plebe International History course now focuses on gender to the exclusion of many other important themes. On the other hand, an entire semester of military history was recently deleted from the curriculum (at West Point!). In all courses, the bar has been lowered to the point where it is irrelevant. ...

    Sincerely and Respectfully,

    Robert M. Heffington

    LTC, U.S. Army (Retired), West Point Class of 1997
     

    A few months ago, I got criticized when I said that the military academies will admit anyone with a pulse. More from Heffington’s letter:

    However, during my time on the West Point faculty (2006-2009 and again from 2013-2017), I personally witnessed a series of fundamental changes at West Point that have eroded it to the point where I question whether the institution should even remain open. (LINK)

    Professor Bruce Fleming has written about the low standards at the Naval Academy. (LINK)

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    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    Well, not "anyone". The problem is that many, many highly-qualified white male candidates are overlooked in favor of filling the diversity quotas of women and POCs. Academic and disciplinary standards fall in inverse proportion to the staffing of the Diversitocracy.
    , @Truth
    No, I believe it requires a pulse and a Congressional approval.
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  58. I’m watch my Sunday morning football on a 52” Samsung hi def tv, so I’m gonna call the Korean War a win, and take the Raiders to win straight up.

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    • Replies: @ScarletNumber

    take the Raiders to win straight up
     
    Yeah, so much for that.
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  59. @David Davenport
    and what about the army’s current record in land wars? not too hot… but hey, football right?

    Please tell us which war or wars the United States Army has lost since 1945.

    Please tell us which war or wars the United States Army has lost since 1945.

    Everyone except Korea (a draw) and GWI; both of those had fairly limited aims.

    If your war involves being involved in a foreign theatre of war for – essentially – forever, then you will – essentially – ultimately lose.

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  60. @psmith

    Lots of sprinters can barely run a mile.
     
    Name three.

    (inb4 "oh, I once knew this guy" yeah, ok)

    “Name three.”

    I can name one. He was on the Southern Cal track team (maybe the best in the country) as a sprinter in 1967-68. He was part of a world record relay team and also played on the USC football team.

    In 1973 he had a fairly good year running the football in the NFL. After the season, he competed in the ABC Superstars. Although entered in the half-mile run, he decided not to try it, telling writer John Devaney (who was writing a book on him), “I’m afraid I would die out there in the half mile in front of everybody.”

    Devaney himself had done the half mile in high school and told him it wasn’t hard to pace yourself and he could pick up a few points. “No,” the ex-Southern Cal sprinter replied, “We aren’t that good at distance.”

    What was the name of this world class sprinter, who by his own account couldn’t run a half-mile, much less a mile?

    O.J. Simpson.

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    • Replies: @psmith

    What was the name of this world class sprinter, who by his own account couldn’t run a half-mile, much less a mile?
     
    Albert Einstein, of course.

    Anyway, fair enough, props for coming up with a verifiable example. Though I wonder how much of that was not wanting to risk injury or being revealed as "slow" (bearing in mind that a perfect score on the Army PFT is a 13:00 2 mile, which is pretty slow itself by some standards.).
    , @Truth
    Running distances develops long-twitch muscle fibers which interferes, for an athlete, with what he gets paid for.

    One who is determined can easily and quickly overcome that though;

    http://www.letsrun.com/forum/flat_read.php?thread=3224788
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  61. @PV van der Byl
    My recollection from the late 1970s was that the better Ivy League football teams were competitive with or superior to West Point.

    Both the service academies and the Ivies also fielded "lightweight" football teams (155 lb. max), however. When the lightweight Ivy teams played Army or Navy, they usually lost by scores like 63-7.

    Tbe service academies are filled with very fit, very athletic welterweights and middleweights.

    Too small to interest the NFL.

    But sized just right for the interior of tanks, fighter jet cockpits, and submarines.

    Tbe service academies are filled with very fit, very athletic welterweights and middleweights.

    Back in the early 1980′s I played college baseball and our team played Army (a few times) and Navy (once). I had a similar takeaway at the time.

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  62. “straight women who want to become military officers are usually following in dad’s or grandpa’s footsteps”

    It appears to me a substantial part of government workers, including military, are the children of government workers.

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  63. Read More
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  64. @anon
    Ahmad Bradshaw was born in Bluefield, Virginia to Diana Davis and James Bradshaw.

    Ahmad Bradshaw was born in Bluefield, Virginia to Diana Davis and James Bradshaw.

    Chart the cultural decline of Black America via first names: from James to Ahmad in a single generation….

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  65. @PV van der Byl
    My recollection from the late 1970s was that the better Ivy League football teams were competitive with or superior to West Point.

    Both the service academies and the Ivies also fielded "lightweight" football teams (155 lb. max), however. When the lightweight Ivy teams played Army or Navy, they usually lost by scores like 63-7.

    Tbe service academies are filled with very fit, very athletic welterweights and middleweights.

    Too small to interest the NFL.

    But sized just right for the interior of tanks, fighter jet cockpits, and submarines.

    PeeVee, when I was young, graduated HS in ’64, Army, Navy, Syracuse, Cornell,UB and a number of what should now be DIII schools played entertaining football. Army and Navy used to field teams where you had to be 150 or less, sort of like JV football. Remember, years ago, there was freshman football, freshman could not play varsity ball.

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  66. I am old enough to have played freshman football myself!

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  67. Anon • Disclaimer says: • Website

    In Greek mythology, the gods have a right to rape. Indeed, it is even considered a honor.

    Patton said America loves a winner and despises losers. The main culture of America is sports, esp football, and cucked white males and junglized white females worship black athletes as demigods.

    So, black athletes have special privilege.

    Americans also love money and power, and Jews got lots of it. They are winners, so Americans look the other way as Palestinians keep getting ‘raped’ politically.

    But Americans are not just about winners but about Redemption. Its Christian legacy favors the Holy Victim. In secular America, Negro Slavery and Holocaust are seen as the greatest tragedies of all time.

    So, blacks and Jews got the best of both worlds. Biggest victims and biggest victors. Perfect fit for American psyche that is centered around the ‘Christian Soldier’, fusing victim narrative with victor warrior theme.

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  68. @Discard
    A soldier who who has just run 5 miles with an 80 pound back may not be in the best condition to fight, but he will be much better off than the soldier who collapsed at mile three, or the soldier who dumped half his ammo to lighten the load.

    Do you imagine that endurance was unimportant to American soldiers in Vietnam? To NVA soldiers? To Roman Legionaires, the defenders of Bastogne, Taliban fighters, and US troops in Afghanistan? Infantry fighting is mostly drudge work.

    In what scenario would it make sense to run 5 miles with a pack on? In retreat? You’re going to outrun tanks and APCs at 5mph? In attack? Arriving at your objective rally point a half hour earlier will make up for getting there in much worse condition than marching? It doesn’t make much sense.

    I would be surprised if any American troops ran five miles with full packs on during a war in the last 50 years.

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  69. @Daniel H
    >>What sort of shape to fight in are you going to be in after that?

    Maybe in shape enough to stay alive. Endurance touches on many aspects of military fitness. Digging foxholes and bunkers, until the job is done right. Continued, intense movement while under fire. Hand to hand combat, then continue to fight afterwards.

    Sprinting is for pussies.

    I’d rather have Usain Bolt on my side in hand to hand combat or foxhole digging than Mo Ibrahim.

    And by the way, does anyone still dig foxholes by hand? We did it when I was in infantry training in the last century, and it takes forever using regular shovels and pick axes. With the little collapsable shovel (E-tool) that came with the standard kit it would have taken even longer.

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    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Yes.
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  70. @Hibernian
    Endurance, muscular strength, and arerobic capacity are all necessary conditions; none is sufficient by itself.

    Sure, but they work at cross purposes, so you have to prioritize somewhat. Long distance running is catabolic. That’s why marathon runners often look like concentration camp inmates.

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    • Disagree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @psmith
    Mike Prevost of the Naval Academy has an interesting writeup and review of the research on military training for carrying heavy packs, linked here ("Ruck Training Program"): http://mikeprevost.com/tactical-fitness/

    Very interesting and potentially very useful in general, but this in particular stood out to me:

    The important point of the figure is that at heavier loads, strength matters more than aerobic fitness. Training for heavier loads would place an emphasis on strength training and heavy rucks. At lighter loads, aerobic fitness matters more than strength. Training for lighter loads would place an emphasis on running and lighter, long duration rucks. Somewhere in the middle, they are both very important.
     
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  71. @Steve Sailer
    The NFL Raiders about 25 years ago had a naval officer on the team who was assigned to a navy base near the stadium and given weekend passes to play.

    But then they changed the rules that academy grads couldn't play professionally for 4 or 5 years.

    Back during the draft it was not uncommon for drafted players to play on weekends. Elgin Baylor served in the military and played over half the Laker's schedule one year by taking all sorts of flights around the country to catch up with the team.

    The military should let them play professionally after they graduate and serve as reserve officers in the off-season, maybe doing recruiting. They’d only use a tiny handful of grads to the pros, and each one would give them free PR.

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  72. @PV van der Byl
    My recollection from the late 1970s was that the better Ivy League football teams were competitive with or superior to West Point.

    Both the service academies and the Ivies also fielded "lightweight" football teams (155 lb. max), however. When the lightweight Ivy teams played Army or Navy, they usually lost by scores like 63-7.

    Tbe service academies are filled with very fit, very athletic welterweights and middleweights.

    Too small to interest the NFL.

    But sized just right for the interior of tanks, fighter jet cockpits, and submarines.

    I don’t know. I watched the Army-Navy game yesterday and was surprised at how big some of the linemen were. Made me wonder if they could actually pass a military fitness test, much less fit in a sub or tank.

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    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    They have to cut weight in the spring of their senior years.
    , @PV van der Byl
    I didn't say the service academies had no big guys at all, just that the ones they have are not better athletes than those you would find on a good Ivy football team.

    The big differences are among those whose height and weight are around mean average. The average plebe and midshipman is a much better athlete than his Ivy League counterpart.
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  73. @Steve Sailer
    The NFL Raiders about 25 years ago had a naval officer on the team who was assigned to a navy base near the stadium and given weekend passes to play.

    But then they changed the rules that academy grads couldn't play professionally for 4 or 5 years.

    Back during the draft it was not uncommon for drafted players to play on weekends. Elgin Baylor served in the military and played over half the Laker's schedule one year by taking all sorts of flights around the country to catch up with the team.

    BTW, something I hadn’t known before checking that Wikipedia entry: McConkey’s coach at Annapolis was Bill Belichick’s father. That’s who he called when he wanted an intro to the NFL (Bill was the Giants’ defensive coordinator at the time).

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  74. @David In TN
    "Name three."

    I can name one. He was on the Southern Cal track team (maybe the best in the country) as a sprinter in 1967-68. He was part of a world record relay team and also played on the USC football team.

    In 1973 he had a fairly good year running the football in the NFL. After the season, he competed in the ABC Superstars. Although entered in the half-mile run, he decided not to try it, telling writer John Devaney (who was writing a book on him), "I'm afraid I would die out there in the half mile in front of everybody."

    Devaney himself had done the half mile in high school and told him it wasn't hard to pace yourself and he could pick up a few points. "No," the ex-Southern Cal sprinter replied, "We aren't that good at distance."

    What was the name of this world class sprinter, who by his own account couldn't run a half-mile, much less a mile?

    O.J. Simpson.

    What was the name of this world class sprinter, who by his own account couldn’t run a half-mile, much less a mile?

    Albert Einstein, of course.

    Anyway, fair enough, props for coming up with a verifiable example. Though I wonder how much of that was not wanting to risk injury or being revealed as “slow” (bearing in mind that a perfect score on the Army PFT is a 13:00 2 mile, which is pretty slow itself by some standards.).

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    • Replies: @prusmc
    That is the standard(max) for the 2 mile run in the lowest age category. There are two (2) other events The event most likely to be failed and least likely to be maxed (at any age group) is the two mile run.
    , @David In TN
    I guess I have to say it twice. O.J. told John Devaney he wouldn't run the half-mile because he was afraid of collapsing from exhaustion in front of a national TV audience. O.J. also said "We" (meaning blacks) aren't as good at distance running.

    "O.J. Simpson: Football's Greatest Runner." 1974, by John Devaney

    You can obtain it from Amazon for a few dollars. It's largely clip and paste along with interviews of O.J. right after the 1973 season. Devaney followed him from banquets to the Pro Bowl to the ABC Superstars competition.

    It's one of the more obscure O.J. books. There were a lot of quickie paperbacks (Devaney wrote a lot of these on famous athletes) on him in those days. This one is the most revealing IMO.
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  75. @Dave Pinsen
    Sure, but they work at cross purposes, so you have to prioritize somewhat. Long distance running is catabolic. That's why marathon runners often look like concentration camp inmates.

    Mike Prevost of the Naval Academy has an interesting writeup and review of the research on military training for carrying heavy packs, linked here (“Ruck Training Program”): http://mikeprevost.com/tactical-fitness/

    Very interesting and potentially very useful in general, but this in particular stood out to me:

    The important point of the figure is that at heavier loads, strength matters more than aerobic fitness. Training for heavier loads would place an emphasis on strength training and heavy rucks. At lighter loads, aerobic fitness matters more than strength. Training for lighter loads would place an emphasis on running and lighter, long duration rucks. Somewhere in the middle, they are both very important.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Thanks, that makes sense.
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  76. @anon
    Ahmad Bradshaw was born in Bluefield, Virginia to Diana Davis and James Bradshaw.

    Not this Ahmad Bradshaw. He was raised in Chicago by a single mother named Kizzy Collins. His grandmother must have been a fan of Leslie Uggams in Roots.

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  77. @Hibernian
    In high school the good sprinters were often good basketball and/or football players whereas the good distance runners didn't have another sport.

    None of the cross country guys at my school did anything but CC and distance running during the indoor and outdoor track seasons. All the shot putters, of course, were football players.

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  78. > Ahmad Bradshaw ran for 94 yards

    what’s with the American Blacks being in love with Arabic given-names?

    How long before a majority of American Black baby boys are named “Muhammed”?

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  79. @Hibernian
    In high school the good sprinters were often good basketball and/or football players whereas the good distance runners didn't have another sport.

    I ran track. In my high school some sprinters played football but the distance runners had cross country during the fall. There was no overlap between basketball and track (for boys).

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  80. @anonymous
    The GI Jockery on this thread is pretty deep. It seems worthwhile to share that what riles some of the other commenters both saddens and pleases me. Given the degeneracy of our rulers, I don't even want Uncle Sam in good fighting condition beyond the national borders.

    Has anyone else here come to see the scandalization of big time sports and the USG's military institutions as cathartic in getting our country past a shameful, imperial era?

    Big time sports and the military used to be mainstays of conservative worship. I know they were for me, as a kid, growing up. In some ways, for the former at least, I’m happy to see that the pedestal we put them on is coming down. Both have been completely captured by the Left.

    If you need any evidence, look at the Left’s wholehearted embrace of both. I began to notice at least 5+ years ago that following and rooting for professional sports became very popular among liberal friends and colleagues. I attribute it to the massive marketing push among (almost always) childless women and NAMs. Look at the people used in advertisements, for God’s sake. The military is the same thing. Look at that puke inducing ad that keeps running with military planes unloading boxes that say “AID,” as if the sole reason to sign up is the opportunity to babysit some sad sack dumpster fire overseas.

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    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    Russian recruiting videos look a little different:

    https://vimeo.com/94556376
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  81. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Unfortunately, long-since retired Robinson now suffers from bulkhead-related CTE.

    Huh? I think you’re thinking of a different athlete. Former NBA star David Robinson is known for his discipline and focus on education…most notably at his self funded academy. His son just dropped football at ND to run for student body president.

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    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    It was a slapstick joke, not an actual assessment of Robinson. Imagine if the Navy made him serve his two years on cramped vessels, and he banged his head 20 times a day.
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  82. @Dave Pinsen
    Why should the ability to run 5 miles with an 80lb pack be of any interest to an army? What sort of shape to fight in are you going to be in after that?

    The moronic obsession with endurance over all else is, I suspect, partly due to the U.S. Army's intstitutional memory about its disastrous retreat in the Korean War, and partly due to Dr. Kenneth Cooper's influence, which got perpetuated as officers who liked to run tended to stay in and reinforce the status quo. There are a few field grade officers who are Mark Rippetoe-certified Starting Strength coaches who have been pushing back against this.

    Maybe the running with packs is about developing toughness, and identifying the soldiers who have it. If there’s no war going on, you have to simulate stress, exhaustion and discomfort somehow.

    Of course you need to give heavier packs to the fitter guys, to ensure that those five miles are a challenge for everyone.

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    • Replies: @Bill B.

    Maybe the running with packs is about developing toughness, and identifying the soldiers who have it.
     
    I have never served in the military but my impression talking to various soldiers in varies armies over the years is that regularly running distances of several miles is seen as way of ensuring basic fitness.

    Even lazy slobs are capable of lifting above average-guy weights if they do it reasonably often and then sort-of-kind-of doing other exercises. But running any distance is challenging if you are out of shape and it is difficult to cheat.

    I am not talking about elite troops but ordinary soldiers who do guard duty or work at a desk etc..
    , @Dave Pinsen
    Causing stress, exhaustion, and discomfort is a component of some advanced training/weeding programs, like Ranger school, and a common way is via sleep deprivation combined with lots of physical exertion. But even there, there's a balance between that and avoiding injury. Even a tough SOB can injure a foot or ankle running in boots with a pack on.
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  83. @Dave Pinsen
    I'd rather have Usain Bolt on my side in hand to hand combat or foxhole digging than Mo Ibrahim.

    And by the way, does anyone still dig foxholes by hand? We did it when I was in infantry training in the last century, and it takes forever using regular shovels and pick axes. With the little collapsable shovel (E-tool) that came with the standard kit it would have taken even longer.

    Yes.

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  84. No one ran with an 80lb pack for five miles but God knows I walked plenty of times with an 80+ lbs pack for miles because of an obsessive tendency of the military to have to reinvent the wheel.

    When I was in Afghanistan we were relieving the 10th MTN. On our first big op, you had us getting off the deuce and halfs with a third of everything we owned on our backs (the other 2/3rds was kept in duffle bags on the deuce ‘just in case’). The 10th Mountain guys were riding around on humvees carrying batteries, water and ammo with some MREs and cold weather gear in rucks on the truck.

    They tried telling our leadership that you cant climb those mountains wearing 100+ lbs of kit without someone getting hurt.

    Well, they were right, and even after the battalion mortars were rendered ineffective cause so many of them fell off the cliff sides we kept on. Our next op lessons were learned, I guess, because we were riding around in humvees in platoon sized flying columns with nothing more ammo, water, batteries and a change of DCUs.

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  85. @Steve Sailer
    David Robinson was 6'5" when he entered the Naval Academy but then grew to be 7 feet tall, which is too big for most ships: you bang your head on bulkheads. It was said that if he wasn't a famous athlete they just would have discharged him upon graduation. But they made him serve two years before going to the NBA.

    13 Steve Sailor > too big for most ships: you bang your head on bulkheads

    on the overheads, I hope

    I “award” 50 hours of “additional military instruction” as “mess crank” to iSteve

    After he “secures from” that, he can have a “Navy Good Conduct” ribbon

    Overheads don’t move, iSteve, so you shouldn’t salute them….. you should paint them.

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    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    I actually prefer Trayvon to Ahmad. Trayvon, while in the black separatist tradition, is at least a recognizable thread of the American experience. Ahmad, not so much.
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  86. @International Jew
    Maybe the running with packs is about developing toughness, and identifying the soldiers who have it. If there's no war going on, you have to simulate stress, exhaustion and discomfort somehow.

    Of course you need to give heavier packs to the fitter guys, to ensure that those five miles are a challenge for everyone.

    Maybe the running with packs is about developing toughness, and identifying the soldiers who have it.

    I have never served in the military but my impression talking to various soldiers in varies armies over the years is that regularly running distances of several miles is seen as way of ensuring basic fitness.

    Even lazy slobs are capable of lifting above average-guy weights if they do it reasonably often and then sort-of-kind-of doing other exercises. But running any distance is challenging if you are out of shape and it is difficult to cheat.

    I am not talking about elite troops but ordinary soldiers who do guard duty or work at a desk etc..

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    There was plenty of running as part of physical training in my time, but it was done in running shoes, without packs. The only time you'd run in a pack was if you were a road guard blocking intersections during marches, and then running back to your place after.

    From what I've read, basic training and infantry training have been made easier this century to avoid injuries.
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  87. @Polynikes
    Huh? I think you're thinking of a different athlete. Former NBA star David Robinson is known for his discipline and focus on education...most notably at his self funded academy. His son just dropped football at ND to run for student body president.

    It was a slapstick joke, not an actual assessment of Robinson. Imagine if the Navy made him serve his two years on cramped vessels, and he banged his head 20 times a day.

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  88. @El Dato
    Germans say no problem:

    https://www.welt.de/politik/deutschland/article12381421/Warum-Frauen-fuer-die-Marine-unersetzlich-sind.html

    I read the article on Google Translate. The last par ends:

    The integration of the “weaker sex” in the “Strong troop” but seems – at least officially – succeeded. The statement that “the Bundeswehr is only a mirror of society” already existed before women were allowed into the German Armed Forces and, when it comes to gender-specific grievances, points to unsolved problems in German society – and they have long been not only in the military.

    Yes armies do reflect the societies from which they emerge but this is silly.

    In the modern way every organisation must be twisted, or painted over to pretend, to conform to the current ideology.

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  89. @anonymous
    I was always under the apparently mistaken assumption that to graduate from "The Point" (or any of the service academies for that matter) you had to major in one of the "STEM" curricula (after taking prerequisites in English, History, a foreign language similar to, say, MIT or CalTech) but now I'm hearing that such is not the case and that even though graduates are awarded a B.S. it doesn't necessarily have to reflect something in the STEM field.

    Anyone out there know if this is true. iSteve??

    That is correct. For instance, at USAFA, one can graduate with a B.S. in Psychology.

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  90. @Triumph104
    A few months ago, I got criticized when I said that the military academies will admit anyone with a pulse. More from Heffington's letter:


    However, during my time on the West Point faculty (2006-2009 and again from 2013-2017), I personally witnessed a series of fundamental changes at West Point that have eroded it to the point where I question whether the institution should even remain open. (LINK)
     
    Professor Bruce Fleming has written about the low standards at the Naval Academy. (LINK)

    Well, not “anyone”. The problem is that many, many highly-qualified white male candidates are overlooked in favor of filling the diversity quotas of women and POCs. Academic and disciplinary standards fall in inverse proportion to the staffing of the Diversitocracy.

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  91. @PSR
    I don't know. I watched the Army-Navy game yesterday and was surprised at how big some of the linemen were. Made me wonder if they could actually pass a military fitness test, much less fit in a sub or tank.

    They have to cut weight in the spring of their senior years.

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  92. @Bleuteaux
    Big time sports and the military used to be mainstays of conservative worship. I know they were for me, as a kid, growing up. In some ways, for the former at least, I'm happy to see that the pedestal we put them on is coming down. Both have been completely captured by the Left.

    If you need any evidence, look at the Left's wholehearted embrace of both. I began to notice at least 5+ years ago that following and rooting for professional sports became very popular among liberal friends and colleagues. I attribute it to the massive marketing push among (almost always) childless women and NAMs. Look at the people used in advertisements, for God's sake. The military is the same thing. Look at that puke inducing ad that keeps running with military planes unloading boxes that say "AID," as if the sole reason to sign up is the opportunity to babysit some sad sack dumpster fire overseas.

    Russian recruiting videos look a little different:

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    • Replies: @Simon in London
    If it ever came to conventional war they would slaughter us. The European 'armies' are helpless sheep. The Americans still have the firepower, but are decaying rapidly in competence.
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  93. @Mike Perry
    So she had sex with a "few" other cadets (presumably not including Bradshaw since she says that was rape) in the two years she was at West Point despite spending quite a bit of her time on crutches and/or in forced confinement to her room.

    Practical logistics and time management. Excellent officer material!

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  94. @psmith

    Lots of sprinters can barely run a mile.
     
    Name three.

    (inb4 "oh, I once knew this guy" yeah, ok)

    #2.

    Bo Jackson (10.39 in the 100 meters, 4.12 in the NFL Combine 40 yard dash) won the Alabama state high school decathlon title, despite sitting out the mile.

    “Anything over 400 yards and he’s ready to cash it in.”

    http://articles.latimes.com/1988-03-30/sports/sp-136_1_bo-jackson/3

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  95. Two groups who should never have been admitted to the Army, negros and females. Therein lies your problem.

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  96. @psmith

    What was the name of this world class sprinter, who by his own account couldn’t run a half-mile, much less a mile?
     
    Albert Einstein, of course.

    Anyway, fair enough, props for coming up with a verifiable example. Though I wonder how much of that was not wanting to risk injury or being revealed as "slow" (bearing in mind that a perfect score on the Army PFT is a 13:00 2 mile, which is pretty slow itself by some standards.).

    That is the standard(max) for the 2 mile run in the lowest age category. There are two (2) other events The event most likely to be failed and least likely to be maxed (at any age group) is the two mile run.

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  97. @psmith

    What was the name of this world class sprinter, who by his own account couldn’t run a half-mile, much less a mile?
     
    Albert Einstein, of course.

    Anyway, fair enough, props for coming up with a verifiable example. Though I wonder how much of that was not wanting to risk injury or being revealed as "slow" (bearing in mind that a perfect score on the Army PFT is a 13:00 2 mile, which is pretty slow itself by some standards.).

    I guess I have to say it twice. O.J. told John Devaney he wouldn’t run the half-mile because he was afraid of collapsing from exhaustion in front of a national TV audience. O.J. also said “We” (meaning blacks) aren’t as good at distance running.

    “O.J. Simpson: Football’s Greatest Runner.” 1974, by John Devaney

    You can obtain it from Amazon for a few dollars. It’s largely clip and paste along with interviews of O.J. right after the 1973 season. Devaney followed him from banquets to the Pro Bowl to the ABC Superstars competition.

    It’s one of the more obscure O.J. books. There were a lot of quickie paperbacks (Devaney wrote a lot of these on famous athletes) on him in those days. This one is the most revealing IMO.

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  98. @PSR
    I don't know. I watched the Army-Navy game yesterday and was surprised at how big some of the linemen were. Made me wonder if they could actually pass a military fitness test, much less fit in a sub or tank.

    I didn’t say the service academies had no big guys at all, just that the ones they have are not better athletes than those you would find on a good Ivy football team.

    The big differences are among those whose height and weight are around mean average. The average plebe and midshipman is a much better athlete than his Ivy League counterpart.

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  99. @David Davenport
    and what about the army’s current record in land wars? not too hot… but hey, football right?

    Please tell us which war or wars the United States Army has lost since 1945.

    Especially if you’re a major defense contractor, or even an officer aspiring to flag/general rank.

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  100. @Farenheit
    I’m watch my Sunday morning football on a 52” Samsung hi def tv, so I’m gonna call the Korean War a win, and take the Raiders to win straight up.

    take the Raiders to win straight up

    Yeah, so much for that.

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  101. @psmith

    Lots of sprinters can barely run a mile.
     
    Name three.

    (inb4 "oh, I once knew this guy" yeah, ok)

    According to his agent Ricky Simms, “Usain [Bolt] has never run a mile.”

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  102. @bomag
    The army countenanced Nidal Hasan (Ft. Hood shooter), which was pretty bad.

    Gramsci said to march through the institutions; so it goes.

    The thing that finished off Joe McCarthy’s career was his claim that the US Army was protecting known Communists.
    Now, the US Army really is protecting known Communists.
    LOL

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  103. @PV van der Byl
    My recollection from the late 1970s was that the better Ivy League football teams were competitive with or superior to West Point.

    Both the service academies and the Ivies also fielded "lightweight" football teams (155 lb. max), however. When the lightweight Ivy teams played Army or Navy, they usually lost by scores like 63-7.

    Tbe service academies are filled with very fit, very athletic welterweights and middleweights.

    Too small to interest the NFL.

    But sized just right for the interior of tanks, fighter jet cockpits, and submarines.

    “Lightweight” football is properly known at Sprint Football. The current maximum weight is 178 with a body-fat percentage of 5%.

    Jimmy Carter played for Navy.

    The funny thing about weight limits is that youth football always had weight limits. Now, the only college sport with weight limits is wrestling. Even the heavyweight division has a maximum weight of 285, up from 275 from 1986-98. Before instituting a weight limit, you had guys weighing 191 and guys weighing 450 wrestling each other as heavyweights. The late Tab Thacker won the heavyweight wrestling championship at NC State in 1984. He went on to play Finch in Wildcats.

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  104. @syonredux

    Especially since he retired from the NFL four years ago.
     
    And to think, my great-grandfather lived his entire life without reading about a single American named "Ahmad"....now we have two quasi-famous football players named "Ahmad Bradshaw".....How I envy my great-grandfather....

    Hey, on the other hand, Syndy, he lived without internet porn as well.

    What would you do with the extra four daily hours?

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  105. @Triumph104
    A few months ago, I got criticized when I said that the military academies will admit anyone with a pulse. More from Heffington's letter:


    However, during my time on the West Point faculty (2006-2009 and again from 2013-2017), I personally witnessed a series of fundamental changes at West Point that have eroded it to the point where I question whether the institution should even remain open. (LINK)
     
    Professor Bruce Fleming has written about the low standards at the Naval Academy. (LINK)

    No, I believe it requires a pulse and a Congressional approval.

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    No, I think you need to find a Congressman with a pulse. It's harder than you'd think.
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  106. @David In TN
    "Name three."

    I can name one. He was on the Southern Cal track team (maybe the best in the country) as a sprinter in 1967-68. He was part of a world record relay team and also played on the USC football team.

    In 1973 he had a fairly good year running the football in the NFL. After the season, he competed in the ABC Superstars. Although entered in the half-mile run, he decided not to try it, telling writer John Devaney (who was writing a book on him), "I'm afraid I would die out there in the half mile in front of everybody."

    Devaney himself had done the half mile in high school and told him it wasn't hard to pace yourself and he could pick up a few points. "No," the ex-Southern Cal sprinter replied, "We aren't that good at distance."

    What was the name of this world class sprinter, who by his own account couldn't run a half-mile, much less a mile?

    O.J. Simpson.

    Running distances develops long-twitch muscle fibers which interferes, for an athlete, with what he gets paid for.

    One who is determined can easily and quickly overcome that though;

    http://www.letsrun.com/forum/flat_read.php?thread=3224788

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    Page had his weight go way down from the running and the Vikings traded him.
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  107. @psmith
    Mike Prevost of the Naval Academy has an interesting writeup and review of the research on military training for carrying heavy packs, linked here ("Ruck Training Program"): http://mikeprevost.com/tactical-fitness/

    Very interesting and potentially very useful in general, but this in particular stood out to me:

    The important point of the figure is that at heavier loads, strength matters more than aerobic fitness. Training for heavier loads would place an emphasis on strength training and heavy rucks. At lighter loads, aerobic fitness matters more than strength. Training for lighter loads would place an emphasis on running and lighter, long duration rucks. Somewhere in the middle, they are both very important.
     

    Thanks, that makes sense.

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  108. @International Jew
    Maybe the running with packs is about developing toughness, and identifying the soldiers who have it. If there's no war going on, you have to simulate stress, exhaustion and discomfort somehow.

    Of course you need to give heavier packs to the fitter guys, to ensure that those five miles are a challenge for everyone.

    Causing stress, exhaustion, and discomfort is a component of some advanced training/weeding programs, like Ranger school, and a common way is via sleep deprivation combined with lots of physical exertion. But even there, there’s a balance between that and avoiding injury. Even a tough SOB can injure a foot or ankle running in boots with a pack on.

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    • Replies: @International Jew
    You were in the US armed forces, but "stress, exhaustion, and discomfort" weren't part of your experience? Just curious, but what sort of job did you have there?
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  109. @Bill B.

    Maybe the running with packs is about developing toughness, and identifying the soldiers who have it.
     
    I have never served in the military but my impression talking to various soldiers in varies armies over the years is that regularly running distances of several miles is seen as way of ensuring basic fitness.

    Even lazy slobs are capable of lifting above average-guy weights if they do it reasonably often and then sort-of-kind-of doing other exercises. But running any distance is challenging if you are out of shape and it is difficult to cheat.

    I am not talking about elite troops but ordinary soldiers who do guard duty or work at a desk etc..

    There was plenty of running as part of physical training in my time, but it was done in running shoes, without packs. The only time you’d run in a pack was if you were a road guard blocking intersections during marches, and then running back to your place after.

    From what I’ve read, basic training and infantry training have been made easier this century to avoid injuries.

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  110. @Dave Pinsen
    Causing stress, exhaustion, and discomfort is a component of some advanced training/weeding programs, like Ranger school, and a common way is via sleep deprivation combined with lots of physical exertion. But even there, there's a balance between that and avoiding injury. Even a tough SOB can injure a foot or ankle running in boots with a pack on.

    You were in the US armed forces, but “stress, exhaustion, and discomfort” weren’t part of your experience? Just curious, but what sort of job did you have there?

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Drill sergeant. Stress, exhaustion and discomfort were part of the experience of going through basic training and infantry training (more so as drill sergeant), but not to the extent of, say, Ranger school, where trainees get an hour of sleep per night for a stretch. Basic trainees who didn't have fireguard duty got a good 7 hours of sleep (~9pm to ~4am) most nights, with a couple hours extra on Sundays.
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  111. @Truth
    No, I believe it requires a pulse and a Congressional approval.

    No, I think you need to find a Congressman with a pulse. It’s harder than you’d think.

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  112. @International Jew
    You were in the US armed forces, but "stress, exhaustion, and discomfort" weren't part of your experience? Just curious, but what sort of job did you have there?

    Drill sergeant. Stress, exhaustion and discomfort were part of the experience of going through basic training and infantry training (more so as drill sergeant), but not to the extent of, say, Ranger school, where trainees get an hour of sleep per night for a stretch. Basic trainees who didn’t have fireguard duty got a good 7 hours of sleep (~9pm to ~4am) most nights, with a couple hours extra on Sundays.

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  113. @Truth
    Running distances develops long-twitch muscle fibers which interferes, for an athlete, with what he gets paid for.

    One who is determined can easily and quickly overcome that though;

    http://www.letsrun.com/forum/flat_read.php?thread=3224788

    Page had his weight go way down from the running and the Vikings traded him.

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  114. @SteveRogers42
    Russian recruiting videos look a little different:

    https://vimeo.com/94556376

    If it ever came to conventional war they would slaughter us. The European ‘armies’ are helpless sheep. The Americans still have the firepower, but are decaying rapidly in competence.

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  115. Re the OP, AFAICT she was punished for the consensual sex, not the apparently false rape allegation. Reading the article it looks like she claimed rape because her room mate reported her having sex, and she was trying to evade punishment. I guess if she was ‘laid up’ in her room with the injured knee, having a lot of sex with various guys (as was apparently the case), the room mate had become seriously annoyed!

    It’s not clear Ahmed was punished for the sex; I guess his suspension during the investigation was considered enough.

    She should not have been in the military, except maybe in a non-combatant position with training that did not wreck her knee. It sounds like Ahmed is not officer material but would probably have made an ok private.

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  116. @Karl
    13 Steve Sailor > too big for most ships: you bang your head on bulkheads

    on the overheads, I hope

    I "award" 50 hours of "additional military instruction" as "mess crank" to iSteve

    After he "secures from" that, he can have a "Navy Good Conduct" ribbon


    Overheads don't move, iSteve, so you shouldn't salute them..... you should paint them.

    I actually prefer Trayvon to Ahmad. Trayvon, while in the black separatist tradition, is at least a recognizable thread of the American experience. Ahmad, not so much.

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