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From the Washington Post:

Memorial to ‘racist’ Francis Scott Key, who wrote ‘The Star-Spangled Banner,’ vandalized in Maryland

By Justin Wm. Moyer September 13 at 5:17 PM

A monument commemorating “Star-Spangled Banner” author Francis Scott Key was vandalized in downtown Baltimore, officials said Wednesday.

Photographs show the monument, at 1200 N. Eutaw St., covered with red paint and the words “racist anthem” written in black.

 
    []
  1. AM says:

    This is going downhill fast.

    I’m bit shocked at how fast the gap is widening between feelings and any semblance of reality.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Cultural Revolution spiraled pretty fast too.
    , @Hippopotamusdrome
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    A: Yes.
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  2. All Four Stanzas

    By Isaac Asimov

    Introductory Note. Unless you’re already well acquainted with our “national anthem,” this interesting piece by the late Isaac Asimov will be an eye-opener. It was for me. It’s especially appropriate at a time when there is much talk of tossing out this difficult-to-sing and difficult-to-comprehend old song in favor of something that better suits Ray Charles’ voice. You’ll understand the song much better after you read Mr. Asimov’s explanation.–Hardly Waite, Gazette Senior Editor.

    I have a weakness–I am crazy, absolutely nuts, about our national anthem.

    The words are difficult and the tune is almost impossible, but frequently when I’m taking a shower I sing it with as much power and emotion as I can. It shakes me up every time.

    I was once asked to speak at a luncheon. Taking my life in my hands, I announced I was going to sing our national anthem–all four stanzas.

    This was greeted with loud groans. One man closed the door to the kitchen, where the noise of dishes and cutlery was loud and distracting. “Thanks, Herb,” I said.

    “That’s all right,” he said. “It was at the request of the kitchen staff.”

    I explained the background of the anthem and then sang all four stanzas.

    Let me tell you, those people had never heard it before–or had never really listened. I got a standing ovation. But it was not me; it was the anthem.

    More recently, while conducting a seminar, I told my students the story of the anthem and sang all four stanzas. Again there was a wild ovation and prolonged applause. And again, it was the anthem and not me.

    So now let me tell you how it came to be written.

    In 1812, the United States went to war with Great Britain, primarily over freedom of the seas. We were in the right. For two years, we held off the British, even though we were still a rather weak country. Great Britain was in a life and death struggle with Napoleon. In fact, just as the United States declared war, Napoleon marched off to invade Russia. If he won, as everyone expected, he would control Europe, and Great Britain would be isolated. It was no time for her to be involved in an American war.

    At first, our seamen proved better than the British. After we won a battle on Lake Erie in 1813, the American commander, Oliver Hazard Perry, sent the message “We have met the enemy and they are ours.” However, the weight of the British navy beat down our ships eventually. New England, hard-hit by a tightening blockade, threatened secession.

    Meanwhile, Napoleon was beaten in Russia and in 1814 was forced to abdicate. Great Britain now turned its attention to the United States, launching a three-pronged attack. The northern prong was to come down Lake Champlain toward New York and seize parts of New England. The southern prong was to go up the Mississippi, take New Orleans and paralyze the west. The central prong was to head for the mid-Atlantic states and then attack Baltimore, the greatest port south of New York. If Baltimore was taken, the nation, which still hugged the Atlantic coast, could be split in two. The fate of the United States, then, rested to a large extent on the success or failure of the central prong.

    The British reached the American coast, and on August 24, 1814, took Washington, D. C. Then they moved up the Chesapeake Bay toward Baltimore. On September 12, they arrived and found 1000 men in Fort McHenry, whose guns controlled the harbor. If the British wished to take Baltimore, they would have to take the fort.

    On one of the British ships was an aged physician, William Beanes, who had been arrested in Maryland and brought along as a prisoner. Francis Scott Key, a lawyer and friend of the physician, had come to the ship to negotiate his release. The British captain was willing, but the two Americans would have to wait. It was now the night of September 13, and the bombardment of Fort McHenry was about to start.

    As twilight deepened, Key and Beanes saw the American flag flying over Fort McHenry. Through the night, they heard bombs bursting and saw the red glare of rockets. They knew the fort was resisting and the American flag was still flying. But toward morning the bombardment ceased, and a dread silence fell. Either Fort McHenry had surrendered and the British flag flew above it, or the bombardment had failed and the American flag still flew.

    As dawn began to brighten the eastern sky, Key and Beanes stared out at the fort, trying to see which flag flew over it. He and the physician must have asked each other over and over, “Can you see the flag?”

    After it was all finished, Key wrote a four stanza poem telling the events of the night. Called “The Defence of Fort M’Henry,” it was published in newspapers and swept the nation. Someone noted that the words fit an old English tune called “To Anacreon in Heaven” –a difficult melody with an uncomfortably large vocal range. For obvious reasons, Key’s work became known as “The Star Spangled Banner,” and in 1931 Congress declared it the official anthem of the United States.

    Now that you know the story, here are the words. Presumably, the old doctor is speaking. This is what he asks Key

    Oh! say, can you see, by the dawn’s early light,
    W hat so proudly we hailed at the twilight’s last gleaming?
    Whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight,
    O’er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming?

    And the rocket’s red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
    Gave proof thro’ the night that our flag was still there.
    Oh! say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave,
    O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

    “Ramparts,” in case you don’t know, are the protective walls or other elevations that surround a fort. The first stanza asks a question. The second gives an answer

    On the shore, dimly seen thro’ the mist of the deep,
    Where the foe’s haughty host in dread silence reposes,
    What is that which the breeze, o’er the towering steep.
    As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?

    Now it catches the gleam of the morning’s first beam,
    In full glory reflected, now shines on the stream
    ‘Tis the star-spangled banner. Oh! long may it wave
    O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

    “The towering steep” is again, the ramparts. The bombardment has failed, and the British can do nothing more but sail away, their mission a failure.

    In the third stanza, I feel Key allows himself to gloat over the American triumph. In the aftermath of the bombardment, Key probably was in no mood to act otherwise.

    During World War II, when the British were our staunchest allies, this third stanza was not sung. However, I know it, so here it is

    And where is that band who so vauntingly swore
    That the havoc of war and the battle’s confusion
    A home and a country should leave us no more?
    Their blood has washed out their foul footstep’s pollution.

    No refuge could save the hireling and slave
    From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave,
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
    O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

    The fourth stanza, a pious hope for the future, should be sung more slowly than the other three and with even deeper feeling.

    Oh! thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand
    Between their loved homes and the war’s desolation,
    Blest with vict’ry and peace, may the Heav’n – rescued land
    Praise the Pow’r that hath made and preserved us a nation.

    Then conquer we must, for our cause is just,
    And this be our motto–”In God is our trust.”
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
    O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

    I hope you will look at the national anthem with new eyes. Listen to it, the next time you have a chance, with new ears.

    And don’t let them ever take it away.

    –Isaac Asimov, March 1991

    http://purewatergazette.net/asimov.htm

    Read More
    • Agree: Sarah Toga
    • Replies: @songbird
    Interesting. I had somewhat gotten a different idea of Asimov from an essay he wrote about SDI. He was probably right to be sceptical of the technology, but his rhetoric was pretty partisan and unhinged.

    Saying the Soviets were peaceful by nature (forgetting Afghanistan, Hungary, and many other conflicts). Saying Americans were warlike by nature (perhaps true in DC) because of movies like Rambo. Saying that Republicans would use the threat of SDI to turn everyone into Republicans.
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    This is remarkable. Thank you.

    Issac sang pretty well for a man who had written three hundred books.
    , @guest
    "in favor of something that better suits Ray Charles' voice"

    America the Beautiful better suits everyone's voice. So does God Bless America, written by Asimov's fellow Russian Jew, Irving Berlin.

    This essay is all about the poem. That's fine. Enjoy it, recite it as often as you like. But anthems are anthems, dangit! The tune is infinitely more important than the lyrics.
    , @Frau Katze
    The Star-Spangled Banner is a beautiful anthem, I say as a Canadian (ours is rather ordinary).

    But I can see how poor singers might have trouble with the tune. But both the words and tune are lovely.

    It's true that after all this time, the British and Canada are no longer enemies, but it certainly was the case at the time.

  3. How is the Star Spangled Banner racist?
    Does the word “racist” have any meaning at all beyond “this is something I don’t like”?
    Away from the games, the words can still move.

    Oh, say, can you see, by the dawn’s early light,
    What so proudly we hail’d at the twilight’s last gleaming?
    Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro’ the perilous fight,
    O’er the ramparts we watch’d, were so gallantly streaming?
    And the rockets’ red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
    Gave proof thro’ the night that our flag was still there.
    O say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave
    O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

    Read More
    • Replies: @27 year old
    It's the anthem of America

    America is racist

    Therefore
    , @Sane Left Libertarian

    How is the Star Spangled Banner racist?
    Does the word “racist” have any meaning at all beyond “this is something I don’t like”?

     

    Close - "racist" now actually means "created/discovered by a white man"
    , @res
    I think the problem is that he was a slaveowner: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Scott_Key#Slavery_and_American_Colonization_Society
    , @Raymund Eich
    Those few of us who know US history know the line in the third verse about "hirelings and slaves" refers to the Hessian mercenaries, mostly conscripts whose regiments were rented out by their German princelings, used by the British in the American Revolution. But to the hundreds of millions of historical illiterates in this country, "slaves" could only be a pejorative reference to blacks.

    That's the only even faintly fact-based grounding I can see for "the national anthem is racist." Otherwise, as other commenters have noted, it's purely "white people take pride in it" = "it's racist."
    , @guest
    Reasons Why the National Anthem is Racist, by guest:

    #1. It is the anthem of the U.S. The U.S. is racist. Possibly the most racist thing ever.

    #2. It was written by a white. Whites are racists. Definitely the most racist of all races.

    #3. Maryland was a slave state.

    #4. Francis Scott Key probably owned slaves or looked twice at a black in a convenience store once.

    #5. Key's second cousin three times removed and namesake F. Scott Fitzgerald evinced knowledge of the writings of Madison Grant and Lothrop Stoddard, and therefore was clearly a crimethinker. (I don't actually expect any Baltimorean vandals to under a word I just typed.)

    #6. Great Britain outlawed the slave trade slightly before the U S., and therefore was marginally less racist. Being run by white people, it was of course still ultra-maxi-uber-totally racist.

    , @MBlanc46
    If it's done by a white person, it's racist. Their entire philosophy is: Whites are evil.
  4. Sunbeam says:

    Hmmm wonder if these guys have given any thought to their endgame. What exactly is going to be the common framework that holds us together as a nation? As opposed to a collection of interests, that may wind up in conflict? I mean what exactly is the rationale that anyone bother to work to a common good, as opposed to the interests of their particular group?

    They seem to think that you can wipe away all this stuff, and things will work as they always have, just more “diverse.” But an alternate viewpoint is there won’t be any center left, let alone that center holding.

    Do they seriously think a bunch of statues of Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King is going to shame, or inspire, or whatever a bunch of Mexicans or Chinese into kowtowing to the present system?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    They think the endgame is a slow suffocation, like Sweden.

    The reality is the endgame is going to look like Bosnia on steroids. The best thing to hope for is a warlord who is pragmatic enough to mount the Pale Horse, ride it as hard and fast as possible, and get off while one can still put civilization back together in a few generations.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    Indeed. It's hard to believe blacks can stand to use that racist money covered with the faces and symbols of racist whites. We ought to have multiple currencies. Each ethnic group in the US can mint its own and decide whether to accept the currency of other ethnic groups. They can all be exchangeable for the IMF's international XDRs.

    Or, we can just use Chinese yuan. The Confucian solution that Yan Shen no doubt approves of is to have all people subject to the Son of Heaven. The Japanese had a motto, something like "the eight corners of the world under one roof", back when they were running the East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere.

    You see, everyone can live together as long as the ruler is strong.
    , @Dr. X

    Hmmm wonder if these guys have given any thought to their endgame.
     
    The endgame is communism and the extirpation of the straight white man.

    What exactly is going to be the common framework that holds us together as a nation?
     
    They don't want the U.S. to be a nation.
    , @Anon

    Hmmm wonder if these guys have given any thought to their endgame.
     
    Ha! Good one!
    , @George
    "Hmmm wonder if these guys have given any thought to their endgame. What exactly is going to be the common framework that holds us together "

    The is what public school is for.
    , @DFH

    Hmmm wonder if these guys have given any thought to their endgame. What exactly is going to be the common framework that holds us together as a nation?
     
    After all, blacks are well-known for their long time preferences and ability for planning. That is why they make such good borrowers, and football players are known for their wise financial decisions
    , @guest
    The only goal is to root out the Old Order, which happens to be a white order. Doesn't matter what they have planned next, because with the Old Order goes Western Civilization, and they go with it.
  5. The Left will keep on pushing till someone pushes back. Given that most American’s think History is “Bunk” – I don’t think it will end well.

    Read More
  6. There are stories from the Cultural Revolution in China about traffic accidents because people were afraid to stop at red lights. We’re getting close to that level of silliness in the American Cultural Revolution now.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    Not quite what you mean, but in many 'hoods here in the USA, people are already afraid to stop at red lights. Sort of like in South Africa, and for much the same reason.
  7. Barnard says:

    I doubt they even know about Francis Scott Key’s role with the American Colonization Society. There is no content in the Star Spangled Banner that could be considered racist, but they would want to dig up Key’s remains for the ACS.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist

    I doubt they even know about Francis Scott Key’s role with the American Colonization Society. There is no content in the Star Spangled Banner that could be considered racist
     
    No but they know that NFL players are still protesting during the National Anthem and they know FSK wrote the SSB.

    Anymore protests during the National Anthem and watch the NFL TV ratings continue to nose dive.
    , @11 Bravo

    There is no content in the Star Spangled Banner that could be considered racist,
     
    I think, I write I think, that they are referring to this line as racist:

    No refuge could save the hireling and slave

    Supposedly it refers to the the slaves who were freed by the British in exchange for fighting against the USA. They formed a group called the Colonial Marines.

    I am not saying this is so. But I came across it at some wacko site like Slate, the Atlantic or something similar.
  8. anon says: • Disclaimer

    Given their homicide rate, the police and government can’t protect much of anything.

    This is touristy type stuff. There is a Betsy Ross thing there also. I haven’t been there in a decade, but I suppose they still have their inner harbor and waterfront zone for whites.

    If they don’t get a grip, their future is Detroit.

    Read More
  9. syonredux says:

    Wonder how long it will be before someone in Baltimore gives Poe’s statue the “Robert E Lee Treatment”

    https://explore.baltimoreheritage.org/items/show/185

    After all, Poe said some rather unkind things about people with black bodies in The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym…..

    One thread of critical analysis of this tale focuses on the possibly racist implications of Poe’s plot and imagery. One such plot element is the black cook who leads the mutiny on the Grampus and is its most bloodthirsty participant.[44] Dirk Peters, a hybrid of white and Native American ancestry, is described as having a ferocious appearance, with long, protruding teeth, bowed legs, and a bald head like “the head of most negroes.”[45] The brilliant whiteness of the final figure in the novel contrasts with the dark-skinned savages and such a contrast may call to mind the escalating racial tensions over the question of slavery in the United States as Poe was writing the novel.[46]
    Additionally, the novel drew from prevalent assumptions during the time that dark-skinned people were somehow inherently inferior.[47] One critic of the use of race in The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket is Toni Morrison. In “Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination,” Morrison discusses how the Africanist presence in the novel is used as an “Other” against which the author defines “white,” “free,” and “individual”.[48] In her explorations of the depiction of African characters in white American literature, Morrison writes that “no early American writer is more important to the concept of American Africanism than Poe” because of the focus on the symbolism of black and white in Poe’s novel.[49] This possible racial symbolism is explored further in Mat Johnson’s satirical fantasy Pym (2011).[

    Read More

    • Replies: @songbird
    They put up a statue of him in Boston near the Common just about like 3 years ago.

    I'd guess not. Short stories were his strong suite, and Gordon Pym isn't that great. Plus, few blacks are literary-minded. Lovecraft's race stuff is more memorable, and he's still a big part of the pop culture.
  10. More proof, not that we needed it, that they are far past the threshold of Stupid. They obviously don’t realize that 99.99% of all weaponry in America is held by patriots. They may get away with trashing Lee or even Jefferson, but if they attack our Flag and Anthem there WILL be blood. Even in our “diverse” military the combat troops and special forces are overwhelmingly white patriots. These imbeciles are begging for a civil war they cannot win.

    Read More
    • Replies: @27 year old
    We're already in a civil war. The 99.99% weaponry is sitting in gun safes and nightstands, not being used.
    , @Jason Roberts
    This is the hope of the Right, but what evidence is there it will actually happen? Right-wingers are obedient and compliant. They'll only go to war if someone they recognize as having authority to launch a war does in fact do so. That ain't ever gonna happen.
  11. Achilles says:

    covered with red paint

    Looks more pink than red. An attack by the LGBTrannies of Baltimore?

    Read More
  12. @Sunbeam
    Hmmm wonder if these guys have given any thought to their endgame. What exactly is going to be the common framework that holds us together as a nation? As opposed to a collection of interests, that may wind up in conflict? I mean what exactly is the rationale that anyone bother to work to a common good, as opposed to the interests of their particular group?

    They seem to think that you can wipe away all this stuff, and things will work as they always have, just more "diverse." But an alternate viewpoint is there won't be any center left, let alone that center holding.

    Do they seriously think a bunch of statues of Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King is going to shame, or inspire, or whatever a bunch of Mexicans or Chinese into kowtowing to the present system?

    They think the endgame is a slow suffocation, like Sweden.

    The reality is the endgame is going to look like Bosnia on steroids. The best thing to hope for is a warlord who is pragmatic enough to mount the Pale Horse, ride it as hard and fast as possible, and get off while one can still put civilization back together in a few generations.

    Read More
  13. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    I’m quite cynical about our leftist youth. They frequently come from rich families whose businesses benefit from cheap foreign labor.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    This.

    What the Boomers did covertly by neglect the Millennials do overtly with vandalism and violence.

    Either way it's a nasty business.
  14. @cwhatfuture
    How is the Star Spangled Banner racist?
    Does the word "racist" have any meaning at all beyond "this is something I don't like"?
    Away from the games, the words can still move.


    Oh, say, can you see, by the dawn's early light,
    What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming?
    Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight,
    O'er the ramparts we watch'd, were so gallantly streaming?
    And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
    Gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there.
    O say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

    It’s the anthem of America

    America is racist

    Therefore

    Read More
  15. @Barnard
    I doubt they even know about Francis Scott Key's role with the American Colonization Society. There is no content in the Star Spangled Banner that could be considered racist, but they would want to dig up Key's remains for the ACS.

    I doubt they even know about Francis Scott Key’s role with the American Colonization Society. There is no content in the Star Spangled Banner that could be considered racist

    No but they know that NFL players are still protesting during the National Anthem and they know FSK wrote the SSB.

    Anymore protests during the National Anthem and watch the NFL TV ratings continue to nose dive.

    Read More
  16. @cwhatfuture
    How is the Star Spangled Banner racist?
    Does the word "racist" have any meaning at all beyond "this is something I don't like"?
    Away from the games, the words can still move.


    Oh, say, can you see, by the dawn's early light,
    What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming?
    Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight,
    O'er the ramparts we watch'd, were so gallantly streaming?
    And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
    Gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there.
    O say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

    How is the Star Spangled Banner racist?
    Does the word “racist” have any meaning at all beyond “this is something I don’t like”?

    Close – “racist” now actually means “created/discovered by a white man”

    Read More
  17. @Stan d Mute
    More proof, not that we needed it, that they are far past the threshold of Stupid. They obviously don't realize that 99.99% of all weaponry in America is held by patriots. They may get away with trashing Lee or even Jefferson, but if they attack our Flag and Anthem there WILL be blood. Even in our "diverse" military the combat troops and special forces are overwhelmingly white patriots. These imbeciles are begging for a civil war they cannot win.

    We’re already in a civil war. The 99.99% weaponry is sitting in gun safes and nightstands, not being used.

    Read More
  18. songbird says:
    @Joe Stalin
    All Four Stanzas

    By Isaac Asimov

    Introductory Note. Unless you're already well acquainted with our "national anthem," this interesting piece by the late Isaac Asimov will be an eye-opener. It was for me. It's especially appropriate at a time when there is much talk of tossing out this difficult-to-sing and difficult-to-comprehend old song in favor of something that better suits Ray Charles' voice. You'll understand the song much better after you read Mr. Asimov's explanation.--Hardly Waite, Gazette Senior Editor.



    I have a weakness--I am crazy, absolutely nuts, about our national anthem.

    The words are difficult and the tune is almost impossible, but frequently when I'm taking a shower I sing it with as much power and emotion as I can. It shakes me up every time.

    I was once asked to speak at a luncheon. Taking my life in my hands, I announced I was going to sing our national anthem--all four stanzas.

    This was greeted with loud groans. One man closed the door to the kitchen, where the noise of dishes and cutlery was loud and distracting. "Thanks, Herb," I said.

    "That's all right," he said. "It was at the request of the kitchen staff."

    I explained the background of the anthem and then sang all four stanzas.

    Let me tell you, those people had never heard it before--or had never really listened. I got a standing ovation. But it was not me; it was the anthem.

    More recently, while conducting a seminar, I told my students the story of the anthem and sang all four stanzas. Again there was a wild ovation and prolonged applause. And again, it was the anthem and not me.

    So now let me tell you how it came to be written.

    In 1812, the United States went to war with Great Britain, primarily over freedom of the seas. We were in the right. For two years, we held off the British, even though we were still a rather weak country. Great Britain was in a life and death struggle with Napoleon. In fact, just as the United States declared war, Napoleon marched off to invade Russia. If he won, as everyone expected, he would control Europe, and Great Britain would be isolated. It was no time for her to be involved in an American war.

    At first, our seamen proved better than the British. After we won a battle on Lake Erie in 1813, the American commander, Oliver Hazard Perry, sent the message "We have met the enemy and they are ours." However, the weight of the British navy beat down our ships eventually. New England, hard-hit by a tightening blockade, threatened secession.

    Meanwhile, Napoleon was beaten in Russia and in 1814 was forced to abdicate. Great Britain now turned its attention to the United States, launching a three-pronged attack. The northern prong was to come down Lake Champlain toward New York and seize parts of New England. The southern prong was to go up the Mississippi, take New Orleans and paralyze the west. The central prong was to head for the mid-Atlantic states and then attack Baltimore, the greatest port south of New York. If Baltimore was taken, the nation, which still hugged the Atlantic coast, could be split in two. The fate of the United States, then, rested to a large extent on the success or failure of the central prong.

    The British reached the American coast, and on August 24, 1814, took Washington, D. C. Then they moved up the Chesapeake Bay toward Baltimore. On September 12, they arrived and found 1000 men in Fort McHenry, whose guns controlled the harbor. If the British wished to take Baltimore, they would have to take the fort.

    On one of the British ships was an aged physician, William Beanes, who had been arrested in Maryland and brought along as a prisoner. Francis Scott Key, a lawyer and friend of the physician, had come to the ship to negotiate his release. The British captain was willing, but the two Americans would have to wait. It was now the night of September 13, and the bombardment of Fort McHenry was about to start.

    As twilight deepened, Key and Beanes saw the American flag flying over Fort McHenry. Through the night, they heard bombs bursting and saw the red glare of rockets. They knew the fort was resisting and the American flag was still flying. But toward morning the bombardment ceased, and a dread silence fell. Either Fort McHenry had surrendered and the British flag flew above it, or the bombardment had failed and the American flag still flew.

    As dawn began to brighten the eastern sky, Key and Beanes stared out at the fort, trying to see which flag flew over it. He and the physician must have asked each other over and over, "Can you see the flag?"

    After it was all finished, Key wrote a four stanza poem telling the events of the night. Called "The Defence of Fort M'Henry," it was published in newspapers and swept the nation. Someone noted that the words fit an old English tune called "To Anacreon in Heaven" --a difficult melody with an uncomfortably large vocal range. For obvious reasons, Key's work became known as "The Star Spangled Banner," and in 1931 Congress declared it the official anthem of the United States.

    Now that you know the story, here are the words. Presumably, the old doctor is speaking. This is what he asks Key

    Oh! say, can you see, by the dawn's early light,
    W hat so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming?
    Whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight,
    O'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming?

    And the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
    Gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there.
    Oh! say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave,
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

    "Ramparts," in case you don't know, are the protective walls or other elevations that surround a fort. The first stanza asks a question. The second gives an answer

    On the shore, dimly seen thro' the mist of the deep,
    Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes,
    What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep.
    As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?

    Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam,
    In full glory reflected, now shines on the stream
    'Tis the star-spangled banner. Oh! long may it wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!



    "The towering steep" is again, the ramparts. The bombardment has failed, and the British can do nothing more but sail away, their mission a failure.

    In the third stanza, I feel Key allows himself to gloat over the American triumph. In the aftermath of the bombardment, Key probably was in no mood to act otherwise.

    During World War II, when the British were our staunchest allies, this third stanza was not sung. However, I know it, so here it is

    And where is that band who so vauntingly swore
    That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion
    A home and a country should leave us no more?
    Their blood has washed out their foul footstep's pollution.

    No refuge could save the hireling and slave
    From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave,
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.



    The fourth stanza, a pious hope for the future, should be sung more slowly than the other three and with even deeper feeling.

    Oh! thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand
    Between their loved homes and the war's desolation,
    Blest with vict'ry and peace, may the Heav'n - rescued land
    Praise the Pow'r that hath made and preserved us a nation.

    Then conquer we must, for our cause is just,
    And this be our motto--"In God is our trust."
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

    I hope you will look at the national anthem with new eyes. Listen to it, the next time you have a chance, with new ears.

    And don't let them ever take it away.

    --Isaac Asimov, March 1991

    http://purewatergazette.net/asimov.htm

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXulnF3twtQ

    Interesting. I had somewhat gotten a different idea of Asimov from an essay he wrote about SDI. He was probably right to be sceptical of the technology, but his rhetoric was pretty partisan and unhinged.

    Saying the Soviets were peaceful by nature (forgetting Afghanistan, Hungary, and many other conflicts). Saying Americans were warlike by nature (perhaps true in DC) because of movies like Rambo. Saying that Republicans would use the threat of SDI to turn everyone into Republicans.

    Read More
  19. @AM
    This is going downhill fast.

    I'm bit shocked at how fast the gap is widening between feelings and any semblance of reality.

    Cultural Revolution spiraled pretty fast too.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    The first stage of the Culteral Revolution was similar to the mob harassment against Bret Weinstein. Basically have a few dozen SJW students surround him and yell obscenities whenever he went on campus, including inside his scheduled undergraduate biology classes.

    I understand though at other points the Chinamen students would group cannibalize counterrevolutionary wrecker professors.
  20. songbird says:
    @syonredux
    Wonder how long it will be before someone in Baltimore gives Poe's statue the "Robert E Lee Treatment"

    https://explore.baltimoreheritage.org/items/show/185

    After all, Poe said some rather unkind things about people with black bodies in The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym.....

    One thread of critical analysis of this tale focuses on the possibly racist implications of Poe's plot and imagery. One such plot element is the black cook who leads the mutiny on the Grampus and is its most bloodthirsty participant.[44] Dirk Peters, a hybrid of white and Native American ancestry, is described as having a ferocious appearance, with long, protruding teeth, bowed legs, and a bald head like "the head of most negroes."[45] The brilliant whiteness of the final figure in the novel contrasts with the dark-skinned savages and such a contrast may call to mind the escalating racial tensions over the question of slavery in the United States as Poe was writing the novel.[46]
    Additionally, the novel drew from prevalent assumptions during the time that dark-skinned people were somehow inherently inferior.[47] One critic of the use of race in The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket is Toni Morrison. In "Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination," Morrison discusses how the Africanist presence in the novel is used as an "Other" against which the author defines "white," "free," and "individual".[48] In her explorations of the depiction of African characters in white American literature, Morrison writes that "no early American writer is more important to the concept of American Africanism than Poe" because of the focus on the symbolism of black and white in Poe's novel.[49] This possible racial symbolism is explored further in Mat Johnson's satirical fantasy Pym (2011).[
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Narrative_of_Arthur_Gordon_Pym_of_Nantucket#Race

    They put up a statue of him in Boston near the Common just about like 3 years ago.

    I’d guess not. Short stories were his strong suite, and Gordon Pym isn’t that great. Plus, few blacks are literary-minded. Lovecraft’s race stuff is more memorable, and he’s still a big part of the pop culture.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    They put up a statue of him in Boston near the Common just about like 3 years ago.
     
    Boston is the most racist and White Supremacist city in the USA.

    #BlackBostonLivesMatter

    I’d guess not. Short stories were his strong suite, and Gordon Pym isn’t that great. Plus, few blacks are literary-minded. Lovecraft’s race stuff is more memorable, and he’s still a big part of the pop culture.
     
    Get WOKE, bigot.Lovecraft idolized Poe, called him his "God of fiction." That retroactively taints Poe with Lovecraft's toxic racism.


    #BaltimoreBlacksAgainstPoe
  21. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    If certain people who have a paranoid personality don’t have enemies, they will go out and deliberately try to create their own enemies. They cannot let go of their own personality disorder, and they welcome anything that supports their own paranoid delusions. The left keeps shrieking that the right is out to get them, but all the provocative attacks are coming from the left.

    Read More
  22. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    After college PC indoctrination.

    More lunacy. Possessed, not ‘woke’.

    http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/amp/Junipero-Serra-statue-decapitated-splashed-with-12192175.php

    The two PC’s: Political Correctness and trashy PC amnesia. Vandalism of culture, history, and memory.

    https://www.edhat.com/news/junipero-serra-statue-beheaded-at-old-mission

    Read More
  23. Dube says:

    Yes, the tune is hard to sing, at least for most of us. But the words of the first stanza, in the phrasing of that period, are worthy of their circumstances. I’d like to hear the poem spoken at a sporting event, by a major oral interpreter with a great voice — say, James Earl Jones.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sarah Toga
    How about Mike Rowe.

    He sang for the Baltimore Opera. A truly expert voice. And with good politics, unlike Mr. Jones.
  24. Related, video from Black Pigeon Speaks on why the West hates and wants to destroy itself:

    Read More
    • Replies: @AM
    An excellent video by Black Pigeon. He's correctly identified the cultural shifts since the 1960's and the importance of foundation stories/myths.

    It's that type of discussion that makes me think we're going to need to address not just HBD, but the mind viruses of the West.

    As an aside, I'm a huge Agatha Christie fan. Her 1950's novels (all her novels were contemporary) are dark but pretty good. However, by the 1960's her characters begin to express outright confusion at the newest batch of young people. Certainly part of that could simply be old age. Her very last novels showed issues along those lines. However, I often wonder if she picked up on the massive culture shift and wasn't quite sure how to react.

    , @anonymous-antimarxist
    Excellent video!!!

    My only criticism of "Black Pigeon" is that while for those of us at isteve at least, it is clear he is thoroughly woke.... he is also very careful to not violate the edict of TWMNBN!!! So for the time being he is not kicked off Youtube, but merely demonitized and shadow banned.

    However, the above video is an "alt-lighter" version that was clearly heavily influenced by this recent video by VERTIGO POLITIX. New Vertigo Politix videos have been banned by Youtube because they are clearly up front about the JQ and do not pull their punches.

    The Perversion of the Western Foundation Myth
    https://vid.me/HHk6F

    Check out all the Vertigo Politix videos!!

    Don't waste your time going to Youtube, it does not have a complete set of Vertigo Politix videos and is shadow banning the ones it has.

    Go here instead
    https://vid.me/VertigoPolitix

    Check out especially these banned by Youtube.

    The Indispensable Future of White Masculinity
    A simply outstanding take on Christopher Nolan's Interstellar.
    https://vid.me/nfrkr

    The Tactics of Immigration
    https://vid.me/Do4lB

    The New Confederacy
    https://vid.me/Uyiwf

    START SWITCHING TO VIDME!!! The hell with Youtube!!!
  25. @Joe Stalin
    All Four Stanzas

    By Isaac Asimov

    Introductory Note. Unless you're already well acquainted with our "national anthem," this interesting piece by the late Isaac Asimov will be an eye-opener. It was for me. It's especially appropriate at a time when there is much talk of tossing out this difficult-to-sing and difficult-to-comprehend old song in favor of something that better suits Ray Charles' voice. You'll understand the song much better after you read Mr. Asimov's explanation.--Hardly Waite, Gazette Senior Editor.



    I have a weakness--I am crazy, absolutely nuts, about our national anthem.

    The words are difficult and the tune is almost impossible, but frequently when I'm taking a shower I sing it with as much power and emotion as I can. It shakes me up every time.

    I was once asked to speak at a luncheon. Taking my life in my hands, I announced I was going to sing our national anthem--all four stanzas.

    This was greeted with loud groans. One man closed the door to the kitchen, where the noise of dishes and cutlery was loud and distracting. "Thanks, Herb," I said.

    "That's all right," he said. "It was at the request of the kitchen staff."

    I explained the background of the anthem and then sang all four stanzas.

    Let me tell you, those people had never heard it before--or had never really listened. I got a standing ovation. But it was not me; it was the anthem.

    More recently, while conducting a seminar, I told my students the story of the anthem and sang all four stanzas. Again there was a wild ovation and prolonged applause. And again, it was the anthem and not me.

    So now let me tell you how it came to be written.

    In 1812, the United States went to war with Great Britain, primarily over freedom of the seas. We were in the right. For two years, we held off the British, even though we were still a rather weak country. Great Britain was in a life and death struggle with Napoleon. In fact, just as the United States declared war, Napoleon marched off to invade Russia. If he won, as everyone expected, he would control Europe, and Great Britain would be isolated. It was no time for her to be involved in an American war.

    At first, our seamen proved better than the British. After we won a battle on Lake Erie in 1813, the American commander, Oliver Hazard Perry, sent the message "We have met the enemy and they are ours." However, the weight of the British navy beat down our ships eventually. New England, hard-hit by a tightening blockade, threatened secession.

    Meanwhile, Napoleon was beaten in Russia and in 1814 was forced to abdicate. Great Britain now turned its attention to the United States, launching a three-pronged attack. The northern prong was to come down Lake Champlain toward New York and seize parts of New England. The southern prong was to go up the Mississippi, take New Orleans and paralyze the west. The central prong was to head for the mid-Atlantic states and then attack Baltimore, the greatest port south of New York. If Baltimore was taken, the nation, which still hugged the Atlantic coast, could be split in two. The fate of the United States, then, rested to a large extent on the success or failure of the central prong.

    The British reached the American coast, and on August 24, 1814, took Washington, D. C. Then they moved up the Chesapeake Bay toward Baltimore. On September 12, they arrived and found 1000 men in Fort McHenry, whose guns controlled the harbor. If the British wished to take Baltimore, they would have to take the fort.

    On one of the British ships was an aged physician, William Beanes, who had been arrested in Maryland and brought along as a prisoner. Francis Scott Key, a lawyer and friend of the physician, had come to the ship to negotiate his release. The British captain was willing, but the two Americans would have to wait. It was now the night of September 13, and the bombardment of Fort McHenry was about to start.

    As twilight deepened, Key and Beanes saw the American flag flying over Fort McHenry. Through the night, they heard bombs bursting and saw the red glare of rockets. They knew the fort was resisting and the American flag was still flying. But toward morning the bombardment ceased, and a dread silence fell. Either Fort McHenry had surrendered and the British flag flew above it, or the bombardment had failed and the American flag still flew.

    As dawn began to brighten the eastern sky, Key and Beanes stared out at the fort, trying to see which flag flew over it. He and the physician must have asked each other over and over, "Can you see the flag?"

    After it was all finished, Key wrote a four stanza poem telling the events of the night. Called "The Defence of Fort M'Henry," it was published in newspapers and swept the nation. Someone noted that the words fit an old English tune called "To Anacreon in Heaven" --a difficult melody with an uncomfortably large vocal range. For obvious reasons, Key's work became known as "The Star Spangled Banner," and in 1931 Congress declared it the official anthem of the United States.

    Now that you know the story, here are the words. Presumably, the old doctor is speaking. This is what he asks Key

    Oh! say, can you see, by the dawn's early light,
    W hat so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming?
    Whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight,
    O'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming?

    And the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
    Gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there.
    Oh! say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave,
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

    "Ramparts," in case you don't know, are the protective walls or other elevations that surround a fort. The first stanza asks a question. The second gives an answer

    On the shore, dimly seen thro' the mist of the deep,
    Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes,
    What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep.
    As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?

    Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam,
    In full glory reflected, now shines on the stream
    'Tis the star-spangled banner. Oh! long may it wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!



    "The towering steep" is again, the ramparts. The bombardment has failed, and the British can do nothing more but sail away, their mission a failure.

    In the third stanza, I feel Key allows himself to gloat over the American triumph. In the aftermath of the bombardment, Key probably was in no mood to act otherwise.

    During World War II, when the British were our staunchest allies, this third stanza was not sung. However, I know it, so here it is

    And where is that band who so vauntingly swore
    That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion
    A home and a country should leave us no more?
    Their blood has washed out their foul footstep's pollution.

    No refuge could save the hireling and slave
    From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave,
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.



    The fourth stanza, a pious hope for the future, should be sung more slowly than the other three and with even deeper feeling.

    Oh! thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand
    Between their loved homes and the war's desolation,
    Blest with vict'ry and peace, may the Heav'n - rescued land
    Praise the Pow'r that hath made and preserved us a nation.

    Then conquer we must, for our cause is just,
    And this be our motto--"In God is our trust."
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

    I hope you will look at the national anthem with new eyes. Listen to it, the next time you have a chance, with new ears.

    And don't let them ever take it away.

    --Isaac Asimov, March 1991

    http://purewatergazette.net/asimov.htm

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXulnF3twtQ

    This is remarkable. Thank you.

    Issac sang pretty well for a man who had written three hundred books.

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  26. @Stan d Mute
    More proof, not that we needed it, that they are far past the threshold of Stupid. They obviously don't realize that 99.99% of all weaponry in America is held by patriots. They may get away with trashing Lee or even Jefferson, but if they attack our Flag and Anthem there WILL be blood. Even in our "diverse" military the combat troops and special forces are overwhelmingly white patriots. These imbeciles are begging for a civil war they cannot win.

    This is the hope of the Right, but what evidence is there it will actually happen? Right-wingers are obedient and compliant. They’ll only go to war if someone they recognize as having authority to launch a war does in fact do so. That ain’t ever gonna happen.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    The average Joe Boomer Conservative is still foolishly supporting his sportsball teams.

    Perhaps we should have Generation Identitaire style protests at NCAA/NFL football games in the mold of what nude streakers have done in the past. Culture Jamming.

    The black left is helping us out with their rage at Colin Kapernick not being signed, this is a significant chance to damage a major cultural adversary.
  27. syonredux says:
    @songbird
    They put up a statue of him in Boston near the Common just about like 3 years ago.

    I'd guess not. Short stories were his strong suite, and Gordon Pym isn't that great. Plus, few blacks are literary-minded. Lovecraft's race stuff is more memorable, and he's still a big part of the pop culture.

    They put up a statue of him in Boston near the Common just about like 3 years ago.

    Boston is the most racist and White Supremacist city in the USA.

    #BlackBostonLivesMatter

    I’d guess not. Short stories were his strong suite, and Gordon Pym isn’t that great. Plus, few blacks are literary-minded. Lovecraft’s race stuff is more memorable, and he’s still a big part of the pop culture.

    Get WOKE, bigot.Lovecraft idolized Poe, called him his “God of fiction.” That retroactively taints Poe with Lovecraft’s toxic racism.

    #BaltimoreBlacksAgainstPoe

    Read More
    • Replies: @songbird
    All good points, although I admit to always laughing when I hear Boston is the most racist city. In my youth it was the city that bused black kids to my suburban school, though technically I think it was my my suburb that picked up the tab, which I think would make it more racist. But the Hub is the Hub, after all.
  28. Anyway, we want them to do this. As long as normies know about it. If the news story is buried, it doesn’t help us.

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  29. CCZ says:

    The “Cultural Revolution” says Key is a racist and the anthem is “Neo-Confederate.”

    I do not imagine that the cretins who vandalized the monument even remotely know this, but his “white supremacy” credentials apparently arise, in part, from his “overly aggressive prosecution” of a “young black male” accused of attempting to assault his “white female owner” and the riot that ensued. Andrew Jackson chose Key to be the United States Attorney for the District of Columbia (1833-1841). However, Key also “stood in front of a jail door and faced down the white lynch mob that wanted to skip the trial and hang the suspect, Arthur Bowen, from the nearest tree.”

    But, he owned slaves and was not an abolitionist and:

    “The words and the origins of our national anthem, is another neo-Confederate symbol” because “The Star-Spangled Banner was lobbied by Southerners into its exalted status.”
    So says Jefferson Morley, a staff writer for Salon in Washington and author of the forthcoming book, Snow-Storm in August: Washington City, Francis Scott Key, and the Forgotten Race Riot of 1835.

    Next stop, the chant, “Because of Snow, he’s gotta go.”

    Read More
  30. @Dube
    Yes, the tune is hard to sing, at least for most of us. But the words of the first stanza, in the phrasing of that period, are worthy of their circumstances. I'd like to hear the poem spoken at a sporting event, by a major oral interpreter with a great voice -- say, James Earl Jones.

    How about Mike Rowe.

    He sang for the Baltimore Opera. A truly expert voice. And with good politics, unlike Mr. Jones.

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  31. @Sunbeam
    Hmmm wonder if these guys have given any thought to their endgame. What exactly is going to be the common framework that holds us together as a nation? As opposed to a collection of interests, that may wind up in conflict? I mean what exactly is the rationale that anyone bother to work to a common good, as opposed to the interests of their particular group?

    They seem to think that you can wipe away all this stuff, and things will work as they always have, just more "diverse." But an alternate viewpoint is there won't be any center left, let alone that center holding.

    Do they seriously think a bunch of statues of Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King is going to shame, or inspire, or whatever a bunch of Mexicans or Chinese into kowtowing to the present system?

    Indeed. It’s hard to believe blacks can stand to use that racist money covered with the faces and symbols of racist whites. We ought to have multiple currencies. Each ethnic group in the US can mint its own and decide whether to accept the currency of other ethnic groups. They can all be exchangeable for the IMF’s international XDRs.

    Or, we can just use Chinese yuan. The Confucian solution that Yan Shen no doubt approves of is to have all people subject to the Son of Heaven. The Japanese had a motto, something like “the eight corners of the world under one roof”, back when they were running the East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere.

    You see, everyone can live together as long as the ruler is strong.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    The Chinese used to use Mexican silver dollars as money; we could do the same thing and have REAL money instead!

    "A coin’s journey from the silver mines of the Americas to a remote hill region in Asia reveals much about China’s remarkable rise to modernity, according to political culture expert Professor Michael Dutton."

    “This coin travels the route of Chinese modernity. It was part of an early currency colonialism that transformed the way Chinese thought about the question of ‘value’ as a result of their encounter with the West,” he says.

    “Traditionally Chinese people would calculate value on the basis of the weight of silver. Through coins like the Mexican silver dollar, we start to see a new basis of calculation emerging. They move from weight to ‘face value’.

    “The advent of the coin can also be seen as the harbinger of the modern money market. Some scholars have speculated that its arrival marked the beginning of futures markets.”

    “Because of the discovery of vast reserves of silver in Spanish controlled America, coinage often came from that region. The most popular coin was one produced after the Mexican War of Independence which had an eagle on it,” Prof Dutton says.

    “The Mexican silver dollar became the dominant currency of southern and eastern China in the 1830s and it was so ubiquitous that people started to forge it. It is said that the communists somehow got hold of one of the Mexican silver dollar counterfeiter’s moulds and used it to produce their first coin in 1928.

    “The coin’s journey to China reveals much about trade between developing countries which was a precursor to modern global economics and trade, such as China coming into a money-based economic system. Historically, this coin connects the dots between that prehistory and modern China.”

    http://w3.unisa.edu.au/unisanews/2014/September/story11.asp
  32. Dr. X says:
    @Sunbeam
    Hmmm wonder if these guys have given any thought to their endgame. What exactly is going to be the common framework that holds us together as a nation? As opposed to a collection of interests, that may wind up in conflict? I mean what exactly is the rationale that anyone bother to work to a common good, as opposed to the interests of their particular group?

    They seem to think that you can wipe away all this stuff, and things will work as they always have, just more "diverse." But an alternate viewpoint is there won't be any center left, let alone that center holding.

    Do they seriously think a bunch of statues of Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King is going to shame, or inspire, or whatever a bunch of Mexicans or Chinese into kowtowing to the present system?

    Hmmm wonder if these guys have given any thought to their endgame.

    The endgame is communism and the extirpation of the straight white man.

    What exactly is going to be the common framework that holds us together as a nation?

    They don’t want the U.S. to be a nation.

    Read More
  33. Dr. X says:

    A monument commemorating “Star-Spangled Banner” author Francis Scott Key was vandalized in downtown Baltimore, officials said Wednesday.

    Photographs show the monument, at 1200 N. Eutaw St., covered with red paint and the words “racist anthem” written in black.

    Can you imagine what the reaction would be if alt-righters started vandalizing Martin Luther King statues and spray-painting “philandering Negro communist” on them?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pericles

    Can you imagine what the reaction would be if alt-righters started vandalizing Martin Luther King statues and spray-painting “philandering Negro communist” on them?

     

    "Phila-what?"
  34. Ok, perhaps now is the time to either

    1. Nationalize all statues of US Historical persons, with mandatory 10 yr prison terms and harsh fines.

    2. Move all statues that are located in blue states and hence face the greater likelihood of damage. Example: Move all of Baltimore’s historical statues to a predominantly red state and in a relatively solid red area county. And then hire some local police to safeguard the statues a few times per week.

    “You know, I’m half inclined to believe, that there’s a rational explanation for all of this.”–Caldicott, in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1938 “The Lady Vanishes”.

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    • Replies: @Anon

    Example: Move all of Baltimore’s historical statues to a predominantly red state and in a relatively solid red area county.
     
    Not just 'historical statues', but monuments, grand old buildings, museums, parks, Mt Vernon Place, Guilford, Fort McHenry, Downtown, Homeland, Federal Hill, Camden Yards, Johns Hopkins, etc etc etc.

    A tad easier to just move the people, no? The ones giving offense I mean. Separation. Say it with me now.

  35. res says:
    @cwhatfuture
    How is the Star Spangled Banner racist?
    Does the word "racist" have any meaning at all beyond "this is something I don't like"?
    Away from the games, the words can still move.


    Oh, say, can you see, by the dawn's early light,
    What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming?
    Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight,
    O'er the ramparts we watch'd, were so gallantly streaming?
    And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
    Gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there.
    O say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?
    Read More
  36. AM says:
    @Perspective
    Related, video from Black Pigeon Speaks on why the West hates and wants to destroy itself:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NanumqpBDtA

    An excellent video by Black Pigeon. He’s correctly identified the cultural shifts since the 1960′s and the importance of foundation stories/myths.

    It’s that type of discussion that makes me think we’re going to need to address not just HBD, but the mind viruses of the West.

    As an aside, I’m a huge Agatha Christie fan. Her 1950′s novels (all her novels were contemporary) are dark but pretty good. However, by the 1960′s her characters begin to express outright confusion at the newest batch of young people. Certainly part of that could simply be old age. Her very last novels showed issues along those lines. However, I often wonder if she picked up on the massive culture shift and wasn’t quite sure how to react.

    Read More
  37. 11 Bravo says:
    @Barnard
    I doubt they even know about Francis Scott Key's role with the American Colonization Society. There is no content in the Star Spangled Banner that could be considered racist, but they would want to dig up Key's remains for the ACS.

    There is no content in the Star Spangled Banner that could be considered racist,

    I think, I write I think, that they are referring to this line as racist:

    No refuge could save the hireling and slave

    Supposedly it refers to the the slaves who were freed by the British in exchange for fighting against the USA. They formed a group called the Colonial Marines.

    I am not saying this is so. But I came across it at some wacko site like Slate, the Atlantic or something similar.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clark Westwood
    That was my thought as well. As you put it, some wacko lefty site had a piece about how the line "No refuge could save the hireling and slave" was a reference to freed slaves fighting for the Brits. And then some other blogger who really should have known better (I forget who it was, but I remember being shocked at his ignorance) actually took this seriously.

    Of course, anyone who reads things written before, say, yesterday, recognizes that "slave" was commonly used snark for a subject of a monarch (as opposed to citizens who governed themselves).

    But when you consider that there are people who seriously believe the word "picnic" comes from "pick a ni99er [for lynching]," no level of stupidity will surprise you.
  38. @cwhatfuture
    How is the Star Spangled Banner racist?
    Does the word "racist" have any meaning at all beyond "this is something I don't like"?
    Away from the games, the words can still move.


    Oh, say, can you see, by the dawn's early light,
    What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming?
    Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight,
    O'er the ramparts we watch'd, were so gallantly streaming?
    And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
    Gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there.
    O say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

    Those few of us who know US history know the line in the third verse about “hirelings and slaves” refers to the Hessian mercenaries, mostly conscripts whose regiments were rented out by their German princelings, used by the British in the American Revolution. But to the hundreds of millions of historical illiterates in this country, “slaves” could only be a pejorative reference to blacks.

    That’s the only even faintly fact-based grounding I can see for “the national anthem is racist.” Otherwise, as other commenters have noted, it’s purely “white people take pride in it” = “it’s racist.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ironsides
    Having spoken to the insane (i.e. leftists) on precisely this topic. It's nothing sophisticated; it's the "hireling and slave" line, as you suspect. That's it; nothing more or less.

    I've explained to them that "slave" means "draftee of a monarch," that the Americans of the era sometimes referred to white Europeans as the "slaves of absolutism," and that they stated that defeat by the British would render them "slaves" (e.g. subjects of a monarch, not black-skinned people in cotton fields).

    Such explanations, invoking fact as they did, were utterly vain. They went right on screeching about the anthem hating on black bodies, or whatever. They are profoundly ignorant, stupid, and insanely arrogant.
  39. Apparently, Key was a slaveholder and took legal steps to suppress abolitionists.
    If we’re going to read history backwards, who can withstand scrutiny? Many of the Founding Fathers were cheaters–but then, so were most of the Kennedys as well as MLK. As for Civil Rights folks, Stokely Carmichael and Eldridge Cleaver weren’t exactly nice to women.
    In other cutting-edge news, the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381 has been put down. Since Richard II was one of Chaucer’s patrons, I guess Canterbury Tales is next

    Read More
  40. songbird says:
    @syonredux

    They put up a statue of him in Boston near the Common just about like 3 years ago.
     
    Boston is the most racist and White Supremacist city in the USA.

    #BlackBostonLivesMatter

    I’d guess not. Short stories were his strong suite, and Gordon Pym isn’t that great. Plus, few blacks are literary-minded. Lovecraft’s race stuff is more memorable, and he’s still a big part of the pop culture.
     
    Get WOKE, bigot.Lovecraft idolized Poe, called him his "God of fiction." That retroactively taints Poe with Lovecraft's toxic racism.


    #BaltimoreBlacksAgainstPoe

    All good points, although I admit to always laughing when I hear Boston is the most racist city. In my youth it was the city that bused black kids to my suburban school, though technically I think it was my my suburb that picked up the tab, which I think would make it more racist. But the Hub is the Hub, after all.

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  41. Wait! F (Francis) Scott Fitzgerald was named for distant relative Francis Scott Key. Hide your copies of Great Gatsby while you can….
    Besides, his wife was a Southern Belle, with numerous connections to the Confederacy. (On the other hand, she gets some Brownie points for being a schizophrenic whom feminists adopted as a kind of hero at one point.)

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  42. The right needs to grow a sense of humor. I am all in favor of erecting a few statues of my own. My proposal is to go on eBay and get a $100 black lawn jockey and plant it in the middle of the peoples park at night. Using about 20 bags of quick drying cement it can be permanently affixed just in time for freedom of speech week. Another good idea would be to build one of Trayvon and Michael Brown but they would already be in the prone position so the crowds would not have to pull them down. My piece de resistance would be to build a one piece 20 foot tall paper mache MLK wearing a red MAGA hat.

    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    Rest assured that if you actually did any of that we would quickly learn about just how many security cameras there really are.
  43. PhDPepper says:

    Will F. Scott Fitzgerald soon follow? At least school students won’t have to read that bloody awful book of his.

    Read More
  44. @Anon
    I'm quite cynical about our leftist youth. They frequently come from rich families whose businesses benefit from cheap foreign labor.

    This.

    What the Boomers did covertly by neglect the Millennials do overtly with vandalism and violence.

    Either way it’s a nasty business.

    Read More
  45. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Sunbeam
    Hmmm wonder if these guys have given any thought to their endgame. What exactly is going to be the common framework that holds us together as a nation? As opposed to a collection of interests, that may wind up in conflict? I mean what exactly is the rationale that anyone bother to work to a common good, as opposed to the interests of their particular group?

    They seem to think that you can wipe away all this stuff, and things will work as they always have, just more "diverse." But an alternate viewpoint is there won't be any center left, let alone that center holding.

    Do they seriously think a bunch of statues of Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King is going to shame, or inspire, or whatever a bunch of Mexicans or Chinese into kowtowing to the present system?

    Hmmm wonder if these guys have given any thought to their endgame.

    Ha! Good one!

    Read More
  46. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @NJ Transit Commuter
    There are stories from the Cultural Revolution in China about traffic accidents because people were afraid to stop at red lights. We're getting close to that level of silliness in the American Cultural Revolution now.

    Not quite what you mean, but in many ‘hoods here in the USA, people are already afraid to stop at red lights. Sort of like in South Africa, and for much the same reason.

    Read More
  47. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Ok, perhaps now is the time to either

    1. Nationalize all statues of US Historical persons, with mandatory 10 yr prison terms and harsh fines.

    2. Move all statues that are located in blue states and hence face the greater likelihood of damage. Example: Move all of Baltimore's historical statues to a predominantly red state and in a relatively solid red area county. And then hire some local police to safeguard the statues a few times per week.

    "You know, I'm half inclined to believe, that there's a rational explanation for all of this."--Caldicott, in Alfred Hitchcock's 1938 "The Lady Vanishes".

    Example: Move all of Baltimore’s historical statues to a predominantly red state and in a relatively solid red area county.

    Not just ‘historical statues’, but monuments, grand old buildings, museums, parks, Mt Vernon Place, Guilford, Fort McHenry, Downtown, Homeland, Federal Hill, Camden Yards, Johns Hopkins, etc etc etc.

    A tad easier to just move the people, no? The ones giving offense I mean. Separation. Say it with me now.

    Read More
  48. Ironsides says:
    @Raymund Eich
    Those few of us who know US history know the line in the third verse about "hirelings and slaves" refers to the Hessian mercenaries, mostly conscripts whose regiments were rented out by their German princelings, used by the British in the American Revolution. But to the hundreds of millions of historical illiterates in this country, "slaves" could only be a pejorative reference to blacks.

    That's the only even faintly fact-based grounding I can see for "the national anthem is racist." Otherwise, as other commenters have noted, it's purely "white people take pride in it" = "it's racist."

    Having spoken to the insane (i.e. leftists) on precisely this topic. It’s nothing sophisticated; it’s the “hireling and slave” line, as you suspect. That’s it; nothing more or less.

    I’ve explained to them that “slave” means “draftee of a monarch,” that the Americans of the era sometimes referred to white Europeans as the “slaves of absolutism,” and that they stated that defeat by the British would render them “slaves” (e.g. subjects of a monarch, not black-skinned people in cotton fields).

    Such explanations, invoking fact as they did, were utterly vain. They went right on screeching about the anthem hating on black bodies, or whatever. They are profoundly ignorant, stupid, and insanely arrogant.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Logan
    It's the "niggardly" story all over again. Historical facts and etymology are irrelevant.

    Was listening to the great Jordan Peterson while driving last night. He made an interesting point.

    Conservatives tend to see the story of America as one of liberation and increasing freedom. Liberals see it as one of oppression and tyranny of oppressed minorities.

    Then they argue about which viewpoint is true.

    Well, the truth is that they are both true, but with the latter increasingly less so over time. But it takes a sophisticated, intelligent person to understand the idea that a society is more than a single label.

  49. @Chrisnonymous
    Indeed. It's hard to believe blacks can stand to use that racist money covered with the faces and symbols of racist whites. We ought to have multiple currencies. Each ethnic group in the US can mint its own and decide whether to accept the currency of other ethnic groups. They can all be exchangeable for the IMF's international XDRs.

    Or, we can just use Chinese yuan. The Confucian solution that Yan Shen no doubt approves of is to have all people subject to the Son of Heaven. The Japanese had a motto, something like "the eight corners of the world under one roof", back when they were running the East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere.

    You see, everyone can live together as long as the ruler is strong.

    The Chinese used to use Mexican silver dollars as money; we could do the same thing and have REAL money instead!

    “A coin’s journey from the silver mines of the Americas to a remote hill region in Asia reveals much about China’s remarkable rise to modernity, according to political culture expert Professor Michael Dutton.”

    “This coin travels the route of Chinese modernity. It was part of an early currency colonialism that transformed the way Chinese thought about the question of ‘value’ as a result of their encounter with the West,” he says.

    “Traditionally Chinese people would calculate value on the basis of the weight of silver. Through coins like the Mexican silver dollar, we start to see a new basis of calculation emerging. They move from weight to ‘face value’.

    “The advent of the coin can also be seen as the harbinger of the modern money market. Some scholars have speculated that its arrival marked the beginning of futures markets.”

    “Because of the discovery of vast reserves of silver in Spanish controlled America, coinage often came from that region. The most popular coin was one produced after the Mexican War of Independence which had an eagle on it,” Prof Dutton says.

    “The Mexican silver dollar became the dominant currency of southern and eastern China in the 1830s and it was so ubiquitous that people started to forge it. It is said that the communists somehow got hold of one of the Mexican silver dollar counterfeiter’s moulds and used it to produce their first coin in 1928.

    “The coin’s journey to China reveals much about trade between developing countries which was a precursor to modern global economics and trade, such as China coming into a money-based economic system. Historically, this coin connects the dots between that prehistory and modern China.”

    http://w3.unisa.edu.au/unisanews/2014/September/story11.asp

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    Mexican and Spanish-America minted silver dollars were also the dominant currency in the USA in colonial times and many decades afterward. The Coinage Act of 1857 demanded only American minted coins be used, and to facilitate the conversation the size and purity of the US Dollar was made identical to the Spanish Dollar. It took another 15 or 20 years before the law was completely complied with.
  50. Maj. Kong says:
    @Jason Roberts
    This is the hope of the Right, but what evidence is there it will actually happen? Right-wingers are obedient and compliant. They'll only go to war if someone they recognize as having authority to launch a war does in fact do so. That ain't ever gonna happen.

    The average Joe Boomer Conservative is still foolishly supporting his sportsball teams.

    Perhaps we should have Generation Identitaire style protests at NCAA/NFL football games in the mold of what nude streakers have done in the past. Culture Jamming.

    The black left is helping us out with their rage at Colin Kapernick not being signed, this is a significant chance to damage a major cultural adversary.

    Read More
  51. Mr. Anon says:

    It is a lousy anthem It’s about the flag, not the country.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Logan
    Metonymy. Look it up.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metonymy
    , @Anonymous
    I don't even believe you said that.
  52. Whiskey says: • Website

    Where this is all headed is perfectly obvious. Slavery for White men, rule by Black men and women. This is what the coalition of the fringes, actually the CENTER of the United States of America such as it is in the pozzed debauched state it is in, represents.

    Straight White men are the weirdos and fringes. Does not matter if they built and bled for this nation, they have no power and all social power is wielded by Blacks and White women. When was the last time people tore into Black men for their many faults: philandering illegitimacy, laziness, stupidity, violence, inability to speak even anything approximating English, cruelty to animals for sadistic pleasure, etc? Never since 1919. Since Women got the vote it has been nothing but inching towards Black Rule over White Men.

    This is the lesson — live with other races either yours dominates in all ways — numerically and physically and socially and economically and puts the boot in; or you get the reverse. There is no middle way.

    WHEN, not if Madame Hillary! assumes the Presidency after Trumps impeachment by the Democratic Congress and removal by the McConnell Senate, a series of decrees essentially enslaving White men to the great applause of White women and non-Whites is coming. THAT is the end point.

    And no, there will be no resistance. The military and police are hopeless cucked, Able to blow up towelheads in Afghanistan but unable to even lift a finger as they too are herded up (LAST) to the gulags and prison camps. If I’m lucky I will see you all in the new Manzanar or whatever prison camp they cook up for most White men.

    THAT is the endpoint. Rule by Blacks and White women and White male slavery. If I had the money I’d move to anyplace that is just nasty enough to avoid the African exodus and just nice enough to survive — Argentina or Peru or Ecuador or Uruguay. [New Zealand is run by its women who have both a bad case like all White women of Jungle Fever and HATE HATE HATE for White men. So they'll invite as many Africans as they can.] Maybe I’ll follow my brother to Japan; he speaks a bit of Japanese.

    Read More
  53. Pericles says:
    @Dr. X

    A monument commemorating “Star-Spangled Banner” author Francis Scott Key was vandalized in downtown Baltimore, officials said Wednesday.

    Photographs show the monument, at 1200 N. Eutaw St., covered with red paint and the words “racist anthem” written in black.
     
    Can you imagine what the reaction would be if alt-righters started vandalizing Martin Luther King statues and spray-painting "philandering Negro communist" on them?

    Can you imagine what the reaction would be if alt-righters started vandalizing Martin Luther King statues and spray-painting “philandering Negro communist” on them?

    “Phila-what?”

    Read More
  54. eah says:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The psychos really are in charge now, almost. I wonder if our latinx contingent will take offense. They are both Latin & Amerind. Though mostly the latter, I grant you.
  55. George says:
    @Sunbeam
    Hmmm wonder if these guys have given any thought to their endgame. What exactly is going to be the common framework that holds us together as a nation? As opposed to a collection of interests, that may wind up in conflict? I mean what exactly is the rationale that anyone bother to work to a common good, as opposed to the interests of their particular group?

    They seem to think that you can wipe away all this stuff, and things will work as they always have, just more "diverse." But an alternate viewpoint is there won't be any center left, let alone that center holding.

    Do they seriously think a bunch of statues of Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King is going to shame, or inspire, or whatever a bunch of Mexicans or Chinese into kowtowing to the present system?

    “Hmmm wonder if these guys have given any thought to their endgame. What exactly is going to be the common framework that holds us together ”

    The is what public school is for.

    Read More
  56. Lot says:
    @Daniel Chieh
    Cultural Revolution spiraled pretty fast too.

    The first stage of the Culteral Revolution was similar to the mob harassment against Bret Weinstein. Basically have a few dozen SJW students surround him and yell obscenities whenever he went on campus, including inside his scheduled undergraduate biology classes.

    I understand though at other points the Chinamen students would group cannibalize counterrevolutionary wrecker professors.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    It's just so mind-blowing. As students we held our professors in the highest esteem, and they in turn did their best to challenge us.

    Now that's been completely inverted.
  57. Logan says:
    @Ironsides
    Having spoken to the insane (i.e. leftists) on precisely this topic. It's nothing sophisticated; it's the "hireling and slave" line, as you suspect. That's it; nothing more or less.

    I've explained to them that "slave" means "draftee of a monarch," that the Americans of the era sometimes referred to white Europeans as the "slaves of absolutism," and that they stated that defeat by the British would render them "slaves" (e.g. subjects of a monarch, not black-skinned people in cotton fields).

    Such explanations, invoking fact as they did, were utterly vain. They went right on screeching about the anthem hating on black bodies, or whatever. They are profoundly ignorant, stupid, and insanely arrogant.

    It’s the “niggardly” story all over again. Historical facts and etymology are irrelevant.

    Was listening to the great Jordan Peterson while driving last night. He made an interesting point.

    Conservatives tend to see the story of America as one of liberation and increasing freedom. Liberals see it as one of oppression and tyranny of oppressed minorities.

    Then they argue about which viewpoint is true.

    Well, the truth is that they are both true, but with the latter increasingly less so over time. But it takes a sophisticated, intelligent person to understand the idea that a society is more than a single label.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    Depends which conservatives you talk to. Some still regard the Revolution as an act of treason.
  58. Lot says:
    @Joe Stalin
    The Chinese used to use Mexican silver dollars as money; we could do the same thing and have REAL money instead!

    "A coin’s journey from the silver mines of the Americas to a remote hill region in Asia reveals much about China’s remarkable rise to modernity, according to political culture expert Professor Michael Dutton."

    “This coin travels the route of Chinese modernity. It was part of an early currency colonialism that transformed the way Chinese thought about the question of ‘value’ as a result of their encounter with the West,” he says.

    “Traditionally Chinese people would calculate value on the basis of the weight of silver. Through coins like the Mexican silver dollar, we start to see a new basis of calculation emerging. They move from weight to ‘face value’.

    “The advent of the coin can also be seen as the harbinger of the modern money market. Some scholars have speculated that its arrival marked the beginning of futures markets.”

    “Because of the discovery of vast reserves of silver in Spanish controlled America, coinage often came from that region. The most popular coin was one produced after the Mexican War of Independence which had an eagle on it,” Prof Dutton says.

    “The Mexican silver dollar became the dominant currency of southern and eastern China in the 1830s and it was so ubiquitous that people started to forge it. It is said that the communists somehow got hold of one of the Mexican silver dollar counterfeiter’s moulds and used it to produce their first coin in 1928.

    “The coin’s journey to China reveals much about trade between developing countries which was a precursor to modern global economics and trade, such as China coming into a money-based economic system. Historically, this coin connects the dots between that prehistory and modern China.”

    http://w3.unisa.edu.au/unisanews/2014/September/story11.asp

    Mexican and Spanish-America minted silver dollars were also the dominant currency in the USA in colonial times and many decades afterward. The Coinage Act of 1857 demanded only American minted coins be used, and to facilitate the conversation the size and purity of the US Dollar was made identical to the Spanish Dollar. It took another 15 or 20 years before the law was completely complied with.

    Read More
  59. DFH says:
    @Sunbeam
    Hmmm wonder if these guys have given any thought to their endgame. What exactly is going to be the common framework that holds us together as a nation? As opposed to a collection of interests, that may wind up in conflict? I mean what exactly is the rationale that anyone bother to work to a common good, as opposed to the interests of their particular group?

    They seem to think that you can wipe away all this stuff, and things will work as they always have, just more "diverse." But an alternate viewpoint is there won't be any center left, let alone that center holding.

    Do they seriously think a bunch of statues of Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King is going to shame, or inspire, or whatever a bunch of Mexicans or Chinese into kowtowing to the present system?

    Hmmm wonder if these guys have given any thought to their endgame. What exactly is going to be the common framework that holds us together as a nation?

    After all, blacks are well-known for their long time preferences and ability for planning. That is why they make such good borrowers, and football players are known for their wise financial decisions

    Read More
  60. guest says:
    @Joe Stalin
    All Four Stanzas

    By Isaac Asimov

    Introductory Note. Unless you're already well acquainted with our "national anthem," this interesting piece by the late Isaac Asimov will be an eye-opener. It was for me. It's especially appropriate at a time when there is much talk of tossing out this difficult-to-sing and difficult-to-comprehend old song in favor of something that better suits Ray Charles' voice. You'll understand the song much better after you read Mr. Asimov's explanation.--Hardly Waite, Gazette Senior Editor.



    I have a weakness--I am crazy, absolutely nuts, about our national anthem.

    The words are difficult and the tune is almost impossible, but frequently when I'm taking a shower I sing it with as much power and emotion as I can. It shakes me up every time.

    I was once asked to speak at a luncheon. Taking my life in my hands, I announced I was going to sing our national anthem--all four stanzas.

    This was greeted with loud groans. One man closed the door to the kitchen, where the noise of dishes and cutlery was loud and distracting. "Thanks, Herb," I said.

    "That's all right," he said. "It was at the request of the kitchen staff."

    I explained the background of the anthem and then sang all four stanzas.

    Let me tell you, those people had never heard it before--or had never really listened. I got a standing ovation. But it was not me; it was the anthem.

    More recently, while conducting a seminar, I told my students the story of the anthem and sang all four stanzas. Again there was a wild ovation and prolonged applause. And again, it was the anthem and not me.

    So now let me tell you how it came to be written.

    In 1812, the United States went to war with Great Britain, primarily over freedom of the seas. We were in the right. For two years, we held off the British, even though we were still a rather weak country. Great Britain was in a life and death struggle with Napoleon. In fact, just as the United States declared war, Napoleon marched off to invade Russia. If he won, as everyone expected, he would control Europe, and Great Britain would be isolated. It was no time for her to be involved in an American war.

    At first, our seamen proved better than the British. After we won a battle on Lake Erie in 1813, the American commander, Oliver Hazard Perry, sent the message "We have met the enemy and they are ours." However, the weight of the British navy beat down our ships eventually. New England, hard-hit by a tightening blockade, threatened secession.

    Meanwhile, Napoleon was beaten in Russia and in 1814 was forced to abdicate. Great Britain now turned its attention to the United States, launching a three-pronged attack. The northern prong was to come down Lake Champlain toward New York and seize parts of New England. The southern prong was to go up the Mississippi, take New Orleans and paralyze the west. The central prong was to head for the mid-Atlantic states and then attack Baltimore, the greatest port south of New York. If Baltimore was taken, the nation, which still hugged the Atlantic coast, could be split in two. The fate of the United States, then, rested to a large extent on the success or failure of the central prong.

    The British reached the American coast, and on August 24, 1814, took Washington, D. C. Then they moved up the Chesapeake Bay toward Baltimore. On September 12, they arrived and found 1000 men in Fort McHenry, whose guns controlled the harbor. If the British wished to take Baltimore, they would have to take the fort.

    On one of the British ships was an aged physician, William Beanes, who had been arrested in Maryland and brought along as a prisoner. Francis Scott Key, a lawyer and friend of the physician, had come to the ship to negotiate his release. The British captain was willing, but the two Americans would have to wait. It was now the night of September 13, and the bombardment of Fort McHenry was about to start.

    As twilight deepened, Key and Beanes saw the American flag flying over Fort McHenry. Through the night, they heard bombs bursting and saw the red glare of rockets. They knew the fort was resisting and the American flag was still flying. But toward morning the bombardment ceased, and a dread silence fell. Either Fort McHenry had surrendered and the British flag flew above it, or the bombardment had failed and the American flag still flew.

    As dawn began to brighten the eastern sky, Key and Beanes stared out at the fort, trying to see which flag flew over it. He and the physician must have asked each other over and over, "Can you see the flag?"

    After it was all finished, Key wrote a four stanza poem telling the events of the night. Called "The Defence of Fort M'Henry," it was published in newspapers and swept the nation. Someone noted that the words fit an old English tune called "To Anacreon in Heaven" --a difficult melody with an uncomfortably large vocal range. For obvious reasons, Key's work became known as "The Star Spangled Banner," and in 1931 Congress declared it the official anthem of the United States.

    Now that you know the story, here are the words. Presumably, the old doctor is speaking. This is what he asks Key

    Oh! say, can you see, by the dawn's early light,
    W hat so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming?
    Whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight,
    O'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming?

    And the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
    Gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there.
    Oh! say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave,
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

    "Ramparts," in case you don't know, are the protective walls or other elevations that surround a fort. The first stanza asks a question. The second gives an answer

    On the shore, dimly seen thro' the mist of the deep,
    Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes,
    What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep.
    As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?

    Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam,
    In full glory reflected, now shines on the stream
    'Tis the star-spangled banner. Oh! long may it wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!



    "The towering steep" is again, the ramparts. The bombardment has failed, and the British can do nothing more but sail away, their mission a failure.

    In the third stanza, I feel Key allows himself to gloat over the American triumph. In the aftermath of the bombardment, Key probably was in no mood to act otherwise.

    During World War II, when the British were our staunchest allies, this third stanza was not sung. However, I know it, so here it is

    And where is that band who so vauntingly swore
    That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion
    A home and a country should leave us no more?
    Their blood has washed out their foul footstep's pollution.

    No refuge could save the hireling and slave
    From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave,
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.



    The fourth stanza, a pious hope for the future, should be sung more slowly than the other three and with even deeper feeling.

    Oh! thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand
    Between their loved homes and the war's desolation,
    Blest with vict'ry and peace, may the Heav'n - rescued land
    Praise the Pow'r that hath made and preserved us a nation.

    Then conquer we must, for our cause is just,
    And this be our motto--"In God is our trust."
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

    I hope you will look at the national anthem with new eyes. Listen to it, the next time you have a chance, with new ears.

    And don't let them ever take it away.

    --Isaac Asimov, March 1991

    http://purewatergazette.net/asimov.htm

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXulnF3twtQ

    “in favor of something that better suits Ray Charles’ voice”

    America the Beautiful better suits everyone’s voice. So does God Bless America, written by Asimov’s fellow Russian Jew, Irving Berlin.

    This essay is all about the poem. That’s fine. Enjoy it, recite it as often as you like. But anthems are anthems, dangit! The tune is infinitely more important than the lyrics.

    Read More
  61. guest says:
    @cwhatfuture
    How is the Star Spangled Banner racist?
    Does the word "racist" have any meaning at all beyond "this is something I don't like"?
    Away from the games, the words can still move.


    Oh, say, can you see, by the dawn's early light,
    What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming?
    Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight,
    O'er the ramparts we watch'd, were so gallantly streaming?
    And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
    Gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there.
    O say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

    Reasons Why the National Anthem is Racist, by guest:

    #1. It is the anthem of the U.S. The U.S. is racist. Possibly the most racist thing ever.

    #2. It was written by a white. Whites are racists. Definitely the most racist of all races.

    #3. Maryland was a slave state.

    #4. Francis Scott Key probably owned slaves or looked twice at a black in a convenience store once.

    #5. Key’s second cousin three times removed and namesake F. Scott Fitzgerald evinced knowledge of the writings of Madison Grant and Lothrop Stoddard, and therefore was clearly a crimethinker. (I don’t actually expect any Baltimorean vandals to under a word I just typed.)

    #6. Great Britain outlawed the slave trade slightly before the U S., and therefore was marginally less racist. Being run by white people, it was of course still ultra-maxi-uber-totally racist.

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  62. guest says:
    @Sunbeam
    Hmmm wonder if these guys have given any thought to their endgame. What exactly is going to be the common framework that holds us together as a nation? As opposed to a collection of interests, that may wind up in conflict? I mean what exactly is the rationale that anyone bother to work to a common good, as opposed to the interests of their particular group?

    They seem to think that you can wipe away all this stuff, and things will work as they always have, just more "diverse." But an alternate viewpoint is there won't be any center left, let alone that center holding.

    Do they seriously think a bunch of statues of Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King is going to shame, or inspire, or whatever a bunch of Mexicans or Chinese into kowtowing to the present system?

    The only goal is to root out the Old Order, which happens to be a white order. Doesn’t matter what they have planned next, because with the Old Order goes Western Civilization, and they go with it.

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    • Replies: @Opinionator
    The only goal is to root out the white order, which happens to be the Old Order.
  63. @guest
    The only goal is to root out the Old Order, which happens to be a white order. Doesn't matter what they have planned next, because with the Old Order goes Western Civilization, and they go with it.

    The only goal is to root out the white order, which happens to be the Old Order.

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  64. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Mr. Anon
    It is a lousy anthem It's about the flag, not the country.

    I don’t even believe you said that.

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  65. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @eah
    https://twitter.com/prageru/status/908040937258991616

    The psychos really are in charge now, almost. I wonder if our latinx contingent will take offense. They are both Latin & Amerind. Though mostly the latter, I grant you.

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  66. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Lot
    The first stage of the Culteral Revolution was similar to the mob harassment against Bret Weinstein. Basically have a few dozen SJW students surround him and yell obscenities whenever he went on campus, including inside his scheduled undergraduate biology classes.

    I understand though at other points the Chinamen students would group cannibalize counterrevolutionary wrecker professors.

    It’s just so mind-blowing. As students we held our professors in the highest esteem, and they in turn did their best to challenge us.

    Now that’s been completely inverted.

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  67. @11 Bravo

    There is no content in the Star Spangled Banner that could be considered racist,
     
    I think, I write I think, that they are referring to this line as racist:

    No refuge could save the hireling and slave

    Supposedly it refers to the the slaves who were freed by the British in exchange for fighting against the USA. They formed a group called the Colonial Marines.

    I am not saying this is so. But I came across it at some wacko site like Slate, the Atlantic or something similar.

    That was my thought as well. As you put it, some wacko lefty site had a piece about how the line “No refuge could save the hireling and slave” was a reference to freed slaves fighting for the Brits. And then some other blogger who really should have known better (I forget who it was, but I remember being shocked at his ignorance) actually took this seriously.

    Of course, anyone who reads things written before, say, yesterday, recognizes that “slave” was commonly used snark for a subject of a monarch (as opposed to citizens who governed themselves).

    But when you consider that there are people who seriously believe the word “picnic” comes from “pick a ni99er [for lynching],” no level of stupidity will surprise you.

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  68. @AM
    This is going downhill fast.

    I'm bit shocked at how fast the gap is widening between feelings and any semblance of reality.

    Q: Is ____ racist?

    A: Yes.

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  69. @Perspective
    Related, video from Black Pigeon Speaks on why the West hates and wants to destroy itself:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NanumqpBDtA

    Excellent video!!!

    My only criticism of “Black Pigeon” is that while for those of us at isteve at least, it is clear he is thoroughly woke…. he is also very careful to not violate the edict of TWMNBN!!! So for the time being he is not kicked off Youtube, but merely demonitized and shadow banned.

    However, the above video is an “alt-lighter” version that was clearly heavily influenced by this recent video by VERTIGO POLITIX. New Vertigo Politix videos have been banned by Youtube because they are clearly up front about the JQ and do not pull their punches.

    The Perversion of the Western Foundation Myth

    https://vid.me/HHk6F

    Check out all the Vertigo Politix videos!!

    Don’t waste your time going to Youtube, it does not have a complete set of Vertigo Politix videos and is shadow banning the ones it has.

    Go here instead

    https://vid.me/VertigoPolitix

    Check out especially these banned by Youtube.

    The Indispensable Future of White Masculinity
    A simply outstanding take on Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar.

    https://vid.me/nfrkr

    The Tactics of Immigration

    https://vid.me/Do4lB

    The New Confederacy

    https://vid.me/Uyiwf

    START SWITCHING TO VIDME!!! The hell with Youtube!!!

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  70. @Joe Stalin
    All Four Stanzas

    By Isaac Asimov

    Introductory Note. Unless you're already well acquainted with our "national anthem," this interesting piece by the late Isaac Asimov will be an eye-opener. It was for me. It's especially appropriate at a time when there is much talk of tossing out this difficult-to-sing and difficult-to-comprehend old song in favor of something that better suits Ray Charles' voice. You'll understand the song much better after you read Mr. Asimov's explanation.--Hardly Waite, Gazette Senior Editor.



    I have a weakness--I am crazy, absolutely nuts, about our national anthem.

    The words are difficult and the tune is almost impossible, but frequently when I'm taking a shower I sing it with as much power and emotion as I can. It shakes me up every time.

    I was once asked to speak at a luncheon. Taking my life in my hands, I announced I was going to sing our national anthem--all four stanzas.

    This was greeted with loud groans. One man closed the door to the kitchen, where the noise of dishes and cutlery was loud and distracting. "Thanks, Herb," I said.

    "That's all right," he said. "It was at the request of the kitchen staff."

    I explained the background of the anthem and then sang all four stanzas.

    Let me tell you, those people had never heard it before--or had never really listened. I got a standing ovation. But it was not me; it was the anthem.

    More recently, while conducting a seminar, I told my students the story of the anthem and sang all four stanzas. Again there was a wild ovation and prolonged applause. And again, it was the anthem and not me.

    So now let me tell you how it came to be written.

    In 1812, the United States went to war with Great Britain, primarily over freedom of the seas. We were in the right. For two years, we held off the British, even though we were still a rather weak country. Great Britain was in a life and death struggle with Napoleon. In fact, just as the United States declared war, Napoleon marched off to invade Russia. If he won, as everyone expected, he would control Europe, and Great Britain would be isolated. It was no time for her to be involved in an American war.

    At first, our seamen proved better than the British. After we won a battle on Lake Erie in 1813, the American commander, Oliver Hazard Perry, sent the message "We have met the enemy and they are ours." However, the weight of the British navy beat down our ships eventually. New England, hard-hit by a tightening blockade, threatened secession.

    Meanwhile, Napoleon was beaten in Russia and in 1814 was forced to abdicate. Great Britain now turned its attention to the United States, launching a three-pronged attack. The northern prong was to come down Lake Champlain toward New York and seize parts of New England. The southern prong was to go up the Mississippi, take New Orleans and paralyze the west. The central prong was to head for the mid-Atlantic states and then attack Baltimore, the greatest port south of New York. If Baltimore was taken, the nation, which still hugged the Atlantic coast, could be split in two. The fate of the United States, then, rested to a large extent on the success or failure of the central prong.

    The British reached the American coast, and on August 24, 1814, took Washington, D. C. Then they moved up the Chesapeake Bay toward Baltimore. On September 12, they arrived and found 1000 men in Fort McHenry, whose guns controlled the harbor. If the British wished to take Baltimore, they would have to take the fort.

    On one of the British ships was an aged physician, William Beanes, who had been arrested in Maryland and brought along as a prisoner. Francis Scott Key, a lawyer and friend of the physician, had come to the ship to negotiate his release. The British captain was willing, but the two Americans would have to wait. It was now the night of September 13, and the bombardment of Fort McHenry was about to start.

    As twilight deepened, Key and Beanes saw the American flag flying over Fort McHenry. Through the night, they heard bombs bursting and saw the red glare of rockets. They knew the fort was resisting and the American flag was still flying. But toward morning the bombardment ceased, and a dread silence fell. Either Fort McHenry had surrendered and the British flag flew above it, or the bombardment had failed and the American flag still flew.

    As dawn began to brighten the eastern sky, Key and Beanes stared out at the fort, trying to see which flag flew over it. He and the physician must have asked each other over and over, "Can you see the flag?"

    After it was all finished, Key wrote a four stanza poem telling the events of the night. Called "The Defence of Fort M'Henry," it was published in newspapers and swept the nation. Someone noted that the words fit an old English tune called "To Anacreon in Heaven" --a difficult melody with an uncomfortably large vocal range. For obvious reasons, Key's work became known as "The Star Spangled Banner," and in 1931 Congress declared it the official anthem of the United States.

    Now that you know the story, here are the words. Presumably, the old doctor is speaking. This is what he asks Key

    Oh! say, can you see, by the dawn's early light,
    W hat so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming?
    Whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight,
    O'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming?

    And the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
    Gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there.
    Oh! say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave,
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

    "Ramparts," in case you don't know, are the protective walls or other elevations that surround a fort. The first stanza asks a question. The second gives an answer

    On the shore, dimly seen thro' the mist of the deep,
    Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes,
    What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep.
    As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?

    Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam,
    In full glory reflected, now shines on the stream
    'Tis the star-spangled banner. Oh! long may it wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!



    "The towering steep" is again, the ramparts. The bombardment has failed, and the British can do nothing more but sail away, their mission a failure.

    In the third stanza, I feel Key allows himself to gloat over the American triumph. In the aftermath of the bombardment, Key probably was in no mood to act otherwise.

    During World War II, when the British were our staunchest allies, this third stanza was not sung. However, I know it, so here it is

    And where is that band who so vauntingly swore
    That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion
    A home and a country should leave us no more?
    Their blood has washed out their foul footstep's pollution.

    No refuge could save the hireling and slave
    From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave,
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.



    The fourth stanza, a pious hope for the future, should be sung more slowly than the other three and with even deeper feeling.

    Oh! thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand
    Between their loved homes and the war's desolation,
    Blest with vict'ry and peace, may the Heav'n - rescued land
    Praise the Pow'r that hath made and preserved us a nation.

    Then conquer we must, for our cause is just,
    And this be our motto--"In God is our trust."
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

    I hope you will look at the national anthem with new eyes. Listen to it, the next time you have a chance, with new ears.

    And don't let them ever take it away.

    --Isaac Asimov, March 1991

    http://purewatergazette.net/asimov.htm

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXulnF3twtQ

    The Star-Spangled Banner is a beautiful anthem, I say as a Canadian (ours is rather ordinary).

    But I can see how poor singers might have trouble with the tune. But both the words and tune are lovely.

    It’s true that after all this time, the British and Canada are no longer enemies, but it certainly was the case at the time.

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  71. MBlanc46 says:
    @cwhatfuture
    How is the Star Spangled Banner racist?
    Does the word "racist" have any meaning at all beyond "this is something I don't like"?
    Away from the games, the words can still move.


    Oh, say, can you see, by the dawn's early light,
    What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming?
    Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight,
    O'er the ramparts we watch'd, were so gallantly streaming?
    And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
    Gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there.
    O say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

    If it’s done by a white person, it’s racist. Their entire philosophy is: Whites are evil.

    Read More
  72. Lagertha says:

    This country is degenerating much faster as a result of American people denigrating all cultural pieces of history before today. At this point, most anihilists are like the Taliban boys who blew up the Bamayan Budhas. Destruction is their mantra. And, without daddy & mommy’s money, where will these protestors be in a year? that’s the real question. After the smashing of statues…what’s left to smash???? Most monument/statue smashers are white kids…wtf is wrong with them? Cut off the money, I say.

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  73. If you like “The Star Spangled Banner,” you’ll love the official Maryland state song, “Maryland, My Maryland,” written by secessionist Jamer Ryder Randall at the time of the War Between the States. It refers to Lincoln as a despot, tyrant and vandal and calls the Northern armies “scum.” Randall was buried in Georgia, and there is a statue of him in Augusta. Also, an elementary school in Clinton, Maryland is named for him. Wonder how long that willlt?

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  74. res says:
    @Prof. Woland
    The right needs to grow a sense of humor. I am all in favor of erecting a few statues of my own. My proposal is to go on eBay and get a $100 black lawn jockey and plant it in the middle of the peoples park at night. Using about 20 bags of quick drying cement it can be permanently affixed just in time for freedom of speech week. Another good idea would be to build one of Trayvon and Michael Brown but they would already be in the prone position so the crowds would not have to pull them down. My piece de resistance would be to build a one piece 20 foot tall paper mache MLK wearing a red MAGA hat.

    Rest assured that if you actually did any of that we would quickly learn about just how many security cameras there really are.

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  75. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Logan
    It's the "niggardly" story all over again. Historical facts and etymology are irrelevant.

    Was listening to the great Jordan Peterson while driving last night. He made an interesting point.

    Conservatives tend to see the story of America as one of liberation and increasing freedom. Liberals see it as one of oppression and tyranny of oppressed minorities.

    Then they argue about which viewpoint is true.

    Well, the truth is that they are both true, but with the latter increasingly less so over time. But it takes a sophisticated, intelligent person to understand the idea that a society is more than a single label.

    Depends which conservatives you talk to. Some still regard the Revolution as an act of treason.

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  76. Logan says:

    The Revolution was treason. All Revolutions are, by definition, treason.

    I sometimes think it is interesting to contemplate what would have happened had the Revolution failed.

    In the long run, we would probably have ended up as a really, really large and powerful Canada.

    There are much worse fates.

    However, Canada and Oz ended up as they did largely because the Brits learned a very harsh lesson in America. Had they learned a different lesson things might have turned out quite differently here and in those two countries.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    Treason doth never prosper; what's the reason?
  77. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Logan
    The Revolution was treason. All Revolutions are, by definition, treason.

    I sometimes think it is interesting to contemplate what would have happened had the Revolution failed.

    In the long run, we would probably have ended up as a really, really large and powerful Canada.

    There are much worse fates.

    However, Canada and Oz ended up as they did largely because the Brits learned a very harsh lesson in America. Had they learned a different lesson things might have turned out quite differently here and in those two countries.

    Treason doth never prosper; what’s the reason?

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  78. Logan says:

    If it prosper, none dare call it treason.

    If this be treason, make the most of it. They did.

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