The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
American Writers and Their Pet Criminals
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New Reply
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From the Washington Post:

Edgar H. Smith 1934–2017

Death row inmate whose release was championed by William F. Buckley Jr. dies at 83

Mr. Smith was released in 1971 in a case involving the 1957 death of a 15-year-old high school cheerleader, and he became a cause celebre, only to return to prison for another gruesome assault.

By Paul W. Valentine

A couple of generations ago, you almost couldn’t be a big time writer in America without championing the release of some pet inmate, who would then almost immediately get thrown back in the slammer for committing another vicious crime. Buckley had Edgar Smith, Norman Mailer had Jack Abbot, and William Styron had Benjamin Reid.

This kind of naiveté about criminals was widespread in the 1960s. Buckley, Mailer, and Styron were not unworldly men, but they each fell for a crook’s hard-luck story.

 
Hide 231 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
    []
  1. Isn’t this a trend that has accelerated? I don’t warch any of them, but my impression is there is a whole genre of Netflix and HBO documentaries and documentary series whose premise is that they profile some criminal or criminals whose predicament of being incarcerated is due to the malevolence of the prison industrial complex not their own criminal acts.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Matthew McConnagay
    Like this? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3tkFOtM6go
    , @Rifleman

    Buckley had Edgar Smith, Norman Mailer had Jack Abbot, and William Styron had Benjamin Reid.
     
    Don't forget Gore Vidal and Timothy McVeigh. Similar, not in the assumption of innocence but nobility of the cause I guess.
    , @anonymouslee
    the first wildly popular "making a murderer" was about the dramatic tension in being able to easily shift the viewers feelings from "guilty" to "framed" and back again.

    you may be able to guess how this was accomplished: imo it's clear the accused were both guilty and framed. unfortunately, that's still somewhat a dirty little secret about how the sausage is made. I think people don't find this intuitive because in drama someone innocent is usually framed for sinister reasons while in real life someone guilty did too good a job of cleaning up the hard evidence juries now demand.

    OJ for example was the victim of planted evidence. Why, when he was clearly guilty? I don't know but perhaps it's just standard operating procedure for some departments.
    , @bartok
    American Communists (e.g. media Jews with podcasts) still have their pet inmates. Steve's point is that famous writers are on to other subjects and are less naive about insane, violent and/or junkie criminals.

    Famous writers today are obsessed with food, e.g. "Eating Animals" by Foer.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
    Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
    Sharing Comment via Twitter
    /isteve/american-writers-and-their-pet-criminals/#comment-2018576
    More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  2. In Scandinavian countries they coddle their prisoners and release them after laughably short (by american standards) prison terms and yet still have rates of recidivism much lower than the those in the US.

    I know people will be tempted to make the demographic argument. But while demographics certainly explain why there are more criminals in the US than say, Sweden, I’m not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don’t.

    Overall I’m not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I’d be interested to hear peoples thoughts.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Almost Missouri

    "still have rates of recidivism much lower than the those in the US."
     
    With the incoming tide of New Swedes, that'll be over soon.
    , @James Braxton
    Having a racially stratified society corrupts all our institutions.

    It's why we can't have good public schools, inexpensive healthcare, or a lenient criminal justice system.
    , @Paco Wové
    "I’m not sure [demographics] explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the [criminals] in Sweden don’t."

    "Demographics" sounds pretty good to me. What's wrong with it?
    , @S. Anonyia
    I wouldn't want to coddle criminals even if recidivism rates ended up being lower (which I don't think they would for the U.S). Part of why many American conservatives like harsh sentences is for punishment, not just crime prevention.

    Besides, I'm not sure our sentencing is as different from Scandinavia as you think. There are many violent offenders getting out early as it is. Just because they get "life" or "25-30" in a court room doesn't mean they serve the full term. http://www.wthr.com/article/13-investigates-violent-criminals-released-too-soon


    More benign prison sentences would make sense for drug related crimes. It's really absurd that there are people locked away 10 + years for drug related crimes while stuff like sex abuse of children is given 2-5 (if that) by some judges.
    , @bomag

    I’m not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don’t.
     
    I suspect demographics explains this difference. The last time I checked, Swedes in America had a similar crime and recidivism rate as Swedes in Sweden. As Almost Missouri noted, it is now time to run a big experiment where a new cohort is imported into Sweden so we can observe their crime and recidivism rates and be surprised when things don't work out too well.
    , @snorlax
    Pre-WWII, when the Scandinavian countries had right-wing governments and harshly punitive justice systems, they had crime rates hundreds to thousands of times lower than they do today.
    , @Corn
    I'm not a sociologist so I'm winging it here but I'll take a stab at this. Demographics, and historical demographics may play a role. I read years ago that in Switzerland crime rates were lower than the US (no surprise) but that punishments were often more lenient as well. At one time in Switzerland a person convicted of manslaughter or second degree murder could often receive a suspended sentence if their previous criminal record was light. It was suggested that the Swiss could afford this leniency because they were an old nation, people were committing crimes amongst people they knew in mountain towns their families and victims' families had lived in for generations. In America however immigration threw all sorts of all different stripes into crowded urban neighborhoods, and slums formed, and a more dog eat dog thuggish mentality.

    Perhaps Scandinavian nations experiences mirrored the Swiss in some ways. Largely homogeneous communities (until recently) that go back generations. Perhaps even criminals feel rooted? Or the community feels more of a proactive obligation to look after of ex-cons or keep them on the straight and narrow? I don't know.

    , @MBlanc46
    It's because the criminals are Scandinavian.
    , @Yak-15
    Certainly the demographic profile contributes a lot to their success. A LOT. Also, a singular culture/ethnic/race contributes a great deal towards not committing more crimes. Why rob your co-ethnics? Why not take better care of your stupider, less successful co-ethnics?
    , @AnotherDad

    Overall I’m not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I’d be interested to hear peoples thoughts.
     
    I'm sure. In fact, it's one of the things conservatives are--pretty obviously--"rightest" about.

    One of the things that the "left" continually gets "wrong" is getting the incentives right. People aren't behavorialist machines, but they nonetheless react to the environment they are presented with. Give them incentives to behave better ... they'll behave better. Give them incentives to behave worse--what the left always does, crime, welfare, diversity rackets, etc.--they'll behave worse.

    Crime is also one of the clear examples of this. Conservative elected to "get tough on crime" started putting people in jail again for longer sentences and viola! ... crime went down.

    ~~

    There are two reasonable responses to someone who refuses to abide by the laws of their community.
    -- kill them (for serious violations)
    or
    -- expel them.

    Modern societies unfortunately lack the basic "expel them" option. (It would do the world a favor to have a global Devil's Island.) So we have this "temporary expulsion" of sending them off to prison. It's weak sauce. It basically only works because in modern society the payoff for disorganized crime is generally pretty low and if you can keep a lot of these guys locked up past 30, when their testosterone starts ebbing, they come out, survey the situation and don't see any big reason to do criminal crap. It's not like they are "reformed", it's just that they are "retired". And you still have a decent tranche who are more violently sociopathic and will keep doing crime on and on and on.
    , @Crawfurdmuir
    Let's see how much recidivism the Muslim criminals now infesting Sweden have exhibited, once we have (say) ten or twenty years' more data.

    States in the upper Midwest, such as Wisconsin, Minnesota, and North Dakota, once populated largely by immigrant stock from Scandinavia, once had both low crime rates and little recidivism. Capital punishment was abolished in all of them more than a hundred years ago. They rarely executed criminals even when it was on the books, because few were capital offenders.

    Now, crime has a different complexion, and a different character, in those jurisdictions. It is more violent and more frequent, and often gang-related. Police and courts have been slow in adjusting to the new realities. I suspect the same phenomena are occurring in Sweden.
    , @JSM

    know people will be tempted to make the demographic argument. But while demographics certainly explain why there are more criminals in the US than say, Sweden, I’m not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don’t
     
    .

    It's because of the genetic makeup of the people. Perhaps it's the MAOA gene, the so-called warrior
    gene. People who lack the gene can be dissuaded from crime easily, with mild punishment. With few people in the population carrying the gene, the courts can be lenient. In Scandinavia, few carry the warrior gene, so they get away with lax penal system.

    But in America, the warrior gene is more common. People with warrior's gene can't be dissuaded from crime with mild punishment. So, we have not only more criminals, but those criminals are more stubbornly criminal as individuals. So lax penal system here spells disaster.
    , @Jaakko Raipala
    I'd like to see real backing for this claim that Scandinavia has lower recidivism for serious crimes as I suspect its one of those stories of Scandinavian liberal utopia that evaporate on closer examination. Scandinavia does not have across the board lax punishment and in some cases like drugs, damaging state property and financial crimes the consequences are relatively harsh by Western standards. If the statistics are merely about all crimes then these are going to swamp the murder and rape cases.

    The problem is that Scandinavian countries since WWII have adopted a propaganda model of trying to be the ideal countries as imagined by Anglo elites which means that in the English speaking press and academia there are all sorts of bogus statistics floating around glorifying Scandinavia with no one even attempting a skeptical look. Even here commenters are just uncritically swallowing the idea that Scandinavia was some sort of a socialist utopia before non-white immigration.

    We do have the kind of criminal recidivism that simply wouldn't happen in America at all, like serial killers who rape and strangle a woman, go to prison for a few years, get released, rape and murder again, go to prison for a few years, get released... Another thing we have is a proliferation of "crime magazines" (these days the internet) that follow these murderers around and inform us of their faces, names and homes so that in the absence of a government willing to isolate dangerous people we can avoid them ourselves.

    It's nice that immigration has brought some attention to how much of the Scandinavian model is a propaganda lie but there's really a lot more to expose and I wish the rest of the world was interested given how much pats on the back our leaders are getting from the larger countries for imposing this deranged system on us. For a notorious example, we have cases like the same man shooting a young girl that he had kidnapped to rape and then later poaching a deer; the punishment for killing the deer was harsher. A deer is state property but a young girl isn't so the life of a deer means more than the life of a person to the socialist state.
    , @overtime52
    Interesting observation. Light sentences for crime, yet lower recidivism. So the big question is why? I'm not sure! But my take on this matter would be that pre-immigration Sweden was just a better place for your average lower class person (from whose ranks criminals are drawn). Job training, welfare, housing stipend, employment and low general level of social dysfunction. Basically, society was healthier than American society - America has always been pretty violent by north European standards (even including American whites).

    That's my take. But I actually came here to read some cogent conservative responses to the leniency/ low recidivism thing. After all, this phenomenon is a real conundrum if you think that harsh penalties are the only way to achieve a low-crime equilibrium. So I came to the comment's responses (all four of them) hoping to find some later day, USA Han Fei's!

    Alas, no such luck. The main thing on offer was sardonic remarks about how the lenient punishment / low recidivism thing won't hold up under conditions of mass immigration. Well, the question is why it ever worked in the first place! And another comment was simply ideological boilerplate about how killing criminals and exiling them is the only thing that works - but this ideological position didn't engage with the empirical point of actually existing leniency-low-recidivism in Sweden! Hello! Han Fei, Han Fei, whereforever art thou?? If only you could come back, maybe you could articulate the conservative case for harshness! Cuz if you read him he spells it out pretty well!

    I come to Unz because I like seeing heterodox but intelligent points. I find it useful to be confronted with perspectives different form my own. Personally, I think Victor Hugo and Charles Dickens had it right: harsh social conditions create harsh people who create harsh crime, which itself feeds back into the harsh social conditions.

    But I'm open to hearing other points of view; that's why I'm here! So a plea to the commenting conservatives: higher standards, please. Like pull up stats on Swedish recidivism or something. I dunno, just do something. You gotta bring your A game, guys.
    Mic drop!
    , @Lagertha
    It's very different now...crime is rising in Sweden, Finland, Norway. Gun violence was less before the EU; handguns were strictly regulated. With EU came the black market, so guns have proliferated...along with drugs and contraband & human trafficking. Crime is way up....it was creepy this summer. People are breaking into homes/apartments/stealing cars, mugging old people, etc. And, it is almost entirely by immigrants...or non-ethnic Finns.

    Recidivism may have worked in the past, particularly in small towns where shame followed that perp to a penurious, lonely existence, but now, prisons are filling up again in the Nordic countries...and yeah, not with ethnic natives. Fear of deportation helps, but like the Afghan boys who gang raped and set fire to a teen girl, they're still sitting in prison because Finns have never confronted a human bar-b-que victim, let alone a gang rape victim. Nordic countries are not utopia.

    , @ATX Hipster
    What are the recidivism rates for ethnic Swedish criminals vs. New Swedes from Gangrapeistan?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  3. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Perhaps it’s all a symptom of living a sheltered, privileged life.

    There are no harsher critics of blue-collar men than other blue-collar men. Hence, in armies the world over, the NCOs are promoted grunts who know and understand the grunts beneath them – and can be relied upon to know bullshit when they smell it, whilst the officer class, exclusively drawn from the upper classes, and raised in loving, kindhearted, honest, literate homes, are generally too naive and forgiving of the ways of the scoundrel, the cheat, the liar, the trickster, the fraudster, the bully etc. The idea is that the NCO is the ‘bridge’ between the intellect of the officers and the mean roughness of the grunts.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.

    Read More
    • Agree: Abe, BB753, Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @dearieme
    Yup. iSteve should have said 'Buckley, Mailer, and Styron were unworldly men, having each fallen for a crook’s hard-luck story'.
    , @TheJester

    The idea is that the NCO is the ‘bridge’ between the intellect of the officers and the mean roughness of the grunts.
     
    You nailed it. As an officer for 20 years, I quickly learned to rely on senior NCOs for advice, counsel, and direct control over the enlisted ranks. Officers who did not reply on their NCOs had to learn hard lessons the hard way.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.
     
    Of course, today's SJWs would attribute lower class status to class and racial oppression. However, the reality among Baby Boomers was that there was enough fluidity among the economic and social classes in post-WWII America that a person with ambition could get his or her college degree and graduate into the middle class. Perhaps it would take more planning and harder work for some compared to others ... but improving your way of life for yourself and your family was a way of life.

    Today it appears that young people want the good life "gifted" to them.

    A new book by Jean Twenge:

    "iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy -- and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood -- and What That Means for the Rest of Us"

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01N6ACK3B?ref_=cm_sw_r_kb_dp_JlvWzbEY92CDQ&tag=thewaspos09-20&linkCode=kpe
    , @Bill P

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.
     
    And most working class people have no idea about how stingy, ruthless and selfish a certain type of upper class family can be.

    I've known both groups, and I'd have to say that when it comes to dumb behavior the working class may take the cake, but today's upper class beats them by a mile when it comes to "general nastiness."
    , @YetAnotherAnon
    "raised in loving, kindhearted, honest, literate homes, are generally too naive and forgiving of the ways of the scoundrel, the cheat, the liar, the trickster, the fraudster, the bully etc"

    That's a subset of the upper classes, not all of them. How did their forebears get to be upper class? Plenty of psycho bad blood around. Plenty of loving working class homes too.
    , @Big Bill
    Don't forget the utter obliviousness of the upper castes. In my youth, I thought Marie Antoinette was being deliberately cruel when she said, "let them eat cake". She wasn't.
    , @Anon
    Comment of the Year!!!!!!!!!
    , @L Woods
    Military officers haven't been drawn from the "upper classes" in the Western world for quite awhile now. These days I'd say they're only a sub-class or two above the enlisted. The larger point is taken though.
    , @Je Suis Charlie Martel
    I am going to have to agree with Bill P. In my long march through the institutions I have found levels of nastiness and duplicity the higher I get that continue to amaze me... I had to hit eject and go a different way because I could not internalize the life of the lie, and it really has to become an internalized habit if you are going to make it at an elite level... I cracked up when I finally "arrived" and said to myself "this is it?! To hell with these people"... but nor do I romanticize the Cracker, they'll rip you off too, but they seem to think everyone one is in on the scam as if it's a cosmic prank
    , @BEER/ we're all going to die
    Haha. Maybe displays of dumbness by wealthier and higher status sapiens is a (mostly subconscious) display of their status. Demonstrating their disconnectedness and relative safety from their "pets", which are in fact predators (usually *obviously* to any regular joe with eyes) to those left in parts of the human zoo big writers and such have the means to avoid, such convict defenders show they have no skin in the game, they're up in the box seats. Well that's maybe part of it, maybe a better take than claiming that they're mainly just pampered and naive about the lower ranks because they're from a more civilized and moral world, etc.

    Anyway nevermind, but I was reminded of good ole William Cuckley, a real snake apparently. Some of these people's personal lives and politics, whew, us peasants tend not to realize what creeps these people can be. I mean they're so sophisticated and well spoken. http://www.vdare.com/articles/william-f-buckley-jr-rip-sort-of
    , @Louis Renault

    ...the officer class, exclusively drawn from the upper classes,...
     
    Which country's armed forces are you describing, it sure isn't the US.
    , @whoever

    in armies the world over, the NCOs are promoted grunts who know and understand the grunts beneath them – and can be relied upon to know bullshit when they smell it, whilst the officer class, exclusively drawn from the upper classes, and raised in loving, kindhearted, honest, literate homes, are generally too naive and forgiving of the ways of the scoundrel, the cheat, the liar, the trickster, the fraudster, the bully etc.
     
    The only difference I have noticed between enlisted and officers in the American armed forces is that the officers have already gone to college and the enlisted haven't yet -- if they want to. They are both drawn from the same strata of society, by and large, with the same worldview, attitudes, accents and aspirations. Officers were "A" students in high school, enlisted, "B" students; that's about the only difference.
    I did notice a huge difference in the British armed forces: The officers seemed to be from almost a different country from the enlisted, speaking what seemed to be a different language. They exhibited the classic British combination of snooty accent, arrogant incompetence, and knee-jerk anti-Americanism.
    The enlisted personnel, on the other hand, once you could figure out what they were saying -- heavy regional accents were common -- were okay guys, if very poorly led, and trained in tactics that might have worked in northern Ireland in 1970 but were otherwise useless. They were steeped in American pop culture. Most wanted to emigrate to Australia, their dream land of beer, beaches and babes.
    , @HEL

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.
     
    This is of course the root of a lot of liberalism, particularly of the racial variety. Liberals love to talk about empathy. Their empathy is a ludicrous, malignant thing, a brainless and unreflective mixture of projection and condescending sentimentality. In reality a meek, 120 IQ liberal with good impulse control is absolutely incapable of entering the mind of a hyper-aggressive, 75 IQ thug who has no concept of tomorrow. They are worlds apart. The liberal's thought process seems to be, well I can't imagine myself ever doing the things this person did, so obviously this violent thug must have somehow been forced into doing such things by terrible circumstances. Surely he is really me, underneath it all. This applies to a lot of noncriminals too. The left's plans are largely destined to fail because they refuse to accept that even decent, upstanding low class and low intelligence individuals are very different from the genteel, educated classes. They need different methods and programs to thrive. Though of course the left is no longer really interested in helping such people now anyway . . .

    I can't claim to really understand such minds either, but I at least grasp that they are very, very far removed from my own.
    , @MEH 0910

    A Famous Historian - Monty Python and The Holy Grail.
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-HjOeCvm2I
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  4. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    Read More
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Dylan also wrote sympathetic songs about John Wesley Hardin, premier mass murderer of the Old West, and Joey Gallo, violent mobster.
    , @Dave
    I used to go to wrestling practice with a black guy who grew up in the same neighborhood as Carter, and he stated very openly " the ni**a is guilty ". He said everyone in the community knew it, but Carter could count on gullible white liberals to take up his case and promote his story, which is exactly what Dylan did.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  5. Cortes says:

    And then there’s the gals who like the bad boys:

    http://michaelprescott.freeservers.com/romancing-the-stone-cold.html

    Ayn Rand and her ideal guy, William Edward Hickman.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bellecurvie
    That is really fascinating and horrifying. And consider that the Randians at Cato are considered thoughtful, morally upright centrists when it comes to issues involving criminal justice, in particular.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  6. Bubba says:

    Elites like William Buckley, Norman Mailer and William Styron were never literally “mugged by reality” (WFB’s phrase) like normal NYC folks every day. Hence their vocal support for a disastrous, virtual signaling pet project that they did not understand. And it sure led to lenient sentences by Judge Bruce Wright (a.k.a. “Let ‘Em Loose Bruce”) for hardened, sadistic criminals and the subsequent horrible deaths & injuries for the general public when these criminals were soon released. NYC had a huge “white flight” as a result of Messrs. Buckley, Mailer and Stryon advocating an unproven, strange social experiment that was coupled with insane policies by a very liberal Republican Mayor Lindsey (who appointed Judge “Let ‘Em Loose” Bruce Wright).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cloud of Probable Matricide
    I think you mean Irving Kristol's phrase.
    , @Clyde
    Minor point but this judge/maggot was called, "Turn 'em loose Bruce"

    "Wright was given the nickname "Turn 'Em Loose Bruce" by the police officer's unions in New York City because of his bail practices, ..."
    , @Calj35
    There was one writer of that era who had no need for human pets and had no illusions about the "rehabilitation" of violent criminals-Truman Capote. In a great many interviews on the subject, he was adamant that society's response to murder should be relatively swift execution or lifetime incarceration of the convicted perpetrator. Of course, he had somewhat personal and financial reasons for seeing that two particular murderers did not get the benefit of the absurd system we have today where the criminal can almost indefinitely prolong his punishment. But, I think Capote had been more than sufficiently "mugged by reality" during his lifetime to recognize a sob story or other indefensible excuse when he heard one.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  7. Polynikes says:

    Half the harm that is done in this world is due to people who want to feel important. They don’t mean to do harm; but the harm does not interest them. Or they do not see it, or they justify it because they are absorbed in the endless struggle to think well of themselves.

    –T.S. Eliot

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  8. @Bubba
    Elites like William Buckley, Norman Mailer and William Styron were never literally "mugged by reality" (WFB's phrase) like normal NYC folks every day. Hence their vocal support for a disastrous, virtual signaling pet project that they did not understand. And it sure led to lenient sentences by Judge Bruce Wright (a.k.a. "Let 'Em Loose Bruce") for hardened, sadistic criminals and the subsequent horrible deaths & injuries for the general public when these criminals were soon released. NYC had a huge "white flight" as a result of Messrs. Buckley, Mailer and Stryon advocating an unproven, strange social experiment that was coupled with insane policies by a very liberal Republican Mayor Lindsey (who appointed Judge "Let 'Em Loose" Bruce Wright).

    I think you mean Irving Kristol’s phrase.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bubba
    Thank you for the correction!
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  9. @Guy de Champlagne
    In Scandinavian countries they coddle their prisoners and release them after laughably short (by american standards) prison terms and yet still have rates of recidivism much lower than the those in the US.

    I know people will be tempted to make the demographic argument. But while demographics certainly explain why there are more criminals in the US than say, Sweden, I'm not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don't.

    Overall I'm not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I'd be interested to hear peoples thoughts.

    “still have rates of recidivism much lower than the those in the US.”

    With the incoming tide of New Swedes, that’ll be over soon.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TB
    Sweden-the future is now

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3EG5Nl37RsE
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  10. @415 reasons
    Isn't this a trend that has accelerated? I don't warch any of them, but my impression is there is a whole genre of Netflix and HBO documentaries and documentary series whose premise is that they profile some criminal or criminals whose predicament of being incarcerated is due to the malevolence of the prison industrial complex not their own criminal acts.
    Read More
    • Replies: @415 reasons
    That is a mockumentary right?
    , @Lagertha
    Amazing! So funny! Bring it to fruition or reach out to people/whoever - it is too funny and snarky not to explode...even if this is bs. Love, love, love the trailer...even if I was just, majorly, duped! It is funny - will cave to that.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  11. dearieme says:
    @Anonymous
    Perhaps it's all a symptom of living a sheltered, privileged life.

    There are no harsher critics of blue-collar men than other blue-collar men. Hence, in armies the world over, the NCOs are promoted grunts who know and understand the grunts beneath them - and can be relied upon to know bullshit when they smell it, whilst the officer class, exclusively drawn from the upper classes, and raised in loving, kindhearted, honest, literate homes, are generally too naive and forgiving of the ways of the scoundrel, the cheat, the liar, the trickster, the fraudster, the bully etc. The idea is that the NCO is the 'bridge' between the intellect of the officers and the mean roughness of the grunts.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.

    Yup. iSteve should have said ‘Buckley, Mailer, and Styron were unworldly men, having each fallen for a crook’s hard-luck story’.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Everyone in prison is innocent. Just ask them.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  12. TheJester says:
    @Anonymous
    Perhaps it's all a symptom of living a sheltered, privileged life.

    There are no harsher critics of blue-collar men than other blue-collar men. Hence, in armies the world over, the NCOs are promoted grunts who know and understand the grunts beneath them - and can be relied upon to know bullshit when they smell it, whilst the officer class, exclusively drawn from the upper classes, and raised in loving, kindhearted, honest, literate homes, are generally too naive and forgiving of the ways of the scoundrel, the cheat, the liar, the trickster, the fraudster, the bully etc. The idea is that the NCO is the 'bridge' between the intellect of the officers and the mean roughness of the grunts.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.

    The idea is that the NCO is the ‘bridge’ between the intellect of the officers and the mean roughness of the grunts.

    You nailed it. As an officer for 20 years, I quickly learned to rely on senior NCOs for advice, counsel, and direct control over the enlisted ranks. Officers who did not reply on their NCOs had to learn hard lessons the hard way.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.

    Of course, today’s SJWs would attribute lower class status to class and racial oppression. However, the reality among Baby Boomers was that there was enough fluidity among the economic and social classes in post-WWII America that a person with ambition could get his or her college degree and graduate into the middle class. Perhaps it would take more planning and harder work for some compared to others … but improving your way of life for yourself and your family was a way of life.

    Today it appears that young people want the good life “gifted” to them.

    A new book by Jean Twenge:

    “iGen: Why Today’s Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy — and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood — and What That Means for the Rest of Us”

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01N6ACK3B?ref_=cm_sw_r_kb_dp_JlvWzbEY92CDQ&tag=thewaspos09-20&linkCode=kpe

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Wow. You've completely missed your own point. A big part of the the problem today is precisely that one cannot attain any social mobility in many cases, despite the best efforts, intentions, and even luck in the genetic lottery, because smug bastards among the boomers sold our birthright for infinitely appreciating realty (for them; anyone not in on the ground floor can of course now never afford it...); stocks (via cheap labour, first by Chinese, Mexicans, and Indians abroad, but now by Chinese, Mexicans, and Indians here); and so on.

    Congratulate yourself some more about how hard you worked and how lazy everyone under forty is, Cochise.
    , @L Woods

    Today it appears that young people want the good life “gifted” to them.
     
    Oh please. To be in "iGen" is to see haughty boomers with forgettable credentials and lackluster intellects perched in social and professional positions a millennial would have had to do absolutely everything right (and with unfailing good luck) to attain. Being born a boomer or "greatest" (lol) generation was the biggest life "gift" in human history.

    There are in fact good reasons to dislike millennials. They are utterly conformist, intellectually and morally cowardly, obsequious to authority and its diktats and paradigms. They are among the most eager of the voluntary auxiliary thought police. They have no spine and no honor as a whole. They are a generation of soulless fools. The 'laziness' trope however is just vapid, crotchety curmudgeonry.

    , @oddsbodkins
    "Today it appears that young people want the good life “gifted” to them."

    You are channeling David Brooks at his worst.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  13. Helen A. says:

    James J. Kilpatrick had Silas Rogers, who embarrassed Kilpatrick by getting himself convicted of rape in New Jersey three years after Kilpatrick convinced the governor of Virginia to let him out of prison.

    This preceded Kilpatrick’s segregation crusading by a decade.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  14. Bill P says:
    @Anonymous
    Perhaps it's all a symptom of living a sheltered, privileged life.

    There are no harsher critics of blue-collar men than other blue-collar men. Hence, in armies the world over, the NCOs are promoted grunts who know and understand the grunts beneath them - and can be relied upon to know bullshit when they smell it, whilst the officer class, exclusively drawn from the upper classes, and raised in loving, kindhearted, honest, literate homes, are generally too naive and forgiving of the ways of the scoundrel, the cheat, the liar, the trickster, the fraudster, the bully etc. The idea is that the NCO is the 'bridge' between the intellect of the officers and the mean roughness of the grunts.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.

    And most working class people have no idea about how stingy, ruthless and selfish a certain type of upper class family can be.

    I’ve known both groups, and I’d have to say that when it comes to dumb behavior the working class may take the cake, but today’s upper class beats them by a mile when it comes to “general nastiness.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    If you ever had to deal with *real* gutter-snipe filth/trash/scum of the intergenerational criminal lowest of the low class vermin in 'human' form, then you would think differently.
    Alas very few of the respectable working-class or indeed middle-class other police or correctional officers, social workers or poor, unfortunate teachers, ever get to interact with them - they, as a rule, don't hold down jobs or participate in any other non-criminal activities.
    , @Opinionator
    Who is today's upper class?
    , @Bleuteaux
    It's interesting that you mention stinginess. The last couple of years, I've come to realize how much charity, even the mild stuff, is a scam. I think the middle class falls for it especially. I've become tired of the phrase "giving back."
    , @bartok

    And most working class people have no idea about how stingy, ruthless and selfish a certain type of upper class family can be.
     
    Ted Williams contradicts you: "You meet less shits the higher up you go."
    http://www.esquire.com/sports/interviews/a1460/learned-ted-williams-0499/
    , @MBlanc46
    It may be that genteel general nastiness superficially appears to be less nasty than loutish general nastiness.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  15. @Anonymous
    Perhaps it's all a symptom of living a sheltered, privileged life.

    There are no harsher critics of blue-collar men than other blue-collar men. Hence, in armies the world over, the NCOs are promoted grunts who know and understand the grunts beneath them - and can be relied upon to know bullshit when they smell it, whilst the officer class, exclusively drawn from the upper classes, and raised in loving, kindhearted, honest, literate homes, are generally too naive and forgiving of the ways of the scoundrel, the cheat, the liar, the trickster, the fraudster, the bully etc. The idea is that the NCO is the 'bridge' between the intellect of the officers and the mean roughness of the grunts.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.

    “raised in loving, kindhearted, honest, literate homes, are generally too naive and forgiving of the ways of the scoundrel, the cheat, the liar, the trickster, the fraudster, the bully etc”

    That’s a subset of the upper classes, not all of them. How did their forebears get to be upper class? Plenty of psycho bad blood around. Plenty of loving working class homes too.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  16. Rifleman says:
    @415 reasons
    Isn't this a trend that has accelerated? I don't warch any of them, but my impression is there is a whole genre of Netflix and HBO documentaries and documentary series whose premise is that they profile some criminal or criminals whose predicament of being incarcerated is due to the malevolence of the prison industrial complex not their own criminal acts.

    Buckley had Edgar Smith, Norman Mailer had Jack Abbot, and William Styron had Benjamin Reid.

    Don’t forget Gore Vidal and Timothy McVeigh. Similar, not in the assumption of innocence but nobility of the cause I guess.

    Read More
    • Replies: @MarcB.
    "Don’t forget Gore Vidal and Timothy McVeigh. Similar, not in the assumption of innocence but nobility of the cause I guess".

    Vidal related to McVeigh's anger over a country that had turned it's back on the US Constitution and Bill of Rights, but his advocacy was also based on the premise that McVeigh was a patsy for a false flag operation designed to permanently damage the image of the anti-globalist Patriot Movement. Perhaps only John Doe #2 knows the real story...

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  17. Recidivism is related to certain dysfunctional behavioral and personality traits that are much more common in the US than Sweden??! What is the recidivism rate for US Swedes?

    Long prison terms are probably not very effective at behavioral change. They DO keep criminals away from society, which is a major good.

    That said, a high tech system of electronic-parole / monitoring (lasting for decades if necessary) with quick trips to the clink for stepping out of bounds would be more humane and effective. Of course, that will likely fail politically once different outcomes across protected groups become apparent.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  18. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Bill P

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.
     
    And most working class people have no idea about how stingy, ruthless and selfish a certain type of upper class family can be.

    I've known both groups, and I'd have to say that when it comes to dumb behavior the working class may take the cake, but today's upper class beats them by a mile when it comes to "general nastiness."

    If you ever had to deal with *real* gutter-snipe filth/trash/scum of the intergenerational criminal lowest of the low class vermin in ‘human’ form, then you would think differently.
    Alas very few of the respectable working-class or indeed middle-class other police or correctional officers, social workers or poor, unfortunate teachers, ever get to interact with them – they, as a rule, don’t hold down jobs or participate in any other non-criminal activities.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I've always had the inkling that this is real reason why the 'traditional' English class system and class snobbery was so acute and rigid - and also why the pre 1831 English penal system was so notoriously excessively cruel and draconian.

    The upper class English of the time perhaps never directly dealt with the lowest of the low - but they knew, full well, of their character.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  19. Big Bill says:
    @Anonymous
    Perhaps it's all a symptom of living a sheltered, privileged life.

    There are no harsher critics of blue-collar men than other blue-collar men. Hence, in armies the world over, the NCOs are promoted grunts who know and understand the grunts beneath them - and can be relied upon to know bullshit when they smell it, whilst the officer class, exclusively drawn from the upper classes, and raised in loving, kindhearted, honest, literate homes, are generally too naive and forgiving of the ways of the scoundrel, the cheat, the liar, the trickster, the fraudster, the bully etc. The idea is that the NCO is the 'bridge' between the intellect of the officers and the mean roughness of the grunts.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.

    Don’t forget the utter obliviousness of the upper castes. In my youth, I thought Marie Antoinette was being deliberately cruel when she said, “let them eat cake”. She wasn’t.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    There is a modern equivalent of "Let them eat cake" (which Marie Antoinette never actually said, BTW), and I hear it one the business shows when they discuss the impending disappearance of McDonald's type jobs: "No one wants those kind of jobs anyway."
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  20. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymous
    If you ever had to deal with *real* gutter-snipe filth/trash/scum of the intergenerational criminal lowest of the low class vermin in 'human' form, then you would think differently.
    Alas very few of the respectable working-class or indeed middle-class other police or correctional officers, social workers or poor, unfortunate teachers, ever get to interact with them - they, as a rule, don't hold down jobs or participate in any other non-criminal activities.

    I’ve always had the inkling that this is real reason why the ‘traditional’ English class system and class snobbery was so acute and rigid – and also why the pre 1831 English penal system was so notoriously excessively cruel and draconian.

    The upper class English of the time perhaps never directly dealt with the lowest of the low – but they knew, full well, of their character.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  21. Danindc says:

    Buck the cuck!!
    What an embarrassment.
    Gore Vidal would have kicked his ass if that incident ever came to blows.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  22. @Guy de Champlagne
    In Scandinavian countries they coddle their prisoners and release them after laughably short (by american standards) prison terms and yet still have rates of recidivism much lower than the those in the US.

    I know people will be tempted to make the demographic argument. But while demographics certainly explain why there are more criminals in the US than say, Sweden, I'm not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don't.

    Overall I'm not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I'd be interested to hear peoples thoughts.

    Having a racially stratified society corrupts all our institutions.

    It’s why we can’t have good public schools, inexpensive healthcare, or a lenient criminal justice system.

    Read More
    • Agree: Jonathan Mason
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Having a racially stratified society corrupts all our institutions.

    It’s why we can’t have good public schools, inexpensive healthcare, or a lenient criminal justice system.

     

    This is a deceptively simple, but actually very profound comment. In the US almost all politics is racial, especially when it is considered not to be racial, for the health care debate is actually a debate about government subsidies for health care (insurance for individuals and families).

    But the elephant in the room is that no one is talking about who are the greatest beneficiaries of Medicare, Medicaid, and Obamacare, and who are the individuals and families who have the most to gain or lose through potential changes to the way the federal government hands out money to help people pay for health care, and ultimately to support the whole structure of hospitals, skilled nursing care facilities, doctor's offices, and drug companies, which provide a significant percentage of the total number of jobs in every state of the union (even if they are not very cost effective compared to most other countries).

    It is a statistic almost universally acknowledged that close to 50% of all births in the US are paid for by Medicaid, the program for the poor, but what is the percentage of births of African Americans paid for by Medicaid, and how might proposed changes in Medicaid funding affect this? This is the kind of question that We the People and our elected representatives ought to be talking about, but never are.

    The same goes for political slogans like "tough on crime". In reality this probably often means "tough on blacks." The whole gun control debate, inasmuch as it exists at all, is completely incomprehensible to foreigners, because it is never declared that the noble and historic right to bear arms is largely a movement of white homeowners, especially rural ones, who are terrified of a home invasion by their black neighbors. Of course the original constitutional right to bear arms did not apply to blacks and certainly not to slaves, and it was certainly helpful in preventing large scale slave rebellions in the US compared to other countries, let alone wholesale takeovers like in Haiti which terrified the population of white s̶l̶a̶v̶e̶ property owners of earlier generations.

    , @Olorin
    This is as Jonathan says, a highly perceptive comment...and in my view what "racial realism" has always been about.

    I'd go so far as to say that in a racially stratified society, managing that stratification and shoring it up takes the place of those institutions, their care and keep. It becomes the sole end and aim of all activity, all energy, all resources.

    When all you have as your goal and product is racial strife, you don't need institutions, or even a society per se to peddle it. People can always be driven to conflict, and their tormenters can always be there to divide and conquer. There is always something to envy, and always something to resent. You can even monetarize and harvest profits from and speculate on this destruction. See: New York City, gentrification of.

    Or: Black Bodies, fantasies about.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  23. @415 reasons
    Isn't this a trend that has accelerated? I don't warch any of them, but my impression is there is a whole genre of Netflix and HBO documentaries and documentary series whose premise is that they profile some criminal or criminals whose predicament of being incarcerated is due to the malevolence of the prison industrial complex not their own criminal acts.

    the first wildly popular “making a murderer” was about the dramatic tension in being able to easily shift the viewers feelings from “guilty” to “framed” and back again.

    you may be able to guess how this was accomplished: imo it’s clear the accused were both guilty and framed. unfortunately, that’s still somewhat a dirty little secret about how the sausage is made. I think people don’t find this intuitive because in drama someone innocent is usually framed for sinister reasons while in real life someone guilty did too good a job of cleaning up the hard evidence juries now demand.

    OJ for example was the victim of planted evidence. Why, when he was clearly guilty? I don’t know but perhaps it’s just standard operating procedure for some departments.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rapparee

    "OJ for example was the victim of planted evidence. Why, when he was clearly guilty?"
     
    Easy to answer- he wasn't the victim of planted evidence. The "frame-up" story was ludicrous and transparent nonsense cooked up by O.J.'s desperate lawyers because the evidence against him was too overwhelming to refute. Unfortunately, the spectacularly incompetent prosecutors barely bothered to dispute this whacky idea in their closing statements, and the low-IQ jury bought it hook, line, and sinker.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  24. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Could be that the Swedes feel more invested in their society once they are out of prison.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  25. Dr. X says:

    A couple of generations ago, you almost couldn’t be a big time writer in America without championing the release of some pet inmate, who would then almost immediately get thrown back in the slammer for committing another vicious crime. Buckley had Edgar Smith, Norman Mailer had Jack Abbot, and William Styron had Benjamin Reid.

    Not just writers — musicians, too. Johnny Cash had Glen Sherley, and that didn’t work out very well, either.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  26. Now they drool over Trayvon Martin and the like.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dahlia
    Very different things.

    That stuff gets championed by people who halfway know better: they simply identify with these groups, perhaps due to low self-esteem.
    But do they live amongst them? No. When they get married and have kids do they live amongst them? HELL NO! Such a thing has yet to be documented, lol.
    "Oh, I wish I could, but darn it, the schools"...

    The ruling class of the 60s was a wholly different thing when it came to crime. When you read how vicious predators were handled is to understand immediately why it was a hellscape. This isn't much of an exaggeration:
    "Charlie Wayne Whatever was caught trying to rape a 3-year-old girl, and was sentenced to 1 year, though he only served 3 months for good behavior. 2 months after release, he tortured and raped a woman and this time was sentenced to 2 years, though served only 1. A year later, he murdered 5 people."

    When I was in high school, we had an encyclopedia set devoted to serial killers and I read it all (stuck in the library for a period because I had taken chemistry a year early, but wasn't ready for physics) and I to this day am always coming across some sadistic killer I've never heard of before. The last new one was some guy who outfitted his van to be a torture chamber (in the late 70s, I think).
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  27. I worked in a prison for a while quite a few years ago, and they are full of people who have nothing better to do with their time than try to figure out ways to get out of their current predicament, for which, for some mysterious reason, they are nearly always not guilty as charged, or victims of sentencing by judges who hold a personal grudge.

    This kind of wisdom is passed on from inmate to inmate, and some of it is very ingenious. Truth does not come into it.

    So not surprising that a writer or two has been taken in. Some of these guys can be very charming and persuasive.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  28. @Bill P

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.
     
    And most working class people have no idea about how stingy, ruthless and selfish a certain type of upper class family can be.

    I've known both groups, and I'd have to say that when it comes to dumb behavior the working class may take the cake, but today's upper class beats them by a mile when it comes to "general nastiness."

    Who is today’s upper class?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  29. @Guy de Champlagne
    In Scandinavian countries they coddle their prisoners and release them after laughably short (by american standards) prison terms and yet still have rates of recidivism much lower than the those in the US.

    I know people will be tempted to make the demographic argument. But while demographics certainly explain why there are more criminals in the US than say, Sweden, I'm not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don't.

    Overall I'm not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I'd be interested to hear peoples thoughts.

    “I’m not sure [demographics] explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the [criminals] in Sweden don’t.”

    “Demographics” sounds pretty good to me. What’s wrong with it?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  30. At least Buckley apologized for his previous advocacy on Mr. Smith’s behalf. As far as I know, only Jonathan Capehart even acknowledged that Michael Brown was anything other than a gentle giant.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  31. but they each fell for a crook’s hard-luck story.

    In the ESPN 30 for 30 Elway to Marino, the agent that represented the two quarterbacks mentioned that he had previously been a criminal defense attorney but left the profession after winning acquittals for two clients that later admitted to him that they were guilty.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Russ
    The son of said attorney/agent, now a big shot for the Rams, has recently been labeled "professional liar" in a Fox2 news graphic in St. Louis. Perhaps the attorney left law, but the lessons from his clients obviously taught the boy well.
    , @Gary in Gramercy
    Any criminal defense lawyer who actually believes that most of his clients are innocent of the charges against them is probably better off in another line of work.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  32. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymous
    Perhaps it's all a symptom of living a sheltered, privileged life.

    There are no harsher critics of blue-collar men than other blue-collar men. Hence, in armies the world over, the NCOs are promoted grunts who know and understand the grunts beneath them - and can be relied upon to know bullshit when they smell it, whilst the officer class, exclusively drawn from the upper classes, and raised in loving, kindhearted, honest, literate homes, are generally too naive and forgiving of the ways of the scoundrel, the cheat, the liar, the trickster, the fraudster, the bully etc. The idea is that the NCO is the 'bridge' between the intellect of the officers and the mean roughness of the grunts.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.

    Comment of the Year!!!!!!!!!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  33. L Woods says:
    @Anonymous
    Perhaps it's all a symptom of living a sheltered, privileged life.

    There are no harsher critics of blue-collar men than other blue-collar men. Hence, in armies the world over, the NCOs are promoted grunts who know and understand the grunts beneath them - and can be relied upon to know bullshit when they smell it, whilst the officer class, exclusively drawn from the upper classes, and raised in loving, kindhearted, honest, literate homes, are generally too naive and forgiving of the ways of the scoundrel, the cheat, the liar, the trickster, the fraudster, the bully etc. The idea is that the NCO is the 'bridge' between the intellect of the officers and the mean roughness of the grunts.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.

    Military officers haven’t been drawn from the “upper classes” in the Western world for quite awhile now. These days I’d say they’re only a sub-class or two above the enlisted. The larger point is taken though.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  34. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Nassim Taleb’s reference to IYI (intellectual yet idiot).

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  35. @Guy de Champlagne
    In Scandinavian countries they coddle their prisoners and release them after laughably short (by american standards) prison terms and yet still have rates of recidivism much lower than the those in the US.

    I know people will be tempted to make the demographic argument. But while demographics certainly explain why there are more criminals in the US than say, Sweden, I'm not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don't.

    Overall I'm not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I'd be interested to hear peoples thoughts.

    I wouldn’t want to coddle criminals even if recidivism rates ended up being lower (which I don’t think they would for the U.S). Part of why many American conservatives like harsh sentences is for punishment, not just crime prevention.

    Besides, I’m not sure our sentencing is as different from Scandinavia as you think. There are many violent offenders getting out early as it is. Just because they get “life” or “25-30″ in a court room doesn’t mean they serve the full term. http://www.wthr.com/article/13-investigates-violent-criminals-released-too-soon

    More benign prison sentences would make sense for drug related crimes. It’s really absurd that there are people locked away 10 + years for drug related crimes while stuff like sex abuse of children is given 2-5 (if that) by some judges.

    Read More
    • Replies: @StillCARealist
    "More benign prison sentences would make sense for drug related crimes. It’s really absurd that there are people locked away 10 + years for drug related crimes while stuff like sex abuse of children is given 2-5 (if that) by some judges."

    Interesting. Last year I found myself in a courtroom watching several defendants come before the judge with various drug-related offenses. One had been sent to "treatment" and had failed to show up. Another was being sent to "treatment" and yet a third stood there and made all sorts of promises to behave, oh yes sir. The fourth one had tried to rob a store with a knife and been caught. He blamed it on drugs and apologized profusely. All these people were basically let go with nothing more than promises to go to treatment and honest Injun never to do anything bad again. What a crock. The prosecutor tried to get the knife-man held in jail but the judge wasn't having it. Off he went with a smile to his buddy waiting in the audience.

    The final person who was coming before the judge was accused of child molestation from 20 years earlier. The judge kept him in prison.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  36. In the 60s/70s, the pet causes of the intellectual elites were white working class criminals. Now they would simply sneer at the white working class, criminal or not, despite their arguably worse position in society.

    The modern analogue is celebrities fighting the cause for immigrants – the more dubious the immigrant the better. So you’ll get celebs like Clooney and JK Rowling ‘standing up’ for Syrian refugees – as long as the celebs can also stand very far away from the immigrants because of their wealth.

    Perhaps this gives hope that celebs will be ‘mugged by reality’ and get #woke, but it seems very far off.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  37. @Anonymous
    Perhaps it's all a symptom of living a sheltered, privileged life.

    There are no harsher critics of blue-collar men than other blue-collar men. Hence, in armies the world over, the NCOs are promoted grunts who know and understand the grunts beneath them - and can be relied upon to know bullshit when they smell it, whilst the officer class, exclusively drawn from the upper classes, and raised in loving, kindhearted, honest, literate homes, are generally too naive and forgiving of the ways of the scoundrel, the cheat, the liar, the trickster, the fraudster, the bully etc. The idea is that the NCO is the 'bridge' between the intellect of the officers and the mean roughness of the grunts.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.

    I am going to have to agree with Bill P. In my long march through the institutions I have found levels of nastiness and duplicity the higher I get that continue to amaze me… I had to hit eject and go a different way because I could not internalize the life of the lie, and it really has to become an internalized habit if you are going to make it at an elite level… I cracked up when I finally “arrived” and said to myself “this is it?! To hell with these people”… but nor do I romanticize the Cracker, they’ll rip you off too, but they seem to think everyone one is in on the scam as if it’s a cosmic prank

    Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    I have found levels of nastiness and duplicity the higher I get that continue to amaze me… but nor do I romanticize the Cracker, they’ll rip you off too
     
    In Freakonomics Leavitt has a story about someone named Paul Feldman and selling bagels on the honor system. He found that 85% of his customers were honest. The interesting question is: "Does the 85% hold for both the "Crackers" and the upper class?" I have met honest people at both strata. I have met genuinely despicable people at both too.

    But kudos to you for not selling your soul. I salute you.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  38. You have set parameters here too narrowly, Steve. To wit, writers with literary pretensions with a whole lotta love for the worst of scummy criminals.

    You should broaden the scope and admit to this discussion lowly journalists, working for the Lefty press. In 2015 and 2016, these immoral Lefty scumbags openly practiced a love affair with candidate Hillary Clinton. They “went down” on her in much the same manner in which Monica “went down” on Bill. They kept saying that Hillary “had experience in government” and that Trump didn’t have any meaningful governmental experience and that Trump was a thoroughgoing reprobate and a complete disgrace to the human race.

    The only experience Hillary got in Little Rock was taking bribes from Tyson Chicken and flushing the pourboires through the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. The only experience Hillary got in DC was taking bribes from Third-World dictators and flushing the pourboires through THE CLINTON FOUNDATION and claiming it was all done strictly for the cause of World Charity.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  39. @Anonymous
    Perhaps it's all a symptom of living a sheltered, privileged life.

    There are no harsher critics of blue-collar men than other blue-collar men. Hence, in armies the world over, the NCOs are promoted grunts who know and understand the grunts beneath them - and can be relied upon to know bullshit when they smell it, whilst the officer class, exclusively drawn from the upper classes, and raised in loving, kindhearted, honest, literate homes, are generally too naive and forgiving of the ways of the scoundrel, the cheat, the liar, the trickster, the fraudster, the bully etc. The idea is that the NCO is the 'bridge' between the intellect of the officers and the mean roughness of the grunts.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.

    Haha. Maybe displays of dumbness by wealthier and higher status sapiens is a (mostly subconscious) display of their status. Demonstrating their disconnectedness and relative safety from their “pets”, which are in fact predators (usually *obviously* to any regular joe with eyes) to those left in parts of the human zoo big writers and such have the means to avoid, such convict defenders show they have no skin in the game, they’re up in the box seats. Well that’s maybe part of it, maybe a better take than claiming that they’re mainly just pampered and naive about the lower ranks because they’re from a more civilized and moral world, etc.

    Anyway nevermind, but I was reminded of good ole William Cuckley, a real snake apparently. Some of these people’s personal lives and politics, whew, us peasants tend not to realize what creeps these people can be. I mean they’re so sophisticated and well spoken. http://www.vdare.com/articles/william-f-buckley-jr-rip-sort-of

    Read More
    • Replies: @TelfoedJohn

    Maybe displays of dumbness by wealthier and higher status sapiens is a (mostly subconscious) display of their status.
     
    Economists have the theory of conspicuous consumption - buying things as a form of social display due to excess wealth. With political belief, it’s Conspicuous Conventionality - whereby you are displaying how closely you adhere to the current vanguard of politically correct conventional NPR-listening rich kids.

    I’ve been to lefty events in the UK and the speakers and leaders are often privileged Oxford types, who formulate their theories in their bubbles, while the audience are lower on the social ladder - but desperately want to believe and be like the speakers. The irony of Marxists pretending to be rich and insulated from life’s realities is probably lost on them.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  40. Bleuteaux says:
    @Bill P

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.
     
    And most working class people have no idea about how stingy, ruthless and selfish a certain type of upper class family can be.

    I've known both groups, and I'd have to say that when it comes to dumb behavior the working class may take the cake, but today's upper class beats them by a mile when it comes to "general nastiness."

    It’s interesting that you mention stinginess. The last couple of years, I’ve come to realize how much charity, even the mild stuff, is a scam. I think the middle class falls for it especially. I’ve become tired of the phrase “giving back.”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  41. @Anonymous
    Perhaps it's all a symptom of living a sheltered, privileged life.

    There are no harsher critics of blue-collar men than other blue-collar men. Hence, in armies the world over, the NCOs are promoted grunts who know and understand the grunts beneath them - and can be relied upon to know bullshit when they smell it, whilst the officer class, exclusively drawn from the upper classes, and raised in loving, kindhearted, honest, literate homes, are generally too naive and forgiving of the ways of the scoundrel, the cheat, the liar, the trickster, the fraudster, the bully etc. The idea is that the NCO is the 'bridge' between the intellect of the officers and the mean roughness of the grunts.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.

    …the officer class, exclusively drawn from the upper classes,…

    Which country’s armed forces are you describing, it sure isn’t the US.

    Read More
    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Hibernian
    The officers don't tend to come from the poorest of the poor, and are more ambitious and competitive than the E-1 through E-4s and junior NCOs (I was both of these in a reserve component.)
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  42. We jail way too many non violent people in the US, as a result of our insane drug laws and incredibly over criminalized federal law – from tax, to fishing, to bank deposits to campaigning. Congress has made everything a “federal crime” literally which is why “prosecutors” can pick anyone they like and find something on them – anyone. This is why “Special Prosecutors” are so dangerous. This produces a disrespect of the criminal justice system. Once the system is not respected, it is easy to believe that even a real criminal – even a violent one – has received a bad deal .

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Disagree. Few are in jail for an ounce of weed. The cops know who the bad guys are but can't get them for the murders they've done, so drug crimes it is.

    Just Some Cop please weigh in.

    2) Jesus H. Christ! I am now into 15 minutes of watching NBC's Football Night in America and it has been nothing by What Does All The Black blah blah blah mean. How about some f***ing highlights!?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  43. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    An uncle of mine pulled this scam on a famous intellectual in the 1950s. He was serving a ten-year sentence for armed robbery when the famous intellectual visited the prison to lecture and chat with the inmates. My uncle immediately spotted him as a gullible mark with a rescue fantasy, so he turned on the charm and began the con game. He presented the intellectual with some very bad, avant-garde “poetry” he had written in prison and started a long correspondence with him. The intellectual championed my uncle as a literary genius and testified at his parole hearing. Thanks to the intellectual’s campaign and testimony, my uncle was released after serving five years. I’m happy to report that my uncle never committed any crimes after being paroled, although he is very adept at mooching and makes a modest living charming foolish people out of small sums of money.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  44. bomag says:
    @Guy de Champlagne
    In Scandinavian countries they coddle their prisoners and release them after laughably short (by american standards) prison terms and yet still have rates of recidivism much lower than the those in the US.

    I know people will be tempted to make the demographic argument. But while demographics certainly explain why there are more criminals in the US than say, Sweden, I'm not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don't.

    Overall I'm not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I'd be interested to hear peoples thoughts.

    I’m not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don’t.

    I suspect demographics explains this difference. The last time I checked, Swedes in America had a similar crime and recidivism rate as Swedes in Sweden. As Almost Missouri noted, it is now time to run a big experiment where a new cohort is imported into Sweden so we can observe their crime and recidivism rates and be surprised when things don’t work out too well.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  45. One of the numerous things that caused the ’60s New Left to implode was the romanticization of convicts who claimed to have been radicalized and who were thus transformed from felonious thugs to “political prisoners”.

    A whole prison movement arose, fueled particularly by well-meaning white women mooning over black inmates who had plenty of time on their hands to engage in extended correspondence describing how they were wronged and how they were now passionate about social justice and making the world a better place.

    Needless to say, this did not play out well. Do a search for “Popeye Jackson” or “Tribal Thumb” or “United Prisoners Union”. The SLA, in part, came out of that milieu.

    I came across a six year old blog post by a woman who has been at it for forty+ years and must be the purest living archetype of the prisoner advocate.

    http://whyaminotsurprised.blogspot.com/2011/08/locked-into-locked-up.html

    Today, in addition to everything else, I blog regularly on criminal justice issues. And I am deeply committed to the campaign to release the remaining two members of the Angola 3, Black Panther Party members who have been in solitary confinement since 1972 because of their politics. Both of my children were fathered by men I met while they were in prison. And my fiance served twenty-seven years for a robbery that netted $70 and involved no physical injuries.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Tracey Ullman does comedy sketches on women who recurrently fall in love with Death Row prisoners.
    , @YetAnotherAnon
    "Britain's most violent prisoner", also bodybuilder and author of book on prison fitness, Michael Petersen aka Charles Bronson, 64, is engaged to a 36 year old soap actress.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Salvador

    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/2859096/paula-williamson-charles-bronson-fiancee-wedding-good-morning-britain

    His record (in Wiki) is ... extensive. This is just two of dozens of incidents, most not so darkly comic.

    "In April 1996 he was sent back to Belmarsh after taking a doctor hostage at Birmingham.

    Five months later an Iraqi hijacker bumped into him in the canteen and did not apologise. After a long period of brooding he then took two Iraqi hijackers, along with another inmate named Jason Greasley, hostage in a cell. By his own admission he was "losing it badly" and ranted about his dead father, saying that any "funny business" would result in him "snapping necks". He sang and laughed and forced the Iraqis to tickle his feet and call him 'General'. He demanded a plane to take him to Libya, two Uzi sub-machine guns, 5,000 rounds of ammunition, and an axe. He released Greasley, but began chanting "I want ice cream". He felt guilty after hitting one of the hostages with a metal tray and therefore insisted the same hostage hit him over the head four times so as to call it 'quits'. He slashed himself four times with a safety razor, but agreed to release the hostages and walk back to the segregation unit"
     
    , @ATX Hipster
    I'd like to hear Whiskey's take on that blog.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  46. I don’t know if it’s fair to say they “fell for” a criminal’s hard-luck story. Of course, you know WFB personally, so you can speak to that better. But from my perspective, it looks more ideological.

    Cf, Gavin McInnes, who flirted with us for a while but then started his new show with an “anti-paleo” perspective. He fancies himself a patriotic libertarian who rejects imprisonment. I myself feel sympathetic to his perspective, but I think he underestimates the criminality of criminals. It’s about Optimism vs. Pessimism and the human condition.

    Christians should be optimists, not pessimists.

    In the case of Buckley, I want to believe his optimism about humanity derived from honest theological conviction (but, again, you know him better). In the case of McInnes, I feel he is either cucked or deceptively promoting “culture” as a way of inviting people into the fold.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "Of course, you know WFB personally"

    Not me.

    , @AM

    Christians should be optimists, not pessimists.
     
    The Christian framework assumes a fallen humanity. It assumes that human, left in "ordinary" conditions will decay to evil if they do not actively work on being good. Christians by default are pessimists about human condition because they have to be.

    The rub is having to offer mercy and forgiveness if someone actually repents. That bit is tricky, especially with criminal behavior. And someone genuinely repenting of an act might want to try to atone for it, aka spend some time in prison.

    Why Mr. McInnes doesn't want people imprisoned is a bit of a mystery.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  47. Elite figures championing convicted or other brutes may be an instance of the elite figure acting on the aphorism that there’s “no such thing as bad publicity,” redolent of the French term succès de scandale. Adopting a brute as a cause célebre, as an exemplar of putative oppression, to gain oneself free publicity is a cheap trick – and Enemedia-Pravda’s promotion of “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot!” and other such profitable virtue-signalling, audience-garnering canonizations of actual criminals show them to be no strangers to this sort of manipulative legerdemain.

    The NFL seems also to profit from promotion of rule-governed violence while issuing rote pro forma denunciations of corollary off the field violence committed by a significant disproportion of its players.

    This trick also works the other way round, as with Enemedia-Pravda’s propaganda power deployed to demonize President Trump or anyone else who challenges the presumed validity and rectitude of the Open Border$ Multi-Culti Diversity Über Alles/Toxic Whiteness Narrative.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  48. @Anon
    Bob Dylan and Rubin Carter.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane_(Bob_Dylan_song)

    Dylan also wrote sympathetic songs about John Wesley Hardin, premier mass murderer of the Old West, and Joey Gallo, violent mobster.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    On Harding, with irony.

    On Carter, with naive nostalgia for Civil Rights days.
    , @allen
    John Wesley Harding is a bit different. Dylan treated him as a semi-mythical figure just as the older folksingers would have. No different than other folk numbers like Pretty Boy Floyd that romanticized dashing outlaws that probably weren’t that pleasant in real life.

    Joey Gallo is sorta weird, but it actually had the ironic effect of counterbalancing the Ruben Hurricane stuff. I recall one review at the time that said something like (I paraphrase from memory): “Dylan makes me believe Ruben Carter’s innocence in ‘Hurricane’ and then makes me second guess his sincerity when he lionizes a real criminal in ‘Joey’”

    Dylan performed the song Hurricane almost exclusively during the time in which he wrote it, the 1975-76 Rolling Thunder Revue tour. After that, I don’t think he ever performed it again (though it remains a standard on greatest hits albums). I think Dylan sincerely believed in Ruben Carter’s innocence at the time, but I can’t help but wonder if he came to regret his endorsement.

    Likewise, there’s a fairly rare Dylan single from 71 where he eulogized Black Panther George Jackson. It’s pretty poorly written by Dylan’s standards, but I find it fascinating that he totally disowned the song. It was never performed live and it’s never appeared on any CD, album, box set, rarity set, or anything else since 1971 (I think it did get a release on an Australian box set and maybe as part of an itunes download bundle).

    Always a little hard to tell what Dylan really stood for, but I do think what he has continued to play is a decent indication. Interestingly, he never disowned his Christian/Gospel material the way he disowned the above songs. He still plays some of those tunes today. I recall one HBO special he did with Tom Petty in 86 or 87 where he spoke disparagingly of how people looked up to Gandhi and MLK as “heroes” and then said he was going to play a song about his hero, launching into one of his Christian songs “In the Garden” about Christ’s betrayal. These days he’s singing old Sinatra standards at his concerts. Weird guy, but fascinating
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  49. bartok says:
    @415 reasons
    Isn't this a trend that has accelerated? I don't warch any of them, but my impression is there is a whole genre of Netflix and HBO documentaries and documentary series whose premise is that they profile some criminal or criminals whose predicament of being incarcerated is due to the malevolence of the prison industrial complex not their own criminal acts.

    American Communists (e.g. media Jews with podcasts) still have their pet inmates. Steve’s point is that famous writers are on to other subjects and are less naive about insane, violent and/or junkie criminals.

    Famous writers today are obsessed with food, e.g. “Eating Animals” by Foer.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  50. bartok says:
    @Bill P

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.
     
    And most working class people have no idea about how stingy, ruthless and selfish a certain type of upper class family can be.

    I've known both groups, and I'd have to say that when it comes to dumb behavior the working class may take the cake, but today's upper class beats them by a mile when it comes to "general nastiness."

    And most working class people have no idea about how stingy, ruthless and selfish a certain type of upper class family can be.

    Ted Williams contradicts you: “You meet less shits the higher up you go.”

    http://www.esquire.com/sports/interviews/a1460/learned-ted-williams-0499/

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  51. snorlax says:
    @Guy de Champlagne
    In Scandinavian countries they coddle their prisoners and release them after laughably short (by american standards) prison terms and yet still have rates of recidivism much lower than the those in the US.

    I know people will be tempted to make the demographic argument. But while demographics certainly explain why there are more criminals in the US than say, Sweden, I'm not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don't.

    Overall I'm not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I'd be interested to hear peoples thoughts.

    Pre-WWII, when the Scandinavian countries had right-wing governments and harshly punitive justice systems, they had crime rates hundreds to thousands of times lower than they do today.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Even among native Swedes? What an absurd claim. You need to cite your sources immediately.
    , @TheUmpteenthGermanOnHere
    Any reference?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  52. Read More
    • Replies: @Antlitz Grollheim
    The current political landscape in 3 minutes, nice!
    , @Nico
    So little is required of students at all levels of academia that I'm almost not surprised that a doctor of psychology would seem so blissfully unaware of the well-recognized condition hybristophilia, recognized as one of a cluster of sexual paraphilias (also including among others asphyxiophilia, autassassinophilia, biastophilia* and chremastophilia) that are potentially lethal if acted upon.

    * I have read that up to 10% of females report that rape fantasy is their favorite sexual fantasy, though while this might be correlated I'm not sure it's necessarily the same thing: a sexual fantasy isn't necessarily the same as a source of excitement.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  53. Corn says:
    @Guy de Champlagne
    In Scandinavian countries they coddle their prisoners and release them after laughably short (by american standards) prison terms and yet still have rates of recidivism much lower than the those in the US.

    I know people will be tempted to make the demographic argument. But while demographics certainly explain why there are more criminals in the US than say, Sweden, I'm not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don't.

    Overall I'm not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I'd be interested to hear peoples thoughts.

    I’m not a sociologist so I’m winging it here but I’ll take a stab at this. Demographics, and historical demographics may play a role. I read years ago that in Switzerland crime rates were lower than the US (no surprise) but that punishments were often more lenient as well. At one time in Switzerland a person convicted of manslaughter or second degree murder could often receive a suspended sentence if their previous criminal record was light. It was suggested that the Swiss could afford this leniency because they were an old nation, people were committing crimes amongst people they knew in mountain towns their families and victims’ families had lived in for generations. In America however immigration threw all sorts of all different stripes into crowded urban neighborhoods, and slums formed, and a more dog eat dog thuggish mentality.

    Perhaps Scandinavian nations experiences mirrored the Swiss in some ways. Largely homogeneous communities (until recently) that go back generations. Perhaps even criminals feel rooted? Or the community feels more of a proactive obligation to look after of ex-cons or keep them on the straight and narrow? I don’t know.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  54. MBlanc46 says:
    @Guy de Champlagne
    In Scandinavian countries they coddle their prisoners and release them after laughably short (by american standards) prison terms and yet still have rates of recidivism much lower than the those in the US.

    I know people will be tempted to make the demographic argument. But while demographics certainly explain why there are more criminals in the US than say, Sweden, I'm not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don't.

    Overall I'm not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I'd be interested to hear peoples thoughts.

    It’s because the criminals are Scandinavian.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  55. Yak-15 says:
    @Guy de Champlagne
    In Scandinavian countries they coddle their prisoners and release them after laughably short (by american standards) prison terms and yet still have rates of recidivism much lower than the those in the US.

    I know people will be tempted to make the demographic argument. But while demographics certainly explain why there are more criminals in the US than say, Sweden, I'm not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don't.

    Overall I'm not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I'd be interested to hear peoples thoughts.

    Certainly the demographic profile contributes a lot to their success. A LOT. Also, a singular culture/ethnic/race contributes a great deal towards not committing more crimes. Why rob your co-ethnics? Why not take better care of your stupider, less successful co-ethnics?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  56. Clyde says:
    @Bubba
    Elites like William Buckley, Norman Mailer and William Styron were never literally "mugged by reality" (WFB's phrase) like normal NYC folks every day. Hence their vocal support for a disastrous, virtual signaling pet project that they did not understand. And it sure led to lenient sentences by Judge Bruce Wright (a.k.a. "Let 'Em Loose Bruce") for hardened, sadistic criminals and the subsequent horrible deaths & injuries for the general public when these criminals were soon released. NYC had a huge "white flight" as a result of Messrs. Buckley, Mailer and Stryon advocating an unproven, strange social experiment that was coupled with insane policies by a very liberal Republican Mayor Lindsey (who appointed Judge "Let 'Em Loose" Bruce Wright).

    Minor point but this judge/maggot was called, “Turn ‘em loose Bruce”

    “Wright was given the nickname “Turn ‘Em Loose Bruce” by the police officer’s unions in New York City because of his bail practices, …”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bubba
    Thank you! I was going by memory there when recalling my late uncle's (NYC cop at the time) rants when he was reading the New York Daily News. Lord, thanks for the memories! He really hated Lindsey, Beame, Kuntzler and Bruce Wright (Alfred Sharpton was not making headlines in the early '70's until after he met James Brown).
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  57. MBlanc46 says:
    @Bill P

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.
     
    And most working class people have no idea about how stingy, ruthless and selfish a certain type of upper class family can be.

    I've known both groups, and I'd have to say that when it comes to dumb behavior the working class may take the cake, but today's upper class beats them by a mile when it comes to "general nastiness."

    It may be that genteel general nastiness superficially appears to be less nasty than loutish general nastiness.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bill P
    Exactly. Loutish general nastiness is petty, often random and more often than not self-destructive and therefore self-limiting. Genteel general nastiness is deliberate, calculated and and self-aggrandizing, so it goes from strength to strength.

    I guess you could say that a certain nasty personality type is punished when unaccompanied by a talent for wealth accumulation, but greatly rewarded when it makes people rich. The difference may be only a couple standard deviations of intelligence and greater impulse control, but at heart, the jerks are the same.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  58. @Guy de Champlagne
    In Scandinavian countries they coddle their prisoners and release them after laughably short (by american standards) prison terms and yet still have rates of recidivism much lower than the those in the US.

    I know people will be tempted to make the demographic argument. But while demographics certainly explain why there are more criminals in the US than say, Sweden, I'm not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don't.

    Overall I'm not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I'd be interested to hear peoples thoughts.

    Overall I’m not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I’d be interested to hear peoples thoughts.

    I’m sure. In fact, it’s one of the things conservatives are–pretty obviously–”rightest” about.

    One of the things that the “left” continually gets “wrong” is getting the incentives right. People aren’t behavorialist machines, but they nonetheless react to the environment they are presented with. Give them incentives to behave better … they’ll behave better. Give them incentives to behave worse–what the left always does, crime, welfare, diversity rackets, etc.–they’ll behave worse.

    Crime is also one of the clear examples of this. Conservative elected to “get tough on crime” started putting people in jail again for longer sentences and viola! … crime went down.

    ~~

    There are two reasonable responses to someone who refuses to abide by the laws of their community.
    – kill them (for serious violations)
    or
    – expel them.

    Modern societies unfortunately lack the basic “expel them” option. (It would do the world a favor to have a global Devil’s Island.) So we have this “temporary expulsion” of sending them off to prison. It’s weak sauce. It basically only works because in modern society the payoff for disorganized crime is generally pretty low and if you can keep a lot of these guys locked up past 30, when their testosterone starts ebbing, they come out, survey the situation and don’t see any big reason to do criminal crap. It’s not like they are “reformed”, it’s just that they are “retired”. And you still have a decent tranche who are more violently sociopathic and will keep doing crime on and on and on.

    Read More
    • Agree: Nico
    • Replies: @dc.sunsets
    "Expel them?"

    I hear Puerto Rico is a real steal right now. I favor using it as an Escape from New York style penal colony. Three strikes and you are deported forever, and once there you're on your own. No taxpayers will fund squat.
    , @Sunbeam
    "Modern societies unfortunately lack the basic “expel them” option. (It would do the world a favor to have a global Devil’s Island.) "

    You could get a hell of a book or tv series out of that. Hunger Games for adults.
    , @Thomas O. Meehan
    Our inability to permanently expel persistent offenders cannot be over-stated as a driver of crime. Many criminals have no pro-social values and are unfit to live among the rest of us. Yet, we have nowhere to put them. Some form of internal exile would be helpful but is not open to us constitutionally.
    , @willieskull68
    Case in point; Barney Frank discussing some banking "scandal" on CNBC; after talking about penalties, he mumbles about not understanding incentives. He has not the slightest understanding about how private business works. And he will admit it. Mark Haynes forever.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  59. @Guy de Champlagne
    In Scandinavian countries they coddle their prisoners and release them after laughably short (by american standards) prison terms and yet still have rates of recidivism much lower than the those in the US.

    I know people will be tempted to make the demographic argument. But while demographics certainly explain why there are more criminals in the US than say, Sweden, I'm not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don't.

    Overall I'm not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I'd be interested to hear peoples thoughts.

    Let’s see how much recidivism the Muslim criminals now infesting Sweden have exhibited, once we have (say) ten or twenty years’ more data.

    States in the upper Midwest, such as Wisconsin, Minnesota, and North Dakota, once populated largely by immigrant stock from Scandinavia, once had both low crime rates and little recidivism. Capital punishment was abolished in all of them more than a hundred years ago. They rarely executed criminals even when it was on the books, because few were capital offenders.

    Now, crime has a different complexion, and a different character, in those jurisdictions. It is more violent and more frequent, and often gang-related. Police and courts have been slow in adjusting to the new realities. I suspect the same phenomena are occurring in Sweden.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dc.sunsets
    Capital punishment is returning, administered at the point of "sale," via rapidly rising rates of concealed carry.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  60. Then what was Northwestern’s “Innocence Project’s” excuse?

    Oh, silly me, IT WAS ABOUT THE MONEY. There’s a law firm in Chicago making bank by suing over “wrongful conviction” and reaping a share of the loot the envy of every personal injury attorney.

    Read Martin Preib’s work on the Anthony Porter case (among others.) It’s clear that Chicago politicians are in bed with that law firm, all engaged in raping the taxpayers.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  61. @Crawfurdmuir
    Let's see how much recidivism the Muslim criminals now infesting Sweden have exhibited, once we have (say) ten or twenty years' more data.

    States in the upper Midwest, such as Wisconsin, Minnesota, and North Dakota, once populated largely by immigrant stock from Scandinavia, once had both low crime rates and little recidivism. Capital punishment was abolished in all of them more than a hundred years ago. They rarely executed criminals even when it was on the books, because few were capital offenders.

    Now, crime has a different complexion, and a different character, in those jurisdictions. It is more violent and more frequent, and often gang-related. Police and courts have been slow in adjusting to the new realities. I suspect the same phenomena are occurring in Sweden.

    Capital punishment is returning, administered at the point of “sale,” via rapidly rising rates of concealed carry.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  62. @AnotherDad

    Overall I’m not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I’d be interested to hear peoples thoughts.
     
    I'm sure. In fact, it's one of the things conservatives are--pretty obviously--"rightest" about.

    One of the things that the "left" continually gets "wrong" is getting the incentives right. People aren't behavorialist machines, but they nonetheless react to the environment they are presented with. Give them incentives to behave better ... they'll behave better. Give them incentives to behave worse--what the left always does, crime, welfare, diversity rackets, etc.--they'll behave worse.

    Crime is also one of the clear examples of this. Conservative elected to "get tough on crime" started putting people in jail again for longer sentences and viola! ... crime went down.

    ~~

    There are two reasonable responses to someone who refuses to abide by the laws of their community.
    -- kill them (for serious violations)
    or
    -- expel them.

    Modern societies unfortunately lack the basic "expel them" option. (It would do the world a favor to have a global Devil's Island.) So we have this "temporary expulsion" of sending them off to prison. It's weak sauce. It basically only works because in modern society the payoff for disorganized crime is generally pretty low and if you can keep a lot of these guys locked up past 30, when their testosterone starts ebbing, they come out, survey the situation and don't see any big reason to do criminal crap. It's not like they are "reformed", it's just that they are "retired". And you still have a decent tranche who are more violently sociopathic and will keep doing crime on and on and on.

    “Expel them?”

    I hear Puerto Rico is a real steal right now. I favor using it as an Escape from New York style penal colony. Three strikes and you are deported forever, and once there you’re on your own. No taxpayers will fund squat.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cato
    Baffin Island would be better--very few original inhabitants to displace, and one would have to cooperate with others to survive.
    , @njguy73

    I hear Puerto Rico is a real steal right now. I favor using it as an Escape from New York style penal colony. Three strikes and you are deported forever, and once there you’re on your own. No taxpayers will fund squat.
     
    See my comment. I swear I did not read yours first.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  63. JSM says:
    @Guy de Champlagne
    In Scandinavian countries they coddle their prisoners and release them after laughably short (by american standards) prison terms and yet still have rates of recidivism much lower than the those in the US.

    I know people will be tempted to make the demographic argument. But while demographics certainly explain why there are more criminals in the US than say, Sweden, I'm not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don't.

    Overall I'm not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I'd be interested to hear peoples thoughts.

    know people will be tempted to make the demographic argument. But while demographics certainly explain why there are more criminals in the US than say, Sweden, I’m not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don’t

    .

    It’s because of the genetic makeup of the people. Perhaps it’s the MAOA gene, the so-called warrior
    gene. People who lack the gene can be dissuaded from crime easily, with mild punishment. With few people in the population carrying the gene, the courts can be lenient. In Scandinavia, few carry the warrior gene, so they get away with lax penal system.

    But in America, the warrior gene is more common. People with warrior’s gene can’t be dissuaded from crime with mild punishment. So, we have not only more criminals, but those criminals are more stubbornly criminal as individuals. So lax penal system here spells disaster.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  64. Mike Huckabee has always had a soft spot for criminals. http://www.rightwingwatch.org/post/mike-huckabee-pushed-for-parole-of-rapist-who-then-killed-two-women/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2009_Lakewood_shooting

    I’ve tried to find links, but I do recall that when he was asked why he let this guy out, Schumuckabee said it was because the criminal had accepted Jesus. Schumuckabee is a Zioevangizer.

    Also, the USA RCC bishops are behind the push for amnesty for illegals. “Illegals” means they have broken the law. The bishops no comprende this. They believe illegals are victims.

    We are not dealing with naiveté anymore, but degeneracy and madness.

    Read More
    • Agree: Autochthon
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  65. RDittmar says:

    This kind of naiveté about criminals was widespread in the 1960s.

    This naiveté wasn’t confined to the 60′s. The worst of the pet criminal lot was Jack Unterweger from the 90′s:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Unterweger

    He was championed by a wide array of literary notables who managed to get him released only for him to kill nearly a dozen women on two continents. At least the body count from Smith et al was far lower. I wonder if a quirk of the writer personality causes them to be drawn to psychopaths like these. Maybe to a writer, writing itself is so precious that no number of lives sacrificed in the production of same is too great. You certainly don’t see engineers acting like this. “Sure the man strangled a teenager to death, but now that he’s devoted his life to the correct calculation of the loading factors for I-beams he should be released to become a productive member of society.”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  66. Sunbeam says:
    @AnotherDad

    Overall I’m not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I’d be interested to hear peoples thoughts.
     
    I'm sure. In fact, it's one of the things conservatives are--pretty obviously--"rightest" about.

    One of the things that the "left" continually gets "wrong" is getting the incentives right. People aren't behavorialist machines, but they nonetheless react to the environment they are presented with. Give them incentives to behave better ... they'll behave better. Give them incentives to behave worse--what the left always does, crime, welfare, diversity rackets, etc.--they'll behave worse.

    Crime is also one of the clear examples of this. Conservative elected to "get tough on crime" started putting people in jail again for longer sentences and viola! ... crime went down.

    ~~

    There are two reasonable responses to someone who refuses to abide by the laws of their community.
    -- kill them (for serious violations)
    or
    -- expel them.

    Modern societies unfortunately lack the basic "expel them" option. (It would do the world a favor to have a global Devil's Island.) So we have this "temporary expulsion" of sending them off to prison. It's weak sauce. It basically only works because in modern society the payoff for disorganized crime is generally pretty low and if you can keep a lot of these guys locked up past 30, when their testosterone starts ebbing, they come out, survey the situation and don't see any big reason to do criminal crap. It's not like they are "reformed", it's just that they are "retired". And you still have a decent tranche who are more violently sociopathic and will keep doing crime on and on and on.

    “Modern societies unfortunately lack the basic “expel them” option. (It would do the world a favor to have a global Devil’s Island.) ”

    You could get a hell of a book or tv series out of that. Hunger Games for adults.

    Read More
    • Replies: @njguy73

    “Modern societies unfortunately lack the basic “expel them” option. (It would do the world a favor to have a global Devil’s Island.) ”

    You could get a hell of a book or tv series out of that. Hunger Games for adults.
     
    In 2017, the crime rate and hurricane frequency on Earth rises four hundred percent. The once great island of Hispaniola becomes the one maximum security prison for the entire world. A fifty-foot containment wall is erected along the Jamaica Channel, across the Windward Passage, and down along the Mona Passage. It completely surrounds Hispaniola. All bridges and waterways are mined. The United Nations Police Force, like an army, is encamped around the island. There are no guards inside the prison, only prisoners and the worlds they have made. The rules are simple: once you go in, you don't come out.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  67. Observer2 says:

    Steve,
    A radio show by Robin Semien (Phone Calls to an Undisclosed Location) came to my attention. She got airplay yesterday talking about Gavin MacInnes and his Proud Boys movement. There is apparent overlap with your audience and themes that you dissect.

    https://thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/626/white-haze?act=2

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  68. whoever says: • Website
    @Anonymous
    Perhaps it's all a symptom of living a sheltered, privileged life.

    There are no harsher critics of blue-collar men than other blue-collar men. Hence, in armies the world over, the NCOs are promoted grunts who know and understand the grunts beneath them - and can be relied upon to know bullshit when they smell it, whilst the officer class, exclusively drawn from the upper classes, and raised in loving, kindhearted, honest, literate homes, are generally too naive and forgiving of the ways of the scoundrel, the cheat, the liar, the trickster, the fraudster, the bully etc. The idea is that the NCO is the 'bridge' between the intellect of the officers and the mean roughness of the grunts.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.

    in armies the world over, the NCOs are promoted grunts who know and understand the grunts beneath them – and can be relied upon to know bullshit when they smell it, whilst the officer class, exclusively drawn from the upper classes, and raised in loving, kindhearted, honest, literate homes, are generally too naive and forgiving of the ways of the scoundrel, the cheat, the liar, the trickster, the fraudster, the bully etc.

    The only difference I have noticed between enlisted and officers in the American armed forces is that the officers have already gone to college and the enlisted haven’t yet — if they want to. They are both drawn from the same strata of society, by and large, with the same worldview, attitudes, accents and aspirations. Officers were “A” students in high school, enlisted, “B” students; that’s about the only difference.
    I did notice a huge difference in the British armed forces: The officers seemed to be from almost a different country from the enlisted, speaking what seemed to be a different language. They exhibited the classic British combination of snooty accent, arrogant incompetence, and knee-jerk anti-Americanism.
    The enlisted personnel, on the other hand, once you could figure out what they were saying — heavy regional accents were common — were okay guys, if very poorly led, and trained in tactics that might have worked in northern Ireland in 1970 but were otherwise useless. They were steeped in American pop culture. Most wanted to emigrate to Australia, their dream land of beer, beaches and babes.

    Read More
    • Agree: L Woods
    • Replies: @anon
    The Armed Forces Qualification Test at work.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  69. @anony-mouse
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bZf7XhlKls

    The current political landscape in 3 minutes, nice!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  70. AndrewR says:
    @snorlax
    Pre-WWII, when the Scandinavian countries had right-wing governments and harshly punitive justice systems, they had crime rates hundreds to thousands of times lower than they do today.

    Even among native Swedes? What an absurd claim. You need to cite your sources immediately.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  71. HEL says:
    @Anonymous
    Perhaps it's all a symptom of living a sheltered, privileged life.

    There are no harsher critics of blue-collar men than other blue-collar men. Hence, in armies the world over, the NCOs are promoted grunts who know and understand the grunts beneath them - and can be relied upon to know bullshit when they smell it, whilst the officer class, exclusively drawn from the upper classes, and raised in loving, kindhearted, honest, literate homes, are generally too naive and forgiving of the ways of the scoundrel, the cheat, the liar, the trickster, the fraudster, the bully etc. The idea is that the NCO is the 'bridge' between the intellect of the officers and the mean roughness of the grunts.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.

    This is of course the root of a lot of liberalism, particularly of the racial variety. Liberals love to talk about empathy. Their empathy is a ludicrous, malignant thing, a brainless and unreflective mixture of projection and condescending sentimentality. In reality a meek, 120 IQ liberal with good impulse control is absolutely incapable of entering the mind of a hyper-aggressive, 75 IQ thug who has no concept of tomorrow. They are worlds apart. The liberal’s thought process seems to be, well I can’t imagine myself ever doing the things this person did, so obviously this violent thug must have somehow been forced into doing such things by terrible circumstances. Surely he is really me, underneath it all. This applies to a lot of noncriminals too. The left’s plans are largely destined to fail because they refuse to accept that even decent, upstanding low class and low intelligence individuals are very different from the genteel, educated classes. They need different methods and programs to thrive. Though of course the left is no longer really interested in helping such people now anyway . . .

    I can’t claim to really understand such minds either, but I at least grasp that they are very, very far removed from my own.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  72. cthulhu says:

    One of Tom Wolfe’s pieces (don’t recall which one) has some discussion of Mailer’s folly with Jack Abbott. To Mailer’s credit (a phrase I don’t write or agree with often), after Abbott was arrested for killing a man six weeks after his parole, Mailer owned up to having bamboozled himself by believing Abbott would be nonviolent after release.

    I think it’s a weak spot that many share: the inability to believe that some people are nasty, violent creeps just because they are articulate or show some above average abilities. I lay the blame for much of this at the blank slate mentality – if a person’s psyche is a product of their environment, then sufficient effort can fix that person. In reality, some people are, through the luck (or misfortune) of the genetic draw, predisposed to be violent individuals and there may be little that we as a society can do to move them in a different direction. That such people end up incarcerated for violent crimes at high rates for what is, in some sense, a situation not of their making is sad, but what else can we do? Steven Pinker’s masterpiece The Blank Slate, interestingly enough, recognized this scenario and said that (I’m paraphrasing) a sane society has no choice but to incarcerate such people, for safety and as a deterrent to others.

    (For the umpteenth time, I shake my head in amazement that Pinker has remained a respected public intellectual while espousing pretty radical HBD views, and all of you who haven’t read The Blank Slate should do so immediately – IMHO the most important book of the century so far.)

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  73. Russ says:
    @Triumph104

    but they each fell for a crook’s hard-luck story.
     
    In the ESPN 30 for 30 Elway to Marino, the agent that represented the two quarterbacks mentioned that he had previously been a criminal defense attorney but left the profession after winning acquittals for two clients that later admitted to him that they were guilty.

    The son of said attorney/agent, now a big shot for the Rams, has recently been labeled “professional liar” in a Fox2 news graphic in St. Louis. Perhaps the attorney left law, but the lessons from his clients obviously taught the boy well.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  74. syonredux says:

    Wonder how long it will be before the national anthem is changed…..

    Star-Spangled Bigotry: The Hidden Racist History of the National Anthem

    In the case of our national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner,” perhaps not knowing the full lyrics is a good thing. It is one of the most racist, pro-slavery, anti-black songs in the American lexicon, and you would be wise to cut it from your Fourth of July playlist.

    To understand the full “Star-Spangled Banner” story, you have to understand the author. Key was an aristocrat and city prosecutor in Washington, D.C. He was, like most enlightened men at the time, not against slavery; he just thought that since blacks were mentally inferior, masters should treat them with more Christian kindness. He supported sending free blacks (not slaves) back to Africa and, with a few exceptions, was about as pro-slavery, anti-black and anti-abolitionist as you could get at the time.

    In other words, Key was saying that the blood of all the former slaves and “hirelings” on the battlefield will wash away the pollution of the British invaders. With Key still bitter that some black soldiers got the best of him a few weeks earlier, “The Star-Spangled Banner” is as much a patriotic song as it is a diss track to black people who had the audacity to fight for their freedom. Perhaps that’s why it took almost 100 years for the song to become the national anthem.

    http://www.theroot.com/star-spangled-bigotry-the-hidden-racist-history-of-the-1790855893

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    "Perhaps that's why it took almost 100 years for the song to become the national anthem"

    What, it required a century for us to catch up with the racism of Francis Scott Key? We despised black people more in 1912 than 1812? That's howcome we abolished slavery and replaced it with the more sinister Jim Crow.

    You can't fool the clever black man, Whitey. The fact that the Star-Spangled Banner isn't about black makes it all the more about blacks, nome sane?

    By the way, I've never understood why sending blacks back to Africa was such a bad idea. Without reference to the logistics of it. I mean, if this is such an awful, racist country and they were forced to come against their will. But somehow it's racist to keep them here and racist to send them back. Damned if you do and damned if you don't.

    What's the solution? Let them rule over us (as kangz and sheit)?

    , @Logan
    You probably know this, but it's highly unlikely the "hirelings and slaves" referenced in the (never sung) third stanza were referring to blacks in any way.

    "Hirelings and slaves" was a standard insult that had been hurled at British troops since the time of the Revolution, contrasting the conscripts and mercenaries in the British forces with the patriotic American volunteers.

    Whether this insult was accurate is, of course, an entirely different question.
    , @Joe Stalin
    Public Television apparently was well prepared to underline the Evilness of Key when they released

    F.S. Key after the song

    Noticed it was being broadcast while channel surfing a few weeks back.

    http://www.fskusa.org/
    , @Autochthon
    I cannot take anyone remotely seriously who uses the phrase “diss track” in a formal essay. Perhaps if the essay itself were about hip-hop, such jargon would be forgiveable, but even then, one presumes the spelling should be “dis,” as the term ellides “disrespect.”

    In the event, the whole theory is grossly self-important projection, akin to some groupie or high-school sweetheart of a rockstar who tells anyone who will listen that his hit ballads are about her, with no credible, corroborating evidence.

    Sure; “Photograph” is all about you, honey. Whatever gets you through the night.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  75. @Guy de Champlagne
    In Scandinavian countries they coddle their prisoners and release them after laughably short (by american standards) prison terms and yet still have rates of recidivism much lower than the those in the US.

    I know people will be tempted to make the demographic argument. But while demographics certainly explain why there are more criminals in the US than say, Sweden, I'm not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don't.

    Overall I'm not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I'd be interested to hear peoples thoughts.

    I’d like to see real backing for this claim that Scandinavia has lower recidivism for serious crimes as I suspect its one of those stories of Scandinavian liberal utopia that evaporate on closer examination. Scandinavia does not have across the board lax punishment and in some cases like drugs, damaging state property and financial crimes the consequences are relatively harsh by Western standards. If the statistics are merely about all crimes then these are going to swamp the murder and rape cases.

    The problem is that Scandinavian countries since WWII have adopted a propaganda model of trying to be the ideal countries as imagined by Anglo elites which means that in the English speaking press and academia there are all sorts of bogus statistics floating around glorifying Scandinavia with no one even attempting a skeptical look. Even here commenters are just uncritically swallowing the idea that Scandinavia was some sort of a socialist utopia before non-white immigration.

    We do have the kind of criminal recidivism that simply wouldn’t happen in America at all, like serial killers who rape and strangle a woman, go to prison for a few years, get released, rape and murder again, go to prison for a few years, get released… Another thing we have is a proliferation of “crime magazines” (these days the internet) that follow these murderers around and inform us of their faces, names and homes so that in the absence of a government willing to isolate dangerous people we can avoid them ourselves.

    It’s nice that immigration has brought some attention to how much of the Scandinavian model is a propaganda lie but there’s really a lot more to expose and I wish the rest of the world was interested given how much pats on the back our leaders are getting from the larger countries for imposing this deranged system on us. For a notorious example, we have cases like the same man shooting a young girl that he had kidnapped to rape and then later poaching a deer; the punishment for killing the deer was harsher. A deer is state property but a young girl isn’t so the life of a deer means more than the life of a person to the socialist state.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  76. OFF TOPIC

    Alternative for Germany(AfD) got over 13 percent of the vote in Germany. The AfD will gain some more political power by getting so many votes. The AfD will now investigate and revisit Angela Merkel’s evil plot to demographically destroy Germany by flooding the country with millions of foreigners.

    Hopefully, Alternative for Germany will begin the deportation process that must occur if Germany is to remain German. Germany should deport all foreigners. Germany should deport as many non-Germans as possible to protect the future for young Germans.

    The American Empire should announce plans to leave Germany within 10 years; a beer-soaked celebration of German/American Friendship could be held as the last US military planes leave Ramstein Air Force base. Germany should turn the screw and acquire a nuclear deterrent. Let Germany be a normal nation again, dammit!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonym
    Looks like it's time for an AFD/German election open thread, or better, some commentary from Steve on the topic in its own post.

    This is something of a mini-Brexit or mini-Trumpening. 13% of the vote is not a landslide by any stretch of the imagination, but this is the first electoral success of the so-called far-right since the 1950s. And I guess it could be called the first success of the anti-immigrationist right, since the AfD are hardly about enacting a Kristallnacht and declaring that the USSR is going to be their Lebensraum.

    White countries are reacting to the "open borders for thee, but no for me" policies of globalism.
    , @Pericles
    Let's hope they have better luck than the Sweden Democrats who had similar results. The rest of the parties -- previously very tough political opponents, I'll tell you -- immediately formed an anti-Swedish cartel and began an unending stream of vile Jewish rants in the media. The AfD will probably see the same.

    The Sweden Democrats will still probably make an even better result next election, which is in roughly one year. It won't be sufficient to change direction. Perhaps they might even win in one more election cycle, giving the establishment a decade more to poison the country.

    At that time, the Swedish voters will likely see the limits of democratic elections as starkly as have the American voters this year.

    And when it's the turn of AfD, they will see the same.

    Can it get worse? Of course it can. I'm fully expecting Islamist parties to start entering parliaments once the muslim population gets large enough, and then our cucks will happily ally with them before allying with parties like AfD or the Sweden Democrats.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  77. @Guy de Champlagne
    In Scandinavian countries they coddle their prisoners and release them after laughably short (by american standards) prison terms and yet still have rates of recidivism much lower than the those in the US.

    I know people will be tempted to make the demographic argument. But while demographics certainly explain why there are more criminals in the US than say, Sweden, I'm not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don't.

    Overall I'm not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I'd be interested to hear peoples thoughts.

    Interesting observation. Light sentences for crime, yet lower recidivism. So the big question is why? I’m not sure! But my take on this matter would be that pre-immigration Sweden was just a better place for your average lower class person (from whose ranks criminals are drawn). Job training, welfare, housing stipend, employment and low general level of social dysfunction. Basically, society was healthier than American society – America has always been pretty violent by north European standards (even including American whites).

    That’s my take. But I actually came here to read some cogent conservative responses to the leniency/ low recidivism thing. After all, this phenomenon is a real conundrum if you think that harsh penalties are the only way to achieve a low-crime equilibrium. So I came to the comment’s responses (all four of them) hoping to find some later day, USA Han Fei’s!

    Alas, no such luck. The main thing on offer was sardonic remarks about how the lenient punishment / low recidivism thing won’t hold up under conditions of mass immigration. Well, the question is why it ever worked in the first place! And another comment was simply ideological boilerplate about how killing criminals and exiling them is the only thing that works – but this ideological position didn’t engage with the empirical point of actually existing leniency-low-recidivism in Sweden! Hello! Han Fei, Han Fei, whereforever art thou?? If only you could come back, maybe you could articulate the conservative case for harshness! Cuz if you read him he spells it out pretty well!

    I come to Unz because I like seeing heterodox but intelligent points. I find it useful to be confronted with perspectives different form my own. Personally, I think Victor Hugo and Charles Dickens had it right: harsh social conditions create harsh people who create harsh crime, which itself feeds back into the harsh social conditions.

    But I’m open to hearing other points of view; that’s why I’m here! So a plea to the commenting conservatives: higher standards, please. Like pull up stats on Swedish recidivism or something. I dunno, just do something. You gotta bring your A game, guys.
    Mic drop!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rod1963
    Some of our best criminals come from fine families, attend the most prestigious of schools and then go to work at banking firms known the the world over. Firms like Goldman-Sachs, Fitches, Moody's, etc. Where they perpetrate white collar crime on a scale that makes your head spin.

    But they do crime right. First off they own the politicians so there is no jail time when they are exposed. Even if they're caught stealing a billion dollars of investors money - well stuff happens, you know.

    Others sell securities to towns and cities that are so complex that no one understands them except the seller. Now these securities act like a money vacuum, they suck the towns dry of taxes and revenue for decadees to come. All legal. But totally unethical.

    You ever wonder how junk securities get rated AAA and sold to pension funds? By organized fraud at the highest levels of the bond ratings agencies. These are the very firms that helped cause the great collapse in 2007-2008. All done by impeccably educated and groomed men and women.

    Maybe they become executives at Wells Fargo where they rip off their customers by signing them up for services they don't want by the millions. When they're caught, nothing happens, They just fire a couple thousand peons.

    You see that's how real criminal activity is done. The strong arm stuff is for dummies. The smart criminal gets a college degree and swindles people from his place of business and never breaks a sweat.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  78. Whiskey says: • Website

    Over/under on the National Anthem changed to something by Jay-Z or Kanye West? About two weeks. After all, the IMPORTANT PEOPLE, those who actually MATTER: Blacks, feminists, billionaires, business leaders, sportsball stars, NFL owners, NFL players, the media, all HATE HATE HATE Trump, his deplorables, America, the National Anthem, White people, White men especially, and the Flag.

    So, this “meeting encounter” with Trump and the Deplorables over the National Anthem (and the flag) is going to result in the usual result — defeat of those horrid deplorables and total abasement to any and all Black demand. Trump backing the National Anthem is reason enough for those who rule and matter in this nation to change it.

    The only question is how quickly the Flag is also changed, after all being committed to criminals is not just for writers; the entire NFL roster is probably just a security force fixer intervention away from being in jail for various offenses that would get 20 years for your average White male. I’ll see you Norman Mailer and raise you fans of the Raven’s Ray Lewis.

    Heck, it is the very dominant criminal thug behavior that allows Black players to dominate socially and culturally. White people seem to just abjectly surrender when faced with that posturing and threats: see London where “acid attacks” by young Black men have brought about — a desire to imprison and remove voting rights from White people complaining about it on social media.

    Non White men upped the social domination ante by violent criminal acts, and White men just folded.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  79. Nico says:
    @anony-mouse
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bZf7XhlKls

    So little is required of students at all levels of academia that I’m almost not surprised that a doctor of psychology would seem so blissfully unaware of the well-recognized condition hybristophilia, recognized as one of a cluster of sexual paraphilias (also including among others asphyxiophilia, autassassinophilia, biastophilia* and chremastophilia) that are potentially lethal if acted upon.

    * I have read that up to 10% of females report that rape fantasy is their favorite sexual fantasy, though while this might be correlated I’m not sure it’s necessarily the same thing: a sexual fantasy isn’t necessarily the same as a source of excitement.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  80. @AnotherDad

    Overall I’m not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I’d be interested to hear peoples thoughts.
     
    I'm sure. In fact, it's one of the things conservatives are--pretty obviously--"rightest" about.

    One of the things that the "left" continually gets "wrong" is getting the incentives right. People aren't behavorialist machines, but they nonetheless react to the environment they are presented with. Give them incentives to behave better ... they'll behave better. Give them incentives to behave worse--what the left always does, crime, welfare, diversity rackets, etc.--they'll behave worse.

    Crime is also one of the clear examples of this. Conservative elected to "get tough on crime" started putting people in jail again for longer sentences and viola! ... crime went down.

    ~~

    There are two reasonable responses to someone who refuses to abide by the laws of their community.
    -- kill them (for serious violations)
    or
    -- expel them.

    Modern societies unfortunately lack the basic "expel them" option. (It would do the world a favor to have a global Devil's Island.) So we have this "temporary expulsion" of sending them off to prison. It's weak sauce. It basically only works because in modern society the payoff for disorganized crime is generally pretty low and if you can keep a lot of these guys locked up past 30, when their testosterone starts ebbing, they come out, survey the situation and don't see any big reason to do criminal crap. It's not like they are "reformed", it's just that they are "retired". And you still have a decent tranche who are more violently sociopathic and will keep doing crime on and on and on.

    Our inability to permanently expel persistent offenders cannot be over-stated as a driver of crime. Many criminals have no pro-social values and are unfit to live among the rest of us. Yet, we have nowhere to put them. Some form of internal exile would be helpful but is not open to us constitutionally.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  81. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Harry Baldwin
    Dylan also wrote sympathetic songs about John Wesley Hardin, premier mass murderer of the Old West, and Joey Gallo, violent mobster.

    On Harding, with irony.

    On Carter, with naive nostalgia for Civil Rights days.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  82. Speaking of pet criminals, Germany’s importation of large numbers of Muslim refugees of unknown quality may have something to do with the humbling of both the Christian Democrats and the Social Democrats in the just-completed elections:

    Although Angela Merkel’s Christian Democrats have lost 9 percent compared to the last elections, her party has yet again become the largest party in Germany’s parliament today. Merkel’s CDU won 32.5 percent of the vote. That’s significantly less than four years ago, but because Germany’s electorate is more divided than ever before, it’s enough to make her chancellor once more.

    Well, if she’s able to form a coalition with the liberal Free Democrats and the Greens, that is, who finished the day with respectively 10.5 and 9.4 percent of the vote.

    For Merkel, the results will leave a bitter taste in her mouth; not only because she has lost support and now needs other parties to form a coalition government, but also because she now has a competitor to her right. For the first time in decades, a rightwing populist party has won enough votes to get into the Bundestag. Alternative für Deutschland, which is routinely depicted as ‘racist’ in American media, won 13.5 percent of the vote making AfD Germany’s third largest party.

    The second largest party is, who else?, the social democrats of the SPD. However, if Merkel is somewhat disappointed, today truly was a day from hell for the SPD and its leader Martin Schulz. The SPD ended the day with a mere 20.2 percent of the vote. That’s the worst result for the social democrats since the end of the Second World War. As a result, Schulz has already announced that he is not willing to form a coalition with Merkel.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    In August I predicted (on another thread, obviously) that the AfD would get 20% in Dresden. In fact they got 22% there, and well over 30% in the surrounding electoral districts. They are now the leading party in Saxony.

    This is VERY big news, and yet Steve refuses to give us a thread about it, and goes on interminably about black issues of one kind or another. Am I the only one to think that his particular bees are not only in his bonnet, but have flown off with it?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  83. I’m interested to see that nobody is much interested in the Buckley case.
    That’s good: the sooner the man is utterly forgotten, the better.

    It was this particularly Leftist luvy grandstanding on his part which opened my eyes to just how completely he had sold himself down the river to obtain the smiling plaudits of his cocktail party friends in New York City.

    From then on he went ever downwards, from one betrayal to the next.

    In the end, alone and increasingly senile, did he ever wonder what might have been had he stayed true to his original inspiration?

    But again: who cares, it’s what he did do which defines and condemns him.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  84. @Cortes
    And then there's the gals who like the bad boys:

    http://michaelprescott.freeservers.com/romancing-the-stone-cold.html


    Ayn Rand and her ideal guy, William Edward Hickman.

    That is really fascinating and horrifying. And consider that the Randians at Cato are considered thoughtful, morally upright centrists when it comes to issues involving criminal justice, in particular.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cortes
    Indeed.

    Oddly enough, in a previous existence one of my colleagues was called Hickman.

    His nickname was Hungerford...

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungerford_massacre

    And no, I shit thee not.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  85. @snorlax
    Pre-WWII, when the Scandinavian countries had right-wing governments and harshly punitive justice systems, they had crime rates hundreds to thousands of times lower than they do today.

    Any reference?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  86. OT–It becomes increasingly clear that many female helpers enjoy immigration with a huge male skew for sexual pleasure.* Seems like the ptb have started pre-emptive countermeasures giving oldWhiteFemale/youngMaleMigrant relations a positive spin:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_%26_Abdul

    http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=552987102

    “‘Victoria & Abdul’ Explores Colonialism And Islamophobia During Queen’s Reign”

    It’s not the first time Dame Judi Dench engages in do-goodery, I propose titling her as Dame Judi Stench.

    * cf:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3802351/Calais-aid-workers-regularly-having-SEX-migrants-Jungle-camp-FEMALE-charity-helpers-likely-sleep-refugee.html

    http://www.france24.com/en/20150914-women-migrants-calais-jungle-plight

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  87. guest says:
    @syonredux
    Wonder how long it will be before the national anthem is changed.....


    Star-Spangled Bigotry: The Hidden Racist History of the National Anthem

    In the case of our national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner,” perhaps not knowing the full lyrics is a good thing. It is one of the most racist, pro-slavery, anti-black songs in the American lexicon, and you would be wise to cut it from your Fourth of July playlist.
     

    To understand the full “Star-Spangled Banner” story, you have to understand the author. Key was an aristocrat and city prosecutor in Washington, D.C. He was, like most enlightened men at the time, not against slavery; he just thought that since blacks were mentally inferior, masters should treat them with more Christian kindness. He supported sending free blacks (not slaves) back to Africa and, with a few exceptions, was about as pro-slavery, anti-black and anti-abolitionist as you could get at the time.
     

    In other words, Key was saying that the blood of all the former slaves and “hirelings” on the battlefield will wash away the pollution of the British invaders. With Key still bitter that some black soldiers got the best of him a few weeks earlier, “The Star-Spangled Banner” is as much a patriotic song as it is a diss track to black people who had the audacity to fight for their freedom. Perhaps that’s why it took almost 100 years for the song to become the national anthem.
     
    http://www.theroot.com/star-spangled-bigotry-the-hidden-racist-history-of-the-1790855893

    “Perhaps that’s why it took almost 100 years for the song to become the national anthem”

    What, it required a century for us to catch up with the racism of Francis Scott Key? We despised black people more in 1912 than 1812? That’s howcome we abolished slavery and replaced it with the more sinister Jim Crow.

    You can’t fool the clever black man, Whitey. The fact that the Star-Spangled Banner isn’t about black makes it all the more about blacks, nome sane?

    By the way, I’ve never understood why sending blacks back to Africa was such a bad idea. Without reference to the logistics of it. I mean, if this is such an awful, racist country and they were forced to come against their will. But somehow it’s racist to keep them here and racist to send them back. Damned if you do and damned if you don’t.

    What’s the solution? Let them rule over us (as kangz and sheit)?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  88. Lagertha says:
    @Guy de Champlagne
    In Scandinavian countries they coddle their prisoners and release them after laughably short (by american standards) prison terms and yet still have rates of recidivism much lower than the those in the US.

    I know people will be tempted to make the demographic argument. But while demographics certainly explain why there are more criminals in the US than say, Sweden, I'm not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don't.

    Overall I'm not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I'd be interested to hear peoples thoughts.

    It’s very different now…crime is rising in Sweden, Finland, Norway. Gun violence was less before the EU; handguns were strictly regulated. With EU came the black market, so guns have proliferated…along with drugs and contraband & human trafficking. Crime is way up….it was creepy this summer. People are breaking into homes/apartments/stealing cars, mugging old people, etc. And, it is almost entirely by immigrants…or non-ethnic Finns.

    Recidivism may have worked in the past, particularly in small towns where shame followed that perp to a penurious, lonely existence, but now, prisons are filling up again in the Nordic countries…and yeah, not with ethnic natives. Fear of deportation helps, but like the Afghan boys who gang raped and set fire to a teen girl, they’re still sitting in prison because Finns have never confronted a human bar-b-que victim, let alone a gang rape victim. Nordic countries are not utopia.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  89. syonredux says:

    A WOKE study guide for the Middle Ages:

    Primary sources (editions, translations, and historical sources, both for research and teaching)

    Black Central Europe (international network of scholars): Archive of primary documents and sources including (text, art, and visual media) on the presence of people of black African ancestry living and working in Europe. https://blackcentraleurope.com/ Sources are organized in chronological order beginning with the Middle Ages (1000-1500 CE): https://blackcentraleurope.com/sources/

    Croxton Play of the Sacrament, TEAMS edition by John Sebastian

    England’s Immigrants, 1330-1550: Resident Aliens in the Late Middle Ages (multi-institutional project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council): Extensive searchable archive with interactive maps for anyone interested histories of migration to England. https://www.englandsimmigrants.com/page Resources for Teachers: https://www.englandsimmigrants.com/resources-for-teachers/

    Selected recent blog posts and journalism (organized by date, most recent first):

    Marian, “The Virgin at Chartres, White Supremacy, and Medieval Studies.” Mostly Medieval: Images and Reflections. September 20, 2017. https://mostlymedievalimagesreflections.blogspot.com/2017/09/the-virgin-at-chartres-white-supremacy.html

    Bryan William Van Norden, “What’s With Nazis and Knights?” Huffington Post, September 19, 2017. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/whats-with-nazis-and-knights_us_59c0b469e4b082fd4205b98d

    Medievalists of Color (collectively authored), “Statement of Solidarity With Our Jewish Colleagues.” Medievalists of Color, September 7, 2017. http://medievalistsofcolor.com/medievalists-of-color-/statement-of-solidarity

    Josephine Livingston, “Racism, Medievalism, and the White Supremacists of Charlottesville,” New Republic, August 15, 2017.

    https://newrepublic.com/article/144320/racism-medievalism-white-supremacists-charlottesville

    Rebecca Futo Kennedy, “Bibliography for Race and Ethnicity in the Classical World.” Classics at the Interaesctions, August 14, 2017, https://rfkclassics.blogspot.com/2017/08/bibliography-for-race-and-ethnicity-in.html [This bibliography is being continually updated; so far it mostly pertains to Antiquity (Greek and Roman) and Early Christian periods.]

    Medievalists of Color (collectively authored), “On Race and Medieval Studies: A Collective Statement by Medievalists of Color.” Medievalists of Color, August 1, 2017, http://medievalistsofcolor.com/medievalists-of-color-/on-race-and-medieval-studies.

    Adam Miyashiro, “Decolonizing Anglo-Saxon Studies: A Response to ISAS in Honolulu.” In the Middle, July 29, 2017, http://www.inthemedievalmiddle.com/2017/07/decolonizing-anglo-saxon-studies.html

    Otto L., “Peripheries of the Middle Ages.” Medium, July 28, 2017, https://medium.com/@vivarium/peripheries-of-the-middle-ages-558db6223488.

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/18JClsma1BMKYCxvgeWqwPej3ZSCrQXlAlXbL0CdqWmE/edit

    Read More
    • LOL: Autochthon
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  90. wm. f. buckley the white cornell west.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  91. utu says:

    This kind of naiveté about criminals was widespread in the 1960s.

    The innocence project clearly demonstrated that the naiveté is on the side of those who think that justice system works.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Negrolphin Pool
    Are there really sides there? Seems like a false dichotomy.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  92. Logan says:
    @syonredux
    Wonder how long it will be before the national anthem is changed.....


    Star-Spangled Bigotry: The Hidden Racist History of the National Anthem

    In the case of our national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner,” perhaps not knowing the full lyrics is a good thing. It is one of the most racist, pro-slavery, anti-black songs in the American lexicon, and you would be wise to cut it from your Fourth of July playlist.
     

    To understand the full “Star-Spangled Banner” story, you have to understand the author. Key was an aristocrat and city prosecutor in Washington, D.C. He was, like most enlightened men at the time, not against slavery; he just thought that since blacks were mentally inferior, masters should treat them with more Christian kindness. He supported sending free blacks (not slaves) back to Africa and, with a few exceptions, was about as pro-slavery, anti-black and anti-abolitionist as you could get at the time.
     

    In other words, Key was saying that the blood of all the former slaves and “hirelings” on the battlefield will wash away the pollution of the British invaders. With Key still bitter that some black soldiers got the best of him a few weeks earlier, “The Star-Spangled Banner” is as much a patriotic song as it is a diss track to black people who had the audacity to fight for their freedom. Perhaps that’s why it took almost 100 years for the song to become the national anthem.
     
    http://www.theroot.com/star-spangled-bigotry-the-hidden-racist-history-of-the-1790855893

    You probably know this, but it’s highly unlikely the “hirelings and slaves” referenced in the (never sung) third stanza were referring to blacks in any way.

    “Hirelings and slaves” was a standard insult that had been hurled at British troops since the time of the Revolution, contrasting the conscripts and mercenaries in the British forces with the patriotic American volunteers.

    Whether this insult was accurate is, of course, an entirely different question.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  93. Bubba says:
    @Cloud of Probable Matricide
    I think you mean Irving Kristol's phrase.

    Thank you for the correction!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  94. allen says:
    @Harry Baldwin
    Dylan also wrote sympathetic songs about John Wesley Hardin, premier mass murderer of the Old West, and Joey Gallo, violent mobster.

    John Wesley Harding is a bit different. Dylan treated him as a semi-mythical figure just as the older folksingers would have. No different than other folk numbers like Pretty Boy Floyd that romanticized dashing outlaws that probably weren’t that pleasant in real life.

    Joey Gallo is sorta weird, but it actually had the ironic effect of counterbalancing the Ruben Hurricane stuff. I recall one review at the time that said something like (I paraphrase from memory): “Dylan makes me believe Ruben Carter’s innocence in ‘Hurricane’ and then makes me second guess his sincerity when he lionizes a real criminal in ‘Joey’”

    Dylan performed the song Hurricane almost exclusively during the time in which he wrote it, the 1975-76 Rolling Thunder Revue tour. After that, I don’t think he ever performed it again (though it remains a standard on greatest hits albums). I think Dylan sincerely believed in Ruben Carter’s innocence at the time, but I can’t help but wonder if he came to regret his endorsement.

    Likewise, there’s a fairly rare Dylan single from 71 where he eulogized Black Panther George Jackson. It’s pretty poorly written by Dylan’s standards, but I find it fascinating that he totally disowned the song. It was never performed live and it’s never appeared on any CD, album, box set, rarity set, or anything else since 1971 (I think it did get a release on an Australian box set and maybe as part of an itunes download bundle).

    Always a little hard to tell what Dylan really stood for, but I do think what he has continued to play is a decent indication. Interestingly, he never disowned his Christian/Gospel material the way he disowned the above songs. He still plays some of those tunes today. I recall one HBO special he did with Tom Petty in 86 or 87 where he spoke disparagingly of how people looked up to Gandhi and MLK as “heroes” and then said he was going to play a song about his hero, launching into one of his Christian songs “In the Garden” about Christ’s betrayal. These days he’s singing old Sinatra standards at his concerts. Weird guy, but fascinating

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    It also didn't hurt that Ruben Carter had a film with Denzel Washington about his case, which was Oscar nominated. The film makes you really believe that Carter was innocent, and of course, he was eventually released.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  95. Dave says:
    @Anon
    Bob Dylan and Rubin Carter.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane_(Bob_Dylan_song)

    I used to go to wrestling practice with a black guy who grew up in the same neighborhood as Carter, and he stated very openly ” the ni**a is guilty “. He said everyone in the community knew it, but Carter could count on gullible white liberals to take up his case and promote his story, which is exactly what Dylan did.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I'm a friendly acquaintence of a pretty famous woman who grew up in a city perhaps five miles from where the Ruben Carter murders took place. She said that it was absolute common knowledge among all and sundry that there was no question as to the boxer's guilt.

    She absolutely would say nothing on the record, however.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  96. Cato says:
    @dc.sunsets
    "Expel them?"

    I hear Puerto Rico is a real steal right now. I favor using it as an Escape from New York style penal colony. Three strikes and you are deported forever, and once there you're on your own. No taxpayers will fund squat.

    Baffin Island would be better–very few original inhabitants to displace, and one would have to cooperate with others to survive.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  97. Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  98. @Chrisnonymous
    I don't know if it's fair to say they "fell for" a criminal's hard-luck story. Of course, you know WFB personally, so you can speak to that better. But from my perspective, it looks more ideological.

    Cf, Gavin McInnes, who flirted with us for a while but then started his new show with an "anti-paleo" perspective. He fancies himself a patriotic libertarian who rejects imprisonment. I myself feel sympathetic to his perspective, but I think he underestimates the criminality of criminals. It's about Optimism vs. Pessimism and the human condition.

    Christians should be optimists, not pessimists.

    In the case of Buckley, I want to believe his optimism about humanity derived from honest theological conviction (but, again, you know him better). In the case of McInnes, I feel he is either cucked or deceptively promoting "culture" as a way of inviting people into the fold.

    “Of course, you know WFB personally”

    Not me.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  99. @Laugh Track
    One of the numerous things that caused the '60s New Left to implode was the romanticization of convicts who claimed to have been radicalized and who were thus transformed from felonious thugs to "political prisoners".

    A whole prison movement arose, fueled particularly by well-meaning white women mooning over black inmates who had plenty of time on their hands to engage in extended correspondence describing how they were wronged and how they were now passionate about social justice and making the world a better place.

    Needless to say, this did not play out well. Do a search for "Popeye Jackson" or "Tribal Thumb" or "United Prisoners Union". The SLA, in part, came out of that milieu.

    I came across a six year old blog post by a woman who has been at it for forty+ years and must be the purest living archetype of the prisoner advocate.

    http://whyaminotsurprised.blogspot.com/2011/08/locked-into-locked-up.html


    Today, in addition to everything else, I blog regularly on criminal justice issues. And I am deeply committed to the campaign to release the remaining two members of the Angola 3, Black Panther Party members who have been in solitary confinement since 1972 because of their politics. Both of my children were fathered by men I met while they were in prison. And my fiance served twenty-seven years for a robbery that netted $70 and involved no physical injuries.
     

    Tracey Ullman does comedy sketches on women who recurrently fall in love with Death Row prisoners.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dahlia
    My mother fell in love with an inmate for murder related to a drug deal gone bad. A king pin type. Mother and I are polar opposites when it comes to sizing up people and she's an airy-fairy liberal: scant intuition.
    My late teen years were interesting...
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  100. “I’m an Asian-American doctor and today I #TakeTheKnee to fight white supremacy.”

    Is there any research into whether these people lack theory of mind? Many of them must.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Francis G.
    It's more evidence that the so-called Model Minority is just as hostile to White civilization as any NAM is.
    , @Anon

    "I’m an Asian-American doctor and today I #TakeTheKnee to fight white supremacy.”
     
    Fighting on your knees. Brilliant strategy china-man.
    BTW, he has to go back. :)
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  101. @TheJester

    The idea is that the NCO is the ‘bridge’ between the intellect of the officers and the mean roughness of the grunts.
     
    You nailed it. As an officer for 20 years, I quickly learned to rely on senior NCOs for advice, counsel, and direct control over the enlisted ranks. Officers who did not reply on their NCOs had to learn hard lessons the hard way.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.
     
    Of course, today's SJWs would attribute lower class status to class and racial oppression. However, the reality among Baby Boomers was that there was enough fluidity among the economic and social classes in post-WWII America that a person with ambition could get his or her college degree and graduate into the middle class. Perhaps it would take more planning and harder work for some compared to others ... but improving your way of life for yourself and your family was a way of life.

    Today it appears that young people want the good life "gifted" to them.

    A new book by Jean Twenge:

    "iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy -- and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood -- and What That Means for the Rest of Us"

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01N6ACK3B?ref_=cm_sw_r_kb_dp_JlvWzbEY92CDQ&tag=thewaspos09-20&linkCode=kpe

    Wow. You’ve completely missed your own point. A big part of the the problem today is precisely that one cannot attain any social mobility in many cases, despite the best efforts, intentions, and even luck in the genetic lottery, because smug bastards among the boomers sold our birthright for infinitely appreciating realty (for them; anyone not in on the ground floor can of course now never afford it…); stocks (via cheap labour, first by Chinese, Mexicans, and Indians abroad, but now by Chinese, Mexicans, and Indians here); and so on.

    Congratulate yourself some more about how hard you worked and how lazy everyone under forty is, Cochise.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Nico
    As a millennial who has "made it" in one sense financially and career-wise but who also acknowledges I had considerable support from family, godparents and many friends, I think it is not an either/or question.

    Is my generation more complacent and less thrifty than the previous one? In many ways, yes. But I would argue some of our grievances are legitimate and our lack of drive has to be understood as such: what's the point of scrimping and saving half one's income if the only light at the end of that tunnel is enough for the down payment, 10 to 15 years out of college, on a suburban cottage some 50 minutes away from any gainful employment (to which one is, inevitably, tied as soon as one has a mortgage)?

    At the same time, when so many of our woes come from globalization and immigration and I see my hipster and yuppy white peers screaming "BLACK LIVES MATTER!" and "OPEN BORDERS NOW!" not to mention voting for that evil cow who all but promised to destroy us all last November I wish I could commission a special treason court just for them. However, one must take the people as one finds them, not as one wishes them to be.

    Any proposed solution therefore has to account for these nuances. For instance, as far as college debt is concerned, there needs to be a mass, across-the-board writedown: say, by 50%, with a cap of $45,000, perhaps with anyone overshooting that ceiling becoming ineligible for future student loans regardless of improvement in credit score. This would take care of some, but not all, of the burden, because while I really believe the legal age should be 21 and 18 is too young to see the consequences of these kinds of decisions - which shouldn't ruin our lives - it is pedagogical to have to shoulder some of the consequences of bad decisions even in youth. And some, but not none, because no society can afford to do away with its up and coming generations (however frustrating their conduct may be).
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  102. guest says:

    There was a tv show on HBO called Oz, which was a critique of our “prison-industrial complex” from a left-liberal perspective. (Brought to us by the people behind Homicide: Life on the Street.) Similar to the Wire, it nevertheless featured plenty of un-PC material. For instance, the feral blacks are actually shown to belong there, even if they face injustices while inside. Also, among the most compelling characters is the leader of the Aryan gang played by J.K. Simmons, who’s full of Real Talk.

    It was about a moral crusader in a maximum security prison who built an “experimental” panopticon unit mockingly referred to as Emerald City. There he tried to save prisoners from being victims of modern society, or whatever. But the main theme of the series was that they had to want to be saved, otherwise it was pointless. I took it as anti-utopian.

    Anyway, there was a character called Poet because he was always reciting free verse in the cafeteria and elsewhere. He was “discovered” by the unit manager, who sold his story as a promising ghetto intellectual to the news media to get PR buzz for his GED program. His cause was also championed by a prominent Nation of Islam blacktivist inmate, who had been published before and had contacts in the industry. Together they helped get Poet into an anthology titled Unheard America, or some crap. The subsequent press was enough to get him early release.

    Funny part was he violates himself back into prison immediately when he shoots a guy at a book signing. (It might have been self-defense, because Poet owed money thanks to his heroin habit and this guy was coming to collect. But Poet was on parole and carrying an illegal weapon.) The crusader and the Muslim look on with hang-dog expressions as he returns. The homeboys welcome him back with open arms (and heroin).

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  103. @Matthew McConnagay
    Like this? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3tkFOtM6go

    That is a mockumentary right?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  104. L Woods says:
    @TheJester

    The idea is that the NCO is the ‘bridge’ between the intellect of the officers and the mean roughness of the grunts.
     
    You nailed it. As an officer for 20 years, I quickly learned to rely on senior NCOs for advice, counsel, and direct control over the enlisted ranks. Officers who did not reply on their NCOs had to learn hard lessons the hard way.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.
     
    Of course, today's SJWs would attribute lower class status to class and racial oppression. However, the reality among Baby Boomers was that there was enough fluidity among the economic and social classes in post-WWII America that a person with ambition could get his or her college degree and graduate into the middle class. Perhaps it would take more planning and harder work for some compared to others ... but improving your way of life for yourself and your family was a way of life.

    Today it appears that young people want the good life "gifted" to them.

    A new book by Jean Twenge:

    "iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy -- and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood -- and What That Means for the Rest of Us"

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01N6ACK3B?ref_=cm_sw_r_kb_dp_JlvWzbEY92CDQ&tag=thewaspos09-20&linkCode=kpe

    Today it appears that young people want the good life “gifted” to them.

    Oh please. To be in “iGen” is to see haughty boomers with forgettable credentials and lackluster intellects perched in social and professional positions a millennial would have had to do absolutely everything right (and with unfailing good luck) to attain. Being born a boomer or “greatest” (lol) generation was the biggest life “gift” in human history.

    There are in fact good reasons to dislike millennials. They are utterly conformist, intellectually and morally cowardly, obsequious to authority and its diktats and paradigms. They are among the most eager of the voluntary auxiliary thought police. They have no spine and no honor as a whole. They are a generation of soulless fools. The ‘laziness’ trope however is just vapid, crotchety curmudgeonry.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    There something to the laziness charge considering obesity rates. But you could blame their Boomer and Gen-x parents for feeding them the wrong stuff and letting them have sedentary pastimes. The cocooning of society is more than just a Millennial (God, I hate that term) thing.

    As far as "the good life" and career goes, wellxl, the Boomer generation pretty much screwed up American civilization. How'd Boomers like to grow up amidst mass immigration, globalization, and PC? They had inflation, too, but of course that only gets worse.

    One thing I've noticed, no one in the working world seems to mentor anymore. I mean as a regular thing. Not when you go out of your way and make a show of it. But day to day, senior employees don't give a crap about junior ones in my experience. Beyond basic training, it's every man for himself. That can't be socially healthy.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  105. pyrrhus says:

    Since the writer never expresses guilt after his pet felon rapes or murders someone (William Styron expressly stated that he felt no guilt), this strange attraction must be a feature, not a bug….

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  106. @dearieme
    Yup. iSteve should have said 'Buckley, Mailer, and Styron were unworldly men, having each fallen for a crook’s hard-luck story'.

    Everyone in prison is innocent. Just ask them.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  107. njguy73 says:
    @Sunbeam
    "Modern societies unfortunately lack the basic “expel them” option. (It would do the world a favor to have a global Devil’s Island.) "

    You could get a hell of a book or tv series out of that. Hunger Games for adults.

    “Modern societies unfortunately lack the basic “expel them” option. (It would do the world a favor to have a global Devil’s Island.) ”

    You could get a hell of a book or tv series out of that. Hunger Games for adults.

    In 2017, the crime rate and hurricane frequency on Earth rises four hundred percent. The once great island of Hispaniola becomes the one maximum security prison for the entire world. A fifty-foot containment wall is erected along the Jamaica Channel, across the Windward Passage, and down along the Mona Passage. It completely surrounds Hispaniola. All bridges and waterways are mined. The United Nations Police Force, like an army, is encamped around the island. There are no guards inside the prison, only prisoners and the worlds they have made. The rules are simple: once you go in, you don’t come out.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  108. njguy73 says:
    @dc.sunsets
    "Expel them?"

    I hear Puerto Rico is a real steal right now. I favor using it as an Escape from New York style penal colony. Three strikes and you are deported forever, and once there you're on your own. No taxpayers will fund squat.

    I hear Puerto Rico is a real steal right now. I favor using it as an Escape from New York style penal colony. Three strikes and you are deported forever, and once there you’re on your own. No taxpayers will fund squat.

    See my comment. I swear I did not read yours first.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  109. @Triumph104

    but they each fell for a crook’s hard-luck story.
     
    In the ESPN 30 for 30 Elway to Marino, the agent that represented the two quarterbacks mentioned that he had previously been a criminal defense attorney but left the profession after winning acquittals for two clients that later admitted to him that they were guilty.

    Any criminal defense lawyer who actually believes that most of his clients are innocent of the charges against them is probably better off in another line of work.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    It's not a criminal defense lawyer's job to judge whether a client is innocent. It's his job to defend the client within the limit of the law and to force the state to prove its case beyond a reasonable doubt and to cast doubt on the state's case wherever possible. He cannot present evidence that he knows to be false but he also knows better than to ask clients whether they are guilty. If they tell him that they are guilty this is privileged information that they can be disbarred for sharing. It's really better not to know. Everyone is entitled to a defense. Many, perhaps most, defendants are guilty so if defending the guilty bothers you you should choose a different line of work.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  110. @Laugh Track
    One of the numerous things that caused the '60s New Left to implode was the romanticization of convicts who claimed to have been radicalized and who were thus transformed from felonious thugs to "political prisoners".

    A whole prison movement arose, fueled particularly by well-meaning white women mooning over black inmates who had plenty of time on their hands to engage in extended correspondence describing how they were wronged and how they were now passionate about social justice and making the world a better place.

    Needless to say, this did not play out well. Do a search for "Popeye Jackson" or "Tribal Thumb" or "United Prisoners Union". The SLA, in part, came out of that milieu.

    I came across a six year old blog post by a woman who has been at it for forty+ years and must be the purest living archetype of the prisoner advocate.

    http://whyaminotsurprised.blogspot.com/2011/08/locked-into-locked-up.html


    Today, in addition to everything else, I blog regularly on criminal justice issues. And I am deeply committed to the campaign to release the remaining two members of the Angola 3, Black Panther Party members who have been in solitary confinement since 1972 because of their politics. Both of my children were fathered by men I met while they were in prison. And my fiance served twenty-seven years for a robbery that netted $70 and involved no physical injuries.
     

    “Britain’s most violent prisoner”, also bodybuilder and author of book on prison fitness, Michael Petersen aka Charles Bronson, 64, is engaged to a 36 year old soap actress.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Salvador

    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/2859096/paula-williamson-charles-bronson-fiancee-wedding-good-morning-britain

    His record (in Wiki) is … extensive. This is just two of dozens of incidents, most not so darkly comic.

    “In April 1996 he was sent back to Belmarsh after taking a doctor hostage at Birmingham.

    Five months later an Iraqi hijacker bumped into him in the canteen and did not apologise. After a long period of brooding he then took two Iraqi hijackers, along with another inmate named Jason Greasley, hostage in a cell. By his own admission he was “losing it badly” and ranted about his dead father, saying that any “funny business” would result in him “snapping necks”. He sang and laughed and forced the Iraqis to tickle his feet and call him ‘General’. He demanded a plane to take him to Libya, two Uzi sub-machine guns, 5,000 rounds of ammunition, and an axe. He released Greasley, but began chanting “I want ice cream”. He felt guilty after hitting one of the hostages with a metal tray and therefore insisted the same hostage hit him over the head four times so as to call it ‘quits’. He slashed himself four times with a safety razor, but agreed to release the hostages and walk back to the segregation unit”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    is engaged to a 36 year old soap actress
     
    There must be some lower bound on human stupidity, and this should be it. But I'll bet it isn't.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  111. I’m reminded of the same naïveté that SJW’s show in championing rescue pit bulls. The dogs have less agency than a criminal but I wouldn’t allow either around my kids. It’s all about how good it makes them, the boosters, feel.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonguy

    I’m reminded of the same naïveté that SJW’s show in championing rescue pit bulls.
     
    It is a ruffian affectation as well, like the tattoos. The nice part of this is that SJW's tend to oppose breed specific legislation.

    Portland has a lot of pitbull bites

    http://www.nationalpitbullvictimawareness.org/attacks/bites-bans-deaths-usa/
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  112. Dr. X says:

    OT: Black African Immigrant from Sudan shoots Tennessee Christians in church. A black would-be Dylan Roof, perhaps? Stopped by a parishioner with a concealed-carry license…

    Boy, this one is a REAL narrative-breaker…

    http://dailycaller.com/2017/09/24/tennessee-church-shooter-suspect-identified-as-25-year-old-from-sudan/

    Read More
    • Replies: @BB753
    He doesn't seem to be a Muslim although hailing from Khartoum. BTW, I found the header funny: "Tennessee Church Shooting Suspect Is A Sudanese Bodybuilder"
    Why is it important to mention he was a bodybuilder?
    , @res
    Should Trump invite Caleb Engle to the White House rather than the Warriors?
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson II
    Here is the money quote:

    Engle returned to the church to confront the gunman again. The gunman shot himself in the face when the man returned, possibly by accident.
     
    Possibly by accident!

    St. Peter: "Emanuel Kidega Samson, not only are you a murderer and an unrepentant sinner, you are too stupid to go to heaven even if had repented." Samson, "What? I am a saint from the Camp of the Saint!" St. Peter: "Satan won't take you either - says Hell is almost full and he needs the demon assigned to you to join the team that will torture Bill Gates." Samson, "Great! I can return to Sudan!" St. Peter: "Nope, you will be a narcotics informant in Detroit, specializing in drug cartel cases - we have upped your lives count to 9000." Samson: "WTF?" St. Peter: "Oh, by the way, you will retain all your physical characteristics, except that you will look like a blue-eyed, blond-haired, Scandinavian." Samson, "Noooo! Let me go to Hell please!"
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  113. Jack D says:
    @Gary in Gramercy
    Any criminal defense lawyer who actually believes that most of his clients are innocent of the charges against them is probably better off in another line of work.

    It’s not a criminal defense lawyer’s job to judge whether a client is innocent. It’s his job to defend the client within the limit of the law and to force the state to prove its case beyond a reasonable doubt and to cast doubt on the state’s case wherever possible. He cannot present evidence that he knows to be false but he also knows better than to ask clients whether they are guilty. If they tell him that they are guilty this is privileged information that they can be disbarred for sharing. It’s really better not to know. Everyone is entitled to a defense. Many, perhaps most, defendants are guilty so if defending the guilty bothers you you should choose a different line of work.

    Read More
    • Agree: cthulhu
    • Replies: @Hibernian
    I'm not sure, but I think they really grill the defendant, sort of like the cops do, and impress on them that lying to your lawyer can get you convicted. How this could not include "Did you do it?" is beyond me. My cousin who over time transitioned to personal injury work in his early days defended some particularly vicious juvenile murderers whom even the liberal press didn't pretend were innocent. Another very liberal lawyer cousin of mine, his sister, once said to me, and some others, "The trouble with criminal law is your clients are criminals."
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  114. Cortes says:
    @Bellecurvie
    That is really fascinating and horrifying. And consider that the Randians at Cato are considered thoughtful, morally upright centrists when it comes to issues involving criminal justice, in particular.

    Indeed.

    Oddly enough, in a previous existence one of my colleagues was called Hickman.

    His nickname was Hungerford…

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungerford_massacre

    And no, I shit thee not.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  115. @James Braxton
    Having a racially stratified society corrupts all our institutions.

    It's why we can't have good public schools, inexpensive healthcare, or a lenient criminal justice system.

    Having a racially stratified society corrupts all our institutions.

    It’s why we can’t have good public schools, inexpensive healthcare, or a lenient criminal justice system.

    This is a deceptively simple, but actually very profound comment. In the US almost all politics is racial, especially when it is considered not to be racial, for the health care debate is actually a debate about government subsidies for health care (insurance for individuals and families).

    But the elephant in the room is that no one is talking about who are the greatest beneficiaries of Medicare, Medicaid, and Obamacare, and who are the individuals and families who have the most to gain or lose through potential changes to the way the federal government hands out money to help people pay for health care, and ultimately to support the whole structure of hospitals, skilled nursing care facilities, doctor’s offices, and drug companies, which provide a significant percentage of the total number of jobs in every state of the union (even if they are not very cost effective compared to most other countries).

    It is a statistic almost universally acknowledged that close to 50% of all births in the US are paid for by Medicaid, the program for the poor, but what is the percentage of births of African Americans paid for by Medicaid, and how might proposed changes in Medicaid funding affect this? This is the kind of question that We the People and our elected representatives ought to be talking about, but never are.

    The same goes for political slogans like “tough on crime”. In reality this probably often means “tough on blacks.” The whole gun control debate, inasmuch as it exists at all, is completely incomprehensible to foreigners, because it is never declared that the noble and historic right to bear arms is largely a movement of white homeowners, especially rural ones, who are terrified of a home invasion by their black neighbors. Of course the original constitutional right to bear arms did not apply to blacks and certainly not to slaves, and it was certainly helpful in preventing large scale slave rebellions in the US compared to other countries, let alone wholesale takeovers like in Haiti which terrified the population of white s̶l̶a̶v̶e̶ property owners of earlier generations.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  116. syonredux says:

    speaking of crime…

    According to the data released a few weeks ago, foreigners have a crime rate ~3.5 that of Germans. For asylum seekers the factor is ~7.3.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  117. @Cwhatfuture
    We jail way too many non violent people in the US, as a result of our insane drug laws and incredibly over criminalized federal law - from tax, to fishing, to bank deposits to campaigning. Congress has made everything a "federal crime" literally which is why "prosecutors" can pick anyone they like and find something on them - anyone. This is why "Special Prosecutors" are so dangerous. This produces a disrespect of the criminal justice system. Once the system is not respected, it is easy to believe that even a real criminal - even a violent one - has received a bad deal .

    Disagree. Few are in jail for an ounce of weed. The cops know who the bad guys are but can’t get them for the murders they’ve done, so drug crimes it is.

    Just Some Cop please weigh in.

    2) Jesus H. Christ! I am now into 15 minutes of watching NBC’s Football Night in America and it has been nothing by What Does All The Black blah blah blah mean. How about some f***ing highlights!?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  118. Jack D says:

    Many murderers are psychopaths. Psychopaths have the ability to lie (and kill) completely without guilt so they are very convincing to normal humans who depend on cues such as nervousness to detect when people are lying. The psychopath and the truly innocent person sound exactly the same to us so we have no ability to tell them apart. In fact the psychopath may sound MORE innocent and MORE convincing than a truly innocent person. This is a bug in our software. Therefore it is easy for others to become convinced that some psychopath has been wrongly imprisoned and that a miscarriage of justice has occurred. If you or I believe this, no one cares but for some reason (another bug) we respect what celebrities have to say even outside their area of expertise. Celebrities are expert actors or writers or whatever but when it comes to judging psychopaths they are no better than the rest of us. Unfortunately, bugs in human software are difficult to patch but perhaps all the high profile incidents of celebrity adopted psychopaths repeat offending has put us on notice of that bug and celebrities are perhaps more wary of lending their credibility to someone who may be a psychopath.

    Read More
    • Agree: Hibernian
    • Replies: @Johann Ricke

    Many, perhaps most, defendants are guilty so if defending the guilty bothers you you should choose a different line of work.
     
    This is how a very idealistic acquaintance went from public defender to working in the DA's office - it grated on her that the vast majority of the people she was defending were actually guilty, as opposed to innocent as she had been led to think while going through law school. In a figurative sense, she was mugged by reality.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  119. Bill P says:
    @MBlanc46
    It may be that genteel general nastiness superficially appears to be less nasty than loutish general nastiness.

    Exactly. Loutish general nastiness is petty, often random and more often than not self-destructive and therefore self-limiting. Genteel general nastiness is deliberate, calculated and and self-aggrandizing, so it goes from strength to strength.

    I guess you could say that a certain nasty personality type is punished when unaccompanied by a talent for wealth accumulation, but greatly rewarded when it makes people rich. The difference may be only a couple standard deviations of intelligence and greater impulse control, but at heart, the jerks are the same.

    Read More
    • Agree: MBlanc46
    • Replies: @oddsbodkins
    "Loutish general nastiness is petty, often random and more often than not self-destructive and therefore self-limiting. Genteel general nastiness is deliberate, calculated and and self-aggrandizing..."


    It's the difference between Goodfellas and The Godfather.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  120. syonredux says:

    Del Toro’s Shape of Water sounds terrible…

    The heroine, Eliza (Sally Hawkins), is a cleaning woman in a top-secret underground facility that’s the setting for just that sort of research. One day an Amazonian Gill Man (known as “the Asset,” played by Doug Jones) arrives in a tank in the custody of an agent named Strickland (Michael Shannon), who talks about how the creature is an affront to God, not “being made in His image.” He’s also fond of using an electrified cattle prod, which he refers to as his Alabama how-dee-doo. The way he used it reminded me of how southern policemen beat black civil-rights protesters. Perhaps what reminded me was footage on nearby TV screens of southern policemen beating black civil-rights protesters.

    Did I mention that the heroine is mute and suffers from the feeling that she’s “incomplete?” She was apparently mistreated as a child — her vocal cords were cut, gross — and drowned and was resuscitated, so she already has a relationship of sorts with the creature in the water tank. (It’s fate, she signs.) She has a strong sexual appetite: We see her pleasure herself in the bathtub in the mornings. Meanwhile, he’s not unattractive. No visible sex organs, but slender and broad-shouldered and tall. The pale face in the middle of those undulating gills has the alien-reptile handsomeness of Benedict Cumberbatch.

    I should mention that the lovable, mute heroine lives (above a movie theater) with a lovable, talkative gay painter (Richard Jenkins) who keeps trying to create Norman Rockwell–like illustrations for an advertising firm that has let him go (because he’s gay?). And that Eliza has another natural ally in her fellow cleaning woman, Zelda (Octavia Spencer), who chatters away about her lazy, good-for-nothing husband. So you have a poor mute woman, a poor black woman, a poor gay man, and a so-called freak of nature versus a God-and-country white fascist who buys a Cadillac because it represents “the future” and is shown in bed mechanically grunting over his impassive blonde Stepford wife. Did I mention that he and his five-star general boss want to dissect the Gill Man rather than keep him around? Talk about stacking the deck.

    http://www.vulture.com/2017/09/the-shape-of-water-is-an-utterly-lovely-but-complacent-movie.html

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cortes
    The Shape of Water is one of the earliest novels in the Camilleri series about a Sicilian cop called Montalbano. The novels are humorous. The TV version by Germans, poor.
    , @BB753
    If you think that's silly, what about Del Toro's tv series The Strain, with Nazi vampires and Jewish vampire-hunters? With plenty of Treblinka flashbacks.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  121. @Jack D
    Many murderers are psychopaths. Psychopaths have the ability to lie (and kill) completely without guilt so they are very convincing to normal humans who depend on cues such as nervousness to detect when people are lying. The psychopath and the truly innocent person sound exactly the same to us so we have no ability to tell them apart. In fact the psychopath may sound MORE innocent and MORE convincing than a truly innocent person. This is a bug in our software. Therefore it is easy for others to become convinced that some psychopath has been wrongly imprisoned and that a miscarriage of justice has occurred. If you or I believe this, no one cares but for some reason (another bug) we respect what celebrities have to say even outside their area of expertise. Celebrities are expert actors or writers or whatever but when it comes to judging psychopaths they are no better than the rest of us. Unfortunately, bugs in human software are difficult to patch but perhaps all the high profile incidents of celebrity adopted psychopaths repeat offending has put us on notice of that bug and celebrities are perhaps more wary of lending their credibility to someone who may be a psychopath.

    Many, perhaps most, defendants are guilty so if defending the guilty bothers you you should choose a different line of work.

    This is how a very idealistic acquaintance went from public defender to working in the DA’s office – it grated on her that the vast majority of the people she was defending were actually guilty, as opposed to innocent as she had been led to think while going through law school. In a figurative sense, she was mugged by reality.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  122. @syonredux
    Wonder how long it will be before the national anthem is changed.....


    Star-Spangled Bigotry: The Hidden Racist History of the National Anthem

    In the case of our national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner,” perhaps not knowing the full lyrics is a good thing. It is one of the most racist, pro-slavery, anti-black songs in the American lexicon, and you would be wise to cut it from your Fourth of July playlist.
     

    To understand the full “Star-Spangled Banner” story, you have to understand the author. Key was an aristocrat and city prosecutor in Washington, D.C. He was, like most enlightened men at the time, not against slavery; he just thought that since blacks were mentally inferior, masters should treat them with more Christian kindness. He supported sending free blacks (not slaves) back to Africa and, with a few exceptions, was about as pro-slavery, anti-black and anti-abolitionist as you could get at the time.
     

    In other words, Key was saying that the blood of all the former slaves and “hirelings” on the battlefield will wash away the pollution of the British invaders. With Key still bitter that some black soldiers got the best of him a few weeks earlier, “The Star-Spangled Banner” is as much a patriotic song as it is a diss track to black people who had the audacity to fight for their freedom. Perhaps that’s why it took almost 100 years for the song to become the national anthem.
     
    http://www.theroot.com/star-spangled-bigotry-the-hidden-racist-history-of-the-1790855893

    Public Television apparently was well prepared to underline the Evilness of Key when they released

    F.S. Key after the song

    Noticed it was being broadcast while channel surfing a few weeks back.

    http://www.fskusa.org/

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  123. Hibernian says:
    @Louis Renault

    ...the officer class, exclusively drawn from the upper classes,...
     
    Which country's armed forces are you describing, it sure isn't the US.

    The officers don’t tend to come from the poorest of the poor, and are more ambitious and competitive than the E-1 through E-4s and junior NCOs (I was both of these in a reserve component.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @ATX Hipster
    There's a lot of middle ground between "poorest of the poor" and "exclusively upper class".

    More ambitious and competitive in the narrow sense of wanting to make a career out of the military, yes.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  124. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    You forgot to mention the most famous example: Jack Unterweger, The Vienna Strangler. The leftist journo establishment campaigned for his release after he convinced them that he had been rehabilitated. As soon as he got out, he started a spree of serial murder – even had the balls to fly to America and have the LAPD escort him around town as he played the part of a writer studying criminals.

    https://truecrimecases.blogspot.ru/2014/11/serial-killers-johann-jack-unterweger.html

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  125. Hibernian says:
    @Jack D
    It's not a criminal defense lawyer's job to judge whether a client is innocent. It's his job to defend the client within the limit of the law and to force the state to prove its case beyond a reasonable doubt and to cast doubt on the state's case wherever possible. He cannot present evidence that he knows to be false but he also knows better than to ask clients whether they are guilty. If they tell him that they are guilty this is privileged information that they can be disbarred for sharing. It's really better not to know. Everyone is entitled to a defense. Many, perhaps most, defendants are guilty so if defending the guilty bothers you you should choose a different line of work.

    I’m not sure, but I think they really grill the defendant, sort of like the cops do, and impress on them that lying to your lawyer can get you convicted. How this could not include “Did you do it?” is beyond me. My cousin who over time transitioned to personal injury work in his early days defended some particularly vicious juvenile murderers whom even the liberal press didn’t pretend were innocent. Another very liberal lawyer cousin of mine, his sister, once said to me, and some others, “The trouble with criminal law is your clients are criminals.”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  126. @S. Anonyia
    I wouldn't want to coddle criminals even if recidivism rates ended up being lower (which I don't think they would for the U.S). Part of why many American conservatives like harsh sentences is for punishment, not just crime prevention.

    Besides, I'm not sure our sentencing is as different from Scandinavia as you think. There are many violent offenders getting out early as it is. Just because they get "life" or "25-30" in a court room doesn't mean they serve the full term. http://www.wthr.com/article/13-investigates-violent-criminals-released-too-soon


    More benign prison sentences would make sense for drug related crimes. It's really absurd that there are people locked away 10 + years for drug related crimes while stuff like sex abuse of children is given 2-5 (if that) by some judges.

    “More benign prison sentences would make sense for drug related crimes. It’s really absurd that there are people locked away 10 + years for drug related crimes while stuff like sex abuse of children is given 2-5 (if that) by some judges.”

    Interesting. Last year I found myself in a courtroom watching several defendants come before the judge with various drug-related offenses. One had been sent to “treatment” and had failed to show up. Another was being sent to “treatment” and yet a third stood there and made all sorts of promises to behave, oh yes sir. The fourth one had tried to rob a store with a knife and been caught. He blamed it on drugs and apologized profusely. All these people were basically let go with nothing more than promises to go to treatment and honest Injun never to do anything bad again. What a crock. The prosecutor tried to get the knife-man held in jail but the judge wasn’t having it. Off he went with a smile to his buddy waiting in the audience.

    The final person who was coming before the judge was accused of child molestation from 20 years earlier. The judge kept him in prison.

    Read More
    • Replies: @HEL
    Your observations are much more representative of the reality than the false cliches Anonyia states. In reality about 20% of the people in prison are there for drugs and the overwhelming majority of them are there for dealing, not possession. And of course drug dealers commit an enormous amount of other crime, drugs are just relatively easy to prove. Letting these people out would be a disaster.

    The idea that our prisons are filled with benign, nonviolent drug offenders is a myth or, more precisely, a lie.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  127. Boethiuss says:

    I wonder if you have rethought at all about that security guard at the train station who supposedly shot the cheerleader coming back from filming a music video.

    I chased a few of your links and couldn’t really decide if he did it or not.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Boethiuss
    Not that this is the final answer, but I just found this on google:

    http://www.dailynews.com/2016/06/23/ex-security-guard-convicted-of-palmdale-murder-is-ordered-released-from-prison/
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  128. Boethiuss says:
    @Boethiuss
    I wonder if you have rethought at all about that security guard at the train station who supposedly shot the cheerleader coming back from filming a music video.

    I chased a few of your links and couldn't really decide if he did it or not.
    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  129. Dahlia says:
    @Wilbur Hassenfus
    Now they drool over Trayvon Martin and the like.

    Very different things.

    That stuff gets championed by people who halfway know better: they simply identify with these groups, perhaps due to low self-esteem.
    But do they live amongst them? No. When they get married and have kids do they live amongst them? HELL NO! Such a thing has yet to be documented, lol.
    “Oh, I wish I could, but darn it, the schools”…

    The ruling class of the 60s was a wholly different thing when it came to crime. When you read how vicious predators were handled is to understand immediately why it was a hellscape. This isn’t much of an exaggeration:
    “Charlie Wayne Whatever was caught trying to rape a 3-year-old girl, and was sentenced to 1 year, though he only served 3 months for good behavior. 2 months after release, he tortured and raped a woman and this time was sentenced to 2 years, though served only 1. A year later, he murdered 5 people.”

    When I was in high school, we had an encyclopedia set devoted to serial killers and I read it all (stuck in the library for a period because I had taken chemistry a year early, but wasn’t ready for physics) and I to this day am always coming across some sadistic killer I’ve never heard of before. The last new one was some guy who outfitted his van to be a torture chamber (in the late 70s, I think).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Houston cops in the late 1970s would say that if only they could catch this white guy named "Wayne" and this black guy named "Charles Williams," there'd be no more crime in Houston. Or at least that's what they surmised from all the white arrestees/black arrestees who told the cops: "It wasn't me, it was Wayne/Charles Williams!"
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  130. Cortes says:
    @syonredux
    Del Toro's Shape of Water sounds terrible...

    The heroine, Eliza (Sally Hawkins), is a cleaning woman in a top-secret underground facility that’s the setting for just that sort of research. One day an Amazonian Gill Man (known as “the Asset,” played by Doug Jones) arrives in a tank in the custody of an agent named Strickland (Michael Shannon), who talks about how the creature is an affront to God, not “being made in His image.” He’s also fond of using an electrified cattle prod, which he refers to as his Alabama how-dee-doo. The way he used it reminded me of how southern policemen beat black civil-rights protesters. Perhaps what reminded me was footage on nearby TV screens of southern policemen beating black civil-rights protesters.
     

    Did I mention that the heroine is mute and suffers from the feeling that she’s “incomplete?” She was apparently mistreated as a child — her vocal cords were cut, gross — and drowned and was resuscitated, so she already has a relationship of sorts with the creature in the water tank. (It’s fate, she signs.) She has a strong sexual appetite: We see her pleasure herself in the bathtub in the mornings. Meanwhile, he’s not unattractive. No visible sex organs, but slender and broad-shouldered and tall. The pale face in the middle of those undulating gills has the alien-reptile handsomeness of Benedict Cumberbatch.
     

    I should mention that the lovable, mute heroine lives (above a movie theater) with a lovable, talkative gay painter (Richard Jenkins) who keeps trying to create Norman Rockwell–like illustrations for an advertising firm that has let him go (because he’s gay?). And that Eliza has another natural ally in her fellow cleaning woman, Zelda (Octavia Spencer), who chatters away about her lazy, good-for-nothing husband. So you have a poor mute woman, a poor black woman, a poor gay man, and a so-called freak of nature versus a God-and-country white fascist who buys a Cadillac because it represents “the future” and is shown in bed mechanically grunting over his impassive blonde Stepford wife. Did I mention that he and his five-star general boss want to dissect the Gill Man rather than keep him around? Talk about stacking the deck.
     
    http://www.vulture.com/2017/09/the-shape-of-water-is-an-utterly-lovely-but-complacent-movie.html

    The Shape of Water is one of the earliest novels in the Camilleri series about a Sicilian cop called Montalbano. The novels are humorous. The TV version by Germans, poor.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  131. BB753 says:
    @Dr. X
    OT: Black African Immigrant from Sudan shoots Tennessee Christians in church. A black would-be Dylan Roof, perhaps? Stopped by a parishioner with a concealed-carry license...

    Boy, this one is a REAL narrative-breaker...

    http://dailycaller.com/2017/09/24/tennessee-church-shooter-suspect-identified-as-25-year-old-from-sudan/

    He doesn’t seem to be a Muslim although hailing from Khartoum. BTW, I found the header funny: “Tennessee Church Shooting Suspect Is A Sudanese Bodybuilder”
    Why is it important to mention he was a bodybuilder?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    I found the header funny: “Tennessee Church Shooting Suspect Is A Sudanese Bodybuilder”
    Why is it important to mention he was a bodybuilder?
     
    Many bodybuilders use steroid drugs which can cause behavioral changes?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  132. BB753 says:
    @syonredux
    Del Toro's Shape of Water sounds terrible...

    The heroine, Eliza (Sally Hawkins), is a cleaning woman in a top-secret underground facility that’s the setting for just that sort of research. One day an Amazonian Gill Man (known as “the Asset,” played by Doug Jones) arrives in a tank in the custody of an agent named Strickland (Michael Shannon), who talks about how the creature is an affront to God, not “being made in His image.” He’s also fond of using an electrified cattle prod, which he refers to as his Alabama how-dee-doo. The way he used it reminded me of how southern policemen beat black civil-rights protesters. Perhaps what reminded me was footage on nearby TV screens of southern policemen beating black civil-rights protesters.
     

    Did I mention that the heroine is mute and suffers from the feeling that she’s “incomplete?” She was apparently mistreated as a child — her vocal cords were cut, gross — and drowned and was resuscitated, so she already has a relationship of sorts with the creature in the water tank. (It’s fate, she signs.) She has a strong sexual appetite: We see her pleasure herself in the bathtub in the mornings. Meanwhile, he’s not unattractive. No visible sex organs, but slender and broad-shouldered and tall. The pale face in the middle of those undulating gills has the alien-reptile handsomeness of Benedict Cumberbatch.
     

    I should mention that the lovable, mute heroine lives (above a movie theater) with a lovable, talkative gay painter (Richard Jenkins) who keeps trying to create Norman Rockwell–like illustrations for an advertising firm that has let him go (because he’s gay?). And that Eliza has another natural ally in her fellow cleaning woman, Zelda (Octavia Spencer), who chatters away about her lazy, good-for-nothing husband. So you have a poor mute woman, a poor black woman, a poor gay man, and a so-called freak of nature versus a God-and-country white fascist who buys a Cadillac because it represents “the future” and is shown in bed mechanically grunting over his impassive blonde Stepford wife. Did I mention that he and his five-star general boss want to dissect the Gill Man rather than keep him around? Talk about stacking the deck.
     
    http://www.vulture.com/2017/09/the-shape-of-water-is-an-utterly-lovely-but-complacent-movie.html

    If you think that’s silly, what about Del Toro’s tv series The Strain, with Nazi vampires and Jewish vampire-hunters? With plenty of Treblinka flashbacks.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  133. AM says:
    @Chrisnonymous
    I don't know if it's fair to say they "fell for" a criminal's hard-luck story. Of course, you know WFB personally, so you can speak to that better. But from my perspective, it looks more ideological.

    Cf, Gavin McInnes, who flirted with us for a while but then started his new show with an "anti-paleo" perspective. He fancies himself a patriotic libertarian who rejects imprisonment. I myself feel sympathetic to his perspective, but I think he underestimates the criminality of criminals. It's about Optimism vs. Pessimism and the human condition.

    Christians should be optimists, not pessimists.

    In the case of Buckley, I want to believe his optimism about humanity derived from honest theological conviction (but, again, you know him better). In the case of McInnes, I feel he is either cucked or deceptively promoting "culture" as a way of inviting people into the fold.

    Christians should be optimists, not pessimists.

    The Christian framework assumes a fallen humanity. It assumes that human, left in “ordinary” conditions will decay to evil if they do not actively work on being good. Christians by default are pessimists about human condition because they have to be.

    The rub is having to offer mercy and forgiveness if someone actually repents. That bit is tricky, especially with criminal behavior. And someone genuinely repenting of an act might want to try to atone for it, aka spend some time in prison.

    Why Mr. McInnes doesn’t want people imprisoned is a bit of a mystery.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    Check out Jordan Peterson with his telling of the Babylonian creation myth on what was used to create humans out of.

    Makes Christian story seem rosey.
    , @ATX Hipster
    To be fair, Gavin wants everybody armed, too, so there's a more immediate deterrent to criminals than a possible prison sentence in the future.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  134. MEH 0910 says:
    @Anonymous
    Perhaps it's all a symptom of living a sheltered, privileged life.

    There are no harsher critics of blue-collar men than other blue-collar men. Hence, in armies the world over, the NCOs are promoted grunts who know and understand the grunts beneath them - and can be relied upon to know bullshit when they smell it, whilst the officer class, exclusively drawn from the upper classes, and raised in loving, kindhearted, honest, literate homes, are generally too naive and forgiving of the ways of the scoundrel, the cheat, the liar, the trickster, the fraudster, the bully etc. The idea is that the NCO is the 'bridge' between the intellect of the officers and the mean roughness of the grunts.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.

    A Famous Historian – Monty Python and The Holy Grail.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  135. Rod1963 says:
    @overtime52
    Interesting observation. Light sentences for crime, yet lower recidivism. So the big question is why? I'm not sure! But my take on this matter would be that pre-immigration Sweden was just a better place for your average lower class person (from whose ranks criminals are drawn). Job training, welfare, housing stipend, employment and low general level of social dysfunction. Basically, society was healthier than American society - America has always been pretty violent by north European standards (even including American whites).

    That's my take. But I actually came here to read some cogent conservative responses to the leniency/ low recidivism thing. After all, this phenomenon is a real conundrum if you think that harsh penalties are the only way to achieve a low-crime equilibrium. So I came to the comment's responses (all four of them) hoping to find some later day, USA Han Fei's!

    Alas, no such luck. The main thing on offer was sardonic remarks about how the lenient punishment / low recidivism thing won't hold up under conditions of mass immigration. Well, the question is why it ever worked in the first place! And another comment was simply ideological boilerplate about how killing criminals and exiling them is the only thing that works - but this ideological position didn't engage with the empirical point of actually existing leniency-low-recidivism in Sweden! Hello! Han Fei, Han Fei, whereforever art thou?? If only you could come back, maybe you could articulate the conservative case for harshness! Cuz if you read him he spells it out pretty well!

    I come to Unz because I like seeing heterodox but intelligent points. I find it useful to be confronted with perspectives different form my own. Personally, I think Victor Hugo and Charles Dickens had it right: harsh social conditions create harsh people who create harsh crime, which itself feeds back into the harsh social conditions.

    But I'm open to hearing other points of view; that's why I'm here! So a plea to the commenting conservatives: higher standards, please. Like pull up stats on Swedish recidivism or something. I dunno, just do something. You gotta bring your A game, guys.
    Mic drop!

    Some of our best criminals come from fine families, attend the most prestigious of schools and then go to work at banking firms known the the world over. Firms like Goldman-Sachs, Fitches, Moody’s, etc. Where they perpetrate white collar crime on a scale that makes your head spin.

    But they do crime right. First off they own the politicians so there is no jail time when they are exposed. Even if they’re caught stealing a billion dollars of investors money – well stuff happens, you know.

    Others sell securities to towns and cities that are so complex that no one understands them except the seller. Now these securities act like a money vacuum, they suck the towns dry of taxes and revenue for decadees to come. All legal. But totally unethical.

    You ever wonder how junk securities get rated AAA and sold to pension funds? By organized fraud at the highest levels of the bond ratings agencies. These are the very firms that helped cause the great collapse in 2007-2008. All done by impeccably educated and groomed men and women.

    Maybe they become executives at Wells Fargo where they rip off their customers by signing them up for services they don’t want by the millions. When they’re caught, nothing happens, They just fire a couple thousand peons.

    You see that’s how real criminal activity is done. The strong arm stuff is for dummies. The smart criminal gets a college degree and swindles people from his place of business and never breaks a sweat.

    Read More
    • Agree: Charles Pewitt
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Sounds convincing, but then there's Bernie Madoff serving his centuries time with no parole up in the big house. Apparently not everyone likes it when they're conned out of mega bucks by consters.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  136. Dahlia says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Tracey Ullman does comedy sketches on women who recurrently fall in love with Death Row prisoners.

    My mother fell in love with an inmate for murder related to a drug deal gone bad. A king pin type. Mother and I are polar opposites when it comes to sizing up people and she’s an airy-fairy liberal: scant intuition.
    My late teen years were interesting…

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Interesting - I'll bet.

    This is not just a inability to size up people or scant intuition but something else. Scant intuition would mean that you might randomly make choices that were bad or good but people like this actively seek out bad choices. They know what is right and they do the exact OPPOSITE. Maybe they are getting even with Daddy or Mommy or something but it's not just a matter of poor intuition.

    Women are often attracted to imprisoned murderers for the same reason that people like to ride roller coasters or to stand near the lion's cage - it's a thrill but it is a safe thrill (for as long as the murderer stays locked up).
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  137. @mad anthony
    "I'm an Asian-American doctor and today I #TakeTheKnee to fight white supremacy."

    https://twitter.com/eugenegu/status/911935874711085057

    Is there any research into whether these people lack theory of mind? Many of them must.

    It’s more evidence that the so-called Model Minority is just as hostile to White civilization as any NAM is.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  138. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @AM

    Christians should be optimists, not pessimists.
     
    The Christian framework assumes a fallen humanity. It assumes that human, left in "ordinary" conditions will decay to evil if they do not actively work on being good. Christians by default are pessimists about human condition because they have to be.

    The rub is having to offer mercy and forgiveness if someone actually repents. That bit is tricky, especially with criminal behavior. And someone genuinely repenting of an act might want to try to atone for it, aka spend some time in prison.

    Why Mr. McInnes doesn't want people imprisoned is a bit of a mystery.

    Check out Jordan Peterson with his telling of the Babylonian creation myth on what was used to create humans out of.

    Makes Christian story seem rosey.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  139. res says:
    @Dr. X
    OT: Black African Immigrant from Sudan shoots Tennessee Christians in church. A black would-be Dylan Roof, perhaps? Stopped by a parishioner with a concealed-carry license...

    Boy, this one is a REAL narrative-breaker...

    http://dailycaller.com/2017/09/24/tennessee-church-shooter-suspect-identified-as-25-year-old-from-sudan/

    Should Trump invite Caleb Engle to the White House rather than the Warriors?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    Should Trump invite Caleb Engle to the White House rather than the Warriors?
     
    Yes he should. But given his staff, and their penchants, expect a kum-bye-ya moment with some deciwit from our aristocratic betters.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  140. Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  141. HEL says:
    @StillCARealist
    "More benign prison sentences would make sense for drug related crimes. It’s really absurd that there are people locked away 10 + years for drug related crimes while stuff like sex abuse of children is given 2-5 (if that) by some judges."

    Interesting. Last year I found myself in a courtroom watching several defendants come before the judge with various drug-related offenses. One had been sent to "treatment" and had failed to show up. Another was being sent to "treatment" and yet a third stood there and made all sorts of promises to behave, oh yes sir. The fourth one had tried to rob a store with a knife and been caught. He blamed it on drugs and apologized profusely. All these people were basically let go with nothing more than promises to go to treatment and honest Injun never to do anything bad again. What a crock. The prosecutor tried to get the knife-man held in jail but the judge wasn't having it. Off he went with a smile to his buddy waiting in the audience.

    The final person who was coming before the judge was accused of child molestation from 20 years earlier. The judge kept him in prison.

    Your observations are much more representative of the reality than the false cliches Anonyia states. In reality about 20% of the people in prison are there for drugs and the overwhelming majority of them are there for dealing, not possession. And of course drug dealers commit an enormous amount of other crime, drugs are just relatively easy to prove. Letting these people out would be a disaster.

    The idea that our prisons are filled with benign, nonviolent drug offenders is a myth or, more precisely, a lie.

    Read More
    • Agree: Barnard, Bubba
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  142. Lagertha says:
    @Matthew McConnagay
    Like this? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3tkFOtM6go

    Amazing! So funny! Bring it to fruition or reach out to people/whoever – it is too funny and snarky not to explode…even if this is bs. Love, love, love the trailer…even if I was just, majorly, duped! It is funny – will cave to that.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  143. @Dahlia
    Very different things.

    That stuff gets championed by people who halfway know better: they simply identify with these groups, perhaps due to low self-esteem.
    But do they live amongst them? No. When they get married and have kids do they live amongst them? HELL NO! Such a thing has yet to be documented, lol.
    "Oh, I wish I could, but darn it, the schools"...

    The ruling class of the 60s was a wholly different thing when it came to crime. When you read how vicious predators were handled is to understand immediately why it was a hellscape. This isn't much of an exaggeration:
    "Charlie Wayne Whatever was caught trying to rape a 3-year-old girl, and was sentenced to 1 year, though he only served 3 months for good behavior. 2 months after release, he tortured and raped a woman and this time was sentenced to 2 years, though served only 1. A year later, he murdered 5 people."

    When I was in high school, we had an encyclopedia set devoted to serial killers and I read it all (stuck in the library for a period because I had taken chemistry a year early, but wasn't ready for physics) and I to this day am always coming across some sadistic killer I've never heard of before. The last new one was some guy who outfitted his van to be a torture chamber (in the late 70s, I think).

    Houston cops in the late 1970s would say that if only they could catch this white guy named “Wayne” and this black guy named “Charles Williams,” there’d be no more crime in Houston. Or at least that’s what they surmised from all the white arrestees/black arrestees who told the cops: “It wasn’t me, it was Wayne/Charles Williams!”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dahlia

    Houston cops in the late 1970s would say that if only they could catch this white guy named “Wayne” and this black guy named “Charles Williams,” there’d be no more crime in Houston. Or at least that’s what they surmised from all the white arrestees/black arrestees who told the cops: “It wasn’t me, it was Wayne/Charles Williams!”
     
    Haha! Never heard that before, but have just read so very many criminal histories and those two names lept immediately to mind. Wayne as middle name being mandatory, of course.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  144. Anonym says:
    @Charles Pewitt
    OFF TOPIC

    Alternative for Germany(AfD) got over 13 percent of the vote in Germany. The AfD will gain some more political power by getting so many votes. The AfD will now investigate and revisit Angela Merkel's evil plot to demographically destroy Germany by flooding the country with millions of foreigners.

    Hopefully, Alternative for Germany will begin the deportation process that must occur if Germany is to remain German. Germany should deport all foreigners. Germany should deport as many non-Germans as possible to protect the future for young Germans.

    The American Empire should announce plans to leave Germany within 10 years; a beer-soaked celebration of German/American Friendship could be held as the last US military planes leave Ramstein Air Force base. Germany should turn the screw and acquire a nuclear deterrent. Let Germany be a normal nation again, dammit!

    https://twitter.com/meddynyt/status/911999468521828353

    Looks like it’s time for an AFD/German election open thread, or better, some commentary from Steve on the topic in its own post.

    This is something of a mini-Brexit or mini-Trumpening. 13% of the vote is not a landslide by any stretch of the imagination, but this is the first electoral success of the so-called far-right since the 1950s. And I guess it could be called the first success of the anti-immigrationist right, since the AfD are hardly about enacting a Kristallnacht and declaring that the USSR is going to be their Lebensraum.

    White countries are reacting to the “open borders for thee, but no for me” policies of globalism.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  145. Snoop Dog had “Tookie” Williams, but he was executed anyway.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  146. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Dave
    I used to go to wrestling practice with a black guy who grew up in the same neighborhood as Carter, and he stated very openly " the ni**a is guilty ". He said everyone in the community knew it, but Carter could count on gullible white liberals to take up his case and promote his story, which is exactly what Dylan did.

    I’m a friendly acquaintence of a pretty famous woman who grew up in a city perhaps five miles from where the Ruben Carter murders took place. She said that it was absolute common knowledge among all and sundry that there was no question as to the boxer’s guilt.

    She absolutely would say nothing on the record, however.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  147. @Guy de Champlagne
    In Scandinavian countries they coddle their prisoners and release them after laughably short (by american standards) prison terms and yet still have rates of recidivism much lower than the those in the US.

    I know people will be tempted to make the demographic argument. But while demographics certainly explain why there are more criminals in the US than say, Sweden, I'm not sure it explains why any individual american criminal will react towards a more benign criminal justice in the way conservatives think they will while the ones in Sweden don't.

    Overall I'm not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I'd be interested to hear peoples thoughts.

    What are the recidivism rates for ethnic Swedish criminals vs. New Swedes from Gangrapeistan?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  148. Bubba says:
    @Clyde
    Minor point but this judge/maggot was called, "Turn 'em loose Bruce"

    "Wright was given the nickname "Turn 'Em Loose Bruce" by the police officer's unions in New York City because of his bail practices, ..."

    Thank you! I was going by memory there when recalling my late uncle’s (NYC cop at the time) rants when he was reading the New York Daily News. Lord, thanks for the memories! He really hated Lindsey, Beame, Kuntzler and Bruce Wright (Alfred Sharpton was not making headlines in the early ’70′s until after he met James Brown).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde
    And despite all that those wore the good ol days compared to what we got now. We meaning America.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  149. @Je Suis Charlie Martel
    I am going to have to agree with Bill P. In my long march through the institutions I have found levels of nastiness and duplicity the higher I get that continue to amaze me... I had to hit eject and go a different way because I could not internalize the life of the lie, and it really has to become an internalized habit if you are going to make it at an elite level... I cracked up when I finally "arrived" and said to myself "this is it?! To hell with these people"... but nor do I romanticize the Cracker, they'll rip you off too, but they seem to think everyone one is in on the scam as if it's a cosmic prank

    I have found levels of nastiness and duplicity the higher I get that continue to amaze me… but nor do I romanticize the Cracker, they’ll rip you off too

    In Freakonomics Leavitt has a story about someone named Paul Feldman and selling bagels on the honor system. He found that 85% of his customers were honest. The interesting question is: “Does the 85% hold for both the “Crackers” and the upper class?” I have met honest people at both strata. I have met genuinely despicable people at both too.

    But kudos to you for not selling your soul. I salute you.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Je Suis Charlie Martel
    I tried
    They wouldn't take me lol
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  150. @allen
    John Wesley Harding is a bit different. Dylan treated him as a semi-mythical figure just as the older folksingers would have. No different than other folk numbers like Pretty Boy Floyd that romanticized dashing outlaws that probably weren’t that pleasant in real life.

    Joey Gallo is sorta weird, but it actually had the ironic effect of counterbalancing the Ruben Hurricane stuff. I recall one review at the time that said something like (I paraphrase from memory): “Dylan makes me believe Ruben Carter’s innocence in ‘Hurricane’ and then makes me second guess his sincerity when he lionizes a real criminal in ‘Joey’”

    Dylan performed the song Hurricane almost exclusively during the time in which he wrote it, the 1975-76 Rolling Thunder Revue tour. After that, I don’t think he ever performed it again (though it remains a standard on greatest hits albums). I think Dylan sincerely believed in Ruben Carter’s innocence at the time, but I can’t help but wonder if he came to regret his endorsement.

    Likewise, there’s a fairly rare Dylan single from 71 where he eulogized Black Panther George Jackson. It’s pretty poorly written by Dylan’s standards, but I find it fascinating that he totally disowned the song. It was never performed live and it’s never appeared on any CD, album, box set, rarity set, or anything else since 1971 (I think it did get a release on an Australian box set and maybe as part of an itunes download bundle).

    Always a little hard to tell what Dylan really stood for, but I do think what he has continued to play is a decent indication. Interestingly, he never disowned his Christian/Gospel material the way he disowned the above songs. He still plays some of those tunes today. I recall one HBO special he did with Tom Petty in 86 or 87 where he spoke disparagingly of how people looked up to Gandhi and MLK as “heroes” and then said he was going to play a song about his hero, launching into one of his Christian songs “In the Garden” about Christ’s betrayal. These days he’s singing old Sinatra standards at his concerts. Weird guy, but fascinating

    It also didn’t hurt that Ruben Carter had a film with Denzel Washington about his case, which was Oscar nominated. The film makes you really believe that Carter was innocent, and of course, he was eventually released.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    Carter was released from prison in 1986 but the movie didn't come out until 1999.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  151. @YetAnotherAnon
    "Britain's most violent prisoner", also bodybuilder and author of book on prison fitness, Michael Petersen aka Charles Bronson, 64, is engaged to a 36 year old soap actress.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Salvador

    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/2859096/paula-williamson-charles-bronson-fiancee-wedding-good-morning-britain

    His record (in Wiki) is ... extensive. This is just two of dozens of incidents, most not so darkly comic.

    "In April 1996 he was sent back to Belmarsh after taking a doctor hostage at Birmingham.

    Five months later an Iraqi hijacker bumped into him in the canteen and did not apologise. After a long period of brooding he then took two Iraqi hijackers, along with another inmate named Jason Greasley, hostage in a cell. By his own admission he was "losing it badly" and ranted about his dead father, saying that any "funny business" would result in him "snapping necks". He sang and laughed and forced the Iraqis to tickle his feet and call him 'General'. He demanded a plane to take him to Libya, two Uzi sub-machine guns, 5,000 rounds of ammunition, and an axe. He released Greasley, but began chanting "I want ice cream". He felt guilty after hitting one of the hostages with a metal tray and therefore insisted the same hostage hit him over the head four times so as to call it 'quits'. He slashed himself four times with a safety razor, but agreed to release the hostages and walk back to the segregation unit"
     

    is engaged to a 36 year old soap actress

    There must be some lower bound on human stupidity, and this should be it. But I’ll bet it isn’t.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  152. @AM

    Christians should be optimists, not pessimists.
     
    The Christian framework assumes a fallen humanity. It assumes that human, left in "ordinary" conditions will decay to evil if they do not actively work on being good. Christians by default are pessimists about human condition because they have to be.

    The rub is having to offer mercy and forgiveness if someone actually repents. That bit is tricky, especially with criminal behavior. And someone genuinely repenting of an act might want to try to atone for it, aka spend some time in prison.

    Why Mr. McInnes doesn't want people imprisoned is a bit of a mystery.

    To be fair, Gavin wants everybody armed, too, so there’s a more immediate deterrent to criminals than a possible prison sentence in the future.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  153. @Rod1963
    Some of our best criminals come from fine families, attend the most prestigious of schools and then go to work at banking firms known the the world over. Firms like Goldman-Sachs, Fitches, Moody's, etc. Where they perpetrate white collar crime on a scale that makes your head spin.

    But they do crime right. First off they own the politicians so there is no jail time when they are exposed. Even if they're caught stealing a billion dollars of investors money - well stuff happens, you know.

    Others sell securities to towns and cities that are so complex that no one understands them except the seller. Now these securities act like a money vacuum, they suck the towns dry of taxes and revenue for decadees to come. All legal. But totally unethical.

    You ever wonder how junk securities get rated AAA and sold to pension funds? By organized fraud at the highest levels of the bond ratings agencies. These are the very firms that helped cause the great collapse in 2007-2008. All done by impeccably educated and groomed men and women.

    Maybe they become executives at Wells Fargo where they rip off their customers by signing them up for services they don't want by the millions. When they're caught, nothing happens, They just fire a couple thousand peons.

    You see that's how real criminal activity is done. The strong arm stuff is for dummies. The smart criminal gets a college degree and swindles people from his place of business and never breaks a sweat.

    Sounds convincing, but then there’s Bernie Madoff serving his centuries time with no parole up in the big house. Apparently not everyone likes it when they’re conned out of mega bucks by consters.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bill P
    Madoff is a class traitor. He ripped off the rich.

    If he'd stolen from working class pension funds he wouldn't be doing much time, if any. All those bigshots who called for his head would have been urging leniency and saying his heart was in the right place (i.e. in the same place as theirs -- all in favor of ripping off the little people).
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  154. @AnotherDad

    Overall I’m not so sure that conservatives are as right on this as they think they are. But I’d be interested to hear peoples thoughts.
     
    I'm sure. In fact, it's one of the things conservatives are--pretty obviously--"rightest" about.

    One of the things that the "left" continually gets "wrong" is getting the incentives right. People aren't behavorialist machines, but they nonetheless react to the environment they are presented with. Give them incentives to behave better ... they'll behave better. Give them incentives to behave worse--what the left always does, crime, welfare, diversity rackets, etc.--they'll behave worse.

    Crime is also one of the clear examples of this. Conservative elected to "get tough on crime" started putting people in jail again for longer sentences and viola! ... crime went down.

    ~~

    There are two reasonable responses to someone who refuses to abide by the laws of their community.
    -- kill them (for serious violations)
    or
    -- expel them.

    Modern societies unfortunately lack the basic "expel them" option. (It would do the world a favor to have a global Devil's Island.) So we have this "temporary expulsion" of sending them off to prison. It's weak sauce. It basically only works because in modern society the payoff for disorganized crime is generally pretty low and if you can keep a lot of these guys locked up past 30, when their testosterone starts ebbing, they come out, survey the situation and don't see any big reason to do criminal crap. It's not like they are "reformed", it's just that they are "retired". And you still have a decent tranche who are more violently sociopathic and will keep doing crime on and on and on.

    Case in point; Barney Frank discussing some banking “scandal” on CNBC; after talking about penalties, he mumbles about not understanding incentives. He has not the slightest understanding about how private business works. And he will admit it. Mark Haynes forever.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  155. @Laugh Track
    One of the numerous things that caused the '60s New Left to implode was the romanticization of convicts who claimed to have been radicalized and who were thus transformed from felonious thugs to "political prisoners".

    A whole prison movement arose, fueled particularly by well-meaning white women mooning over black inmates who had plenty of time on their hands to engage in extended correspondence describing how they were wronged and how they were now passionate about social justice and making the world a better place.

    Needless to say, this did not play out well. Do a search for "Popeye Jackson" or "Tribal Thumb" or "United Prisoners Union". The SLA, in part, came out of that milieu.

    I came across a six year old blog post by a woman who has been at it for forty+ years and must be the purest living archetype of the prisoner advocate.

    http://whyaminotsurprised.blogspot.com/2011/08/locked-into-locked-up.html


    Today, in addition to everything else, I blog regularly on criminal justice issues. And I am deeply committed to the campaign to release the remaining two members of the Angola 3, Black Panther Party members who have been in solitary confinement since 1972 because of their politics. Both of my children were fathered by men I met while they were in prison. And my fiance served twenty-seven years for a robbery that netted $70 and involved no physical injuries.
     

    I’d like to hear Whiskey’s take on that blog.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  156. guest says:
    @L Woods

    Today it appears that young people want the good life “gifted” to them.
     
    Oh please. To be in "iGen" is to see haughty boomers with forgettable credentials and lackluster intellects perched in social and professional positions a millennial would have had to do absolutely everything right (and with unfailing good luck) to attain. Being born a boomer or "greatest" (lol) generation was the biggest life "gift" in human history.

    There are in fact good reasons to dislike millennials. They are utterly conformist, intellectually and morally cowardly, obsequious to authority and its diktats and paradigms. They are among the most eager of the voluntary auxiliary thought police. They have no spine and no honor as a whole. They are a generation of soulless fools. The 'laziness' trope however is just vapid, crotchety curmudgeonry.

    There something to the laziness charge considering obesity rates. But you could blame their Boomer and Gen-x parents for feeding them the wrong stuff and letting them have sedentary pastimes. The cocooning of society is more than just a Millennial (God, I hate that term) thing.

    As far as “the good life” and career goes, wellxl, the Boomer generation pretty much screwed up American civilization. How’d Boomers like to grow up amidst mass immigration, globalization, and PC? They had inflation, too, but of course that only gets worse.

    One thing I’ve noticed, no one in the working world seems to mentor anymore. I mean as a regular thing. Not when you go out of your way and make a show of it. But day to day, senior employees don’t give a crap about junior ones in my experience. Beyond basic training, it’s every man for himself. That can’t be socially healthy.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  157. @Dr. X
    OT: Black African Immigrant from Sudan shoots Tennessee Christians in church. A black would-be Dylan Roof, perhaps? Stopped by a parishioner with a concealed-carry license...

    Boy, this one is a REAL narrative-breaker...

    http://dailycaller.com/2017/09/24/tennessee-church-shooter-suspect-identified-as-25-year-old-from-sudan/

    Here is the money quote:

    Engle returned to the church to confront the gunman again. The gunman shot himself in the face when the man returned, possibly by accident.

    Possibly by accident!

    St. Peter: “Emanuel Kidega Samson, not only are you a murderer and an unrepentant sinner, you are too stupid to go to heaven even if had repented.” Samson, “What? I am a saint from the Camp of the Saint!” St. Peter: “Satan won’t take you either – says Hell is almost full and he needs the demon assigned to you to join the team that will torture Bill Gates.” Samson, “Great! I can return to Sudan!” St. Peter: “Nope, you will be a narcotics informant in Detroit, specializing in drug cartel cases – we have upped your lives count to 9000.” Samson: “WTF?” St. Peter: “Oh, by the way, you will retain all your physical characteristics, except that you will look like a blue-eyed, blond-haired, Scandinavian.” Samson, “Noooo! Let me go to Hell please!”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  158. @res
    Should Trump invite Caleb Engle to the White House rather than the Warriors?

    Should Trump invite Caleb Engle to the White House rather than the Warriors?

    Yes he should. But given his staff, and their penchants, expect a kum-bye-ya moment with some deciwit from our aristocratic betters.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  159. @utu
    This kind of naiveté about criminals was widespread in the 1960s.

    The innocence project clearly demonstrated that the naiveté is on the side of those who think that justice system works.

    Are there really sides there? Seems like a false dichotomy.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  160. Glaivester says: • Website

    As I recall, didn’t Truman Capote basically pretend to do this, but basically just use the criminals as story-bait and then abandon them?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Ironically, future killer Robert Blake was nominated in the film based on Capote's novel.
    , @cthulhu
    Capote certainly became fascinated by Perry Smith (portrayed by Robert Blake in the movie) and may have even fallen in love with Smith in some way. But I have never read that Capote ever claimed that that Hickock or Smith were reformed in any sense, although I think that Capote may have tried in some way to get their death sentences commuted to life in prison.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  161. @Glaivester
    As I recall, didn't Truman Capote basically pretend to do this, but basically just use the criminals as story-bait and then abandon them?

    Ironically, future killer Robert Blake was nominated in the film based on Capote’s novel.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  162. @Hibernian
    The officers don't tend to come from the poorest of the poor, and are more ambitious and competitive than the E-1 through E-4s and junior NCOs (I was both of these in a reserve component.)

    There’s a lot of middle ground between “poorest of the poor” and “exclusively upper class”.

    More ambitious and competitive in the narrow sense of wanting to make a career out of the military, yes.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  163. There are two reasonable responses to someone who refuses to abide by the laws of their community.
    – kill them (for serious violations)
    or
    – expel them.

    Modern societies unfortunately lack the basic “expel them” option. (It would do the world a favor to have a global Devil’s Island.)

    That’s a great idea. My suggestion is, make Afghanistan a penal colony for non-Muzzums as well as Mohommedans.

    How would non-Muzzies survive there? Give them a starter package of cash and firearms. Encourage the colonists to stake out homesteads.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  164. Clyde says:
    @Bubba
    Thank you! I was going by memory there when recalling my late uncle's (NYC cop at the time) rants when he was reading the New York Daily News. Lord, thanks for the memories! He really hated Lindsey, Beame, Kuntzler and Bruce Wright (Alfred Sharpton was not making headlines in the early '70's until after he met James Brown).

    And despite all that those wore the good ol days compared to what we got now. We meaning America.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bubba
    I definitely agree with that! And after Europe falls, we won't be much further behind.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  165. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    It also didn't hurt that Ruben Carter had a film with Denzel Washington about his case, which was Oscar nominated. The film makes you really believe that Carter was innocent, and of course, he was eventually released.

    Carter was released from prison in 1986 but the movie didn’t come out until 1999.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  166. Bubba says:
    @Clyde
    And despite all that those wore the good ol days compared to what we got now. We meaning America.

    I definitely agree with that! And after Europe falls, we won’t be much further behind.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  167. cthulhu says:
    @Glaivester
    As I recall, didn't Truman Capote basically pretend to do this, but basically just use the criminals as story-bait and then abandon them?

    Capote certainly became fascinated by Perry Smith (portrayed by Robert Blake in the movie) and may have even fallen in love with Smith in some way. But I have never read that Capote ever claimed that that Hickock or Smith were reformed in any sense, although I think that Capote may have tried in some way to get their death sentences commuted to life in prison.

    Read More
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    If Capote was right, Perry Smith had a childhood that made Shulamith Firestone's read like something from Enid Blyton - he was a sad case. But as one of the other characters says “Many a man can match sob stories with that little bastard. Me included. Maybe I drink too much, but I sure as hell never killed four people in cold blood”.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  168. @Bill P
    Exactly. Loutish general nastiness is petty, often random and more often than not self-destructive and therefore self-limiting. Genteel general nastiness is deliberate, calculated and and self-aggrandizing, so it goes from strength to strength.

    I guess you could say that a certain nasty personality type is punished when unaccompanied by a talent for wealth accumulation, but greatly rewarded when it makes people rich. The difference may be only a couple standard deviations of intelligence and greater impulse control, but at heart, the jerks are the same.

    “Loutish general nastiness is petty, often random and more often than not self-destructive and therefore self-limiting. Genteel general nastiness is deliberate, calculated and and self-aggrandizing…”

    It’s the difference between Goodfellas and The Godfather.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  169. @TheJester

    The idea is that the NCO is the ‘bridge’ between the intellect of the officers and the mean roughness of the grunts.
     
    You nailed it. As an officer for 20 years, I quickly learned to rely on senior NCOs for advice, counsel, and direct control over the enlisted ranks. Officers who did not reply on their NCOs had to learn hard lessons the hard way.

    Put simply, gentlefolk raised as real gentlefolk have absolutely no idea about the cheating, lying, duplicity, general nastiness etc etc which is par for the course in a certain type of lower class family home.
     
    Of course, today's SJWs would attribute lower class status to class and racial oppression. However, the reality among Baby Boomers was that there was enough fluidity among the economic and social classes in post-WWII America that a person with ambition could get his or her college degree and graduate into the middle class. Perhaps it would take more planning and harder work for some compared to others ... but improving your way of life for yourself and your family was a way of life.

    Today it appears that young people want the good life "gifted" to them.

    A new book by Jean Twenge:

    "iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy -- and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood -- and What That Means for the Rest of Us"

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01N6ACK3B?ref_=cm_sw_r_kb_dp_JlvWzbEY92CDQ&tag=thewaspos09-20&linkCode=kpe

    “Today it appears that young people want the good life “gifted” to them.”

    You are channeling David Brooks at his worst.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  170. Pericles says:
    @Charles Pewitt
    OFF TOPIC

    Alternative for Germany(AfD) got over 13 percent of the vote in Germany. The AfD will gain some more political power by getting so many votes. The AfD will now investigate and revisit Angela Merkel's evil plot to demographically destroy Germany by flooding the country with millions of foreigners.

    Hopefully, Alternative for Germany will begin the deportation process that must occur if Germany is to remain German. Germany should deport all foreigners. Germany should deport as many non-Germans as possible to protect the future for young Germans.

    The American Empire should announce plans to leave Germany within 10 years; a beer-soaked celebration of German/American Friendship could be held as the last US military planes leave Ramstein Air Force base. Germany should turn the screw and acquire a nuclear deterrent. Let Germany be a normal nation again, dammit!

    https://twitter.com/meddynyt/status/911999468521828353

    Let’s hope they have better luck than the Sweden Democrats who had similar results. The rest of the parties — previously very tough political opponents, I’ll tell you — immediately formed an anti-Swedish cartel and began an unending stream of vile Jewish rants in the media. The AfD will probably see the same.

    The Sweden Democrats will still probably make an even better result next election, which is in roughly one year. It won’t be sufficient to change direction. Perhaps they might even win in one more election cycle, giving the establishment a decade more to poison the country.

    At that time, the Swedish voters will likely see the limits of democratic elections as starkly as have the American voters this year.

    And when it’s the turn of AfD, they will see the same.

    Can it get worse? Of course it can. I’m fully expecting Islamist parties to start entering parliaments once the muslim population gets large enough, and then our cucks will happily ally with them before allying with parties like AfD or the Sweden Democrats.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  171. Not a writer but Rupert Murdoch had Max Stuart:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Stuart

    Fresh back from his Harvard degree, Rupert sensed that it would sell a lot of papers if they champion some black kid on death row in Australia. It worked, for the papers and the kid.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  172. The syndrome whereby celebrity authors champion celebrity criminals seems less frequent in the U.K. than in the U.S.A., perhaps because British culture has less overall reverence than does American for literary manifestations of what Dwight Macdonald called “the genius act.” There have been a few British instances of the phenomenon even so.

    After Moors Murderess Myra Hindley was sentenced to life in jail, she attracted a half-witted fan-club in the unlikely shapes of Lord Longford (husband of historian Elizabeth Longford) and newspaper columnist Bernard Levin. Both Longford and Levin campaigned frantically for her release. Frantically but, in the end, unsuccessfully. She died, still a prisoner, in 2002, having outlived both her besotted defenders.

    I wrote about the whole matter in The American Conservative some years back. There was also a British movie called Longford (2006) which dealt with the topic. (When Harold Wilson was prime minister he indulged Longford for a while, and gave him a few cabinet posts, but eventually concluded that Longford “had a mental age of 12.”)

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/2001/aug/06/guardianobituaries.prisonsandprobation

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    In Britain, a decent prose style is almost a given. In America, it's seen as a rare gift.
    , @MEH 0910

    I wrote about the whole matter in The American Conservative some years back.
     
    http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/killer-culture/
    , @Bragadocious
    If you read the British media, you'll see that their media/chattering classes make quite a fuss over Brits caught up in the American justice system. Let's see, we had nanny Louise Woodward, who was of course innocent of everything. Same thing with Guantanamo Brit Shaker Aamer, who was minding his own business on that Afghan battlefield until the incompetent Yanks threw him in the hole. And my personal favorite is "British grandmother" (they really call her that) Linda Carty, who's now on death row in Texas for slashing a Hispanic woman to death.

    Carty may fairly be called the British "Hurricane Carty." These were (or are) all cause celebres in Britain, with lots of politicians and deep thinkers either demanding new trials or immediate releases. Because the Yanks apparently don't know what they're doing, and that mean old death penalty.
    , @Jack D
    I have often wondered about the British tradition of the crime novel (often involving gruesome murders) in a country that (once) had very little violent crime. I'd venture that most Brits never knew anyone personally who had been the victim of a violent crime so that crime was something that was detached - you could read about it as something that happened elsewhere, in tabloid headlines or in crime novels and take a certain pleasure in its details because you knew that this had nothing to do with your personal reality. When crime hits closer to home it's not as much fun to read about, especially since real murders happen in a much less picturesque way than in British crime novels.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  173. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @mad anthony
    "I'm an Asian-American doctor and today I #TakeTheKnee to fight white supremacy."

    https://twitter.com/eugenegu/status/911935874711085057

    Is there any research into whether these people lack theory of mind? Many of them must.

    “I’m an Asian-American doctor and today I #TakeTheKnee to fight white supremacy.”

    Fighting on your knees. Brilliant strategy china-man.
    BTW, he has to go back. :)

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  174. @R. J. Stove
    The syndrome whereby celebrity authors champion celebrity criminals seems less frequent in the U.K. than in the U.S.A., perhaps because British culture has less overall reverence than does American for literary manifestations of what Dwight Macdonald called "the genius act." There have been a few British instances of the phenomenon even so.

    After Moors Murderess Myra Hindley was sentenced to life in jail, she attracted a half-witted fan-club in the unlikely shapes of Lord Longford (husband of historian Elizabeth Longford) and newspaper columnist Bernard Levin. Both Longford and Levin campaigned frantically for her release. Frantically but, in the end, unsuccessfully. She died, still a prisoner, in 2002, having outlived both her besotted defenders.

    I wrote about the whole matter in The American Conservative some years back. There was also a British movie called Longford (2006) which dealt with the topic. (When Harold Wilson was prime minister he indulged Longford for a while, and gave him a few cabinet posts, but eventually concluded that Longford "had a mental age of 12.")

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/2001/aug/06/guardianobituaries.prisonsandprobation

    In Britain, a decent prose style is almost a given. In America, it’s seen as a rare gift.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Perhaps that's because the US, unlike the UK, is more widely diverse and has been for decades.

    Regarding the mastery of basic prose, that could in part be based upon the native population having retained their culture (and Britain is a very verbal culture in general)? This in large part is directly connected to their having remained historically white for millennia. In the near future as the UK becomes more and more diverse with third worlders where English is not their first language, then the great prose style among the population may not remain an automatic given.

    For that matter, we keep hearing about how the US will not be majority white by a certain yr, decade, etc. How come we haven't heard the same regarding Great Britain? They're well on their way to becoming a minority white island nation, and whites have been there for thousands of yrs.

    , @syonredux

    In Britain, a decent prose style is almost a given. In America, it’s seen as a rare gift.
     
    Dunno, Steve. Have you read the dreck being churned out by British academics these days........
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  175. @cthulhu
    Capote certainly became fascinated by Perry Smith (portrayed by Robert Blake in the movie) and may have even fallen in love with Smith in some way. But I have never read that Capote ever claimed that that Hickock or Smith were reformed in any sense, although I think that Capote may have tried in some way to get their death sentences commuted to life in prison.

    If Capote was right, Perry Smith had a childhood that made Shulamith Firestone’s read like something from Enid Blyton – he was a sad case. But as one of the other characters says “Many a man can match sob stories with that little bastard. Me included. Maybe I drink too much, but I sure as hell never killed four people in cold blood”.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  176. TB says:
    @Almost Missouri

    "still have rates of recidivism much lower than the those in the US."
     
    With the incoming tide of New Swedes, that'll be over soon.

    Sweden-the future is now

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  177. @BEER/ we're all going to die
    Haha. Maybe displays of dumbness by wealthier and higher status sapiens is a (mostly subconscious) display of their status. Demonstrating their disconnectedness and relative safety from their "pets", which are in fact predators (usually *obviously* to any regular joe with eyes) to those left in parts of the human zoo big writers and such have the means to avoid, such convict defenders show they have no skin in the game, they're up in the box seats. Well that's maybe part of it, maybe a better take than claiming that they're mainly just pampered and naive about the lower ranks because they're from a more civilized and moral world, etc.

    Anyway nevermind, but I was reminded of good ole William Cuckley, a real snake apparently. Some of these people's personal lives and politics, whew, us peasants tend not to realize what creeps these people can be. I mean they're so sophisticated and well spoken. http://www.vdare.com/articles/william-f-buckley-jr-rip-sort-of

    Maybe displays of dumbness by wealthier and higher status sapiens is a (mostly subconscious) display of their status.

    Economists have the theory of conspicuous consumption – buying things as a form of social display due to excess wealth. With political belief, it’s Conspicuous Conventionality – whereby you are displaying how closely you adhere to the current vanguard of politically correct conventional NPR-listening rich kids.

    I’ve been to lefty events in the UK and the speakers and leaders are often privileged Oxford types, who formulate their theories in their bubbles, while the audience are lower on the social ladder – but desperately want to believe and be like the speakers. The irony of Marxists pretending to be rich and insulated from life’s realities is probably lost on them.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  178. MEH 0910 says:
    @R. J. Stove
    The syndrome whereby celebrity authors champion celebrity criminals seems less frequent in the U.K. than in the U.S.A., perhaps because British culture has less overall reverence than does American for literary manifestations of what Dwight Macdonald called "the genius act." There have been a few British instances of the phenomenon even so.

    After Moors Murderess Myra Hindley was sentenced to life in jail, she attracted a half-witted fan-club in the unlikely shapes of Lord Longford (husband of historian Elizabeth Longford) and newspaper columnist Bernard Levin. Both Longford and Levin campaigned frantically for her release. Frantically but, in the end, unsuccessfully. She died, still a prisoner, in 2002, having outlived both her besotted defenders.

    I wrote about the whole matter in The American Conservative some years back. There was also a British movie called Longford (2006) which dealt with the topic. (When Harold Wilson was prime minister he indulged Longford for a while, and gave him a few cabinet posts, but eventually concluded that Longford "had a mental age of 12.")

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/2001/aug/06/guardianobituaries.prisonsandprobation

    I wrote about the whole matter in The American Conservative some years back.

    http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/killer-culture/

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  179. “Buckley, Mailer, and Styron were not unworldly men, but they each fell for a crook’s hard-luck story.”

    And each of them were vain enough to imagine that they were a better judge of men and events than – well – a judge. A judge and jury, listening to evidence from all sides, and coming to a verdict.

    Sure, the court system isn’t perfect. It’s just better than anything else mankind has yet to devise for what it does.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  180. I remember reading what Normal Mailer said about his pet criminal. He never denied that the person was guilty as hell, but deserved another chance. It didn’t work out.
    I have always been mystified why some great writer has not championed the cause of Pamela Smart. She is so obviously innocent, we could be here for hours explaining this. For someone whose family worshiped Perry Mason, this seems mystifying. The two factors against her is that she is innocent and the New York Times bribed a jury member to convict her. I guess you would have to fight the New York Times if you proclaim her innocence, and today’s writers are too cowardly. Emil Zola where are you.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    LOL - everyone else's pet criminal is guilty but YOUR pet criminal is innocent. I have no idea whether Smart really did or did not do what she was tried and convicted of doing but superficially the story sounds exactly like what a manipulative woman seeking to get out of a marriage might do. At the very least, she freely admits to sleeping with a 15 year old so she does not seem to be a person of good character.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  181. anon says: • Website • Disclaimer

    L.A.’s Caryl Chessman had quite a few celebrity champions, including Mailer and rockin’ rockabilly rocker Ronnie Hawkins!

    Mumia Abu-Jamal? There must be somebody who glommed onto him, right?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  182. @Steve Sailer
    In Britain, a decent prose style is almost a given. In America, it's seen as a rare gift.

    Perhaps that’s because the US, unlike the UK, is more widely diverse and has been for decades.

    Regarding the mastery of basic prose, that could in part be based upon the native population having retained their culture (and Britain is a very verbal culture in general)? This in large part is directly connected to their having remained historically white for millennia. In the near future as the UK becomes more and more diverse with third worlders where English is not their first language, then the great prose style among the population may not remain an automatic given.

    For that matter, we keep hearing about how the US will not be majority white by a certain yr, decade, etc. How come we haven’t heard the same regarding Great Britain? They’re well on their way to becoming a minority white island nation, and whites have been there for thousands of yrs.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  183. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @whoever

    in armies the world over, the NCOs are promoted grunts who know and understand the grunts beneath them – and can be relied upon to know bullshit when they smell it, whilst the officer class, exclusively drawn from the upper classes, and raised in loving, kindhearted, honest, literate homes, are generally too naive and forgiving of the ways of the scoundrel, the cheat, the liar, the trickster, the fraudster, the bully etc.
     
    The only difference I have noticed between enlisted and officers in the American armed forces is that the officers have already gone to college and the enlisted haven't yet -- if they want to. They are both drawn from the same strata of society, by and large, with the same worldview, attitudes, accents and aspirations. Officers were "A" students in high school, enlisted, "B" students; that's about the only difference.
    I did notice a huge difference in the British armed forces: The officers seemed to be from almost a different country from the enlisted, speaking what seemed to be a different language. They exhibited the classic British combination of snooty accent, arrogant incompetence, and knee-jerk anti-Americanism.
    The enlisted personnel, on the other hand, once you could figure out what they were saying -- heavy regional accents were common -- were okay guys, if very poorly led, and trained in tactics that might have worked in northern Ireland in 1970 but were otherwise useless. They were steeped in American pop culture. Most wanted to emigrate to Australia, their dream land of beer, beaches and babes.

    The Armed Forces Qualification Test at work.

    Read More
    • Replies: @L Woods
    The AFQT is really not as important as people make it out to be. The scores required to be eligible for nearly every job are trivially easy to attain. Mostly which job you get is a matter of luck (depending on the branch -- only the Army IIRC will give you a contract for a specific job these days, and that's only for enlisted). There are a couple of specialized tests pertaining to computer and language aptitude that are supposedly somewhat harder.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  184. anonguy says:
    @MichiganMom
    I'm reminded of the same naïveté that SJW's show in championing rescue pit bulls. The dogs have less agency than a criminal but I wouldn't allow either around my kids. It's all about how good it makes them, the boosters, feel.

    I’m reminded of the same naïveté that SJW’s show in championing rescue pit bulls.

    It is a ruffian affectation as well, like the tattoos. The nice part of this is that SJW’s tend to oppose breed specific legislation.

    Portland has a lot of pitbull bites

    http://www.nationalpitbullvictimawareness.org/attacks/bites-bans-deaths-usa/

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  185. Crime is a means for a leftist to achieve their ideals, and their ideal goal is to be taken care of by a totalitarian government.

    Federal prisons provide a lot of entitlements that leftist desire and consider to be ideal goals:

    Free food
    Free clean water and showers
    Free bedding
    Free Heat and Electric
    Free medical
    Free dental
    Free Prescription Drugs
    Free washed clothes and free shoes
    Free toiletries
    Free Public Transportation
    Free Birth Control and Abortions
    Free transsexual operations
    Free 24 hour security
    Free cable TV
    Free no-qualification jobs
    Free high school and college education
    Lots of anal and oral sodomy
    Lots of incarcerated left wing friends
    Disarmed civilians
    Hate speech officially suppressed
    Economic and Social Equality
    Free Athletic Equipment Access
    Cultural and ethnic diversity
    Pay no Taxes
    Freedom from Religion
    Solitary Safe Spaces
    Free Books and magazines
    Free Mental Health counseling and therapies
    Free drug counseling and therapies

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  186. whorefinder says: • Website

    Everyone needs a muse. And a story that sticks out of the ordinary statistics makes for good copy—”man bites dog” versus “dog bites man”. Plus communist spies supported propaganda that made the U.S. justice system look untrustworthy; get a useful idiot celebrity to get behind one to enhance the “injustice.”

    And Buckley was long a CIA stooge and a wannabe buddy of all the cool leftists. No surprise he fell right in line with their program.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  187. Olorin says:
    @James Braxton
    Having a racially stratified society corrupts all our institutions.

    It's why we can't have good public schools, inexpensive healthcare, or a lenient criminal justice system.

    This is as Jonathan says, a highly perceptive comment…and in my view what “racial realism” has always been about.

    I’d go so far as to say that in a racially stratified society, managing that stratification and shoring it up takes the place of those institutions, their care and keep. It becomes the sole end and aim of all activity, all energy, all resources.

    When all you have as your goal and product is racial strife, you don’t need institutions, or even a society per se to peddle it. People can always be driven to conflict, and their tormenters can always be there to divide and conquer. There is always something to envy, and always something to resent. You can even monetarize and harvest profits from and speculate on this destruction. See: New York City, gentrification of.

    Or: Black Bodies, fantasies about.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  188. @syonredux
    Wonder how long it will be before the national anthem is changed.....


    Star-Spangled Bigotry: The Hidden Racist History of the National Anthem

    In the case of our national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner,” perhaps not knowing the full lyrics is a good thing. It is one of the most racist, pro-slavery, anti-black songs in the American lexicon, and you would be wise to cut it from your Fourth of July playlist.
     

    To understand the full “Star-Spangled Banner” story, you have to understand the author. Key was an aristocrat and city prosecutor in Washington, D.C. He was, like most enlightened men at the time, not against slavery; he just thought that since blacks were mentally inferior, masters should treat them with more Christian kindness. He supported sending free blacks (not slaves) back to Africa and, with a few exceptions, was about as pro-slavery, anti-black and anti-abolitionist as you could get at the time.
     

    In other words, Key was saying that the blood of all the former slaves and “hirelings” on the battlefield will wash away the pollution of the British invaders. With Key still bitter that some black soldiers got the best of him a few weeks earlier, “The Star-Spangled Banner” is as much a patriotic song as it is a diss track to black people who had the audacity to fight for their freedom. Perhaps that’s why it took almost 100 years for the song to become the national anthem.
     
    http://www.theroot.com/star-spangled-bigotry-the-hidden-racist-history-of-the-1790855893

    I cannot take anyone remotely seriously who uses the phrase “diss track” in a formal essay. Perhaps if the essay itself were about hip-hop, such jargon would be forgiveable, but even then, one presumes the spelling should be “dis,” as the term ellides “disrespect.”

    In the event, the whole theory is grossly self-important projection, akin to some groupie or high-school sweetheart of a rockstar who tells anyone who will listen that his hit ballads are about her, with no credible, corroborating evidence.

    Sure; “Photograph” is all about you, honey. Whatever gets you through the night.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  189. Jack D says:
    @Dahlia
    My mother fell in love with an inmate for murder related to a drug deal gone bad. A king pin type. Mother and I are polar opposites when it comes to sizing up people and she's an airy-fairy liberal: scant intuition.
    My late teen years were interesting...

    Interesting – I’ll bet.

    This is not just a inability to size up people or scant intuition but something else. Scant intuition would mean that you might randomly make choices that were bad or good but people like this actively seek out bad choices. They know what is right and they do the exact OPPOSITE. Maybe they are getting even with Daddy or Mommy or something but it’s not just a matter of poor intuition.

    Women are often attracted to imprisoned murderers for the same reason that people like to ride roller coasters or to stand near the lion’s cage – it’s a thrill but it is a safe thrill (for as long as the murderer stays locked up).

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  190. syonredux says:
    @Steve Sailer
    In Britain, a decent prose style is almost a given. In America, it's seen as a rare gift.

    In Britain, a decent prose style is almost a given. In America, it’s seen as a rare gift.

    Dunno, Steve. Have you read the dreck being churned out by British academics these days……..

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  191. Dahlia says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Houston cops in the late 1970s would say that if only they could catch this white guy named "Wayne" and this black guy named "Charles Williams," there'd be no more crime in Houston. Or at least that's what they surmised from all the white arrestees/black arrestees who told the cops: "It wasn't me, it was Wayne/Charles Williams!"

    Houston cops in the late 1970s would say that if only they could catch this white guy named “Wayne” and this black guy named “Charles Williams,” there’d be no more crime in Houston. Or at least that’s what they surmised from all the white arrestees/black arrestees who told the cops: “It wasn’t me, it was Wayne/Charles Williams!”

    Haha! Never heard that before, but have just read so very many criminal histories and those two names lept immediately to mind. Wayne as middle name being mandatory, of course.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  192. Jack D says:
    @flyingtiger
    I remember reading what Normal Mailer said about his pet criminal. He never denied that the person was guilty as hell, but deserved another chance. It didn't work out.
    I have always been mystified why some great writer has not championed the cause of Pamela Smart. She is so obviously innocent, we could be here for hours explaining this. For someone whose family worshiped Perry Mason, this seems mystifying. The two factors against her is that she is innocent and the New York Times bribed a jury member to convict her. I guess you would have to fight the New York Times if you proclaim her innocence, and today's writers are too cowardly. Emil Zola where are you.

    LOL – everyone else’s pet criminal is guilty but YOUR pet criminal is innocent. I have no idea whether Smart really did or did not do what she was tried and convicted of doing but superficially the story sounds exactly like what a manipulative woman seeking to get out of a marriage might do. At the very least, she freely admits to sleeping with a 15 year old so she does not seem to be a person of good character.

    Read More
    • Replies: @flyingtiger
    So a 16+ year old boy who seduces a married woman is a person of good character? Before Flynn met Smart, he had served time in a juvenile prison and in a rehab center. Since released, he ran with the Fowler gang and committed many burglaries. Before Gregg was put into the ground, Flynn and the rest of the Fowler gang had broke into a warehouse. Flynn was a harden criminal while Smart was a naive woman. With his long time friend, Cecila Pierce by his side, they played her like a sap. Flynn only seduced her to find out if they had anything valuable to steal and how to get in.
    Flynn is tall and has a deep voice and Charlie Manson eyes. In an interview with Diane Sawyer, he should he was an expert pick up artist.
    Gregg did not die on his knees begging for mercy. He had over powered them. The physical evidence and the testimony of the two killers prove this.
    Flynn said in court Smart never told her and he never told her.
    Since we are talking about writers and their pet criminals, Flynn has been idolized by the media. He has always been described in ways that are homoerotic. Even the parole board wished him a happy birthday!
    If you look into this case, you will explain her innocence better than I ca. The movie Liberty Valance was wrong the facts are better than the narrative...er...legend.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  193. MarcB. says:
    @Rifleman

    Buckley had Edgar Smith, Norman Mailer had Jack Abbot, and William Styron had Benjamin Reid.
     
    Don't forget Gore Vidal and Timothy McVeigh. Similar, not in the assumption of innocence but nobility of the cause I guess.

    “Don’t forget Gore Vidal and Timothy McVeigh. Similar, not in the assumption of innocence but nobility of the cause I guess”.

    Vidal related to McVeigh’s anger over a country that had turned it’s back on the US Constitution and Bill of Rights, but his advocacy was also based on the premise that McVeigh was a patsy for a false flag operation designed to permanently damage the image of the anti-globalist Patriot Movement. Perhaps only John Doe #2 knows the real story…

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  194. @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    I have found levels of nastiness and duplicity the higher I get that continue to amaze me… but nor do I romanticize the Cracker, they’ll rip you off too
     
    In Freakonomics Leavitt has a story about someone named Paul Feldman and selling bagels on the honor system. He found that 85% of his customers were honest. The interesting question is: "Does the 85% hold for both the "Crackers" and the upper class?" I have met honest people at both strata. I have met genuinely despicable people at both too.

    But kudos to you for not selling your soul. I salute you.

    I tried
    They wouldn’t take me lol

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  195. I wonder who will be the alt-right’s first pet criminal.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  196. Bill P says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Sounds convincing, but then there's Bernie Madoff serving his centuries time with no parole up in the big house. Apparently not everyone likes it when they're conned out of mega bucks by consters.

    Madoff is a class traitor. He ripped off the rich.

    If he’d stolen from working class pension funds he wouldn’t be doing much time, if any. All those bigshots who called for his head would have been urging leniency and saying his heart was in the right place (i.e. in the same place as theirs — all in favor of ripping off the little people).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    So then, if Edgar Smith were to have seen some real time in the pen, he'd have stolen from William F. Buckley.
    , @whorefinder

    Madoff is a class traitor. He ripped off the rich.
     
    More to the point, ((Madofff)) ripped off his (((fellow tribesman)). I remember being in New York when the whole thing became front page news, and despite the coverage, the real outrage was from ((certain people)) who felt personally betrayed. It's fine to rip off the goyim, but you don't rip off fellow (((members))).

    But that's the nature 0f Ponzi schemes: they are ethnically based. It's a ripoff of the people who trust you.

    it was amusing hearing ((certain people)) viciously attack Madoff when it was revealed that they were just as easily hoodwinked as those stupid goyim who fell for such schemes. They thought themselves too smart and too sophisticated for such a ruse.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  197. @R. J. Stove
    The syndrome whereby celebrity authors champion celebrity criminals seems less frequent in the U.K. than in the U.S.A., perhaps because British culture has less overall reverence than does American for literary manifestations of what Dwight Macdonald called "the genius act." There have been a few British instances of the phenomenon even so.

    After Moors Murderess Myra Hindley was sentenced to life in jail, she attracted a half-witted fan-club in the unlikely shapes of Lord Longford (husband of historian Elizabeth Longford) and newspaper columnist Bernard Levin. Both Longford and Levin campaigned frantically for her release. Frantically but, in the end, unsuccessfully. She died, still a prisoner, in 2002, having outlived both her besotted defenders.

    I wrote about the whole matter in The American Conservative some years back. There was also a British movie called Longford (2006) which dealt with the topic. (When Harold Wilson was prime minister he indulged Longford for a while, and gave him a few cabinet posts, but eventually concluded that Longford "had a mental age of 12.")

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/2001/aug/06/guardianobituaries.prisonsandprobation

    If you read the British media, you’ll see that their media/chattering classes make quite a fuss over Brits caught up in the American justice system. Let’s see, we had nanny Louise Woodward, who was of course innocent of everything. Same thing with Guantanamo Brit Shaker Aamer, who was minding his own business on that Afghan battlefield until the incompetent Yanks threw him in the hole. And my personal favorite is “British grandmother” (they really call her that) Linda Carty, who’s now on death row in Texas for slashing a Hispanic woman to death.

    Carty may fairly be called the British “Hurricane Carty.” These were (or are) all cause celebres in Britain, with lots of politicians and deep thinkers either demanding new trials or immediate releases. Because the Yanks apparently don’t know what they’re doing, and that mean old death penalty.

    Read More
    • Replies: @James Kabala
    A British person was quoted as saying re Woodward that he distrusted the Massachusetts court system because it was "the home of the witch trials." (This was after she was convicted but before she was set free.) Despite much competition over the last twenty years, that might still be the stupidest comment I have ever seen in print.

    Of course, many Americans feel the same way about Amanda Knox, although I think she might actually be innocent. (But I heard so many contradictory claims in that case that I eventually I gave up on trying to figure out the truth. Even if she really is guilty, the prosecutor certainly said and did some strange things that no one in the Woodward case ever did.)
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  198. Nico says:
    @Autochthon
    Wow. You've completely missed your own point. A big part of the the problem today is precisely that one cannot attain any social mobility in many cases, despite the best efforts, intentions, and even luck in the genetic lottery, because smug bastards among the boomers sold our birthright for infinitely appreciating realty (for them; anyone not in on the ground floor can of course now never afford it...); stocks (via cheap labour, first by Chinese, Mexicans, and Indians abroad, but now by Chinese, Mexicans, and Indians here); and so on.

    Congratulate yourself some more about how hard you worked and how lazy everyone under forty is, Cochise.

    As a millennial who has “made it” in one sense financially and career-wise but who also acknowledges I had considerable support from family, godparents and many friends, I think it is not an either/or question.

    Is my generation more complacent and less thrifty than the previous one? In many ways, yes. But I would argue some of our grievances are legitimate and our lack of drive has to be understood as such: what’s the point of scrimping and saving half one’s income if the only light at the end of that tunnel is enough for the down payment, 10 to 15 years out of college, on a suburban cottage some 50 minutes away from any gainful employment (to which one is, inevitably, tied as soon as one has a mortgage)?

    At the same time, when so many of our woes come from globalization and immigration and I see my hipster and yuppy white peers screaming “BLACK LIVES MATTER!” and “OPEN BORDERS NOW!” not to mention voting for that evil cow who all but promised to destroy us all last November I wish I could commission a special treason court just for them. However, one must take the people as one finds them, not as one wishes them to be.

    Any proposed solution therefore has to account for these nuances. For instance, as far as college debt is concerned, there needs to be a mass, across-the-board writedown: say, by 50%, with a cap of $45,000, perhaps with anyone overshooting that ceiling becoming ineligible for future student loans regardless of improvement in credit score. This would take care of some, but not all, of the burden, because while I really believe the legal age should be 21 and 18 is too young to see the consequences of these kinds of decisions – which shouldn’t ruin our lives – it is pedagogical to have to shoulder some of the consequences of bad decisions even in youth. And some, but not none, because no society can afford to do away with its up and coming generations (however frustrating their conduct may be).

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  199. Jack D says:
    @R. J. Stove
    The syndrome whereby celebrity authors champion celebrity criminals seems less frequent in the U.K. than in the U.S.A., perhaps because British culture has less overall reverence than does American for literary manifestations of what Dwight Macdonald called "the genius act." There have been a few British instances of the phenomenon even so.

    After Moors Murderess Myra Hindley was sentenced to life in jail, she attracted a half-witted fan-club in the unlikely shapes of Lord Longford (husband of historian Elizabeth Longford) and newspaper columnist Bernard Levin. Both Longford and Levin campaigned frantically for her release. Frantically but, in the end, unsuccessfully. She died, still a prisoner, in 2002, having outlived both her besotted defenders.

    I wrote about the whole matter in The American Conservative some years back. There was also a British movie called Longford (2006) which dealt with the topic. (When Harold Wilson was prime minister he indulged Longford for a while, and gave him a few cabinet posts, but eventually concluded that Longford "had a mental age of 12.")

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/2001/aug/06/guardianobituaries.prisonsandprobation

    I have often wondered about the British tradition of the crime novel (often involving gruesome murders) in a country that (once) had very little violent crime. I’d venture that most Brits never knew anyone personally who had been the victim of a violent crime so that crime was something that was detached – you could read about it as something that happened elsewhere, in tabloid headlines or in crime novels and take a certain pleasure in its details because you knew that this had nothing to do with your personal reality. When crime hits closer to home it’s not as much fun to read about, especially since real murders happen in a much less picturesque way than in British crime novels.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The lower half of British society gets in more brawls than the lower half of white American society.
    , @whorefinder
    As Hollywood learned during the Great Depression---"STICKS NIX HICK PIX"----people desire escapism from the misery of their lives. This is why the most popular movies of that time period were comedies about mega-rich folks with petty marriage problems, or else exciting action films of either the Western or law enforcement/gangster variety, or Mickey Mouse or fantasy films. (Occasionally they could work in some social commentary---My Man Godfrey was a hit---but mostly the hits avoided preaching or realism).

    Hollywood acknowledged this in Sullivan's Travels, where the director learns that, despite his belief that the people want movies that talk about the struggle of the working man, they prefer cartoons and comedies to give them escape from their hard lives.

    People desire escapism, hence why the murder-mystery novel was huge among those who suffer from very little crime.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  200. @Jack D
    I have often wondered about the British tradition of the crime novel (often involving gruesome murders) in a country that (once) had very little violent crime. I'd venture that most Brits never knew anyone personally who had been the victim of a violent crime so that crime was something that was detached - you could read about it as something that happened elsewhere, in tabloid headlines or in crime novels and take a certain pleasure in its details because you knew that this had nothing to do with your personal reality. When crime hits closer to home it's not as much fun to read about, especially since real murders happen in a much less picturesque way than in British crime novels.

    The lower half of British society gets in more brawls than the lower half of white American society.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Specifically I was thinking of murder. Last time I looked, British homicide rates were way way lower than American - maybe 1/5 the US rate and 1/25 the rate in Chicago. I think that the entire UK has fewer murders than Chicago. Sure lower class Brits get into lots of drunken brawls but they tend to involve fist fights instead of gun battles. It's a lot more fun to write a murder mystery about the vicar in some village who poisons the chocolates he gives to his secret mistress than about two gang bangers shooting it out on a drug corner - not much mystery in that.
    , @Eagle Eye

    The lower half of British society gets in more brawls than the lower half of white American society.
     
    Definitely true. There is much more casual violence, "muggings" etc. in Britain. Principal reasons are:

    1) The long absence of a gun culture.
    2) The erosion of cautious respect for others - one deals differently with strangers if even one in twenty carries.
    3) The general breakdown of all social conventions since WW I, including the internal collapse of the established Church of England.
    4) Longstanding and blatant class divisions.
    5) Betrayal of the old "working class" by sub-standard schools. Grammar schools - the traditional path to success for smart "working class" kids were systematically destroyed by an alliance of the well-off and successful leftists disappointed in the lacking revolutionary fervor of the working class. All of the fashionable classes send their children to fee-paying or special public schools.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  201. Jack D says:
    @Steve Sailer
    The lower half of British society gets in more brawls than the lower half of white American society.

    Specifically I was thinking of murder. Last time I looked, British homicide rates were way way lower than American – maybe 1/5 the US rate and 1/25 the rate in Chicago. I think that the entire UK has fewer murders than Chicago. Sure lower class Brits get into lots of drunken brawls but they tend to involve fist fights instead of gun battles. It’s a lot more fun to write a murder mystery about the vicar in some village who poisons the chocolates he gives to his secret mistress than about two gang bangers shooting it out on a drug corner – not much mystery in that.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    I think you have to take into account that the UK of today isn't the same as the UK of fifty years ago. Given that Rotterdam and other types of incidents from the last twenty years, and the fact that British society is being transformed into a non-white nation, its more than reasonable to suspect that over time the UK homicide rate will catch up to the US homicide rate. Let's not so quickly gloss over the fact that there is a substantial non-white population in the UK at present and it is increasing with each year. Given the fact that more rapes, murders, terrorist bombings (of which there have been more or at least the same number in the UK as in the US within the last ten yrs or so) and the UK is well on the way of catching the US in crime rate, murders, etc.

    From a crime standpoint, the UK isn't as safe as it once was, and that's the main point.
    , @Jonathan Mason

    Sure lower class Brits get into lots of drunken brawls but they tend to involve fist fights instead of gun battles.
     
    My brother-in-law who is a cop in the largely Muslim city of Bradford told me many years ago that the local lads tended to fight with fists, but the "Pakis" often used knives, resulting in worse injuries.

    I think the English crime novel started in earnest with Sherlock Holmes, and then the Murder at the Vicarage type of mystery story was developed by Agatha Christie.

    There were some famous English murderers, but on close examination, some were expatriate Americans. For example W.C. Minor.

    England has had a few serial killers like Jack the Ripper, the Moors Murderers, a young couple who tortured and killed children, and The Yorkshire Ripper (Peter Sutcliffe) who killed prostitutes and female students. Along with 50,000 other men in the target area, I was personally investigated for these crimes, but soon eliminated as I had been out of the country for at least one of them. The investigation continued for years, quite ineptly, but eventually he was caught accidentally.

    Fred West and his wife Rosemary killed at least a dozen young women in Western England after torturing and dismembering them. Most of the bodies were buried in his back yard. West and his wife were parted by death when he committed suicide while in prison on remand, so he was never convicted. However his wife was convicted of 10 murders.

    Physician Harold Shipman is estimated to have killed as many as 250 of his patients, most of them old women, by injecting them with heroin. He also committed suicide in prison in 2004. The inquest into his death found that his suicide could not have been predicted. Who would have thunk it?

    Over the decades there have been quite a few famous English murderers. Most of them either killed young women for purposes of rape and then concealment of the crime, or else they killed their wives.

    There have also been children who killed children including one female child killer called Mary Bell. As a girl of 11, Mary killed two little boys. Another pair of boys called Venables and Thompson abducted and tortured and killed a two year old boy called James Bulger in Liverpool.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Bell

    Since the arrival of an increased number of immigrants from the 1990's onwards, the traditional English murderer has largely been supplanted by imported talent committing spectacular, but pointless murders.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  202. anonguy says:

    The lower half of British society gets in more brawls than the lower half of white American society.

    I’ve observed this personally. It is a very longstanding, multi-generational tradition.

    Any ideas as to why?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Americans have more guns?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  203. @anonguy

    The lower half of British society gets in more brawls than the lower half of white American society.
     
    I've observed this personally. It is a very longstanding, multi-generational tradition.

    Any ideas as to why?

    Americans have more guns?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Guns don't cause crime, people do.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  204. @Jack D
    Specifically I was thinking of murder. Last time I looked, British homicide rates were way way lower than American - maybe 1/5 the US rate and 1/25 the rate in Chicago. I think that the entire UK has fewer murders than Chicago. Sure lower class Brits get into lots of drunken brawls but they tend to involve fist fights instead of gun battles. It's a lot more fun to write a murder mystery about the vicar in some village who poisons the chocolates he gives to his secret mistress than about two gang bangers shooting it out on a drug corner - not much mystery in that.

    I think you have to take into account that the UK of today isn’t the same as the UK of fifty years ago. Given that Rotterdam and other types of incidents from the last twenty years, and the fact that British society is being transformed into a non-white nation, its more than reasonable to suspect that over time the UK homicide rate will catch up to the US homicide rate. Let’s not so quickly gloss over the fact that there is a substantial non-white population in the UK at present and it is increasing with each year. Given the fact that more rapes, murders, terrorist bombings (of which there have been more or at least the same number in the UK as in the US within the last ten yrs or so) and the UK is well on the way of catching the US in crime rate, murders, etc.

    From a crime standpoint, the UK isn’t as safe as it once was, and that’s the main point.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  205. @Steve Sailer
    Americans have more guns?

    Guns don’t cause crime, people do.

    Read More
    • Replies: @JMcG
    I think the point is that one is much less likely to bring fists to a gunfight. That's what I got out of it anyway.
    While in high school I would sometimes work weekends in a carwash owned by the father of a friend. This place was in a heavily mobbed up section of a big eastern city.
    When I ran the vacuum I noticed that maybe a third of the cars driven by men had a pistol under the seat.
    Made me much more tolerant of being cut off while driving around there.
    Cheers
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  206. @Bill P
    Madoff is a class traitor. He ripped off the rich.

    If he'd stolen from working class pension funds he wouldn't be doing much time, if any. All those bigshots who called for his head would have been urging leniency and saying his heart was in the right place (i.e. in the same place as theirs -- all in favor of ripping off the little people).

    So then, if Edgar Smith were to have seen some real time in the pen, he’d have stolen from William F. Buckley.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  207. whorefinder says: • Website
    @Jack D
    I have often wondered about the British tradition of the crime novel (often involving gruesome murders) in a country that (once) had very little violent crime. I'd venture that most Brits never knew anyone personally who had been the victim of a violent crime so that crime was something that was detached - you could read about it as something that happened elsewhere, in tabloid headlines or in crime novels and take a certain pleasure in its details because you knew that this had nothing to do with your personal reality. When crime hits closer to home it's not as much fun to read about, especially since real murders happen in a much less picturesque way than in British crime novels.

    As Hollywood learned during the Great Depression—”STICKS NIX HICK PIX”—-people desire escapism from the misery of their lives. This is why the most popular movies of that time period were comedies about mega-rich folks with petty marriage problems, or else exciting action films of either the Western or law enforcement/gangster variety, or Mickey Mouse or fantasy films. (Occasionally they could work in some social commentary—My Man Godfrey was a hit—but mostly the hits avoided preaching or realism).

    Hollywood acknowledged this in Sullivan’s Travels, where the director learns that, despite his belief that the people want movies that talk about the struggle of the working man, they prefer cartoons and comedies to give them escape from their hard lives.

    People desire escapism, hence why the murder-mystery novel was huge among those who suffer from very little crime.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Exactly. Famous line by Louis B. Mayer applies to Sullivan's Travels "If you want to send a message, try Western Union."

    And its no accident that the Golden Age of Classic Hollywood (ca.1930-60's) is one of the best in US cinema. Very little socially driven movies a la leftwing agenda, at least not explicitly.

    Maybe, just maybe, in addition to wanting escapist feel good films, most people simply aren't politically active and don't want to be preached at in their entertainment. And, perhaps they also don't want that specific brand of politics in their entertainment (e.g. leftist propaganda).
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  208. whorefinder says: • Website
    @Bill P
    Madoff is a class traitor. He ripped off the rich.

    If he'd stolen from working class pension funds he wouldn't be doing much time, if any. All those bigshots who called for his head would have been urging leniency and saying his heart was in the right place (i.e. in the same place as theirs -- all in favor of ripping off the little people).

    Madoff is a class traitor. He ripped off the rich.

    More to the point, ((Madofff)) ripped off his (((fellow tribesman)). I remember being in New York when the whole thing became front page news, and despite the coverage, the real outrage was from ((certain people)) who felt personally betrayed. It’s fine to rip off the goyim, but you don’t rip off fellow (((members))).

    But that’s the nature 0f Ponzi schemes: they are ethnically based. It’s a ripoff of the people who trust you.

    it was amusing hearing ((certain people)) viciously attack Madoff when it was revealed that they were just as easily hoodwinked as those stupid goyim who fell for such schemes. They thought themselves too smart and too sophisticated for such a ruse.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  209. @BB753
    He doesn't seem to be a Muslim although hailing from Khartoum. BTW, I found the header funny: "Tennessee Church Shooting Suspect Is A Sudanese Bodybuilder"
    Why is it important to mention he was a bodybuilder?

    I found the header funny: “Tennessee Church Shooting Suspect Is A Sudanese Bodybuilder”
    Why is it important to mention he was a bodybuilder?

    Many bodybuilders use steroid drugs which can cause behavioral changes?

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon

    Many bodybuilders use steroid drugs which can cause behavioral changes?
     
    That's true, but our masters are very down on things like getting strong, and since the killer isn't White [and can't be criticised on racial grounds], why let a chance to blackwash bodybuilding go begging?
    , @BB753
    Many police officers also use steroids. Does that make them trigger-happy? Nobody wants to go there.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  210. Bill Jone says:

    Why not do it to NYC?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  211. L Woods says:
    @anon
    The Armed Forces Qualification Test at work.

    The AFQT is really not as important as people make it out to be. The scores required to be eligible for nearly every job are trivially easy to attain. Mostly which job you get is a matter of luck (depending on the branch — only the Army IIRC will give you a contract for a specific job these days, and that’s only for enlisted). There are a couple of specialized tests pertaining to computer and language aptitude that are supposedly somewhat harder.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  212. @Jack D
    Specifically I was thinking of murder. Last time I looked, British homicide rates were way way lower than American - maybe 1/5 the US rate and 1/25 the rate in Chicago. I think that the entire UK has fewer murders than Chicago. Sure lower class Brits get into lots of drunken brawls but they tend to involve fist fights instead of gun battles. It's a lot more fun to write a murder mystery about the vicar in some village who poisons the chocolates he gives to his secret mistress than about two gang bangers shooting it out on a drug corner - not much mystery in that.

    Sure lower class Brits get into lots of drunken brawls but they tend to involve fist fights instead of gun battles.

    My brother-in-law who is a cop in the largely Muslim city of Bradford told me many years ago that the local lads tended to fight with fists, but the “Pakis” often used knives, resulting in worse injuries.

    I think the English crime novel started in earnest with Sherlock Holmes, and then the Murder at the Vicarage type of mystery story was developed by Agatha Christie.

    There were some famous English murderers, but on close examination, some were expatriate Americans. For example W.C. Minor.

    England has had a few serial killers like Jack the Ripper, the Moors Murderers, a young couple who tortured and killed children, and The Yorkshire Ripper (Peter Sutcliffe) who killed prostitutes and female students. Along with 50,000 other men in the target area, I was personally investigated for these crimes, but soon eliminated as I had been out of the country for at least one of them. The investigation continued for years, quite ineptly, but eventually he was caught accidentally.

    Fred West and his wife Rosemary killed at least a dozen young women in Western England after torturing and dismembering them. Most of the bodies were buried in his back yard. West and his wife were parted by death when he committed suicide while in prison on remand, so he was never convicted. However his wife was convicted of 10 murders.

    Physician Harold Shipman is estimated to have killed as many as 250 of his patients, most of them old women, by injecting them with heroin. He also committed suicide in prison in 2004. The inquest into his death found that his suicide could not have been predicted. Who would have thunk it?

    Over the decades there have been quite a few famous English murderers. Most of them either killed young women for purposes of rape and then concealment of the crime, or else they killed their wives.

    There have also been children who killed children including one female child killer called Mary Bell. As a girl of 11, Mary killed two little boys. Another pair of boys called Venables and Thompson abducted and tortured and killed a two year old boy called James Bulger in Liverpool.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Bell

    Since the arrival of an increased number of immigrants from the 1990′s onwards, the traditional English murderer has largely been supplanted by imported talent committing spectacular, but pointless murders.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whoever
    The old radio series,The Black Museum, produced in London but broadcast over Radio Luxembourg, hosted by Orson Welles, showcased a lot of sensational British crimes of its era, such as the torture-rape murders committed by Neville Heath. His story was dramatized as "The Pink Powder Puff."

    As far as British crime novels go, they aren't all the Agatha Christie type. Consider James Hadley Chase, prolific and hugely successful author of stories full of graphic violence and sexual sadism, starting with 1939's No Orchids for Miss Blandish, which barfed out George Orwell.
    Chase was trying to out-do American hard-boiled detective fiction, and, until Mickey Spillane came along, I guess he did.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  213. whoever says: • Website
    @Jonathan Mason

    Sure lower class Brits get into lots of drunken brawls but they tend to involve fist fights instead of gun battles.
     
    My brother-in-law who is a cop in the largely Muslim city of Bradford told me many years ago that the local lads tended to fight with fists, but the "Pakis" often used knives, resulting in worse injuries.

    I think the English crime novel started in earnest with Sherlock Holmes, and then the Murder at the Vicarage type of mystery story was developed by Agatha Christie.

    There were some famous English murderers, but on close examination, some were expatriate Americans. For example W.C. Minor.

    England has had a few serial killers like Jack the Ripper, the Moors Murderers, a young couple who tortured and killed children, and The Yorkshire Ripper (Peter Sutcliffe) who killed prostitutes and female students. Along with 50,000 other men in the target area, I was personally investigated for these crimes, but soon eliminated as I had been out of the country for at least one of them. The investigation continued for years, quite ineptly, but eventually he was caught accidentally.

    Fred West and his wife Rosemary killed at least a dozen young women in Western England after torturing and dismembering them. Most of the bodies were buried in his back yard. West and his wife were parted by death when he committed suicide while in prison on remand, so he was never convicted. However his wife was convicted of 10 murders.

    Physician Harold Shipman is estimated to have killed as many as 250 of his patients, most of them old women, by injecting them with heroin. He also committed suicide in prison in 2004. The inquest into his death found that his suicide could not have been predicted. Who would have thunk it?

    Over the decades there have been quite a few famous English murderers. Most of them either killed young women for purposes of rape and then concealment of the crime, or else they killed their wives.

    There have also been children who killed children including one female child killer called Mary Bell. As a girl of 11, Mary killed two little boys. Another pair of boys called Venables and Thompson abducted and tortured and killed a two year old boy called James Bulger in Liverpool.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Bell

    Since the arrival of an increased number of immigrants from the 1990's onwards, the traditional English murderer has largely been supplanted by imported talent committing spectacular, but pointless murders.

    The old radio series,The Black Museum, produced in London but broadcast over Radio Luxembourg, hosted by Orson Welles, showcased a lot of sensational British crimes of its era, such as the torture-rape murders committed by Neville Heath. His story was dramatized as “The Pink Powder Puff.”

    As far as British crime novels go, they aren’t all the Agatha Christie type. Consider James Hadley Chase, prolific and hugely successful author of stories full of graphic violence and sexual sadism, starting with 1939′s No Orchids for Miss Blandish, which barfed out George Orwell.
    Chase was trying to out-do American hard-boiled detective fiction, and, until Mickey Spillane came along, I guess he did.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  214. @Jack D
    LOL - everyone else's pet criminal is guilty but YOUR pet criminal is innocent. I have no idea whether Smart really did or did not do what she was tried and convicted of doing but superficially the story sounds exactly like what a manipulative woman seeking to get out of a marriage might do. At the very least, she freely admits to sleeping with a 15 year old so she does not seem to be a person of good character.

    So a 16+ year old boy who seduces a married woman is a person of good character? Before Flynn met Smart, he had served time in a juvenile prison and in a rehab center. Since released, he ran with the Fowler gang and committed many burglaries. Before Gregg was put into the ground, Flynn and the rest of the Fowler gang had broke into a warehouse. Flynn was a harden criminal while Smart was a naive woman. With his long time friend, Cecila Pierce by his side, they played her like a sap. Flynn only seduced her to find out if they had anything valuable to steal and how to get in.
    Flynn is tall and has a deep voice and Charlie Manson eyes. In an interview with Diane Sawyer, he should he was an expert pick up artist.
    Gregg did not die on his knees begging for mercy. He had over powered them. The physical evidence and the testimony of the two killers prove this.
    Flynn said in court Smart never told her and he never told her.
    Since we are talking about writers and their pet criminals, Flynn has been idolized by the media. He has always been described in ways that are homoerotic. Even the parole board wished him a happy birthday!
    If you look into this case, you will explain her innocence better than I ca. The movie Liberty Valance was wrong the facts are better than the narrative…er…legend.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  215. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Jonathan Mason

    I found the header funny: “Tennessee Church Shooting Suspect Is A Sudanese Bodybuilder”
    Why is it important to mention he was a bodybuilder?
     
    Many bodybuilders use steroid drugs which can cause behavioral changes?

    Many bodybuilders use steroid drugs which can cause behavioral changes?

    That’s true, but our masters are very down on things like getting strong, and since the killer isn’t White [and can't be criticised on racial grounds], why let a chance to blackwash bodybuilding go begging?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  216. @Johann Ricke
    Speaking of pet criminals, Germany's importation of large numbers of Muslim refugees of unknown quality may have something to do with the humbling of both the Christian Democrats and the Social Democrats in the just-completed elections:

    Although Angela Merkel's Christian Democrats have lost 9 percent compared to the last elections, her party has yet again become the largest party in Germany's parliament today. Merkel's CDU won 32.5 percent of the vote. That's significantly less than four years ago, but because Germany's electorate is more divided than ever before, it's enough to make her chancellor once more.

    Well, if she's able to form a coalition with the liberal Free Democrats and the Greens, that is, who finished the day with respectively 10.5 and 9.4 percent of the vote.

    For Merkel, the results will leave a bitter taste in her mouth; not only because she has lost support and now needs other parties to form a coalition government, but also because she now has a competitor to her right. For the first time in decades, a rightwing populist party has won enough votes to get into the Bundestag. Alternative für Deutschland, which is routinely depicted as 'racist' in American media, won 13.5 percent of the vote making AfD Germany's third largest party.

    The second largest party is, who else?, the social democrats of the SPD. However, if Merkel is somewhat disappointed, today truly was a day from hell for the SPD and its leader Martin Schulz. The SPD ended the day with a mere 20.2 percent of the vote. That's the worst result for the social democrats since the end of the Second World War. As a result, Schulz has already announced that he is not willing to form a coalition with Merkel.
     

    In August I predicted (on another thread, obviously) that the AfD would get 20% in Dresden. In fact they got 22% there, and well over 30% in the surrounding electoral districts. They are now the leading party in Saxony.

    This is VERY big news, and yet Steve refuses to give us a thread about it, and goes on interminably about black issues of one kind or another. Am I the only one to think that his particular bees are not only in his bonnet, but have flown off with it?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  217. BB753 says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    I found the header funny: “Tennessee Church Shooting Suspect Is A Sudanese Bodybuilder”
    Why is it important to mention he was a bodybuilder?
     
    Many bodybuilders use steroid drugs which can cause behavioral changes?

    Many police officers also use steroids. Does that make them trigger-happy? Nobody wants to go there.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  218. @Big Bill
    Don't forget the utter obliviousness of the upper castes. In my youth, I thought Marie Antoinette was being deliberately cruel when she said, "let them eat cake". She wasn't.

    There is a modern equivalent of “Let them eat cake” (which Marie Antoinette never actually said, BTW), and I hear it one the business shows when they discuss the impending disappearance of McDonald’s type jobs: “No one wants those kind of jobs anyway.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Uh, yes she did, but the actual meaning as well as the context is lost on people today. In proper context, the "cake" was the black soot that caked off from the frying pot in the fire or oven when its extremely overheated. Antoinette's response was to the general question of what to do about the starving peasants, those who had to pay the bulk of all the taxes in France during the Ancien Regime (all nobility and clergy were completely exempt from paying all taxes).

    In other words she wasn't saying for the peasants to eat a bunch of Duncan Hines. She was saying "go eat the burnt crap off of your ovens from the fire, you've got plenty of that to eat so it's all good."

    The comment is basically a double F to the starving peasants.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  219. @Bragadocious
    If you read the British media, you'll see that their media/chattering classes make quite a fuss over Brits caught up in the American justice system. Let's see, we had nanny Louise Woodward, who was of course innocent of everything. Same thing with Guantanamo Brit Shaker Aamer, who was minding his own business on that Afghan battlefield until the incompetent Yanks threw him in the hole. And my personal favorite is "British grandmother" (they really call her that) Linda Carty, who's now on death row in Texas for slashing a Hispanic woman to death.

    Carty may fairly be called the British "Hurricane Carty." These were (or are) all cause celebres in Britain, with lots of politicians and deep thinkers either demanding new trials or immediate releases. Because the Yanks apparently don't know what they're doing, and that mean old death penalty.

    A British person was quoted as saying re Woodward that he distrusted the Massachusetts court system because it was “the home of the witch trials.” (This was after she was convicted but before she was set free.) Despite much competition over the last twenty years, that might still be the stupidest comment I have ever seen in print.

    Of course, many Americans feel the same way about Amanda Knox, although I think she might actually be innocent. (But I heard so many contradictory claims in that case that I eventually I gave up on trying to figure out the truth. Even if she really is guilty, the prosecutor certainly said and did some strange things that no one in the Woodward case ever did.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bragadocious
    Wow that is quite a quote on the Woodward case. Reveals a lot about the British mentality re their lost colony of America. (Of course, as we know, the people burning witches in Salem were Brits, not Americans. The vast majority were almost certainly born in Britain). So this British pillock is savaging his own people, which makes me laugh on this Tuesday morning.

    As for Knox, I don't think any high profile American stuck up for her, with the possible exception of one Donald Trump. Which is another feather in his red baseball cap to be sure.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  220. @James Kabala
    A British person was quoted as saying re Woodward that he distrusted the Massachusetts court system because it was "the home of the witch trials." (This was after she was convicted but before she was set free.) Despite much competition over the last twenty years, that might still be the stupidest comment I have ever seen in print.

    Of course, many Americans feel the same way about Amanda Knox, although I think she might actually be innocent. (But I heard so many contradictory claims in that case that I eventually I gave up on trying to figure out the truth. Even if she really is guilty, the prosecutor certainly said and did some strange things that no one in the Woodward case ever did.)

    Wow that is quite a quote on the Woodward case. Reveals a lot about the British mentality re their lost colony of America. (Of course, as we know, the people burning witches in Salem were Brits, not Americans. The vast majority were almost certainly born in Britain). So this British pillock is savaging his own people, which makes me laugh on this Tuesday morning.

    As for Knox, I don’t think any high profile American stuck up for her, with the possible exception of one Donald Trump. Which is another feather in his red baseball cap to be sure.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Well you know, Amanda Knox is a straight white woman who was hooked up with a white man. Where's the Narrative, Who/Whom in that one?
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Wonder whatever happened to Amanda Knox? Just disappeared. Probably no films going to be made about her anytime soon.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  221. Rapparee says:
    @anonymouslee
    the first wildly popular "making a murderer" was about the dramatic tension in being able to easily shift the viewers feelings from "guilty" to "framed" and back again.

    you may be able to guess how this was accomplished: imo it's clear the accused were both guilty and framed. unfortunately, that's still somewhat a dirty little secret about how the sausage is made. I think people don't find this intuitive because in drama someone innocent is usually framed for sinister reasons while in real life someone guilty did too good a job of cleaning up the hard evidence juries now demand.

    OJ for example was the victim of planted evidence. Why, when he was clearly guilty? I don't know but perhaps it's just standard operating procedure for some departments.

    “OJ for example was the victim of planted evidence. Why, when he was clearly guilty?”

    Easy to answer- he wasn’t the victim of planted evidence. The “frame-up” story was ludicrous and transparent nonsense cooked up by O.J.’s desperate lawyers because the evidence against him was too overwhelming to refute. Unfortunately, the spectacularly incompetent prosecutors barely bothered to dispute this whacky idea in their closing statements, and the low-IQ jury bought it hook, line, and sinker.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  222. JMcG says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Guns don't cause crime, people do.

    I think the point is that one is much less likely to bring fists to a gunfight. That’s what I got out of it anyway.
    While in high school I would sometimes work weekends in a carwash owned by the father of a friend. This place was in a heavily mobbed up section of a big eastern city.
    When I ran the vacuum I noticed that maybe a third of the cars driven by men had a pistol under the seat.
    Made me much more tolerant of being cut off while driving around there.
    Cheers

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonguy

    While in high school I would sometimes work weekends in a carwash owned by the father of a friend. This place was in a heavily mobbed up section of a big eastern city.
    When I ran the vacuum I noticed that maybe a third of the cars driven by men had a pistol under the seat.
     
    In the 1980s, there were a lot of shooting incidents on Texas big city freeways. The state was booming and attracting rust belt guys who drive like massholes, shooting the bird, etc, from high gun control states, to a good old boy environment with an honor culture and frequently armed in their vehicles.

    There was a bit of commentary at the time on this culture class phenomenon.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  223. anonguy says:
    @JMcG
    I think the point is that one is much less likely to bring fists to a gunfight. That's what I got out of it anyway.
    While in high school I would sometimes work weekends in a carwash owned by the father of a friend. This place was in a heavily mobbed up section of a big eastern city.
    When I ran the vacuum I noticed that maybe a third of the cars driven by men had a pistol under the seat.
    Made me much more tolerant of being cut off while driving around there.
    Cheers

    While in high school I would sometimes work weekends in a carwash owned by the father of a friend. This place was in a heavily mobbed up section of a big eastern city.
    When I ran the vacuum I noticed that maybe a third of the cars driven by men had a pistol under the seat.

    In the 1980s, there were a lot of shooting incidents on Texas big city freeways. The state was booming and attracting rust belt guys who drive like massholes, shooting the bird, etc, from high gun control states, to a good old boy environment with an honor culture and frequently armed in their vehicles.

    There was a bit of commentary at the time on this culture class phenomenon.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  224. Eagle Eye says:
    @Steve Sailer
    The lower half of British society gets in more brawls than the lower half of white American society.

    The lower half of British society gets in more brawls than the lower half of white American society.

    Definitely true. There is much more casual violence, “muggings” etc. in Britain. Principal reasons are:

    1) The long absence of a gun culture.
    2) The erosion of cautious respect for others – one deals differently with strangers if even one in twenty carries.
    3) The general breakdown of all social conventions since WW I, including the internal collapse of the established Church of England.
    4) Longstanding and blatant class divisions.
    5) Betrayal of the old “working class” by sub-standard schools. Grammar schools – the traditional path to success for smart “working class” kids were systematically destroyed by an alliance of the well-off and successful leftists disappointed in the lacking revolutionary fervor of the working class. All of the fashionable classes send their children to fee-paying or special public schools.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  225. @whorefinder
    As Hollywood learned during the Great Depression---"STICKS NIX HICK PIX"----people desire escapism from the misery of their lives. This is why the most popular movies of that time period were comedies about mega-rich folks with petty marriage problems, or else exciting action films of either the Western or law enforcement/gangster variety, or Mickey Mouse or fantasy films. (Occasionally they could work in some social commentary---My Man Godfrey was a hit---but mostly the hits avoided preaching or realism).

    Hollywood acknowledged this in Sullivan's Travels, where the director learns that, despite his belief that the people want movies that talk about the struggle of the working man, they prefer cartoons and comedies to give them escape from their hard lives.

    People desire escapism, hence why the murder-mystery novel was huge among those who suffer from very little crime.

    Exactly. Famous line by Louis B. Mayer applies to Sullivan’s Travels “If you want to send a message, try Western Union.”

    And its no accident that the Golden Age of Classic Hollywood (ca.1930-60′s) is one of the best in US cinema. Very little socially driven movies a la leftwing agenda, at least not explicitly.

    Maybe, just maybe, in addition to wanting escapist feel good films, most people simply aren’t politically active and don’t want to be preached at in their entertainment. And, perhaps they also don’t want that specific brand of politics in their entertainment (e.g. leftist propaganda).

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  226. @Bragadocious
    Wow that is quite a quote on the Woodward case. Reveals a lot about the British mentality re their lost colony of America. (Of course, as we know, the people burning witches in Salem were Brits, not Americans. The vast majority were almost certainly born in Britain). So this British pillock is savaging his own people, which makes me laugh on this Tuesday morning.

    As for Knox, I don't think any high profile American stuck up for her, with the possible exception of one Donald Trump. Which is another feather in his red baseball cap to be sure.

    Well you know, Amanda Knox is a straight white woman who was hooked up with a white man. Where’s the Narrative, Who/Whom in that one?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bragadocious
    There were plenty of narratives. She implicated a black man but got the wrong guy. Then it emerged that another black man actually committed the murder, and he went to prison. But that wasn't enough for the British press. They still wanted Foxy Knoxy's scalp. They didn't get it, so they're still bitter. This was an endlessly fascinating story, sadly ignored by most of the U.S. media.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  227. @Harry Baldwin
    There is a modern equivalent of "Let them eat cake" (which Marie Antoinette never actually said, BTW), and I hear it one the business shows when they discuss the impending disappearance of McDonald's type jobs: "No one wants those kind of jobs anyway."

    Uh, yes she did, but the actual meaning as well as the context is lost on people today. In proper context, the “cake” was the black soot that caked off from the frying pot in the fire or oven when its extremely overheated. Antoinette’s response was to the general question of what to do about the starving peasants, those who had to pay the bulk of all the taxes in France during the Ancien Regime (all nobility and clergy were completely exempt from paying all taxes).

    In other words she wasn’t saying for the peasants to eat a bunch of Duncan Hines. She was saying “go eat the burnt crap off of your ovens from the fire, you’ve got plenty of that to eat so it’s all good.”

    The comment is basically a double F to the starving peasants.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  228. @Bragadocious
    Wow that is quite a quote on the Woodward case. Reveals a lot about the British mentality re their lost colony of America. (Of course, as we know, the people burning witches in Salem were Brits, not Americans. The vast majority were almost certainly born in Britain). So this British pillock is savaging his own people, which makes me laugh on this Tuesday morning.

    As for Knox, I don't think any high profile American stuck up for her, with the possible exception of one Donald Trump. Which is another feather in his red baseball cap to be sure.

    Wonder whatever happened to Amanda Knox? Just disappeared. Probably no films going to be made about her anytime soon.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  229. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Well you know, Amanda Knox is a straight white woman who was hooked up with a white man. Where's the Narrative, Who/Whom in that one?

    There were plenty of narratives. She implicated a black man but got the wrong guy. Then it emerged that another black man actually committed the murder, and he went to prison. But that wasn’t enough for the British press. They still wanted Foxy Knoxy’s scalp. They didn’t get it, so they’re still bitter. This was an endlessly fascinating story, sadly ignored by most of the U.S. media.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  230. Calj35 says:
    @Bubba
    Elites like William Buckley, Norman Mailer and William Styron were never literally "mugged by reality" (WFB's phrase) like normal NYC folks every day. Hence their vocal support for a disastrous, virtual signaling pet project that they did not understand. And it sure led to lenient sentences by Judge Bruce Wright (a.k.a. "Let 'Em Loose Bruce") for hardened, sadistic criminals and the subsequent horrible deaths & injuries for the general public when these criminals were soon released. NYC had a huge "white flight" as a result of Messrs. Buckley, Mailer and Stryon advocating an unproven, strange social experiment that was coupled with insane policies by a very liberal Republican Mayor Lindsey (who appointed Judge "Let 'Em Loose" Bruce Wright).

    There was one writer of that era who had no need for human pets and had no illusions about the “rehabilitation” of violent criminals-Truman Capote. In a great many interviews on the subject, he was adamant that society’s response to murder should be relatively swift execution or lifetime incarceration of the convicted perpetrator. Of course, he had somewhat personal and financial reasons for seeing that two particular murderers did not get the benefit of the absurd system we have today where the criminal can almost indefinitely prolong his punishment. But, I think Capote had been more than sufficiently “mugged by reality” during his lifetime to recognize a sob story or other indefensible excuse when he heard one.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The evidence is clear — but often ignored
The unspoken statistical reality of urban crime over the last quarter century.
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
The major media overlooked Communist spies and Madoff’s fraud. What are they missing today?
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?