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Commenter notsaying observes:

We [Americans] are still strikingly unable to process the thought that changing facts on the ground re immigration may require a change in our laws and regulations — as well as our expectations and attitudes. The ideas that many American have that because we used to take in lots of people we must always do so and that because illegal immigration is bad that therefore all legal immigration is good are very strong.

It would be hugely beneficial if Americans realized they could change their minds about policies going forward without admitting they were wrong in the past. We’d have better policies in the future if pundits could come out and say, I was in favor of X in the past and I was right, but now conditions have changed, so I no longer favor X.

In particular, we’d be better off with more Declare-Victory-and-Go-Home decisions. Vastly increasing immigration has done wonders for availability of ethnic food, but the marginal returns on that have been diminishing steadily. Why not declare victory and go home?

 
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  1. Er, uh, same-sex marriage?

    Politicos have been falling over each other admitting they were wrong, wrong oh so wrong about one of humanity’s oldest institutions. Or transgender rights.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    For most people it's harder (although not impossible) to make a strong "I was right then for believing what I did but things have changed" argument for same-sex marriage than it is for immigration, primarily because most people today simply do not understand that arguments against SSM can be more complex than "muh bible" and "gays are icky." In fairness, those are essentially what most anti-SSM arguments boil down to in practice.
    , @Anon
    "Politicos have been falling over each other admitting they were wrong, wrong oh so wrong about one of humanity’s oldest institutions. Or transgender rights."

    Politicos are whores of the super-elites, and the masses have no sense of history or heritage in Amnesiarica. For the politicos, it's about serving the elites. For the masses, it's about following the fashion as the new passion. Since the masses have been brainwashed with homo-holiness, politicos must now go along with the homo stuff to serve both the super-elites and the dumb masses.

    People without a sense of the past and heritage will give up everything.
    It is a sense of memory that makes you value something and prize it.

    If you were given a vase and told that it once belonged to your grandparents, you would see value in it for familial, cultural, historical, and personal reasons. But if you had no memory of the vase's past significance, it is just another vase and you don't care if you throw it out or someone else takes it. It is just a generic product that is interchangeable.

    America is about Amnesia. Nobody remembers anything. Since they have no sense of the past, they have no sense of owning anything or anything belonging to them.
    So, who cares if whole chunks of America goes to foreigners and immigrants. White Americans have no sense of discovery, conquest, settlement, and development. And what little memory that remains has been smeared with PC cries of 'genocide', slavery, oppression, and etc. as if only white folks did 'bad stuff' throughout history.
    Using that logic, blacks don't deserve Africa since they committed so many horrors there. Chinese don't deserve China since Chinese have done terrible things to one another and others in China. Ridiculous.

    A nation that reforms itself is good. But a nation that reinvents itself is nuts because it erases all past memory. Without memory, things have no value. (Jews don't reinvent themselves as non-Jews. They remain Jews and have done so 3,500 yrs. Even when many Jews marry non-Jews, kids grow up as Jewish. Gentile wombs are used as wombs for Jewish kids. Jews win because they maintain their sense of Jewish past and heritage with pride and righteousness.)

    It is why the man in MEMENTO has to constantly finds ways to remember stuff. Without memory, he's nothing. And if he has any meaning left in life, it's through the memory of his dead wife. Of course, some clever guy manipulates his memory and happenstance so that he ends up killing people who had nothing to do with his wife's rape and murder. He is used as a cuck. He thinks he is serving the memory of his wife's death but he is only serving the agendas of other people.

    Gee, sound familiar? Why did US mess up Iraq? Uh.. Hussein had something to do with 9/11? And how did 80% of Americans come to feel this way? Who manipulates the media and government?
    Americans have memory, no sense of news and truth. They just go along with whatever is featured on the TV. And the TV is manipulated by men who are not unlike the corrupt cop who messes with the mind of the hero of MEMENTO.
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  2. Leftist conservative [AKA "fighter_against_neoliberalism"] says: • Website

    It would be hugely beneficial if Americans realized they could change their minds about policies going forward without admitting they were wrong in the past.

    Indeed. You have to wonder how many liberals are starting to doubt whether blacks are the same as whites, whether immigration is good, whether or not liberal dogma demonizes whites and white males.

    I think we agree there.

    But what about the proposition that Capital is behind mass immigration, and what about the idea that american liberalism/multiculturalism is merely an ideological tool for Capital to grow profits?
    What about the idea that liberals are not really the enemy, and that Capital created liberal dogma for its own benefit?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Threecranes
    "What about the idea that liberals are not really the enemy, and that Capital created liberal dogma for its own benefit?"

    Yes, I believe you're onto something there.

    The dogma of liberalism is designed to push the emotional buttons of a certain kind of person. The right words expressing the correct sentiments elicits an automatic response from a person who wants to see themselves as an impartial good samaritan.

    And the same can be said for conservative dogma which appeals to those who see themselves as independent, capable agents.

    Both parties have crafted their messages to play upon the ego's idealized self-image of their respective targets.

    What better way to control your target than to divert their anger into passionate squabbles over meaningless bones of contention such as transexual boy's use of girl's bathrooms, claims for reparations and the "slaughter of black youth"? Reminiscent of Gulliver's encounter with the Lilliputians/Blefuscus warring over whether to break open the big end or the little end of a hardboiled egg. Meanwhile, Finance rolls on.
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  3. njguy73 says:

    “You can always count on Americans to do the right thing – after they’ve tried everything else.” -
    Winston Churchill

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    "When the facts change, I change my mind. What do you do?" http://quoteinvestigator.com/2011/07/22/keynes-change-mind/
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  4. Alain says:

    Seems like, if we have a “living constitution” ,we might be able to see our way to a “living immigration policy”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @njguy73
    Yeah. If they're living, they can immigrate.
    , @Jack Hanson
    You mean how the 14thAmd is the Left's "Whatever I want it to mean whenever I want it to mean it" isn't enough for you?

    Put down the pipe.

    , @AndrewR
    The left won't accept anything less than European-Americans ceasing to exist as a distinct group (or set of groups) in any way.
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  5. We are quite capable of doing this on some issues – it all depends on framing things right. “Cold War mentality” became D shorthand to backhandedly acknowledge that R’s were right about anti-Communism, but that things had changed.

    If nativists had any framing skills whatsoever, they could coin the term “sweatshop mentality” to taunt those think we should stay in the Ellis Island days forever.

    Anchor your adversaries’ position to a term that creates negative emotions – “Cold War”…no fun! “sweatshop”…ewww!

    Read More
    • Agree: slumber_j
    • Replies: @Tracy

    We are quite capable of doing this on some issues – it all depends on framing things right. “Cold War mentality” became D shorthand to backhandedly acknowledge that R’s were right about anti-Communism, but that things had changed.

    If nativists had any framing skills whatsoever, they could coin the term “sweatshop mentality” to taunt those think we should stay in the Ellis Island days forever.
     
    This nails it. It's sad, but most people think what they're told to think, and are generally capable of "thinking" only in terms of sound bytes. Take your cause, re-frame it, come up with an easily "meme-able" word or phrase to package it, and repeat the meme as often as you can, pairing it with people and things that are considered "cool." If you own the channels of culture, you can also get celebrities in on it, get some "art" going, throw some big "happenings," and yer done.

    Someone famous, I forget who, said that it was "Will and Grace" that changed Americans' view about gay "marriage," and I think they're right. That's how malleable and not grounded in principles most people are. Most people don't have premises they reason from; they have those prepackaged sound bytes handed to them by the people who run the media, and their "arguments" in defense of them consist of sarcasm, derision, snark, and whatever else amounts to a teenager rolling his eyes .

    Whattaworld.
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  6. JerseyGuy says:

    I think one issue in America is that we are able to isolate ourselves from mass immigration by continuously moving away from it. Or at least we could in the past.

    That is one of the drawbacks of having such a huge country. There is the perception that there is an infinite amount of resources (and an infinite amount of land) that can be consumed.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    I think one issue in America is that we are able to isolate ourselves from mass immigration by continuously moving away from it.

    The Western Europeans can't do this and yet they still accept mass immigration being shoved into their laps.
    , @Anonymous
    Absolutely. There are still places out west that are barely populated. From what I can tell, a prevailing 'move if need be' attitude still exists out west. How these places will introduce productive localized farming is beyond me. If there is a will there will probably be a way.
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  7. njguy73 says:
    @Alain
    Seems like, if we have a "living constitution" ,we might be able to see our way to a "living immigration policy".

    Yeah. If they’re living, they can immigrate.

    Read More
    • Replies: @snorlax
    Typical nativist, trying to deny the dead their right to vote and get sent Social Security checks.
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  8. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    What was right for the past might be wrong for the present. Things are not the same as they were but have changed. Immigrants helped build the country but today the country has been built. It’s different now.

    Read More
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  9. Mike1 says:

    Legal immigration, by definition, is the combined opinion of the population of a country. It is the structured rules set up by the democratic process. Illegal immigration, and any end runs around immigration laws, is the opposite.
    Legal immigration is good if you are OK with the democratic process. This discussion is veering into pure nativism.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lugash
    Thanks for the civics lesson and policing the blog comments, super-skilled foreign business man.
    , @Neil Templeton
    "This discussion is veering into pure nativism."

    Yes. Because that's where the higher grade ore is found. Maybe it will never be needed. But when a society appears to navigate by the stars of a cultural narrative formed only years before and transmitted through cinema and popular fiction, it is best to have a bit of leverage wedded to bedrock as a fallback.
    , @JohnnyWalker123
    I'm glad people have a high opinion of my family.

    I just don't want them moving into my house.
    , @Shine a Light
    Excuse me but part of the democratic process is being able to make your case to the public without shaming words like "nativism" being thrown around. Opponents of mass immigration have every right to try to convince their fellow Americans that even legal immigration should be kept to a minimum. Most immigration, legal or illegal, is simply a tool of class warfare.

    "Nativists" must make the case that politicians taking care of their citizen's interests first is exactly analogous to parents looking after the interests of their own children before those of children in the Congo, for example.
    , @Erik Sieven
    When democracy would work like that parties, parliaments etc. would be unnecessary, because there would be no need for any debates. Only thing needed would be elections and police / justice to enforce the laws
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  10. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @njguy73
    “You can always count on Americans to do the right thing - after they've tried everything else.” -
    Winston Churchill

    “When the facts change, I change my mind. What do you do?” http://quoteinvestigator.com/2011/07/22/keynes-change-mind/

    Read More
    • Replies: @njguy73
    Yes, that's the English way of thinking. The American way is "Don't confuse me with facts," or "We make our own reality."
    , @Steve Sailer
    It seems as if English pundits change their views more than American pundits. My vague impression is that it's a pretty standard move in British press circles for a columnist to change sides: e.g., Paul Johnson, Christopher Hitchens, and a lot of people who aren't as well known in America.
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  11. I’ve got some VERY GOOD news.

    Trump has come out strongly against the H-1B visa again. It seems like someone (Jeff Sessions probably) talked some sense into him. Trump also called on Disney to rehire the workers they replaced with the H1b.

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2015/10/29/exclusive-donald-trump-rights-ship-on-immigration-demands-disney-rehire-workers-replaced-by-cheap-foreign-labor-calls-rubio-silicon-valleys-puppet/

    BNN: The media has been filled with stories about companies flying in low-wage H-1B workers to replace American workers in tech jobs. Adding insult to injury, these American workers have been forced to train their replacements. If you were President, would you put a stop to this practice?

    DT: Day one. This is why I got into this race. Because the everyday working person in this country is getting screwed. Lobbyists write the rules to benefit the rich and powerful. They buy off Senators like Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL)79%
    to help them get rich at the expense of working Americans by using H-1B visas–so called “high tech” visas–to replace American workers in all sorts of solid middle class jobs. If I am President, I will not issue any H-1B visas to companies that replace American workers and my Department of Justice will pursue action against them.

    BNN: Hundreds of workers at Disney were forced to train their foreign replacements. But while Florida Senator Nelson rallied to their cause, Senator Rubio did not. While Nelson has called for an investigation, Rubio has not. While Nelson has called to reduce H-1Bs, Rubio has demanded more. Senator Rubio has been the top promoter in Congress for expanding the H-1B program even though millions American tech workers are out of jobs. Rubio’s new bill triples H-1Bs and has zero protections for American workers. Advocates for tech workers said Rubio’s bill would “destroy” the U.S. tech workforce. Rubio’s bill is even endorsed by the CEO of Disney. What do you think of Rubio’s bill?

    DT: It’s a disaster. It would allow any company in America to replace any worker with cheaper foreign labor. It legalizes job theft. It gives companies the legal right to pass over Americans, displace Americans, or directly replace Americans for good-paying middle class jobs. More than 80 percent of these H-1Bs are paid less than the average wage. Senator Rubio works for the lobbyists, not for Americans. That is why he is receiving more money from Silicon Valley than any other candidate in this race. He is their puppet.

    BNN: During the debate, Senator Rubio listed several protections he thought American workers should receive. But the New York Times said Rubio’s bill would does the opposite of what he said, and does not contain a single one of the protections he mentioned. Instead, his bill simply triples the number of H-1B visas given as low-wage substitutes to corporations. Does Rubio have a problem with the truth?

    DT: Yes, Senator Rubio is incapable of telling the truth. He should be disqualified for dishonesty alone.

    BNN: Do you think agree with Senator Rubio that there is a shortage of talented Americans?

    DT: Rubio is dead wrong. America produces the best and brightest in the world. It’s time to stand up for own students–many of whom are racked with terrible, terrible debt and facing a disastrous job market. We are graduating two times more students in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) than find jobs in those fields every year. We have a surplus of talented Americans and we need them to get jobs first.

    BNN: What should happen with the Florida workers who have been replaced?

    DT: I am calling TODAY on Disney to hire back every one of the workers they replaced, and I am calling on Rubio to immediately rescind his sponsorship of the I-Squared bill and apologize to every Floridian for endorsing it. I am further calling on Rubio to return the money he has received from Silicon Valley CEOs and to donate the money to a charity helping unemployed Americans whose jobs Rubio has helped to destroy.

    I’m back on the Trump trolley.

    Read More
    • Agree: Danindc
    • Replies: @snorlax
    Those sound like prepared responses, not an in-person interview (plus no video), so they were probably written by someone other than Trump. Still uneasy about it.
    , @Former Darfur
    The Trolley Song, of course, is the Gay National Anthem.

    Just saying.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    By the way, how are the trolleys of St Louis faring today? Do they go out to Ferguson?
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  12. Ronald Reagan as Governor of California 1967–1975:
    “Our country and state have a special obligation to work toward the stabilization of our own population so as to credibly lead other parts of the world toward population stabilization.”

    California 1970: 19.9m
    California 2015: 38.7m
    Change x1.94

    Read More
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  13. It’s not just about the candidate. It’s about who the candidates surrounds himself with, as it’s the staff who often write the details of their policies. Most of these Republican (and Democratic) politicians surround themselves with corporate whores, who push for all these foreign workers. Trump seems to be surrounding himself with legitimately anti-immigration conservatives (Sessions, Coulter, etc).

    It’s especially good news that within 24 hours of the debate, Trump turned his ship right.

    Read More
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  14. Luke Lea says: • Website

    Countries – and the politicians who lead them — are like babies: they never want to admit when they are wrong. Even if it means going to war.

    Read More
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  15. snorlax says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    I've got some VERY GOOD news.

    Trump has come out strongly against the H-1B visa again. It seems like someone (Jeff Sessions probably) talked some sense into him. Trump also called on Disney to rehire the workers they replaced with the H1b.


    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2015/10/29/exclusive-donald-trump-rights-ship-on-immigration-demands-disney-rehire-workers-replaced-by-cheap-foreign-labor-calls-rubio-silicon-valleys-puppet/

    BNN: The media has been filled with stories about companies flying in low-wage H-1B workers to replace American workers in tech jobs. Adding insult to injury, these American workers have been forced to train their replacements. If you were President, would you put a stop to this practice?

    DT: Day one. This is why I got into this race. Because the everyday working person in this country is getting screwed. Lobbyists write the rules to benefit the rich and powerful. They buy off Senators like Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL)79%
    to help them get rich at the expense of working Americans by using H-1B visas–so called “high tech” visas–to replace American workers in all sorts of solid middle class jobs. If I am President, I will not issue any H-1B visas to companies that replace American workers and my Department of Justice will pursue action against them.

    BNN: Hundreds of workers at Disney were forced to train their foreign replacements. But while Florida Senator Nelson rallied to their cause, Senator Rubio did not. While Nelson has called for an investigation, Rubio has not. While Nelson has called to reduce H-1Bs, Rubio has demanded more. Senator Rubio has been the top promoter in Congress for expanding the H-1B program even though millions American tech workers are out of jobs. Rubio’s new bill triples H-1Bs and has zero protections for American workers. Advocates for tech workers said Rubio’s bill would “destroy” the U.S. tech workforce. Rubio’s bill is even endorsed by the CEO of Disney. What do you think of Rubio’s bill?

    DT: It’s a disaster. It would allow any company in America to replace any worker with cheaper foreign labor. It legalizes job theft. It gives companies the legal right to pass over Americans, displace Americans, or directly replace Americans for good-paying middle class jobs. More than 80 percent of these H-1Bs are paid less than the average wage. Senator Rubio works for the lobbyists, not for Americans. That is why he is receiving more money from Silicon Valley than any other candidate in this race. He is their puppet.

    BNN: During the debate, Senator Rubio listed several protections he thought American workers should receive. But the New York Times said Rubio’s bill would does the opposite of what he said, and does not contain a single one of the protections he mentioned. Instead, his bill simply triples the number of H-1B visas given as low-wage substitutes to corporations. Does Rubio have a problem with the truth?

    DT: Yes, Senator Rubio is incapable of telling the truth. He should be disqualified for dishonesty alone.

    BNN: Do you think agree with Senator Rubio that there is a shortage of talented Americans?

    DT: Rubio is dead wrong. America produces the best and brightest in the world. It’s time to stand up for own students–many of whom are racked with terrible, terrible debt and facing a disastrous job market. We are graduating two times more students in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) than find jobs in those fields every year. We have a surplus of talented Americans and we need them to get jobs first.

    BNN: What should happen with the Florida workers who have been replaced?

    DT: I am calling TODAY on Disney to hire back every one of the workers they replaced, and I am calling on Rubio to immediately rescind his sponsorship of the I-Squared bill and apologize to every Floridian for endorsing it. I am further calling on Rubio to return the money he has received from Silicon Valley CEOs and to donate the money to a charity helping unemployed Americans whose jobs Rubio has helped to destroy.
     
    I'm back on the Trump trolley.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ln3sNwccHxI

    Those sound like prepared responses, not an in-person interview (plus no video), so they were probably written by someone other than Trump. Still uneasy about it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Yes, this doesn't sound like the Donald Trump in the debate last night who didn't want to criticize Rubio or Zuckerberg. He passed up a great opportunity to blast them both. He'd better get serious because Rubio is his main opposition now, not Bush.
    , @JohnnyWalker123
    I'm sure some Trump aide talked to Senator Jeff Sessions, who told them exactly what to write.

    Trump doesn't seem like someone who knows much about immigration or has thought much about the issue. However, it's very heartening that he's allowing anti-immigration intellectuals to shape his policies. As Sailer has said, personnel is policy. If Trump is going to delegate his immigration policies to people who give these type of responses, then I'm all in for Trump.

    I do wish that Trump spent more time thinking about immigration, but the fact is that Trump could've reversed himself if he wanted. For him to double down on an anti-immigration hardline shows he's comfortable letting Sessions craft his stance on immigration, which is excellent.

    Most of these candidates don't really create the details of their policies anyway. It's usually lobbyists and consultants, who almost all are funded by the same group of donors, who take care of the details. This is why almost all the candidates end up with similar positions on most issues. As a self-funding candidate and someone who is legitimately a maverick outsider, Trump is not under their influence. My sense is that Trump is filling his campaign with grassroots non-sellout conservatives, who are directing him to men like Sessions.

    Trump also spoke out against the H1b at the Nevada rally, which shows he's sort of beggining to understand the issue.

    For now, I'll give Trump an A- on immigration. Huckabee, Santorum, and Sanders get a C. The rest get Fs. Maybe I'll give Rubio a F-, just because he wants an amnesty and a massive expansion in the H1b. Rubio is just truly awful.
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  16. snorlax says:
    @njguy73
    Yeah. If they're living, they can immigrate.

    Typical nativist, trying to deny the dead their right to vote and get sent Social Security checks.

    Read More
    • Replies: @njguy73
    Why, thank you!
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  17. At a Nevada rally, Trump came out against H1bs replacing American workers.

    He said he’s only for foreign graduates of Harvard, Yale, Princeton, and Stanford staying. Which seems reasonable. Not because those grads should stay, but because the numbers are trivial enough. The overwhelming majority of H1bs (75%) are non-US graduates. Of the remaining 25% H1bs who graduate from US schools, almost all graduate from tier 2 and tier 3 US universities. The number of foreign Ivy graduates is really small, especially since they have smaller STEM departments.

    Between this and the Breitbart interview, I’m happy.

    Hopefully, Sanders will talk more about H1b in the future. If we get really lucky, maybe other Republicans and Democrats will shift their stance on this issue. For now, I think Trump is the most reliable choice.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lugash

    Hopefully, Sanders will talk more about H1b in the future.
     
    I'd love to see it happen, but I doubt it will. Sanders' doesn't have any fire or passion for anything other than income inequality. He's not in the race to win. He could(and should) have gone for the kill against Hilary's email server, but he folded.
    , @JohnnyWalker123
    56:30 minutes into the tape.
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  18. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    The level of delusion on these boards is amazing. People here really think that because 25% of whitey’s red neck and Nordic wing is supporting Trump in *polls* that 1) he may actually win and 2) that he will repeal the H1-B visa laws.

    More delusional: Real soon now, Global Whitey will rise and shut the door on the wogs they formerly enslaved and colonized. They will win elections! Just like in Germany! Just like in Canada where true Canadians finally stood up and …

    None of these things will happen. To reform HI-B, we should abolish the racist law that limits “any nation” to 7.5% of green cards a year. That will allow HI-Bs to apply for jobs at more competitive salaries and lift wages in tech generally (which are not particularly depressed, e.g., Deloitte’s HI-Bs average over 100K in income a year). Right now these visa holders wait 7-9 years for a Green Card.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Why not just require parity of native and H1-B salaries? It's not as good as getting rid of the guestworker visa program entirely, but it would significantly erode the cost advantage of hiring a visa holder over a native worker. Of course, people like me don't think this country needs any more immigration while our real unemployment rate is near 20% and our STEM-trained graduates can't find decent jobs, so long waits for green cards certainly don't concern us.
    , @William Badwhite
    "racist"...lol

    People using "racist" in a non-ironic sense might as well have "I am not a serious person" tattooed on their forehead.

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  19. Lugash says:
    @Mike1
    Legal immigration, by definition, is the combined opinion of the population of a country. It is the structured rules set up by the democratic process. Illegal immigration, and any end runs around immigration laws, is the opposite.
    Legal immigration is good if you are OK with the democratic process. This discussion is veering into pure nativism.

    Thanks for the civics lesson and policing the blog comments, super-skilled foreign business man.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mike1
    You are welcome. I can help you out with the concept of "policing the blog comments" too. It refers to an attempt to police how people respond to a post. It is (another definition here) what you did in your response to me.
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  20. SFG says:

    I think you’re giving these guys way too much credit for intellectual honesty. The Republicans need votes from the cheap-labor lobby and the Democrats want non-white voters. Immigration helps the elite and hurts the masses, so it stays. That’s really all there is to it.

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  21. It’s amusing/irritating to me that the libs are always telling us “the Constitution is a living document” with regards to, e.g. gun rights, and we shouldn’t base 21st century policy on what worked for an agrarian society in the 18th century. But when it comes to immigration, well, we’re A Nation of Immigrants and if you dare suggest that maybe we should think about a policy update you must be a Klansman/Nazi/Fascist/(insert BadWhite pejorative).

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    • Replies: @Mr. Blank
    Some of Trump's appeal is undoubtedly due to a segment of the right deciding, in effect, to embrace the idea of a "living Constitution" in order to push conservative policies. I doubt Trump understands this, but I suspect a great number of his supporters are thinking, "well, heck, if the Constitution just means whatever the Dear Leader says it means (as expressed through the government's countless departments and ministries), why not have a Dear Leader who merely directs the state to read OUR favored policies into the text?"
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  22. @Alain
    Seems like, if we have a "living constitution" ,we might be able to see our way to a "living immigration policy".

    You mean how the 14thAmd is the Left’s “Whatever I want it to mean whenever I want it to mean it” isn’t enough for you?

    Put down the pipe.

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  23. We [Americans] are still strikingly unable to process the thought that changing facts on the ground re immigration may require a change in our laws and regulations — as well as our expectations and attitudes. The ideas that many American have that because we used to take in lots of people we must always do so and that because illegal immigration is bad that therefore all legal immigration is good are very strong.

    But when polled, “American” citizens consistently prefer lower rates of both legal and illegal immigration. It is the financial, media and cultural elites that push for open borders. Just because our bought and paid for politicians and media clowns support a particular policy, does not mean that “Americans” do not prefer a different policy. It is likely possible that a pollster can come up with a study that shows that a majority of Americans support “comprehensive immigration reform” because the term is effectively meaningless. If the same poll was changed to “Do you support mass amnesty and continued open immigration?” the poll results from “Americans” would be very different.

    The Elites do not care about marginal returns on immigration because they are taking the skim from the aggregate increased demand, but any losses are socialized. Goldman Sachs, Walmart and McDonalds do not care about the per capita benefit to American citizens as long as their take from the ever increasing pie keeps increasing. Add in those elites who are actually hostile to American culture and society for ideological reasons, and you have the interested parties that determine our current immigration policy.

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    • Agree: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @GW
    The fact Trump's doing so well is evidence enough of Americans sensible distrust of pro-immigration propaganda.
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  24. Lugash says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    At a Nevada rally, Trump came out against H1bs replacing American workers.

    He said he's only for foreign graduates of Harvard, Yale, Princeton, and Stanford staying. Which seems reasonable. Not because those grads should stay, but because the numbers are trivial enough. The overwhelming majority of H1bs (75%) are non-US graduates. Of the remaining 25% H1bs who graduate from US schools, almost all graduate from tier 2 and tier 3 US universities. The number of foreign Ivy graduates is really small, especially since they have smaller STEM departments.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=quB9tfcEM2I&feature=youtu.be

    Between this and the Breitbart interview, I'm happy.

    Hopefully, Sanders will talk more about H1b in the future. If we get really lucky, maybe other Republicans and Democrats will shift their stance on this issue. For now, I think Trump is the most reliable choice.

    Hopefully, Sanders will talk more about H1b in the future.

    I’d love to see it happen, but I doubt it will. Sanders’ doesn’t have any fire or passion for anything other than income inequality. He’s not in the race to win. He could(and should) have gone for the kill against Hilary’s email server, but he folded.

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    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Sanders’ doesn’t have any fire or passion for anything other than income inequality.

    Anyone who's not against immigration is not serious about addressing income inequality or unemployment.

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    Sanders was more aggressive on the campaign trail recently.

    I wouldn't discount the possibility of Sanders calling for an end to the H1b. He's made previous statements showing discomfort with the impact of foreign workers on the American labor market. The real problem with Sanders is that he's pro-amnesty and doesn't seem like he'd be aggressively anti-illegal enough. If we don't have a tough line against illegal immigration, people will continue to overstay their visas or cross the border.

    The point of Sanders talking publicly about immigration is that it shifts the overton window and forces other candidates to shift their stances. So even if he loses, he shifts the debate. It's particularly important to have anti-immigration candidates in the Democratic party, as the party is lacking in these.

    Back last year, the immigration debate was between those who wanted amnesty and those who wanted amnesty + H1b expansion. Now Trump has shifted the debate to the point where Republican politicians talk very little about the "path to citizenship." Hopefully the debate will shift enough where Republican politicians begin to turn against legal immigration too.
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  25. Changing immigration levels doesn’t really have to involve changing our laws, but pretending so illustrates the problem.

    The problem is – and I’m not going to win a popularity contest by saying this – that leading amnesty opponents are charlatans and the anti-amnesty base is pretty much dead weight.

    The proof’s in the pudding: there are millions of illegal aliens in the U.S., hundreds of thousands of them have work permits, Obama has (per one of those leaders, Sessions) constantly thwarted immigration enforcement, Hillary feels free to hire an illegal alien for her campaign, etc. etc. And, if not for the unforeseen actions of one judge, Obama would have in effect legalized millions of illegal aliens.

    If that’s success or an example of competence, one wonders what failure would look like.

    Based on past comments, I fully expect some members of that base to chime in and enable charlatans and deny reality. That’s something the pro-amnesty side never does: they demand performance. And, that’s why they keep winning.

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  26. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    The Republican House just voted in open-borders crank Paul Ryan as Speaker. As far as I can tell, Steve posted nada about the campaign to make Ryan speaker, which, now that it has succeeded, will likely eventually result in the passage of something like Gang of Eight even if the GOP holds the House. Mickey Kaus, on the other hand, was clanging on the alarm on this and urging his readers to call their congressmen to raise hell.

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  27. @JerseyGuy
    I think one issue in America is that we are able to isolate ourselves from mass immigration by continuously moving away from it. Or at least we could in the past.

    That is one of the drawbacks of having such a huge country. There is the perception that there is an infinite amount of resources (and an infinite amount of land) that can be consumed.

    I think one issue in America is that we are able to isolate ourselves from mass immigration by continuously moving away from it.

    The Western Europeans can’t do this and yet they still accept mass immigration being shoved into their laps.

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  28. @snorlax
    Those sound like prepared responses, not an in-person interview (plus no video), so they were probably written by someone other than Trump. Still uneasy about it.

    Yes, this doesn’t sound like the Donald Trump in the debate last night who didn’t want to criticize Rubio or Zuckerberg. He passed up a great opportunity to blast them both. He’d better get serious because Rubio is his main opposition now, not Bush.

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    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    Bush is finished. Carson is still number 2, but his candidacy is a joke and he'll fizzle out eventually.

    Rubio is the man who Trump needs to start hitting hard now. It's going to be more difficult than it was with Bush. This Breitbart/Trump interview is a heartening step in the right direction.
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  29. @Lugash

    Hopefully, Sanders will talk more about H1b in the future.
     
    I'd love to see it happen, but I doubt it will. Sanders' doesn't have any fire or passion for anything other than income inequality. He's not in the race to win. He could(and should) have gone for the kill against Hilary's email server, but he folded.

    Sanders’ doesn’t have any fire or passion for anything other than income inequality.

    Anyone who’s not against immigration is not serious about addressing income inequality or unemployment.

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  30. @snorlax
    Those sound like prepared responses, not an in-person interview (plus no video), so they were probably written by someone other than Trump. Still uneasy about it.

    I’m sure some Trump aide talked to Senator Jeff Sessions, who told them exactly what to write.

    Trump doesn’t seem like someone who knows much about immigration or has thought much about the issue. However, it’s very heartening that he’s allowing anti-immigration intellectuals to shape his policies. As Sailer has said, personnel is policy. If Trump is going to delegate his immigration policies to people who give these type of responses, then I’m all in for Trump.

    I do wish that Trump spent more time thinking about immigration, but the fact is that Trump could’ve reversed himself if he wanted. For him to double down on an anti-immigration hardline shows he’s comfortable letting Sessions craft his stance on immigration, which is excellent.

    Most of these candidates don’t really create the details of their policies anyway. It’s usually lobbyists and consultants, who almost all are funded by the same group of donors, who take care of the details. This is why almost all the candidates end up with similar positions on most issues. As a self-funding candidate and someone who is legitimately a maverick outsider, Trump is not under their influence. My sense is that Trump is filling his campaign with grassroots non-sellout conservatives, who are directing him to men like Sessions.

    Trump also spoke out against the H1b at the Nevada rally, which shows he’s sort of beggining to understand the issue.

    For now, I’ll give Trump an A- on immigration. Huckabee, Santorum, and Sanders get a C. The rest get Fs. Maybe I’ll give Rubio a F-, just because he wants an amnesty and a massive expansion in the H1b. Rubio is just truly awful.

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    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    One of the reasons I trust Trump on immigration is that he doesn't mind hurting the feelings of Mexicans. Candidates like Rubio and Kasich who are so concerned with not offending minorities are going to fold like a cheap umbrella the first time their policies are criticized. Seeking universal approval is a great weakness of Republican politicians.
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  31. @Lugash

    Hopefully, Sanders will talk more about H1b in the future.
     
    I'd love to see it happen, but I doubt it will. Sanders' doesn't have any fire or passion for anything other than income inequality. He's not in the race to win. He could(and should) have gone for the kill against Hilary's email server, but he folded.

    Sanders was more aggressive on the campaign trail recently.

    I wouldn’t discount the possibility of Sanders calling for an end to the H1b. He’s made previous statements showing discomfort with the impact of foreign workers on the American labor market. The real problem with Sanders is that he’s pro-amnesty and doesn’t seem like he’d be aggressively anti-illegal enough. If we don’t have a tough line against illegal immigration, people will continue to overstay their visas or cross the border.

    The point of Sanders talking publicly about immigration is that it shifts the overton window and forces other candidates to shift their stances. So even if he loses, he shifts the debate. It’s particularly important to have anti-immigration candidates in the Democratic party, as the party is lacking in these.

    Back last year, the immigration debate was between those who wanted amnesty and those who wanted amnesty + H1b expansion. Now Trump has shifted the debate to the point where Republican politicians talk very little about the “path to citizenship.” Hopefully the debate will shift enough where Republican politicians begin to turn against legal immigration too.

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    • Replies: @AndrewR
    I hate to be this blunt, and I would LOVE to be wrong about this, but I can't help but think that it is absolutely insane to suggest the Democrats are going to talk advocate for any sort of immigration restriction in this cycle, if not ever again. Please guide me through the logic you used to conclude it's even remotely possible. Even Bernie is not going to call for it because the left has decided that borders are racist and that racists are evil, so it's a non-starter even for an old-school leftie like him.
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  32. @Harry Baldwin
    Yes, this doesn't sound like the Donald Trump in the debate last night who didn't want to criticize Rubio or Zuckerberg. He passed up a great opportunity to blast them both. He'd better get serious because Rubio is his main opposition now, not Bush.

    Bush is finished. Carson is still number 2, but his candidacy is a joke and he’ll fizzle out eventually.

    Rubio is the man who Trump needs to start hitting hard now. It’s going to be more difficult than it was with Bush. This Breitbart/Trump interview is a heartening step in the right direction.

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  33. @JohnnyWalker123
    At a Nevada rally, Trump came out against H1bs replacing American workers.

    He said he's only for foreign graduates of Harvard, Yale, Princeton, and Stanford staying. Which seems reasonable. Not because those grads should stay, but because the numbers are trivial enough. The overwhelming majority of H1bs (75%) are non-US graduates. Of the remaining 25% H1bs who graduate from US schools, almost all graduate from tier 2 and tier 3 US universities. The number of foreign Ivy graduates is really small, especially since they have smaller STEM departments.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=quB9tfcEM2I&feature=youtu.be

    Between this and the Breitbart interview, I'm happy.

    Hopefully, Sanders will talk more about H1b in the future. If we get really lucky, maybe other Republicans and Democrats will shift their stance on this issue. For now, I think Trump is the most reliable choice.

    56:30 minutes into the tape.

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  34. GW says:
    @Clifford Brown

    We [Americans] are still strikingly unable to process the thought that changing facts on the ground re immigration may require a change in our laws and regulations — as well as our expectations and attitudes. The ideas that many American have that because we used to take in lots of people we must always do so and that because illegal immigration is bad that therefore all legal immigration is good are very strong.
     
    But when polled, "American" citizens consistently prefer lower rates of both legal and illegal immigration. It is the financial, media and cultural elites that push for open borders. Just because our bought and paid for politicians and media clowns support a particular policy, does not mean that "Americans" do not prefer a different policy. It is likely possible that a pollster can come up with a study that shows that a majority of Americans support "comprehensive immigration reform" because the term is effectively meaningless. If the same poll was changed to "Do you support mass amnesty and continued open immigration?" the poll results from "Americans" would be very different.

    The Elites do not care about marginal returns on immigration because they are taking the skim from the aggregate increased demand, but any losses are socialized. Goldman Sachs, Walmart and McDonalds do not care about the per capita benefit to American citizens as long as their take from the ever increasing pie keeps increasing. Add in those elites who are actually hostile to American culture and society for ideological reasons, and you have the interested parties that determine our current immigration policy.

    The fact Trump’s doing so well is evidence enough of Americans sensible distrust of pro-immigration propaganda.

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  35. njguy73 says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    "When the facts change, I change my mind. What do you do?" http://quoteinvestigator.com/2011/07/22/keynes-change-mind/

    Yes, that’s the English way of thinking. The American way is “Don’t confuse me with facts,” or “We make our own reality.”

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  36. @JohnnyWalker123
    I'm sure some Trump aide talked to Senator Jeff Sessions, who told them exactly what to write.

    Trump doesn't seem like someone who knows much about immigration or has thought much about the issue. However, it's very heartening that he's allowing anti-immigration intellectuals to shape his policies. As Sailer has said, personnel is policy. If Trump is going to delegate his immigration policies to people who give these type of responses, then I'm all in for Trump.

    I do wish that Trump spent more time thinking about immigration, but the fact is that Trump could've reversed himself if he wanted. For him to double down on an anti-immigration hardline shows he's comfortable letting Sessions craft his stance on immigration, which is excellent.

    Most of these candidates don't really create the details of their policies anyway. It's usually lobbyists and consultants, who almost all are funded by the same group of donors, who take care of the details. This is why almost all the candidates end up with similar positions on most issues. As a self-funding candidate and someone who is legitimately a maverick outsider, Trump is not under their influence. My sense is that Trump is filling his campaign with grassroots non-sellout conservatives, who are directing him to men like Sessions.

    Trump also spoke out against the H1b at the Nevada rally, which shows he's sort of beggining to understand the issue.

    For now, I'll give Trump an A- on immigration. Huckabee, Santorum, and Sanders get a C. The rest get Fs. Maybe I'll give Rubio a F-, just because he wants an amnesty and a massive expansion in the H1b. Rubio is just truly awful.

    One of the reasons I trust Trump on immigration is that he doesn’t mind hurting the feelings of Mexicans. Candidates like Rubio and Kasich who are so concerned with not offending minorities are going to fold like a cheap umbrella the first time their policies are criticized. Seeking universal approval is a great weakness of Republican politicians.

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    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    The real danger is when a candidate doesn't want to hurt the feelings of his major contributors. Many of these candidates are pro-immigration less due to PC than the influence of business interests. Fortunately, Trump is self-funding, which gives him a certain degree of autonomy. He's also politically incorrect, unlike Sanders.

    Trump has come out 5 times against the H1b - in his position paper, twice on Twitter, in this recent Breitbart interview, and during his rally in Nevada. He also says that only foreign H1bs he wants are the graduates of Ivy league schools (whose numbers are trivially small anyway).

    So I'm reasonably optimistic.
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  37. I was able to change my mind to support immigration restriction by noting that yes, we are a nation of immigrants, and the way we’ve been able to manage that successfully is a policy that has ebbed and flowed naturally throughout American history. We’re long overdue for an ebb.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Blank
    Yeah, this was pretty much how Sailer and others managed to change my mind on immigration. If you've grown up marinated in the romantic idea of America as a "nation of immigrants," the soft sell is the most effective: "Policy X, which you strongly support, was a good and wise policy at the time it was adopted. But good and wise people continuously monitor results, and by monitoring the results of Policy X, it is now clear that conditions have changed and the costs greatly outweigh the benefits. A good and wise person would now support a fundamental recalibration of Policy X. This does not deny the past wisdom of Policy X; it merely makes the humble acknowledgement that frail humans cannot foresee all possibilities, and Policy X is not ideal in every situation."

    "It was right then, but wrong now" is a very effective rhetorical technique in the hands of a capable rhetorician.

    , @Travis
    treu, and importantly American immigrants were primarily European...We have no history of massive immigration from Asia and Africa.

    since 1990 we have been admitting 1.1 million legal immigrants each year...if these immigrants were primarily from European nations many of us would have less concern.

    from 1900-1965 90% of the immigrants to America were Europeans , thus they had less impact on our culture and were able to assimilate into American culture.
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  38. @Dave Pinsen
    "When the facts change, I change my mind. What do you do?" http://quoteinvestigator.com/2011/07/22/keynes-change-mind/

    It seems as if English pundits change their views more than American pundits. My vague impression is that it’s a pretty standard move in British press circles for a columnist to change sides: e.g., Paul Johnson, Christopher Hitchens, and a lot of people who aren’t as well known in America.

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    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    Weren't all the original neo-cons (Kristol and Podhoretz srs. etc.) American pundits who changed sides?
    , @Rob McX
    America is a nation of immigrants - white immigrants. They shaped and defined the character of the nation. It's European in terms of laws, civic structure, language, and religion . If any people can be said to have a collective right to anything, the founding stock of America have a right to keep their country as it is. The alternative that's being foisted on them is not a nation of any kind, but a hotch-potch of different races (in perpetual flux due to continuing immigration) elbowing each other at the ethnic spoils trough.
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  39. Trump’s mother was an immigrant to this country from the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. In a way, Trump could be seen as an anchor baby. Did Trump’s mother speak Scottish Gaelic? Not of much interest to most people, but it is to me.

    Two of Trump’s wives were European immigrants to our Great Land which can arguably make Trump’s children anchor babies.

    Would a Trump Presidency push for more European immigration? I would be on board with that. What if Trump made this a more explicit policy on the campaign trail? I think there is a fair number of disaffected Norwegians, Swedes, Germans and assorted Euros who would jump at the chance of US citizenship.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Trump's Twitter background picture is of the golf course he built in Aberdeen.
    , @Niccolo Salo
    "Would a Trump Presidency push for more European immigration? I would be on board with that."

    Europe needs all the Europeans it can get. The Anglosphere is for 3rd world migrants, not Europeans.

    Mind you, there'll always be that small minority of weird Ayn Rand fans from the continent who end up in the USA, working for large corporations and complaining about excessive taxation on capital gains in Europe.
    , @Clyde

    Would a Trump Presidency push for more European immigration?
     
    If he really wants to give agita to the anti-whites here, President Trump becomes pro-active in allowing in persecuted white refugees from South Africa-Zimbabwe and Christian refugees from Syria and Iraq. His popularity would zoom.
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  40. @Mike1
    Legal immigration, by definition, is the combined opinion of the population of a country. It is the structured rules set up by the democratic process. Illegal immigration, and any end runs around immigration laws, is the opposite.
    Legal immigration is good if you are OK with the democratic process. This discussion is veering into pure nativism.

    “This discussion is veering into pure nativism.”

    Yes. Because that’s where the higher grade ore is found. Maybe it will never be needed. But when a society appears to navigate by the stars of a cultural narrative formed only years before and transmitted through cinema and popular fiction, it is best to have a bit of leverage wedded to bedrock as a fallback.

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    • Replies: @Mike1
    You are right some nativism is needed. Pride in your country is healthy to a certain point. It is unfortunate that people can't hold nuanced views. There seems to be no daylight between "let everyone in" and hillbilly level terror of anyone born in a different holler.
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  41. “We’d have better policies in the future if pundits could come out and say, I was in favor of X in the past and I was right, but now conditions have changed, so I no longer favor X.”

    The crux is: Who pays the pundits? – what’s in it for the pundits? This is a wrinkle on Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

    It seems many top pundits and Enemedia-Pravda’s onscreen news “personalities” are paid not just in lucre, but also in access – they fear losing their access to rub elbows with the powerful and the famous. And their access opens up to them enormous advantages unseen and unimagined by the public, not least in that access allowing pundits and “news” personalities to take advantage of lucrative speaking fees and to write well-selling books about their hobnobbing with celebs and the powerful both during and after their full-time careers. So it comes down to proposing that pundits and newsfaces should bite the hand that feeds them.

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  42. @Leftist conservative

    It would be hugely beneficial if Americans realized they could change their minds about policies going forward without admitting they were wrong in the past.

     

    Indeed. You have to wonder how many liberals are starting to doubt whether blacks are the same as whites, whether immigration is good, whether or not liberal dogma demonizes whites and white males.

    I think we agree there.

    But what about the proposition that Capital is behind mass immigration, and what about the idea that american liberalism/multiculturalism is merely an ideological tool for Capital to grow profits?
    What about the idea that liberals are not really the enemy, and that Capital created liberal dogma for its own benefit?

    “What about the idea that liberals are not really the enemy, and that Capital created liberal dogma for its own benefit?”

    Yes, I believe you’re onto something there.

    The dogma of liberalism is designed to push the emotional buttons of a certain kind of person. The right words expressing the correct sentiments elicits an automatic response from a person who wants to see themselves as an impartial good samaritan.

    And the same can be said for conservative dogma which appeals to those who see themselves as independent, capable agents.

    Both parties have crafted their messages to play upon the ego’s idealized self-image of their respective targets.

    What better way to control your target than to divert their anger into passionate squabbles over meaningless bones of contention such as transexual boy’s use of girl’s bathrooms, claims for reparations and the “slaughter of black youth”? Reminiscent of Gulliver’s encounter with the Lilliputians/Blefuscus warring over whether to break open the big end or the little end of a hardboiled egg. Meanwhile, Finance rolls on.

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    • Replies: @AndrewR
    I wouldn't call those "meaningless squabbles", although certainly the elites are adept at fanning the flames of preexisting cultural schisms in order to keep the rabble fighting each other instead of teaming up to take out the group that is screwing everyone. We saw how the Tea Party and OWS were both coopted by the establishment. In the Tea Party's case, isolated cases of racialist Thoughtcrime were magnified in order to paint the Tea Party as a bunch of racist white meanypants.

    With OWS we watched as the SJWs took over with their "progressive stacks" and the "1%" were treated as a monolithic group, ensuring the failure of the movement since the lower 0.99% portion of the 1% felt compelled to side with the 0.01% against the 99% (who obviously have no shortage of cultural and ethnic fissures of their own). I think OWS would have been more effective had it focused on the top 0.01% or even the top 0.1%. There has been some distinction made between the 1%'s subgroups but nowhere near the cultural diffusion of "the 99% vs the 1%". Then again, comprehending decimals requires a baseline level of numeracy that may seem low to iSteve commenters but is probably above the level of many if not most Americans.

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  43. @Clifford Brown
    Trump's mother was an immigrant to this country from the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. In a way, Trump could be seen as an anchor baby. Did Trump's mother speak Scottish Gaelic? Not of much interest to most people, but it is to me.

    Two of Trump's wives were European immigrants to our Great Land which can arguably make Trump's children anchor babies.

    Would a Trump Presidency push for more European immigration? I would be on board with that. What if Trump made this a more explicit policy on the campaign trail? I think there is a fair number of disaffected Norwegians, Swedes, Germans and assorted Euros who would jump at the chance of US citizenship.

    Trump’s Twitter background picture is of the golf course he built in Aberdeen.

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  44. AKAHorace says:

    Very briefly, this is not just an American problem. This is a problem for all western countries that were on the anti-communist side during the cold war. Sailer might be able to explain this division, I cannot.

    We need solidarity between nativists in different countries, because the pro mass immigrationists work as a trans-national team, we need do to the same.

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  45. @Harry Baldwin
    One of the reasons I trust Trump on immigration is that he doesn't mind hurting the feelings of Mexicans. Candidates like Rubio and Kasich who are so concerned with not offending minorities are going to fold like a cheap umbrella the first time their policies are criticized. Seeking universal approval is a great weakness of Republican politicians.

    The real danger is when a candidate doesn’t want to hurt the feelings of his major contributors. Many of these candidates are pro-immigration less due to PC than the influence of business interests. Fortunately, Trump is self-funding, which gives him a certain degree of autonomy. He’s also politically incorrect, unlike Sanders.

    Trump has come out 5 times against the H1b – in his position paper, twice on Twitter, in this recent Breitbart interview, and during his rally in Nevada. He also says that only foreign H1bs he wants are the graduates of Ivy league schools (whose numbers are trivially small anyway).

    So I’m reasonably optimistic.

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  46. @Mike1
    Legal immigration, by definition, is the combined opinion of the population of a country. It is the structured rules set up by the democratic process. Illegal immigration, and any end runs around immigration laws, is the opposite.
    Legal immigration is good if you are OK with the democratic process. This discussion is veering into pure nativism.

    I’m glad people have a high opinion of my family.

    I just don’t want them moving into my house.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mike1
    I grew up in a country that Americans are desperate to move to. I have lost count of the number of Americans that have told me they have tried to apply for residency of where I am from. Every trip I take there I sit next to someone from this country who is trying find a way to move there.

    Yet we do let two groups of Americans move there:

    - High net worth. Distasteful but every country on earth welcomes the rich.
    - Needed skills. If you have got off your butt and developed skills that are in demand you are welcome.

    This is what I am arguing for.
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  47. Buddwing says:

    We were a nation of emigrants.
    We became a nation of immigrants.
    But a nation of migrants is no nation at all.

    Read More
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  48. njguy73 says:
    @snorlax
    Typical nativist, trying to deny the dead their right to vote and get sent Social Security checks.

    Why, thank you!

    Read More
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  49. He that is slow to believe anything and everything is of great understanding,
    for belief in one false principle, is the beginning of all unwisdom.

    The chief duty of every new age is to up-raise new men to determine its liberties, to lead it towards material success — to rend (as it were) the rusty padlocks and chains of dead custom that always prevent healthy expansion.

    Theories and ideals and constitutions, that may have meant life and hope, and freedom, for our ancestors, may now mean destruction, slavery and dishonor to us. As environments change no human ideal standeth sure.

    Might Is Right, “Ragnar Redbeard”
    (Usually attributed to Jack London.)

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  50. Dumbo says:

    It’s funny that Trump was little more than a clown for years, and now suddenly he’s a viable (and perhaps even the best) candidate. I’m not really sure what that means.

    America has one thing that Europe doesn’t have: plenty of space. Still, it is not yet completely clear whether that is an advantage or a drawback.

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  51. @JohnnyWalker123
    I've got some VERY GOOD news.

    Trump has come out strongly against the H-1B visa again. It seems like someone (Jeff Sessions probably) talked some sense into him. Trump also called on Disney to rehire the workers they replaced with the H1b.


    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2015/10/29/exclusive-donald-trump-rights-ship-on-immigration-demands-disney-rehire-workers-replaced-by-cheap-foreign-labor-calls-rubio-silicon-valleys-puppet/

    BNN: The media has been filled with stories about companies flying in low-wage H-1B workers to replace American workers in tech jobs. Adding insult to injury, these American workers have been forced to train their replacements. If you were President, would you put a stop to this practice?

    DT: Day one. This is why I got into this race. Because the everyday working person in this country is getting screwed. Lobbyists write the rules to benefit the rich and powerful. They buy off Senators like Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL)79%
    to help them get rich at the expense of working Americans by using H-1B visas–so called “high tech” visas–to replace American workers in all sorts of solid middle class jobs. If I am President, I will not issue any H-1B visas to companies that replace American workers and my Department of Justice will pursue action against them.

    BNN: Hundreds of workers at Disney were forced to train their foreign replacements. But while Florida Senator Nelson rallied to their cause, Senator Rubio did not. While Nelson has called for an investigation, Rubio has not. While Nelson has called to reduce H-1Bs, Rubio has demanded more. Senator Rubio has been the top promoter in Congress for expanding the H-1B program even though millions American tech workers are out of jobs. Rubio’s new bill triples H-1Bs and has zero protections for American workers. Advocates for tech workers said Rubio’s bill would “destroy” the U.S. tech workforce. Rubio’s bill is even endorsed by the CEO of Disney. What do you think of Rubio’s bill?

    DT: It’s a disaster. It would allow any company in America to replace any worker with cheaper foreign labor. It legalizes job theft. It gives companies the legal right to pass over Americans, displace Americans, or directly replace Americans for good-paying middle class jobs. More than 80 percent of these H-1Bs are paid less than the average wage. Senator Rubio works for the lobbyists, not for Americans. That is why he is receiving more money from Silicon Valley than any other candidate in this race. He is their puppet.

    BNN: During the debate, Senator Rubio listed several protections he thought American workers should receive. But the New York Times said Rubio’s bill would does the opposite of what he said, and does not contain a single one of the protections he mentioned. Instead, his bill simply triples the number of H-1B visas given as low-wage substitutes to corporations. Does Rubio have a problem with the truth?

    DT: Yes, Senator Rubio is incapable of telling the truth. He should be disqualified for dishonesty alone.

    BNN: Do you think agree with Senator Rubio that there is a shortage of talented Americans?

    DT: Rubio is dead wrong. America produces the best and brightest in the world. It’s time to stand up for own students–many of whom are racked with terrible, terrible debt and facing a disastrous job market. We are graduating two times more students in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) than find jobs in those fields every year. We have a surplus of talented Americans and we need them to get jobs first.

    BNN: What should happen with the Florida workers who have been replaced?

    DT: I am calling TODAY on Disney to hire back every one of the workers they replaced, and I am calling on Rubio to immediately rescind his sponsorship of the I-Squared bill and apologize to every Floridian for endorsing it. I am further calling on Rubio to return the money he has received from Silicon Valley CEOs and to donate the money to a charity helping unemployed Americans whose jobs Rubio has helped to destroy.
     
    I'm back on the Trump trolley.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ln3sNwccHxI

    The Trolley Song, of course, is the Gay National Anthem.

    Just saying.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar


    The Trolley Song, of course, is the Gay National Anthem.

    Just saying.

     

    Hugh Martin, who wrote it (with no help from Ralph Blane, if you believe him), apparently spent 96 years in the closet. He was also, correct me if I'm wrong, the only major composer of Hollywood's Golden Age who came from the South.

    The first line came verbatim from a caption in a St Louis history tome.
    , @JohnnyWalker123
    What can I say? I'm in love with the Trump candidacy.
    , @SPMoore8
    Basically everything in the Great American Songbook (i.e., popular songs in America from about the 1920's to the 1950's, and then recorded by prominent American vocalists, usually Sinatra and his endless epigones) is a Gay National Anthem. And that also include virtually every tune from Broadway from Gershwin up through Sondheim.

    Just Saying. Although it doesn't really please me to say it.
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  52. I had long suspected that this gender-busting story would fall apart:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/30/business/the-narrative-frays-for-theranos-and-elizabeth-holmes.html

    How did it last so long? Who in our culture is going to look this identity politics gift in the mouth?

    Did it ever make sense that a student of 19 would be able to make a major breakthrough in one of the most heavily regulated industries known to man, the medical device business, and with an invention that would have been on the minds of just about every last engineer in that industry — a mechanism to reduce all kinds of blood tests to a single prick of the finger?

    Anybody with a brain would have had to be skeptical as to the legitimacy of this venture.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ATX Hipster

    How did it last so long? Who in our culture is going to look this identity politics gift in the mouth?
     
    She did an excellent job choosing her parents and time of birth. Seriously, being born at the perfect time to be able to drop out of Stanford 19 years later when your startup-fetishizing country is riding a long, grotesquely inflated tech bubble... such foresight.

    You would think the Steve Jobs-wannabe turtleneck would be taken by an indicator to potential investors she was never anything but a poseur.

    The Silicon Valley VCs are pump & dump shops like Stratton Oakmont, but they're helping "change the world!!1!" so we'll never see the moral outrage from the left like we would if they were operating from Wall Street. Holmes, Ellen Pao, etc. are perfectly representative of what a joke SV is, as well as the "STEM needs more women!" movement.

    Goldman Sachs never had or wanted Facebook's NSA-level data collection reach nor it's influence over immigration policy, but we're still hearing about "evil banksters." How about Occupy Sand Hill?
    , @Anon7
    Elizabeth Holmes should have set off everyone's radar. Her Steve Jobs cosplay is laughable.

    In my experience, the more a woman dresses for the part, the more likely she's just a poser. When I was going to parent-teacher night during my kid's middle school and high school years, you could always tell. If a female STEM teacher wore plate-glass glasses and said things like "OMG I've always been a total math geek!!" you could be sure that she was incompetent and you'd wind up sending your kid to a tutor.
    , @peterike
    How did it last so long? Who in our culture is going to look this identity politics gift in the mouth?

    Woman in STEM, that's why. She's an inspiration! A hero! Even better, she's a totally gorgeous woman in STEM. That grrllll was breaking down ALL the barriers!
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  53. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    I’ve grown to really hate my country, America. So many self-interested traitors seeking immigrant votes, cheap labor, or social status. Anti-whites control and run everything. Nobody will dare espouse explicitly pro-white views in mainstream discourse, but many will preach with smug self-righteousness about how it is a moral imperative for whites to be replaced and for the world to become a non-white planet. California girls used to be regarded as some of the most beautiful women in the world, but today that state is overrun by endless waves of brown masses. There’s just no resistance to the rape and defilement of America. Even Jeff Sessions will only talk about immigration in economic terms. No mainstream figure will take a stand for white people.

    Read More
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  54. t says:

    OT: How the Government Predicts Race and Ethnicity

    http://graphics.wsj.com/ally-settlement-race-calculator/

    They say there’s a 90% chance I’m black!

    Read More
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  55. @Former Darfur
    The Trolley Song, of course, is the Gay National Anthem.

    Just saying.

    The Trolley Song, of course, is the Gay National Anthem.

    Just saying.

    Hugh Martin, who wrote it (with no help from Ralph Blane, if you believe him), apparently spent 96 years in the closet. He was also, correct me if I’m wrong, the only major composer of Hollywood’s Golden Age who came from the South.

    The first line came verbatim from a caption in a St Louis history tome.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    Johnny Mercer probably would have begged to differ. He was from Savannah, Georgia.

    Hoagy Carmichael was from south Indiana, which geographically isn't the South, but as with Illinois and Missouri, its southern parts are of a differing opinion.
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  56. @Steve Sailer
    It seems as if English pundits change their views more than American pundits. My vague impression is that it's a pretty standard move in British press circles for a columnist to change sides: e.g., Paul Johnson, Christopher Hitchens, and a lot of people who aren't as well known in America.

    Weren’t all the original neo-cons (Kristol and Podhoretz srs. etc.) American pundits who changed sides?

    Read More
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  57. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    “Legal immigration is good if you are OK with the democratic process. “

    But notice, we don’t seem to have a democratic process when it comes to immigration. That’s one of the issues that makes people mad. Democracy for me, but not for thee seems to be he word of the day. How are all those judges ruling from the bench doing with this concept of “democracy”?

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  58. @Reg Cæsar


    The Trolley Song, of course, is the Gay National Anthem.

    Just saying.

     

    Hugh Martin, who wrote it (with no help from Ralph Blane, if you believe him), apparently spent 96 years in the closet. He was also, correct me if I'm wrong, the only major composer of Hollywood's Golden Age who came from the South.

    The first line came verbatim from a caption in a St Louis history tome.

    Johnny Mercer probably would have begged to differ. He was from Savannah, Georgia.

    Hoagy Carmichael was from south Indiana, which geographically isn’t the South, but as with Illinois and Missouri, its southern parts are of a differing opinion.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    Mercer was America's greatest lyricist, for sure, but even he would demur at being called a major composer, or a composer at all. He wrote only a handful of his own tunes-- "I'm an Old Cowhand", "Something's Gotta Give", "I Wanna Be Around".

    Hoagy Carmichael and Isham Jones had Virginia ancestry, but were products of Bloomington, Ind., and Saginaw, Mich., respectively. Cole Porter might've had Southern roots on his inconsequential dad's side, but the Coles were pure Yankee stock.

    Tom Jones and Harvey Schmidt were from Texas, and showed up on Broadway later. Of all these, only Carmichael was in Hollywood.

    Mitchell Parish, another great lyricist, spent his first five years in Shreveport, but was otherwise a New Yorker.
    , @Anonymous
    I think it's kind of cute how we now have the music category of "The Great American Songbook" even though it overlaps fairly significantly with jazz. I can see the reason for the split, but it seems kind of funny to me. Having said that, I enjoy the music of the Great American Songbook very much.
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  59. @Former Darfur
    The Trolley Song, of course, is the Gay National Anthem.

    Just saying.

    What can I say? I’m in love with the Trump candidacy.

    Read More
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  60. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymous
    The level of delusion on these boards is amazing. People here really think that because 25% of whitey's red neck and Nordic wing is supporting Trump in *polls* that 1) he may actually win and 2) that he will repeal the H1-B visa laws.

    More delusional: Real soon now, Global Whitey will rise and shut the door on the wogs they formerly enslaved and colonized. They will win elections! Just like in Germany! Just like in Canada where true Canadians finally stood up and ...

    None of these things will happen. To reform HI-B, we should abolish the racist law that limits "any nation" to 7.5% of green cards a year. That will allow HI-Bs to apply for jobs at more competitive salaries and lift wages in tech generally (which are not particularly depressed, e.g., Deloitte's HI-Bs average over 100K in income a year). Right now these visa holders wait 7-9 years for a Green Card.

    Why not just require parity of native and H1-B salaries? It’s not as good as getting rid of the guestworker visa program entirely, but it would significantly erode the cost advantage of hiring a visa holder over a native worker. Of course, people like me don’t think this country needs any more immigration while our real unemployment rate is near 20% and our STEM-trained graduates can’t find decent jobs, so long waits for green cards certainly don’t concern us.

    Read More
    • Replies: @peterike
    Why not just require parity of native and H1-B salaries?

    Because it's not about salaries. It's about the ability to work the H-1B employee to death and get no resistance because they are compliant, beta Indians and Chinese.

    And while the system may have been about lower salaries at first, now it's pure ethnic favoritism. It's been going on long enough that many Indians and Chinese are in upper management positions or at least in hiring positions. Once in place, they hire ONLY from among their own. I've seen this happen again and again. Indians tend to be better at climbing the management ladder because of their command of English, and because a certain type of Indian is a born pole climber. And I don't mean that favorably.

    Indians know precisely how much they are taking advantage of stupid, corrupt American companies that let them get away with displacing Americans. They would NEVER let a similar phenomenon occur in India.
    , @AnAnon
    he says its racist to prevent green cards from being dominated from any one group. you are responding to a troll. that or an idiot.
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  61. Mr. Blank says:
    @ATX Hipster
    It's amusing/irritating to me that the libs are always telling us "the Constitution is a living document" with regards to, e.g. gun rights, and we shouldn't base 21st century policy on what worked for an agrarian society in the 18th century. But when it comes to immigration, well, we're A Nation of Immigrants and if you dare suggest that maybe we should think about a policy update you must be a Klansman/Nazi/Fascist/(insert BadWhite pejorative).

    Some of Trump’s appeal is undoubtedly due to a segment of the right deciding, in effect, to embrace the idea of a “living Constitution” in order to push conservative policies. I doubt Trump understands this, but I suspect a great number of his supporters are thinking, “well, heck, if the Constitution just means whatever the Dear Leader says it means (as expressed through the government’s countless departments and ministries), why not have a Dear Leader who merely directs the state to read OUR favored policies into the text?”

    Read More
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  62. @candid_observer
    I had long suspected that this gender-busting story would fall apart:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/30/business/the-narrative-frays-for-theranos-and-elizabeth-holmes.html

    How did it last so long? Who in our culture is going to look this identity politics gift in the mouth?

    Did it ever make sense that a student of 19 would be able to make a major breakthrough in one of the most heavily regulated industries known to man, the medical device business, and with an invention that would have been on the minds of just about every last engineer in that industry -- a mechanism to reduce all kinds of blood tests to a single prick of the finger?

    Anybody with a brain would have had to be skeptical as to the legitimacy of this venture.

    How did it last so long? Who in our culture is going to look this identity politics gift in the mouth?

    She did an excellent job choosing her parents and time of birth. Seriously, being born at the perfect time to be able to drop out of Stanford 19 years later when your startup-fetishizing country is riding a long, grotesquely inflated tech bubble… such foresight.

    You would think the Steve Jobs-wannabe turtleneck would be taken by an indicator to potential investors she was never anything but a poseur.

    The Silicon Valley VCs are pump & dump shops like Stratton Oakmont, but they’re helping “change the world!!1!” so we’ll never see the moral outrage from the left like we would if they were operating from Wall Street. Holmes, Ellen Pao, etc. are perfectly representative of what a joke SV is, as well as the “STEM needs more women!” movement.

    Goldman Sachs never had or wanted Facebook’s NSA-level data collection reach nor it’s influence over immigration policy, but we’re still hearing about “evil banksters.” How about Occupy Sand Hill?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    In fairness, one of the old school VCs called Theranos out in the FT recently:
    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/655535629665771521
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  63. Mr. Blank says:
    @Desiderius
    I was able to change my mind to support immigration restriction by noting that yes, we are a nation of immigrants, and the way we've been able to manage that successfully is a policy that has ebbed and flowed naturally throughout American history. We're long overdue for an ebb.

    Yeah, this was pretty much how Sailer and others managed to change my mind on immigration. If you’ve grown up marinated in the romantic idea of America as a “nation of immigrants,” the soft sell is the most effective: “Policy X, which you strongly support, was a good and wise policy at the time it was adopted. But good and wise people continuously monitor results, and by monitoring the results of Policy X, it is now clear that conditions have changed and the costs greatly outweigh the benefits. A good and wise person would now support a fundamental recalibration of Policy X. This does not deny the past wisdom of Policy X; it merely makes the humble acknowledgement that frail humans cannot foresee all possibilities, and Policy X is not ideal in every situation.”

    “It was right then, but wrong now” is a very effective rhetorical technique in the hands of a capable rhetorician.

    Read More
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  64. @Mike1
    Legal immigration, by definition, is the combined opinion of the population of a country. It is the structured rules set up by the democratic process. Illegal immigration, and any end runs around immigration laws, is the opposite.
    Legal immigration is good if you are OK with the democratic process. This discussion is veering into pure nativism.

    Excuse me but part of the democratic process is being able to make your case to the public without shaming words like “nativism” being thrown around. Opponents of mass immigration have every right to try to convince their fellow Americans that even legal immigration should be kept to a minimum. Most immigration, legal or illegal, is simply a tool of class warfare.

    “Nativists” must make the case that politicians taking care of their citizen’s interests first is exactly analogous to parents looking after the interests of their own children before those of children in the Congo, for example.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mike1
    Legal immigration is around a million people a year. Adding one person to a room of three hundred is not something it is realistically possible to notice.

    My suggestion is to influence who comes here so that the new entrants add to the country rather than needing to be take care of.
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  65. @Mike1
    Legal immigration, by definition, is the combined opinion of the population of a country. It is the structured rules set up by the democratic process. Illegal immigration, and any end runs around immigration laws, is the opposite.
    Legal immigration is good if you are OK with the democratic process. This discussion is veering into pure nativism.

    When democracy would work like that parties, parliaments etc. would be unnecessary, because there would be no need for any debates. Only thing needed would be elections and police / justice to enforce the laws

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mike1
    Democracy literally does work like that. The rules are the end result of a lot of arguments and pressure and reflect a messy and imperfect consensus.

    I'm confused why you think rules are fixed?
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  66. Accepting immigrants from Europe made sense for America at the time. It still might make sense for us to accept a few more, but only a few. It would have made no sense for us to have accepted immigrants from most other places then or now.

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  67. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @ATX Hipster

    How did it last so long? Who in our culture is going to look this identity politics gift in the mouth?
     
    She did an excellent job choosing her parents and time of birth. Seriously, being born at the perfect time to be able to drop out of Stanford 19 years later when your startup-fetishizing country is riding a long, grotesquely inflated tech bubble... such foresight.

    You would think the Steve Jobs-wannabe turtleneck would be taken by an indicator to potential investors she was never anything but a poseur.

    The Silicon Valley VCs are pump & dump shops like Stratton Oakmont, but they're helping "change the world!!1!" so we'll never see the moral outrage from the left like we would if they were operating from Wall Street. Holmes, Ellen Pao, etc. are perfectly representative of what a joke SV is, as well as the "STEM needs more women!" movement.

    Goldman Sachs never had or wanted Facebook's NSA-level data collection reach nor it's influence over immigration policy, but we're still hearing about "evil banksters." How about Occupy Sand Hill?

    In fairness, one of the old school VCs called Theranos out in the FT recently:

    Read More
    • Replies: @ATX Hipster
    That's interesting. I'm under the impression that Sequoia is less prone than some of the other firms to investing in companies that don't have a clear path to profitability.
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  68. @Former Darfur
    Johnny Mercer probably would have begged to differ. He was from Savannah, Georgia.

    Hoagy Carmichael was from south Indiana, which geographically isn't the South, but as with Illinois and Missouri, its southern parts are of a differing opinion.

    Mercer was America’s greatest lyricist, for sure, but even he would demur at being called a major composer, or a composer at all. He wrote only a handful of his own tunes– “I’m an Old Cowhand”, “Something’s Gotta Give”, “I Wanna Be Around”.

    Hoagy Carmichael and Isham Jones had Virginia ancestry, but were products of Bloomington, Ind., and Saginaw, Mich., respectively. Cole Porter might’ve had Southern roots on his inconsequential dad’s side, but the Coles were pure Yankee stock.

    Tom Jones and Harvey Schmidt were from Texas, and showed up on Broadway later. Of all these, only Carmichael was in Hollywood.

    Mitchell Parish, another great lyricist, spent his first five years in Shreveport, but was otherwise a New Yorker.

    Read More
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  69. Rob McX says:
    @Steve Sailer
    It seems as if English pundits change their views more than American pundits. My vague impression is that it's a pretty standard move in British press circles for a columnist to change sides: e.g., Paul Johnson, Christopher Hitchens, and a lot of people who aren't as well known in America.

    America is a nation of immigrants – white immigrants. They shaped and defined the character of the nation. It’s European in terms of laws, civic structure, language, and religion . If any people can be said to have a collective right to anything, the founding stock of America have a right to keep their country as it is. The alternative that’s being foisted on them is not a nation of any kind, but a hotch-potch of different races (in perpetual flux due to continuing immigration) elbowing each other at the ethnic spoils trough.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Isn't it a country of white settlers who created the country, rather than simply white immigrants who came to an already settled country with infrastructure, etc.?
    , @Anon7
    And, as noted elsewhere, all of the boat people are going in the same direction - away from crappy nations run by people who are African, Asian, Middle Eastern and South American, and toward nations created, built and run by white people - the US, northern Europe and Australia/NZ.

    Based on what I've read by la Raza supporters, I really think that 'elbowing each other at the ethnic spoils trough" is exactly what they are eager to do. My read of their beliefs is that white people are tired and just aren't vital anymore; and there's whole country full of wealth that they built that's going to waste! And that's why they want to come here, by the tens of millions.

    I think that if we don't win the next election with a President and congress that is ready to enforce current immigration law, secure the border and shut off the flow of immigrants, we've lost it forever.
    , @AndrewR
    Ah yes, that culturally and ethnically homogenous entity called Europe.

    I'm into false dichotomies and juvenile notions of history and genetics too. We should be friends!
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  70. Clyde says:

    Vastly increasing immigration has done wonders for availability of ethnic food, but the marginal returns on that have been diminishing steadily.

    The average Chinese restaurant truly sucks these days, with the wild card being the shrimp might have been cultivated in a polluted, chemicalized ditch in China. And some I have eaten in Chinese places sure tasted like it. Shrimp is commonly exported in 5-lb frozen blocks. There are Chinese owned shrimp farms all over the world including Thailand, Panama, Ecuador, Latin America. Growing, freezing, exporting.
    Diminishing returns? Yes!!!
    Mandatory post of open borders loony, George Mason economics professor Tyler Cowin’s ethic dining guide for the Washintoon DC area. Two thirds of these eateries would not exist without your Federal tax dollars flooding into the DC region.
    https://tylercowensethnicdiningguide.com/ My quickie count is 500 ethnic restaurant reviews since 2006. Give us your tired and poor and especially your skilled Hunan and Szechuan chefs!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    "Give us your tired and poor and especially your skilled Hunan and Szechuan chefs!"

    Precisely.
    , @Anonymous
    "The average Chinese restaurant truly sucks these days, with the wild card being the shrimp might have been cultivated in a polluted, chemicalized ditch in China. And some I have eaten in Chinese places sure tasted like it. Shrimp is commonly exported in 5-lb frozen blocks. There are Chinese owned shrimp farms all over the world including Thailand, Panama, Ecuador, Latin America. Growing, freezing, exporting."

    I pretty much only eat vegetable dishes at Chinese restaurants. I never have confidence in their mea, poultry or fish.
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  71. @Clifford Brown
    Trump's mother was an immigrant to this country from the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. In a way, Trump could be seen as an anchor baby. Did Trump's mother speak Scottish Gaelic? Not of much interest to most people, but it is to me.

    Two of Trump's wives were European immigrants to our Great Land which can arguably make Trump's children anchor babies.

    Would a Trump Presidency push for more European immigration? I would be on board with that. What if Trump made this a more explicit policy on the campaign trail? I think there is a fair number of disaffected Norwegians, Swedes, Germans and assorted Euros who would jump at the chance of US citizenship.

    “Would a Trump Presidency push for more European immigration? I would be on board with that.”

    Europe needs all the Europeans it can get. The Anglosphere is for 3rd world migrants, not Europeans.

    Mind you, there’ll always be that small minority of weird Ayn Rand fans from the continent who end up in the USA, working for large corporations and complaining about excessive taxation on capital gains in Europe.

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  72. 20-30 years before, to be favorable to ”nativism” was normal. Today, ”mèrdia” and co. make it look ”impossible”.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    When I was in middle school, awhile back but not that long so, we were taught that nationalism was good and that it made countries strong. I remember doing a project on it. When did nationalism become a dirty word?
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  73. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @JerseyGuy
    I think one issue in America is that we are able to isolate ourselves from mass immigration by continuously moving away from it. Or at least we could in the past.

    That is one of the drawbacks of having such a huge country. There is the perception that there is an infinite amount of resources (and an infinite amount of land) that can be consumed.

    Absolutely. There are still places out west that are barely populated. From what I can tell, a prevailing ‘move if need be’ attitude still exists out west. How these places will introduce productive localized farming is beyond me. If there is a will there will probably be a way.

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  74. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Clyde

    Vastly increasing immigration has done wonders for availability of ethnic food, but the marginal returns on that have been diminishing steadily.
     
    The average Chinese restaurant truly sucks these days, with the wild card being the shrimp might have been cultivated in a polluted, chemicalized ditch in China. And some I have eaten in Chinese places sure tasted like it. Shrimp is commonly exported in 5-lb frozen blocks. There are Chinese owned shrimp farms all over the world including Thailand, Panama, Ecuador, Latin America. Growing, freezing, exporting.
    Diminishing returns? Yes!!!
    Mandatory post of open borders loony, George Mason economics professor Tyler Cowin's ethic dining guide for the Washintoon DC area. Two thirds of these eateries would not exist without your Federal tax dollars flooding into the DC region.
    https://tylercowensethnicdiningguide.com/ My quickie count is 500 ethnic restaurant reviews since 2006. Give us your tired and poor and especially your skilled Hunan and Szechuan chefs!

    “Give us your tired and poor and especially your skilled Hunan and Szechuan chefs!”

    Precisely.

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  75. Mike Zwick [AKA "Dahinda"] says:

    It would also be good if we could say that some immigrants are better than others. We may need people to pick lettuce but not take jobs from Chicago factory workers for example. Or we might admit that a scientist or researcher who would feel more free doing his or her research in the U.S. should be allowed in but not potential terrorists from Chechnya.

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  76. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Steve,

    Not long ago you gave of us a sample of market-tested immigration phrases, such as “smart immigration,” if I recall correctly.

    I think this stuff does make a difference, if it can be absorbed into the culture. And I do detect on the comments section of Breitbart and other places the arguments being put forward on VDARE and here. Douglas Rushkoff, in Media Virus, makes a compelling case that AIDS activists were able get the early release of life-saving drugs by using phrases such as “smart drugs” to change peoples attitudes towards experimental drugs.

    It seems that it would be helpful if there was a patriotic Jourolist (Buchanan, Brimelow, Derbyshire, Sailer, Coulter, etc), who coordinated with well-known but closeted journalists, academics, campaign consultants, and congressional staffers and sent out weekly phrases, arguments, and articles.

    Some may say that blogs serve that purpose, but I think many of us are ghettoized into reading the same few blogs we agree with, and the arguments put forward are helpful but largely inchoate.

    Watching Trump quickly come back into the fold regarding H1-B visas shows the power of arguments and pressure, and Breitbart’s interview with Trump yesterday showed lines of argument developed elsewhere.

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  77. iffen says:

    Vastly increasing immigration has done wonders for availability of ethnic food, but the marginal returns on that have been diminishing steadily.

    Not only that, after the second wave of whichever ethnic group gets here in sufficient numbers they turn up their noses at the cuisine and declare it not authentic.

    There are several things about which I have changed my mind. For example, years ago when I heard about the Rainbow Warriors myth, about how they were going to come and save the earth and save us from ourselves, I thought that will be great. Now that they are here and have turned out to be a bunch of prancing fairies, weight challenged lesbians and maniacal puritans, I want a do-over.

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  78. J1234 says:

    Steve said:

    We’d have better policies in the future if pundits could come out and say, I was in favor of X in the past and I was right, but now conditions have changed, so I no longer favor X.

    I agree. We clear cut forests in the US at one time; it was necessary for many communities and industries, and trees were a renewable resource. It doesn’t make sense now, however. This is usually my response to the “nation of immigrants” claim. The notion that US immigration will always be outside the realm of a paradigm shift is fundamentally flawed thinking, and usually politically motivated.

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  79. Anon7 says:
    @candid_observer
    I had long suspected that this gender-busting story would fall apart:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/30/business/the-narrative-frays-for-theranos-and-elizabeth-holmes.html

    How did it last so long? Who in our culture is going to look this identity politics gift in the mouth?

    Did it ever make sense that a student of 19 would be able to make a major breakthrough in one of the most heavily regulated industries known to man, the medical device business, and with an invention that would have been on the minds of just about every last engineer in that industry -- a mechanism to reduce all kinds of blood tests to a single prick of the finger?

    Anybody with a brain would have had to be skeptical as to the legitimacy of this venture.

    Elizabeth Holmes should have set off everyone’s radar. Her Steve Jobs cosplay is laughable.

    In my experience, the more a woman dresses for the part, the more likely she’s just a poser. When I was going to parent-teacher night during my kid’s middle school and high school years, you could always tell. If a female STEM teacher wore plate-glass glasses and said things like “OMG I’ve always been a total math geek!!” you could be sure that she was incompetent and you’d wind up sending your kid to a tutor.

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  80. peterike says:
    @Anonymous
    Why not just require parity of native and H1-B salaries? It's not as good as getting rid of the guestworker visa program entirely, but it would significantly erode the cost advantage of hiring a visa holder over a native worker. Of course, people like me don't think this country needs any more immigration while our real unemployment rate is near 20% and our STEM-trained graduates can't find decent jobs, so long waits for green cards certainly don't concern us.

    Why not just require parity of native and H1-B salaries?

    Because it’s not about salaries. It’s about the ability to work the H-1B employee to death and get no resistance because they are compliant, beta Indians and Chinese.

    And while the system may have been about lower salaries at first, now it’s pure ethnic favoritism. It’s been going on long enough that many Indians and Chinese are in upper management positions or at least in hiring positions. Once in place, they hire ONLY from among their own. I’ve seen this happen again and again. Indians tend to be better at climbing the management ladder because of their command of English, and because a certain type of Indian is a born pole climber. And I don’t mean that favorably.

    Indians know precisely how much they are taking advantage of stupid, corrupt American companies that let them get away with displacing Americans. They would NEVER let a similar phenomenon occur in India.

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    • Agree: Travis
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    "And while the system may have been about lower salaries at first, now it’s pure ethnic favoritism. It’s been going on long enough that many Indians and Chinese are in upper management positions or at least in hiring positions. Once in place, they hire ONLY from among their own. I’ve seen this happen again and again."

    Isn't that against the law?
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  81. peterike says:
    @candid_observer
    I had long suspected that this gender-busting story would fall apart:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/30/business/the-narrative-frays-for-theranos-and-elizabeth-holmes.html

    How did it last so long? Who in our culture is going to look this identity politics gift in the mouth?

    Did it ever make sense that a student of 19 would be able to make a major breakthrough in one of the most heavily regulated industries known to man, the medical device business, and with an invention that would have been on the minds of just about every last engineer in that industry -- a mechanism to reduce all kinds of blood tests to a single prick of the finger?

    Anybody with a brain would have had to be skeptical as to the legitimacy of this venture.

    How did it last so long? Who in our culture is going to look this identity politics gift in the mouth?

    Woman in STEM, that’s why. She’s an inspiration! A hero! Even better, she’s a totally gorgeous woman in STEM. That grrllll was breaking down ALL the barriers!

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    • Replies: @nglaer
    We need an isteve investment club, for figuring out ways to make money from current idiocy. The other day I told my wife there has to me a way to profit the Merkel craziness, but outside of very long term shorts of Mercedes stock, what can one do? But probably having a good mechanism for shorting companies would be part of it-- it's not something I know how to do, or even if you can do it without your own specialized firm.
    Long term, I'd bet on China, but in the long run. . ..
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  82. AndrewR says:
    @anony-mouse
    Er, uh, same-sex marriage?

    Politicos have been falling over each other admitting they were wrong, wrong oh so wrong about one of humanity's oldest institutions. Or transgender rights.

    For most people it’s harder (although not impossible) to make a strong “I was right then for believing what I did but things have changed” argument for same-sex marriage than it is for immigration, primarily because most people today simply do not understand that arguments against SSM can be more complex than “muh bible” and “gays are icky.” In fairness, those are essentially what most anti-SSM arguments boil down to in practice.

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  83. AndrewR says:
    @Threecranes
    "What about the idea that liberals are not really the enemy, and that Capital created liberal dogma for its own benefit?"

    Yes, I believe you're onto something there.

    The dogma of liberalism is designed to push the emotional buttons of a certain kind of person. The right words expressing the correct sentiments elicits an automatic response from a person who wants to see themselves as an impartial good samaritan.

    And the same can be said for conservative dogma which appeals to those who see themselves as independent, capable agents.

    Both parties have crafted their messages to play upon the ego's idealized self-image of their respective targets.

    What better way to control your target than to divert their anger into passionate squabbles over meaningless bones of contention such as transexual boy's use of girl's bathrooms, claims for reparations and the "slaughter of black youth"? Reminiscent of Gulliver's encounter with the Lilliputians/Blefuscus warring over whether to break open the big end or the little end of a hardboiled egg. Meanwhile, Finance rolls on.

    I wouldn’t call those “meaningless squabbles”, although certainly the elites are adept at fanning the flames of preexisting cultural schisms in order to keep the rabble fighting each other instead of teaming up to take out the group that is screwing everyone. We saw how the Tea Party and OWS were both coopted by the establishment. In the Tea Party’s case, isolated cases of racialist Thoughtcrime were magnified in order to paint the Tea Party as a bunch of racist white meanypants.

    With OWS we watched as the SJWs took over with their “progressive stacks” and the “1%” were treated as a monolithic group, ensuring the failure of the movement since the lower 0.99% portion of the 1% felt compelled to side with the 0.01% against the 99% (who obviously have no shortage of cultural and ethnic fissures of their own). I think OWS would have been more effective had it focused on the top 0.01% or even the top 0.1%. There has been some distinction made between the 1%’s subgroups but nowhere near the cultural diffusion of “the 99% vs the 1%”. Then again, comprehending decimals requires a baseline level of numeracy that may seem low to iSteve commenters but is probably above the level of many if not most Americans.

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    • Replies: @CJ
    But Shorn... does have a point that the .01% is perfectly happy for others to argue about gay and green all day. I've actually gotten a little traction with people by noting out that everything SJWs/hipsters/progs bang on about is no problem for plutocrats. Similarly, with Europeans, you can get somewhere when you point out that the actions of their "anti-fascists" are pretty much indistinguishable from those of fascists.
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  84. AndrewR says:
    @Alain
    Seems like, if we have a "living constitution" ,we might be able to see our way to a "living immigration policy".

    The left won’t accept anything less than European-Americans ceasing to exist as a distinct group (or set of groups) in any way.

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  85. Mike1 says:
    @Lugash
    Thanks for the civics lesson and policing the blog comments, super-skilled foreign business man.

    You are welcome. I can help you out with the concept of “policing the blog comments” too. It refers to an attempt to police how people respond to a post. It is (another definition here) what you did in your response to me.

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  86. Mike1 says:
    @Neil Templeton
    "This discussion is veering into pure nativism."

    Yes. Because that's where the higher grade ore is found. Maybe it will never be needed. But when a society appears to navigate by the stars of a cultural narrative formed only years before and transmitted through cinema and popular fiction, it is best to have a bit of leverage wedded to bedrock as a fallback.

    You are right some nativism is needed. Pride in your country is healthy to a certain point. It is unfortunate that people can’t hold nuanced views. There seems to be no daylight between “let everyone in” and hillbilly level terror of anyone born in a different holler.

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    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    Isn't it interesting that the Hollywood archetype of hillbilly is incestuous and xenophobic, and yet Europe's primary challenge today is accommodating perhaps millions of cousin-marrying, tribalist, xenophobes.
    , @Neil Templeton
    Isn't it interesting that the Hollywood archetype of hillbilly is incestuous and xenophobic, and yet Europe's primary challenge today is accommodating perhaps millions of cousin-marrying, tribalist, xenophobes.
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  87. Mike1 says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    I'm glad people have a high opinion of my family.

    I just don't want them moving into my house.

    I grew up in a country that Americans are desperate to move to. I have lost count of the number of Americans that have told me they have tried to apply for residency of where I am from. Every trip I take there I sit next to someone from this country who is trying find a way to move there.

    Yet we do let two groups of Americans move there:

    - High net worth. Distasteful but every country on earth welcomes the rich.
    - Needed skills. If you have got off your butt and developed skills that are in demand you are welcome.

    This is what I am arguing for.

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    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    Which country is this?
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  88. Mike1 says:
    @Shine a Light
    Excuse me but part of the democratic process is being able to make your case to the public without shaming words like "nativism" being thrown around. Opponents of mass immigration have every right to try to convince their fellow Americans that even legal immigration should be kept to a minimum. Most immigration, legal or illegal, is simply a tool of class warfare.

    "Nativists" must make the case that politicians taking care of their citizen's interests first is exactly analogous to parents looking after the interests of their own children before those of children in the Congo, for example.

    Legal immigration is around a million people a year. Adding one person to a room of three hundred is not something it is realistically possible to notice.

    My suggestion is to influence who comes here so that the new entrants add to the country rather than needing to be take care of.

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    • Replies: @notsaying
    The immigration bill that passed the Senate a few years ago would have greatly increased the 1 million a year number.

    When we end up legalizing the illegal people already here -- which I believe is inevitable -- we will probably have their immediate family members still overseas over here in 5-10 years and perhaps even less. There is a good argument to be made to get kids who will end up here anyway here as soon as possible to learn English and have as many years as possible in our schools. In other words, it's better to get them at age 5 or 10 instead of 15 or 17.

    So we will get a surge of people tied to our (formerly) illegal immigrants which I expect will number tens of millions.

    Why should we just agree to allow the people who want more immigration to get their way? Isn't that what you are really saying when you say to forget about the numbers and concentrate on the quality of newcomers?

    How can we afford to ignore the numbers? It wouldn't surprise me at all if it turns out we lose half the private sector jobs we have today by 2040, given how many jobs are being eliminated by technology. With so much uncertainty about so many fundamentals, why on Earth should we saddle our descendants with tens of millions more people to take care of?

    , @AnAnon
    " Adding one person to a room of three hundred is not something it is realistically possible to notice. " - the room was rated for 250. When water runs out in the SW, we're going to notice it. when our infrastructure, already in the process of crumbling, buckles, that will be noticed. The workforce participation rate crashing and leaving millions of young people without any hope is yet another sign that will be noticed.
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  89. Mike1 says:
    @Erik Sieven
    When democracy would work like that parties, parliaments etc. would be unnecessary, because there would be no need for any debates. Only thing needed would be elections and police / justice to enforce the laws

    Democracy literally does work like that. The rules are the end result of a lot of arguments and pressure and reflect a messy and imperfect consensus.

    I’m confused why you think rules are fixed?

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  90. @Anonymous
    The level of delusion on these boards is amazing. People here really think that because 25% of whitey's red neck and Nordic wing is supporting Trump in *polls* that 1) he may actually win and 2) that he will repeal the H1-B visa laws.

    More delusional: Real soon now, Global Whitey will rise and shut the door on the wogs they formerly enslaved and colonized. They will win elections! Just like in Germany! Just like in Canada where true Canadians finally stood up and ...

    None of these things will happen. To reform HI-B, we should abolish the racist law that limits "any nation" to 7.5% of green cards a year. That will allow HI-Bs to apply for jobs at more competitive salaries and lift wages in tech generally (which are not particularly depressed, e.g., Deloitte's HI-Bs average over 100K in income a year). Right now these visa holders wait 7-9 years for a Green Card.

    “racist”…lol

    People using “racist” in a non-ironic sense might as well have “I am not a serious person” tattooed on their forehead.

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  91. @JohnnyWalker123
    I've got some VERY GOOD news.

    Trump has come out strongly against the H-1B visa again. It seems like someone (Jeff Sessions probably) talked some sense into him. Trump also called on Disney to rehire the workers they replaced with the H1b.


    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2015/10/29/exclusive-donald-trump-rights-ship-on-immigration-demands-disney-rehire-workers-replaced-by-cheap-foreign-labor-calls-rubio-silicon-valleys-puppet/

    BNN: The media has been filled with stories about companies flying in low-wage H-1B workers to replace American workers in tech jobs. Adding insult to injury, these American workers have been forced to train their replacements. If you were President, would you put a stop to this practice?

    DT: Day one. This is why I got into this race. Because the everyday working person in this country is getting screwed. Lobbyists write the rules to benefit the rich and powerful. They buy off Senators like Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL)79%
    to help them get rich at the expense of working Americans by using H-1B visas–so called “high tech” visas–to replace American workers in all sorts of solid middle class jobs. If I am President, I will not issue any H-1B visas to companies that replace American workers and my Department of Justice will pursue action against them.

    BNN: Hundreds of workers at Disney were forced to train their foreign replacements. But while Florida Senator Nelson rallied to their cause, Senator Rubio did not. While Nelson has called for an investigation, Rubio has not. While Nelson has called to reduce H-1Bs, Rubio has demanded more. Senator Rubio has been the top promoter in Congress for expanding the H-1B program even though millions American tech workers are out of jobs. Rubio’s new bill triples H-1Bs and has zero protections for American workers. Advocates for tech workers said Rubio’s bill would “destroy” the U.S. tech workforce. Rubio’s bill is even endorsed by the CEO of Disney. What do you think of Rubio’s bill?

    DT: It’s a disaster. It would allow any company in America to replace any worker with cheaper foreign labor. It legalizes job theft. It gives companies the legal right to pass over Americans, displace Americans, or directly replace Americans for good-paying middle class jobs. More than 80 percent of these H-1Bs are paid less than the average wage. Senator Rubio works for the lobbyists, not for Americans. That is why he is receiving more money from Silicon Valley than any other candidate in this race. He is their puppet.

    BNN: During the debate, Senator Rubio listed several protections he thought American workers should receive. But the New York Times said Rubio’s bill would does the opposite of what he said, and does not contain a single one of the protections he mentioned. Instead, his bill simply triples the number of H-1B visas given as low-wage substitutes to corporations. Does Rubio have a problem with the truth?

    DT: Yes, Senator Rubio is incapable of telling the truth. He should be disqualified for dishonesty alone.

    BNN: Do you think agree with Senator Rubio that there is a shortage of talented Americans?

    DT: Rubio is dead wrong. America produces the best and brightest in the world. It’s time to stand up for own students–many of whom are racked with terrible, terrible debt and facing a disastrous job market. We are graduating two times more students in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) than find jobs in those fields every year. We have a surplus of talented Americans and we need them to get jobs first.

    BNN: What should happen with the Florida workers who have been replaced?

    DT: I am calling TODAY on Disney to hire back every one of the workers they replaced, and I am calling on Rubio to immediately rescind his sponsorship of the I-Squared bill and apologize to every Floridian for endorsing it. I am further calling on Rubio to return the money he has received from Silicon Valley CEOs and to donate the money to a charity helping unemployed Americans whose jobs Rubio has helped to destroy.
     
    I'm back on the Trump trolley.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ln3sNwccHxI

    By the way, how are the trolleys of St Louis faring today? Do they go out to Ferguson?

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  92. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @anony-mouse
    Er, uh, same-sex marriage?

    Politicos have been falling over each other admitting they were wrong, wrong oh so wrong about one of humanity's oldest institutions. Or transgender rights.

    “Politicos have been falling over each other admitting they were wrong, wrong oh so wrong about one of humanity’s oldest institutions. Or transgender rights.”

    Politicos are whores of the super-elites, and the masses have no sense of history or heritage in Amnesiarica. For the politicos, it’s about serving the elites. For the masses, it’s about following the fashion as the new passion. Since the masses have been brainwashed with homo-holiness, politicos must now go along with the homo stuff to serve both the super-elites and the dumb masses.

    People without a sense of the past and heritage will give up everything.
    It is a sense of memory that makes you value something and prize it.

    If you were given a vase and told that it once belonged to your grandparents, you would see value in it for familial, cultural, historical, and personal reasons. But if you had no memory of the vase’s past significance, it is just another vase and you don’t care if you throw it out or someone else takes it. It is just a generic product that is interchangeable.

    America is about Amnesia. Nobody remembers anything. Since they have no sense of the past, they have no sense of owning anything or anything belonging to them.
    So, who cares if whole chunks of America goes to foreigners and immigrants. White Americans have no sense of discovery, conquest, settlement, and development. And what little memory that remains has been smeared with PC cries of ‘genocide’, slavery, oppression, and etc. as if only white folks did ‘bad stuff’ throughout history.
    Using that logic, blacks don’t deserve Africa since they committed so many horrors there. Chinese don’t deserve China since Chinese have done terrible things to one another and others in China. Ridiculous.

    A nation that reforms itself is good. But a nation that reinvents itself is nuts because it erases all past memory. Without memory, things have no value. (Jews don’t reinvent themselves as non-Jews. They remain Jews and have done so 3,500 yrs. Even when many Jews marry non-Jews, kids grow up as Jewish. Gentile wombs are used as wombs for Jewish kids. Jews win because they maintain their sense of Jewish past and heritage with pride and righteousness.)

    It is why the man in MEMENTO has to constantly finds ways to remember stuff. Without memory, he’s nothing. And if he has any meaning left in life, it’s through the memory of his dead wife. Of course, some clever guy manipulates his memory and happenstance so that he ends up killing people who had nothing to do with his wife’s rape and murder. He is used as a cuck. He thinks he is serving the memory of his wife’s death but he is only serving the agendas of other people.

    Gee, sound familiar? Why did US mess up Iraq? Uh.. Hussein had something to do with 9/11? And how did 80% of Americans come to feel this way? Who manipulates the media and government?
    Americans have memory, no sense of news and truth. They just go along with whatever is featured on the TV. And the TV is manipulated by men who are not unlike the corrupt cop who messes with the mind of the hero of MEMENTO.

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  93. Seth Largo says: • Website

    For immigration boosters, 1924 never happened. And for them the years between 1924 – 1965 (when America liberated Europe, unlocked the atom, invented transistors, Fortran, and lasers, then went to space just for the hell of it) were made possible by an endless flow of poor but brilliant immigrants.

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  94. nglaer says:
    @peterike
    How did it last so long? Who in our culture is going to look this identity politics gift in the mouth?

    Woman in STEM, that's why. She's an inspiration! A hero! Even better, she's a totally gorgeous woman in STEM. That grrllll was breaking down ALL the barriers!

    We need an isteve investment club, for figuring out ways to make money from current idiocy. The other day I told my wife there has to me a way to profit the Merkel craziness, but outside of very long term shorts of Mercedes stock, what can one do? But probably having a good mechanism for shorting companies would be part of it– it’s not something I know how to do, or even if you can do it without your own specialized firm.
    Long term, I’d bet on China, but in the long run. . ..

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    My wife should have been a shorts analyst 10 to 15 years ago. She'd figure out which phone company offered us the lowest rates and her I-Can't-Believe-They're-Making-Money picks would go bankrupt spectacularly a year or two later.

    Global Crossing was one ...
    , @Anonymous

    outside of very long term shorts of Mercedes stock, what can one do?
     
    Buy butcher shops and make them halal-compliant. Open clitoridectomy clinics. Start a criminal law practice specializing in sharia-compliant honor killings.

    If you're looking to profit from immigration stateside, anything related to diagnosing and treating diabetes should be a safe bet.

    Don't let the Forbes 400 be the only people to profit from immigration!
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  95. CJ says:
    @AndrewR
    I wouldn't call those "meaningless squabbles", although certainly the elites are adept at fanning the flames of preexisting cultural schisms in order to keep the rabble fighting each other instead of teaming up to take out the group that is screwing everyone. We saw how the Tea Party and OWS were both coopted by the establishment. In the Tea Party's case, isolated cases of racialist Thoughtcrime were magnified in order to paint the Tea Party as a bunch of racist white meanypants.

    With OWS we watched as the SJWs took over with their "progressive stacks" and the "1%" were treated as a monolithic group, ensuring the failure of the movement since the lower 0.99% portion of the 1% felt compelled to side with the 0.01% against the 99% (who obviously have no shortage of cultural and ethnic fissures of their own). I think OWS would have been more effective had it focused on the top 0.01% or even the top 0.1%. There has been some distinction made between the 1%'s subgroups but nowhere near the cultural diffusion of "the 99% vs the 1%". Then again, comprehending decimals requires a baseline level of numeracy that may seem low to iSteve commenters but is probably above the level of many if not most Americans.

    But Shorn… does have a point that the .01% is perfectly happy for others to argue about gay and green all day. I’ve actually gotten a little traction with people by noting out that everything SJWs/hipsters/progs bang on about is no problem for plutocrats. Similarly, with Europeans, you can get somewhere when you point out that the actions of their “anti-fascists” are pretty much indistinguishable from those of fascists.

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    • Replies: @AndrewR
    I don't think I implied otherwise. The plutocrats keep the proles angry over things that don't directly involve the plutocrats in any way. The GOP uses abortion to get poor people to vote for corporate welfare, tax cuts for the rich and open borders, and the Dems use race and sex baiting to get poor people to vote for open borders and rich people to vote for their own ethnic displacement.
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  96. One further point about the Theranos debacle.

    One might argue that Elizabeth Holmes isn’t the first entrepreneur who brought a company to prominence based on shaky (even fraudulent?) underlying technology or business plan. But there are a few things that seem to be unique. For one, the company has been developing its technology for 12 years now — which should have been ample time to find out whether the technology and its business could fly. Second, the evaluation was massive — over 9 billion dollars — despite the failure to verify the technology over this stretch of time. Third, the CEO was barely in her twenties when she started this company, without any track record for success (which of course renders the lack of due diligence more irresponsible).

    And of course this is the very first case of a woman becoming a billionaire on her own merits, based on technology she herself developed. And it turns out be very likely something so overhyped that the story presented bears no important resemblance to the reality.

    It really is impossible to see how this company would have gotten out of the door if there weren’t the Hear Me Roar angle. Without the Sheryl Sandberg’s of the world, Theranos would long ago have been dead meat.

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  97. notsaying says:
    @Mike1
    Legal immigration is around a million people a year. Adding one person to a room of three hundred is not something it is realistically possible to notice.

    My suggestion is to influence who comes here so that the new entrants add to the country rather than needing to be take care of.

    The immigration bill that passed the Senate a few years ago would have greatly increased the 1 million a year number.

    When we end up legalizing the illegal people already here — which I believe is inevitable — we will probably have their immediate family members still overseas over here in 5-10 years and perhaps even less. There is a good argument to be made to get kids who will end up here anyway here as soon as possible to learn English and have as many years as possible in our schools. In other words, it’s better to get them at age 5 or 10 instead of 15 or 17.

    So we will get a surge of people tied to our (formerly) illegal immigrants which I expect will number tens of millions.

    Why should we just agree to allow the people who want more immigration to get their way? Isn’t that what you are really saying when you say to forget about the numbers and concentrate on the quality of newcomers?

    How can we afford to ignore the numbers? It wouldn’t surprise me at all if it turns out we lose half the private sector jobs we have today by 2040, given how many jobs are being eliminated by technology. With so much uncertainty about so many fundamentals, why on Earth should we saddle our descendants with tens of millions more people to take care of?

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  98. AnAnon says:
    @Anonymous
    Why not just require parity of native and H1-B salaries? It's not as good as getting rid of the guestworker visa program entirely, but it would significantly erode the cost advantage of hiring a visa holder over a native worker. Of course, people like me don't think this country needs any more immigration while our real unemployment rate is near 20% and our STEM-trained graduates can't find decent jobs, so long waits for green cards certainly don't concern us.

    he says its racist to prevent green cards from being dominated from any one group. you are responding to a troll. that or an idiot.

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  99. AnAnon says:
    @Mike1
    Legal immigration is around a million people a year. Adding one person to a room of three hundred is not something it is realistically possible to notice.

    My suggestion is to influence who comes here so that the new entrants add to the country rather than needing to be take care of.

    ” Adding one person to a room of three hundred is not something it is realistically possible to notice. ” – the room was rated for 250. When water runs out in the SW, we’re going to notice it. when our infrastructure, already in the process of crumbling, buckles, that will be noticed. The workforce participation rate crashing and leaving millions of young people without any hope is yet another sign that will be noticed.

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  100. Rob McX says:

    It would be better to keep the ten million illegals in America than to crack down on them and then let them apply for legal status (which seems to be the plan of many Republican “tough on immigration” types). Once legalised, they’ll bring in their family members from the home country. Also, remember the baby boom that followed the 1986 amnesty.

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  101. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @peterike
    Why not just require parity of native and H1-B salaries?

    Because it's not about salaries. It's about the ability to work the H-1B employee to death and get no resistance because they are compliant, beta Indians and Chinese.

    And while the system may have been about lower salaries at first, now it's pure ethnic favoritism. It's been going on long enough that many Indians and Chinese are in upper management positions or at least in hiring positions. Once in place, they hire ONLY from among their own. I've seen this happen again and again. Indians tend to be better at climbing the management ladder because of their command of English, and because a certain type of Indian is a born pole climber. And I don't mean that favorably.

    Indians know precisely how much they are taking advantage of stupid, corrupt American companies that let them get away with displacing Americans. They would NEVER let a similar phenomenon occur in India.

    “And while the system may have been about lower salaries at first, now it’s pure ethnic favoritism. It’s been going on long enough that many Indians and Chinese are in upper management positions or at least in hiring positions. Once in place, they hire ONLY from among their own. I’ve seen this happen again and again.”

    Isn’t that against the law?

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  102. Travis says:
    @Desiderius
    I was able to change my mind to support immigration restriction by noting that yes, we are a nation of immigrants, and the way we've been able to manage that successfully is a policy that has ebbed and flowed naturally throughout American history. We're long overdue for an ebb.

    treu, and importantly American immigrants were primarily European…We have no history of massive immigration from Asia and Africa.

    since 1990 we have been admitting 1.1 million legal immigrants each year…if these immigrants were primarily from European nations many of us would have less concern.

    from 1900-1965 90% of the immigrants to America were Europeans , thus they had less impact on our culture and were able to assimilate into American culture.

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  103. @Mike1
    I grew up in a country that Americans are desperate to move to. I have lost count of the number of Americans that have told me they have tried to apply for residency of where I am from. Every trip I take there I sit next to someone from this country who is trying find a way to move there.

    Yet we do let two groups of Americans move there:

    - High net worth. Distasteful but every country on earth welcomes the rich.
    - Needed skills. If you have got off your butt and developed skills that are in demand you are welcome.

    This is what I am arguing for.

    Which country is this?

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  104. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Former Darfur
    Johnny Mercer probably would have begged to differ. He was from Savannah, Georgia.

    Hoagy Carmichael was from south Indiana, which geographically isn't the South, but as with Illinois and Missouri, its southern parts are of a differing opinion.

    I think it’s kind of cute how we now have the music category of “The Great American Songbook” even though it overlaps fairly significantly with jazz. I can see the reason for the split, but it seems kind of funny to me. Having said that, I enjoy the music of the Great American Songbook very much.

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  105. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Rob McX
    America is a nation of immigrants - white immigrants. They shaped and defined the character of the nation. It's European in terms of laws, civic structure, language, and religion . If any people can be said to have a collective right to anything, the founding stock of America have a right to keep their country as it is. The alternative that's being foisted on them is not a nation of any kind, but a hotch-potch of different races (in perpetual flux due to continuing immigration) elbowing each other at the ethnic spoils trough.

    Isn’t it a country of white settlers who created the country, rather than simply white immigrants who came to an already settled country with infrastructure, etc.?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rob McX
    Settlers, to be more precise, when you're talking about the people who create a country. That founding stock has the right to decide who can immigrate to it.
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  106. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Clyde

    Vastly increasing immigration has done wonders for availability of ethnic food, but the marginal returns on that have been diminishing steadily.
     
    The average Chinese restaurant truly sucks these days, with the wild card being the shrimp might have been cultivated in a polluted, chemicalized ditch in China. And some I have eaten in Chinese places sure tasted like it. Shrimp is commonly exported in 5-lb frozen blocks. There are Chinese owned shrimp farms all over the world including Thailand, Panama, Ecuador, Latin America. Growing, freezing, exporting.
    Diminishing returns? Yes!!!
    Mandatory post of open borders loony, George Mason economics professor Tyler Cowin's ethic dining guide for the Washintoon DC area. Two thirds of these eateries would not exist without your Federal tax dollars flooding into the DC region.
    https://tylercowensethnicdiningguide.com/ My quickie count is 500 ethnic restaurant reviews since 2006. Give us your tired and poor and especially your skilled Hunan and Szechuan chefs!

    “The average Chinese restaurant truly sucks these days, with the wild card being the shrimp might have been cultivated in a polluted, chemicalized ditch in China. And some I have eaten in Chinese places sure tasted like it. Shrimp is commonly exported in 5-lb frozen blocks. There are Chinese owned shrimp farms all over the world including Thailand, Panama, Ecuador, Latin America. Growing, freezing, exporting.”

    I pretty much only eat vegetable dishes at Chinese restaurants. I never have confidence in their mea, poultry or fish.

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    • Replies: @Anonym
    I have stopped eating at non-white ethnic restaurants in European/Anglosphere countries, and if forced to choose, I pick the restaurant with the highest concentration of white staff. One of the easiest things to do is support our own. Maybe I'm not the only one.

    Until we can explicitly hire based on race, I wonder if it would be possible for a chain restaurant to play on this, e.g. use the flag in their branding somehow. Maybe rather than a chain, let it be an open source concept that others can copy? I don't know, but I suspect that as the marginal utility of importing foreigners for ethnic restaurants has diminished, the familiarity is breeding contempt, at least it has with me.
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  107. @Mike1
    You are right some nativism is needed. Pride in your country is healthy to a certain point. It is unfortunate that people can't hold nuanced views. There seems to be no daylight between "let everyone in" and hillbilly level terror of anyone born in a different holler.

    Isn’t it interesting that the Hollywood archetype of hillbilly is incestuous and xenophobic, and yet Europe’s primary challenge today is accommodating perhaps millions of cousin-marrying, tribalist, xenophobes.

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  108. @Mike1
    You are right some nativism is needed. Pride in your country is healthy to a certain point. It is unfortunate that people can't hold nuanced views. There seems to be no daylight between "let everyone in" and hillbilly level terror of anyone born in a different holler.

    Isn’t it interesting that the Hollywood archetype of hillbilly is incestuous and xenophobic, and yet Europe’s primary challenge today is accommodating perhaps millions of cousin-marrying, tribalist, xenophobes.

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  109. AndrewR says:
    @CJ
    But Shorn... does have a point that the .01% is perfectly happy for others to argue about gay and green all day. I've actually gotten a little traction with people by noting out that everything SJWs/hipsters/progs bang on about is no problem for plutocrats. Similarly, with Europeans, you can get somewhere when you point out that the actions of their "anti-fascists" are pretty much indistinguishable from those of fascists.

    I don’t think I implied otherwise. The plutocrats keep the proles angry over things that don’t directly involve the plutocrats in any way. The GOP uses abortion to get poor people to vote for corporate welfare, tax cuts for the rich and open borders, and the Dems use race and sex baiting to get poor people to vote for open borders and rich people to vote for their own ethnic displacement.

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  110. SPMoore8 says:
    @Former Darfur
    The Trolley Song, of course, is the Gay National Anthem.

    Just saying.

    Basically everything in the Great American Songbook (i.e., popular songs in America from about the 1920′s to the 1950′s, and then recorded by prominent American vocalists, usually Sinatra and his endless epigones) is a Gay National Anthem. And that also include virtually every tune from Broadway from Gershwin up through Sondheim.

    Just Saying. Although it doesn’t really please me to say it.

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  111. Rob McX says:
    @Anonymous
    Isn't it a country of white settlers who created the country, rather than simply white immigrants who came to an already settled country with infrastructure, etc.?

    Settlers, to be more precise, when you’re talking about the people who create a country. That founding stock has the right to decide who can immigrate to it.

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    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    "..has the right.." Who sez?
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  112. Anon7 says:
    @Rob McX
    America is a nation of immigrants - white immigrants. They shaped and defined the character of the nation. It's European in terms of laws, civic structure, language, and religion . If any people can be said to have a collective right to anything, the founding stock of America have a right to keep their country as it is. The alternative that's being foisted on them is not a nation of any kind, but a hotch-potch of different races (in perpetual flux due to continuing immigration) elbowing each other at the ethnic spoils trough.

    And, as noted elsewhere, all of the boat people are going in the same direction – away from crappy nations run by people who are African, Asian, Middle Eastern and South American, and toward nations created, built and run by white people – the US, northern Europe and Australia/NZ.

    Based on what I’ve read by la Raza supporters, I really think that ‘elbowing each other at the ethnic spoils trough” is exactly what they are eager to do. My read of their beliefs is that white people are tired and just aren’t vital anymore; and there’s whole country full of wealth that they built that’s going to waste! And that’s why they want to come here, by the tens of millions.

    I think that if we don’t win the next election with a President and congress that is ready to enforce current immigration law, secure the border and shut off the flow of immigrants, we’ve lost it forever.

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  113. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Santoculto
    20-30 years before, to be favorable to ''nativism'' was normal. Today, ''mèrdia'' and co. make it look ''impossible''.

    When I was in middle school, awhile back but not that long so, we were taught that nationalism was good and that it made countries strong. I remember doing a project on it. When did nationalism become a dirty word?

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  114. @nglaer
    We need an isteve investment club, for figuring out ways to make money from current idiocy. The other day I told my wife there has to me a way to profit the Merkel craziness, but outside of very long term shorts of Mercedes stock, what can one do? But probably having a good mechanism for shorting companies would be part of it-- it's not something I know how to do, or even if you can do it without your own specialized firm.
    Long term, I'd bet on China, but in the long run. . ..

    My wife should have been a shorts analyst 10 to 15 years ago. She’d figure out which phone company offered us the lowest rates and her I-Can’t-Believe-They’re-Making-Money picks would go bankrupt spectacularly a year or two later.

    Global Crossing was one …

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Clinton bagman now governor of Virginia Terry McAuliffe "made" $16 million at Global Crossing before it went bust and everybody else got screwed. Funny how that works.
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  115. Tracy says: • Website
    @Fiddlesticks
    We are quite capable of doing this on some issues - it all depends on framing things right. "Cold War mentality" became D shorthand to backhandedly acknowledge that R's were right about anti-Communism, but that things had changed.

    If nativists had any framing skills whatsoever, they could coin the term "sweatshop mentality" to taunt those think we should stay in the Ellis Island days forever.

    Anchor your adversaries' position to a term that creates negative emotions - "Cold War"...no fun! "sweatshop"...ewww!

    We are quite capable of doing this on some issues – it all depends on framing things right. “Cold War mentality” became D shorthand to backhandedly acknowledge that R’s were right about anti-Communism, but that things had changed.

    If nativists had any framing skills whatsoever, they could coin the term “sweatshop mentality” to taunt those think we should stay in the Ellis Island days forever.

    This nails it. It’s sad, but most people think what they’re told to think, and are generally capable of “thinking” only in terms of sound bytes. Take your cause, re-frame it, come up with an easily “meme-able” word or phrase to package it, and repeat the meme as often as you can, pairing it with people and things that are considered “cool.” If you own the channels of culture, you can also get celebrities in on it, get some “art” going, throw some big “happenings,” and yer done.

    Someone famous, I forget who, said that it was “Will and Grace” that changed Americans’ view about gay “marriage,” and I think they’re right. That’s how malleable and not grounded in principles most people are. Most people don’t have premises they reason from; they have those prepackaged sound bytes handed to them by the people who run the media, and their “arguments” in defense of them consist of sarcasm, derision, snark, and whatever else amounts to a teenager rolling his eyes .

    Whattaworld.

    Read More
    • Replies: @iffen
    The sides are not equal. Notwithstanding the excellent job that people like Steve do, the other side has many more of the wordsmith types. The other side is less inhibited in their use of language to accomplish their goals. Our side has a lot of people who think that freedom of speech is a good thing and who actually understand that it means free speech for people who are saying stuff that you don’t want to hear. The other side understands the danger involved and has less restrain in silencing the opposition. Our side has too many people who believe that people should weigh the issues and vote for the candidates that most closely align with one’s interests. More people on the other side understand that the point is to get the votes. We have too many people who really believe in “democracy.” The other side has many people who understand that democracy is just one tool that can be used to obtain power. We are crippled by our own beliefs and that is why we are losing. I know this is just a lot of generalizations, but you can see it everywhere you look.

    The saddest part is that Will and Grace was really a funny show.
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  116. @Rob McX
    Settlers, to be more precise, when you're talking about the people who create a country. That founding stock has the right to decide who can immigrate to it.

    “..has the right..” Who sez?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rob McX
    Of course the term "right" is by its nature ambiguous. Truth is, none of us has a right to anything unless we have the physical force to claim it.
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  117. Anonym says:
    @Anonymous
    "The average Chinese restaurant truly sucks these days, with the wild card being the shrimp might have been cultivated in a polluted, chemicalized ditch in China. And some I have eaten in Chinese places sure tasted like it. Shrimp is commonly exported in 5-lb frozen blocks. There are Chinese owned shrimp farms all over the world including Thailand, Panama, Ecuador, Latin America. Growing, freezing, exporting."

    I pretty much only eat vegetable dishes at Chinese restaurants. I never have confidence in their mea, poultry or fish.

    I have stopped eating at non-white ethnic restaurants in European/Anglosphere countries, and if forced to choose, I pick the restaurant with the highest concentration of white staff. One of the easiest things to do is support our own. Maybe I’m not the only one.

    Until we can explicitly hire based on race, I wonder if it would be possible for a chain restaurant to play on this, e.g. use the flag in their branding somehow. Maybe rather than a chain, let it be an open source concept that others can copy? I don’t know, but I suspect that as the marginal utility of importing foreigners for ethnic restaurants has diminished, the familiarity is breeding contempt, at least it has with me.

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  118. Rob McX says:
    @Neil Templeton
    "..has the right.." Who sez?

    Of course the term “right” is by its nature ambiguous. Truth is, none of us has a right to anything unless we have the physical force to claim it.

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  119. Clyde says:
    @Clifford Brown
    Trump's mother was an immigrant to this country from the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. In a way, Trump could be seen as an anchor baby. Did Trump's mother speak Scottish Gaelic? Not of much interest to most people, but it is to me.

    Two of Trump's wives were European immigrants to our Great Land which can arguably make Trump's children anchor babies.

    Would a Trump Presidency push for more European immigration? I would be on board with that. What if Trump made this a more explicit policy on the campaign trail? I think there is a fair number of disaffected Norwegians, Swedes, Germans and assorted Euros who would jump at the chance of US citizenship.

    Would a Trump Presidency push for more European immigration?

    If he really wants to give agita to the anti-whites here, President Trump becomes pro-active in allowing in persecuted white refugees from South Africa-Zimbabwe and Christian refugees from Syria and Iraq. His popularity would zoom.

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  120. iffen says:
    @Tracy

    We are quite capable of doing this on some issues – it all depends on framing things right. “Cold War mentality” became D shorthand to backhandedly acknowledge that R’s were right about anti-Communism, but that things had changed.

    If nativists had any framing skills whatsoever, they could coin the term “sweatshop mentality” to taunt those think we should stay in the Ellis Island days forever.
     
    This nails it. It's sad, but most people think what they're told to think, and are generally capable of "thinking" only in terms of sound bytes. Take your cause, re-frame it, come up with an easily "meme-able" word or phrase to package it, and repeat the meme as often as you can, pairing it with people and things that are considered "cool." If you own the channels of culture, you can also get celebrities in on it, get some "art" going, throw some big "happenings," and yer done.

    Someone famous, I forget who, said that it was "Will and Grace" that changed Americans' view about gay "marriage," and I think they're right. That's how malleable and not grounded in principles most people are. Most people don't have premises they reason from; they have those prepackaged sound bytes handed to them by the people who run the media, and their "arguments" in defense of them consist of sarcasm, derision, snark, and whatever else amounts to a teenager rolling his eyes .

    Whattaworld.

    The sides are not equal. Notwithstanding the excellent job that people like Steve do, the other side has many more of the wordsmith types. The other side is less inhibited in their use of language to accomplish their goals. Our side has a lot of people who think that freedom of speech is a good thing and who actually understand that it means free speech for people who are saying stuff that you don’t want to hear. The other side understands the danger involved and has less restrain in silencing the opposition. Our side has too many people who believe that people should weigh the issues and vote for the candidates that most closely align with one’s interests. More people on the other side understand that the point is to get the votes. We have too many people who really believe in “democracy.” The other side has many people who understand that democracy is just one tool that can be used to obtain power. We are crippled by our own beliefs and that is why we are losing. I know this is just a lot of generalizations, but you can see it everywhere you look.

    The saddest part is that Will and Grace was really a funny show.

    Read More
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  121. @Steve Sailer
    My wife should have been a shorts analyst 10 to 15 years ago. She'd figure out which phone company offered us the lowest rates and her I-Can't-Believe-They're-Making-Money picks would go bankrupt spectacularly a year or two later.

    Global Crossing was one ...

    Clinton bagman now governor of Virginia Terry McAuliffe “made” $16 million at Global Crossing before it went bust and everybody else got screwed. Funny how that works.

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  122. AndrewR says:
    @Rob McX
    America is a nation of immigrants - white immigrants. They shaped and defined the character of the nation. It's European in terms of laws, civic structure, language, and religion . If any people can be said to have a collective right to anything, the founding stock of America have a right to keep their country as it is. The alternative that's being foisted on them is not a nation of any kind, but a hotch-potch of different races (in perpetual flux due to continuing immigration) elbowing each other at the ethnic spoils trough.

    Ah yes, that culturally and ethnically homogenous entity called Europe.

    I’m into false dichotomies and juvenile notions of history and genetics too. We should be friends!

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    • Replies: @Rob McX

    Ah yes, that culturally and ethnically homogenous entity called Europe.
     
    Culturally and ethnically homogenous? You said that, not me. There's relatively little friction among the nationalities making up the white population of America, that's all I'm saying - nothing compared to what'll be created by adding millions of non-whites.
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  123. AndrewR says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Sanders was more aggressive on the campaign trail recently.

    I wouldn't discount the possibility of Sanders calling for an end to the H1b. He's made previous statements showing discomfort with the impact of foreign workers on the American labor market. The real problem with Sanders is that he's pro-amnesty and doesn't seem like he'd be aggressively anti-illegal enough. If we don't have a tough line against illegal immigration, people will continue to overstay their visas or cross the border.

    The point of Sanders talking publicly about immigration is that it shifts the overton window and forces other candidates to shift their stances. So even if he loses, he shifts the debate. It's particularly important to have anti-immigration candidates in the Democratic party, as the party is lacking in these.

    Back last year, the immigration debate was between those who wanted amnesty and those who wanted amnesty + H1b expansion. Now Trump has shifted the debate to the point where Republican politicians talk very little about the "path to citizenship." Hopefully the debate will shift enough where Republican politicians begin to turn against legal immigration too.

    I hate to be this blunt, and I would LOVE to be wrong about this, but I can’t help but think that it is absolutely insane to suggest the Democrats are going to talk advocate for any sort of immigration restriction in this cycle, if not ever again. Please guide me through the logic you used to conclude it’s even remotely possible. Even Bernie is not going to call for it because the left has decided that borders are racist and that racists are evil, so it’s a non-starter even for an old-school leftie like him.

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  124. @Dave Pinsen
    In fairness, one of the old school VCs called Theranos out in the FT recently:
    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/655535629665771521

    That’s interesting. I’m under the impression that Sequoia is less prone than some of the other firms to investing in companies that don’t have a clear path to profitability.

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  125. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @nglaer
    We need an isteve investment club, for figuring out ways to make money from current idiocy. The other day I told my wife there has to me a way to profit the Merkel craziness, but outside of very long term shorts of Mercedes stock, what can one do? But probably having a good mechanism for shorting companies would be part of it-- it's not something I know how to do, or even if you can do it without your own specialized firm.
    Long term, I'd bet on China, but in the long run. . ..

    outside of very long term shorts of Mercedes stock, what can one do?

    Buy butcher shops and make them halal-compliant. Open clitoridectomy clinics. Start a criminal law practice specializing in sharia-compliant honor killings.

    If you’re looking to profit from immigration stateside, anything related to diagnosing and treating diabetes should be a safe bet.

    Don’t let the Forbes 400 be the only people to profit from immigration!

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  126. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    http://stuffblackpeopledontlike.blogspot.com/2015/10/the-united-states-of-america-jumps-shark.html

    Finally a solution to community policing.

    Cops should nae nae or bump and grind.

    Obama hails this.

    White folks attitude about blacks is ‘treat them like children who are stronger than you.’

    Let the Good Times Roll Policing.

    Why didn’t Darren Wilson just shake his ass with Michael Brown?

    Next time blacks act bad, just dance with them.

    Clinton called for midnight basketball.

    How about midnight twerking to start the healing?

    If Bush can save Africa by going there, giving billions in aid, and beating on the bongo drum, I guess this will help too.

    I Have a Drum.

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  127. Rob McX says:
    @AndrewR
    Ah yes, that culturally and ethnically homogenous entity called Europe.

    I'm into false dichotomies and juvenile notions of history and genetics too. We should be friends!

    Ah yes, that culturally and ethnically homogenous entity called Europe.

    Culturally and ethnically homogenous? You said that, not me. There’s relatively little friction among the nationalities making up the white population of America, that’s all I’m saying – nothing compared to what’ll be created by adding millions of non-whites.

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