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Here is a new highbrow quarterly being promoted as sympathetic to Trump: American Affairs.

The first issue features articles by new National Security Council member Michael Anton, Clyde Prestowitz, and David P. Goldman, the “Spengler” guy who used to be a LaRouchie.

 
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  1. Is having a war with Iran a big theme?

    Read More
    • Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist
    Is having a war with Iran a big theme?

    Very good question, considering the names listed.

    Steve has called Goldman "for entertainment purposes only". Goldman's actually name dropped Steve favorably a couple of times over the years. Sure, it's easy to blow him off on the Rosenweig-America is this special place, but all nations will die but Israel-Iran/Islam/all my enemies are doomed thing. I find Goldman to be ridiculous on the obvious stuff, but I have to admit every few columns he has something insightful to say- kind of like Rod Dreher, except you have to wade through some ridiculously pompous stuff to find it.

    , @anon
    It certainly can act as an economic shot in the arm in Trump country and help him propel through 2020 as Iraq did to GWB in 2004. Of course, by 2024, the house of cards will collapse, but then most would forget what happened.
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  2. @nglaer
    Is having a war with Iran a big theme?

    Is having a war with Iran a big theme?

    Very good question, considering the names listed.

    Steve has called Goldman “for entertainment purposes only”. Goldman’s actually name dropped Steve favorably a couple of times over the years. Sure, it’s easy to blow him off on the Rosenweig-America is this special place, but all nations will die but Israel-Iran/Islam/all my enemies are doomed thing. I find Goldman to be ridiculous on the obvious stuff, but I have to admit every few columns he has something insightful to say- kind of like Rod Dreher, except you have to wade through some ridiculously pompous stuff to find it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
    Rod Dreher is fifty times more pompous than David Goldman. I actually find Dreher worse than David Brooks.
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  3. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Judging by the writers and content of the articles, it’s a neocon journal that’s pro-Trump. There are West Coast Straussians and other neocons who are relatively pro-Trump compared to more establishment neocons largely because they haven’t had prominent policymaking jobs and because they’re much less sanguine about recent US policy being good for the future of neoconnery.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    West Coast Straussians -- NO!

    West Coast Offense -- YES!
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  4. I subscribed. So far only read one article (on Burnham’s managerial elite)–excellent review of Burnham’s thought and the causes of our contemporary crisis, but a little disappointing in that it did not arrive at any solutions.

    Steve–any chance you might contribute to this august publication?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I haven't been asked.
    , @Dark Reformation101
    See what I wrote below for "solutions."
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  5. 5 out of the 8 articles so far have been written by Jewish authors.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SFG
    Well, they're West Coast (((Strauss)))ians, after all. It ain't Chronicles.

    Might give them a little more mainstream credibility. Who knows. Personally I'd like to see moderate populist ideas get an airing. It'd be nice to see free trade deals evaluated with an eye to their effects on American workers, or immigration viewed as something that should benefit us rather than a right owed to everyone.
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  6. @O'Really
    I subscribed. So far only read one article (on Burnham's managerial elite)--excellent review of Burnham's thought and the causes of our contemporary crisis, but a little disappointing in that it did not arrive at any solutions.

    Steve--any chance you might contribute to this august publication?

    I haven’t been asked.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    They'll need some more wins under their belt before they can do that.

    May be sooner than you think.
    , @O'Really
    Make a pitch.
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  7. OT:

    George W. Bush from 02/27/2017:

    A bedrock of our freedom is the right to worship freely. People who murder the innocent are not religious people. They want to advance an ideology.

    Can someone explain that word salad to me?

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag
    I believe it is called a Mad Lib.
    , @Busby
    He couldn't say Islamic terrorist if he was lying in the street bleeding from a sucking chest wound caused by an Islamic terrorist car bomb.
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  8. “Spengler’s” latest article at PJM, was possibly the most insane thing I have ever read. The man is out to lunch and late for dinner.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Not Raul
    He should watch out.

    Cocaine is a hell of a drug.
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  9. @Steve Sailer
    I haven't been asked.

    They’ll need some more wins under their belt before they can do that.

    May be sooner than you think.

    Read More
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  10. There hasn’t been a good moderate populist-nationalist (‘alt-center’?) journal of opinion in my memory (and I used to go to magazine stores and look through the whole range). Maybe its time has come.

    I mean, you can map out the political landscape–what’s on the other side of libertarianism and globalism?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    There hasn’t been a good moderate populist-nationalist (‘alt-center’?) journal of opinion in my memory
     
    You're reading one.
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  11. I used to read Spengler all the time back in the day, and I was on his forum from early times. He is an Israeli supremacist, plain and simple. That’s his goal and everything he writes is bent towards it.

    Read More
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  12. @jJay
    OT:

    George W. Bush from 02/27/2017:

    A bedrock of our freedom is the right to worship freely. People who murder the innocent are not religious people. They want to advance an ideology.
     
    Can someone explain that word salad to me?

    I believe it is called a Mad Lib.

    Read More
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  13. @jJay
    OT:

    George W. Bush from 02/27/2017:

    A bedrock of our freedom is the right to worship freely. People who murder the innocent are not religious people. They want to advance an ideology.
     
    Can someone explain that word salad to me?

    He couldn’t say Islamic terrorist if he was lying in the street bleeding from a sucking chest wound caused by an Islamic terrorist car bomb.

    Read More
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  14. I was so happy when I found out Publius Decius Mus was Michael Anton, and that he’s employed in the Trump Administration.

    Read More
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  15. @yaqub the mad scientist
    Is having a war with Iran a big theme?

    Very good question, considering the names listed.

    Steve has called Goldman "for entertainment purposes only". Goldman's actually name dropped Steve favorably a couple of times over the years. Sure, it's easy to blow him off on the Rosenweig-America is this special place, but all nations will die but Israel-Iran/Islam/all my enemies are doomed thing. I find Goldman to be ridiculous on the obvious stuff, but I have to admit every few columns he has something insightful to say- kind of like Rod Dreher, except you have to wade through some ridiculously pompous stuff to find it.

    Rod Dreher is fifty times more pompous than David Goldman. I actually find Dreher worse than David Brooks.

    Read More
    • Replies: @San Joaquin Sam

    Rod Dreher is fifty times more pompous than David Goldman. I actually find Dreher worse than David Brooks.
     
    That Dreher guy really is terrible.
    , @Old fogey
    Wow, it is hard to believe there is anyone worse than David Brooks.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Rod Dreher is fifty times more pompous than David Goldman.
     
    That doesn't sound very "crunchy", does it?

    Too bad David Goldman didn't get the chance to collaborate with Oliver Sacks.
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  16. SFG says:
    @Anonymous
    5 out of the 8 articles so far have been written by Jewish authors.

    Well, they’re West Coast (((Strauss)))ians, after all. It ain’t Chronicles.

    Might give them a little more mainstream credibility. Who knows. Personally I’d like to see moderate populist ideas get an airing. It’d be nice to see free trade deals evaluated with an eye to their effects on American workers, or immigration viewed as something that should benefit us rather than a right owed to everyone.

    Read More
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  17. @Sam Haysom
    Rod Dreher is fifty times more pompous than David Goldman. I actually find Dreher worse than David Brooks.

    Rod Dreher is fifty times more pompous than David Goldman. I actually find Dreher worse than David Brooks.

    That Dreher guy really is terrible.

    Read More
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  18. @MikeTB
    "Spengler's" latest article at PJM, was possibly the most insane thing I have ever read. The man is out to lunch and late for dinner.

    He should watch out.

    Cocaine is a hell of a drug.

    Read More
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  19. The outfit is run by a guy called Julius Klein, a “Harvard whizz kid” who apparently made a nice little pile playing the stock market. Klein apparently worked with Michael “93” Anton at the journal of American Greatness or something.

    Apparently, the purpose of the outfit is to provide some “intellectual” foundations for the Trump administration.

    I am, personally, fascinated by this guy Klein, as I am by all these “wonks” or “public policy” experts or whatever.

    What’s his angle?

    How do they get gigs like this?

    Presumably coming from an Ivy league university is a requisite.

    One theory is that this guy Klein saw an opportunity to create a new journal “explaining” Trump to other intellectuals – a underserved “market” if ever there was one.

    ( Though Steve Sailer (I have read every one your “noticing” for nearly a year now – excellent) and a couple of other boys and girls would be excellent explainers or councillors to those suffering Trump Derangement Syndrome. )

    Ok, so that’s job one.

    Job two is to do TV spots and interviews. Become the face of the Trump intelligentsia. Dress and talk like Buckley of course.

    Job three is to get a book out – hit the speaking circuit. Have a few debates with some of the top Brahmins: Brooks, Krugman, and Kristof. Have a discussion with Samantha Powers at the Kennedy School of Whatever at Harvard.

    Job four is to get attached either to the administration, become an adviser to some top dog republican, or join the eventual Trump re-election team and then work for the admin, which allows you to go back on Fox, or CNN, or CNBC.

    Rise and Repeat.

    Is that how these guys work?

    The other question I am interested in could be stated as follows: are these guys just the whistle of the kettle?

    With men like Anton, or Gorka, or even Bannon, the question is what kind of input do they have? Or is their role simply to explain to other intellectuals what Trump “really” meant?

    Another way of looking at it is as follows. Some guy puts a “hex” on you; so, you get your own witchdoctor to tell everyone that the “hex” has been lifted. Or, some guy says he’s gonna go get his lawyer, so you go get yours. It’s the political version of “lawyering up” or bringing your homies, or some hirelings, to a street beef.

    In other words, they are intellectual bodyguards.

    The left intellectuals hit Trump as a buffon, not so says Julius Klein, who might then go on to say: “Trump’s election victory signifies that the “mangerialism” as described by James Burnham all those years ago in his ground-breaking and iconoclastic book The Managerial Revolution has finally run aground. Have you read James Burnham Nicholas Kristof?”

    During the Roman Civil war, between Caesar and the Republicans, both sides wrote propaganda pieces attacking each other. Even after Caesar’s victory, Brutus wrote a tribute to Cato (who committed suicide rather than suffer from Caesar’s “clemency”) and Caesar penned a response. Keeping Up Appearances and all that.

    Court intellectuals and court intellectualism.

    Speaking of James Burnham, he is a fantastic thinker and writer. His book Machiavellians: Defenders of Freedom convinced me that I had been doing political analysis wrong the whole time.

    The principles:

    Politics is the struggle for power and pre-eminence.

    In every political regime, there are the rulers and there are the ruled. This distinction is the most important one.

    The rulers of a regime have a “formula” which justifies their rule over the great unwashed masses.

    The purpose of the “formula” is to mask power’s real intentions, and real actions.

    Politics is an elite activity. The political elites all have certain psychological profile, namely Machiavellianism, sociopathy and narcissism.

    Tis an excellent book.

    Klein’s essay is long, but I believe the punchline calls for class and caste war against the managers/ mandarins/Brahmin/bobos that run the civil service (the permanent government), the universities, the press, the judiciary, the NGOs, the foundations and of course, all the strategists, staffers, spin-doctors and “back stairs crawlers” of both political parties. Control. Alter Delete.

    According to C Wright Mills in The Power Elite we basically have a Triumvirate of powers in USG:

    1: The Corporations.

    2: The Political Directorate (progressives, both of the inner “blue” and outer “red” party).

    3: The Warlords.

    Trump’s election appears to be a temporary triumph of reactionary populism aligned with the Warlords, with substantial backing of some corporations, over the corrupt and incompetent politicos.

    America is an Empire (I’m far away from Rome in Britannia); to restore the empire to greatness, knock out or “repeal and replace” (2) with a new elite with a new theory and practice.

    Accomplishing this task means, as Bannon barks, to “deconstruct” the administrative state.

    1: Investigate charge, try and convict the corrupt members of the inner party. Start with the “flies” to progressively isolate the “tigers”, and then bag the “tigers”. Investigate links between certain “tigers” and certain “jackals” in Persia, Numidia and with the Moomin Sisterhood.
    2: Punish and clean out the intel boys and girl responsible for the “squeaks.” National security folks.

    3: America, and the Empire, is at WAR. This requires Command and Control over all aspects of the information systems that have been engaging in “unconstitutional” and “treasonous” practices.

    In China, The Weekly Southern ran negative op-eds against the new boss Xi. A few days later, Cadres were writing their op-eds.

    The NYT, the WP, CNN, etc etc, must be “nationalised” in the name of the “nation.”

    4. Defund the universities. Aim for total divorce between the federal government and education. Begin investigations into academic fraud, misconduct and misappropriations of tax-payer funds etc etc. Pressure some into turning “state’s witness”; offer “truth and reconciliation” for others, jail or re-education through for the rest. Wheel out debt forgiveness for all humanities students who never went to Ivy.

    5: Progressive deconstruction of the civil service state. Outsource tasks and responsibilities to private companies, operating on a “hire and fire” principle. In short, a return to the spoils system, but this time it is “wholesale” rather than “retail”. (The spoils go to companies, not favoured individuals.)

    6: Hand as much power back to the States, cities, towns and villages as possible.

    7: Lifetime healthcare, pension and bonuses for women with IQ overs 110, who are married and have three children – same with their children. Fathers get a guarantee of work, if they have a family, or agree to marry and have children.

    8: African American males, between the ages of 13 and 30 will receive a PS4, five games and a lifetime’s subscription to Netflix, with three new games per year, and a big bag of green, in return for zero rapes, robbery and murder – one further condition, they never get to vote ever again.

    9: Amend the constitution so that no Moomin can ever become a citizen, or stay longer than one year, subject to renewal, as long as Radical Moomin groups are in a state of War with U.S.A or its allies.

    10: Build the damn wall, and keep America Great for ever and ever.

    Amen.

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  20. OT: China is going all out to grab the few remaining crown jewels of American know-how

    http://semimd.com/eds-threads/2016/11/29/china-to-be-15-of-world-fab-capacity-by-2018/

    Relying on the “free market” is going to be the death of American manufacturing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    TSMC is pretty state of the art; Samsung too. Not sure I accept the "remaining crown jewels" theory. GlobalFoundries, the fab arm of AMD and IBM is owned by Abu Dhabi, UAE and has a pretty international management team. Intel, considered to be a leading U.S. manufacturer, actually has lot of properties, both physical and intellectual, abroad.
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  21. @O'Really
    I subscribed. So far only read one article (on Burnham's managerial elite)--excellent review of Burnham's thought and the causes of our contemporary crisis, but a little disappointing in that it did not arrive at any solutions.

    Steve--any chance you might contribute to this august publication?

    See what I wrote below for “solutions.”

    Read More
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  22. @Steve Sailer
    I haven't been asked.

    Make a pitch.

    Read More
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  23. Quote from Goldman piece:
    >> The U.S. stood godfather to the European Union, as the saying goes, to keep the Germans down, the Russians out, and the Americans in. <<

    This is your brain on drugs, Dave.

    The saying is about NATO, not the EU.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Seamus Padraig
    Goldman never denied that the original saying (attributed to Lord Ismay) was about NATO. He's just implying here what a lot of us have long believed: that the EU is really just the economic arm of NATO, and so it's purpose is essentially the same.
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  24. @nglaer
    Is having a war with Iran a big theme?

    It certainly can act as an economic shot in the arm in Trump country and help him propel through 2020 as Iraq did to GWB in 2004. Of course, by 2024, the house of cards will collapse, but then most would forget what happened.

    Read More
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  25. @SFG
    There hasn't been a good moderate populist-nationalist ('alt-center'?) journal of opinion in my memory (and I used to go to magazine stores and look through the whole range). Maybe its time has come.

    I mean, you can map out the political landscape--what's on the other side of libertarianism and globalism?

    There hasn’t been a good moderate populist-nationalist (‘alt-center’?) journal of opinion in my memory

    You’re reading one.

    Read More
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  26. @Sam Haysom
    Rod Dreher is fifty times more pompous than David Goldman. I actually find Dreher worse than David Brooks.

    Wow, it is hard to believe there is anyone worse than David Brooks.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dr kill
    The only thing worse than the old Brooks is new Brooks. Never underestimate what an older man will do to keep banging a babe 25 years his junior.
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  27. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Escher
    OT: China is going all out to grab the few remaining crown jewels of American know-how

    http://semimd.com/eds-threads/2016/11/29/china-to-be-15-of-world-fab-capacity-by-2018/

    Relying on the "free market" is going to be the death of American manufacturing.

    TSMC is pretty state of the art; Samsung too. Not sure I accept the “remaining crown jewels” theory. GlobalFoundries, the fab arm of AMD and IBM is owned by Abu Dhabi, UAE and has a pretty international management team. Intel, considered to be a leading U.S. manufacturer, actually has lot of properties, both physical and intellectual, abroad.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Twinkie

    Not sure I accept the “remaining crown jewels” theory.
     
    To be sure, there is a HUGE amount of intellectual property theft and industrial espionage committed by China. But late-industrializers that try to catch up often engage in such behaviors (Europeans did the same earlier).

    Obviously, it should go without saying that we should be aware of such attempts and protect ourselves. Just because it's a historical trend doesn't mean we should tolerate it.

    Nonetheless, some commenters here live under the fantasy that only whites invent and that East Asians just copy. They've obviously never been to corporate research facilities in Japan or Korea.

    Although it's not 100% certain that China is on the same path as Japan and Korea, the trend is broadly similar if delayed by 20-30 years.
    , @Escher
    Intel's core R&D in advanced manufacturing (which is what has kept them ahead of the curve all these years) is exclusively conducted in Hillsboro, Oregon. Their biggest factories are still in the US, although that will possibly change as China lures them into growing their footprint over there.
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  28. @Sam Haysom
    Rod Dreher is fifty times more pompous than David Goldman. I actually find Dreher worse than David Brooks.

    Rod Dreher is fifty times more pompous than David Goldman.

    That doesn’t sound very “crunchy”, does it?

    Too bad David Goldman didn’t get the chance to collaborate with Oliver Sacks.

    Read More
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  29. pat says:

    I like Spengler.
    He’s erudite, very knowledgeable in subjects ranging from finance to music.
    I don’t agree with his almost evangelical
    belief that demography is destiny, but it’s certainly plays an important role.
    He’s Jewish, and I believe a convert if that’s the right word to some kind of orthodoxy. In other words he’s someone who believes in a God, and not only a God, but an approachable One.
    If he’s an unabashed supportor of Israel I don’t find that strange at all.
    He was an early Trump backer, and his rather harsh op-ed suggesting it was time for the Neocons to go was a joy to read

    Read More
    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Not Raul
    Goldman was not an early Trump backer.

    Goldman was calling Trump voters losers back in May
    http://www.atimes.com/negotiate-this-mr-trump/

    In response to Trumps comments about Japan getting nukes, Goldman called him a narcissist who would be a disaster
    http://www.atimes.com/trumps-nuclear-arson-in-asia/

    Here is Goldman in April, mocking Trump and saying that his delegates would dump him for Cruz
    http://www.atimes.com/donald-trump-be-the-greatest-dealmaker-in-history/

    Last March, in his love letter to Cruz, Goldman had this to say about Trump:

    >> We keep hearing that Trump is a businessman who will "get things done." That is utterly wrong: the most successful businessmen are very good at very limited number of things. Great entrepreneurs, as George Gilder wrote, are the kind of people who sit up all night thinking of better garbage routes. Trump is not even a particularly successful entrepreneur; if he had put the $100 million he inherited in 1978 into an index fund, he'd have twice as much money today. As a casino investor, he doesn't compare to Sheldon Adelson, who came from poverty and now has ten times Trump's wealth. In fact, Trump has the worst possible kind of background for a president: as the child of wealth running a private company, he is used to saying "Jump," and having his lackeys say, "How long should I stay in the air?"

    Trump doesn't read. He brags about his own ignorance. <<
    https://pjmedia.com/spengler/2016/03/25/ted-cruz-our-last-best-hope/2/

    So, no, Goldman was not an early Trump backer.

    , @Jus' Sayin'...

    If he’s an unabashed supportor of Israel I don’t find that strange at all.
     
    Someone who puts Israel first will always, at best, put the USA second. Spengler's writing always takes on a deranged quality when - as is too often the case - he tries to defend policies that are obviously good for Israel and bad for the rest of the world, e.g., all those policies that Steve Sailer characterizes as invade the world/invite the world and the USA's insanely belligerent projection of power into areas that are obviously Russian and Chinese spheres of influence.
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  30. @Old fogey
    Wow, it is hard to believe there is anyone worse than David Brooks.

    The only thing worse than the old Brooks is new Brooks. Never underestimate what an older man will do to keep banging a babe 25 years his junior.

    Read More
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  31. @Not Raul
    Quote from Goldman piece:
    >> The U.S. stood godfather to the European Union, as the saying goes, to keep the Germans down, the Russians out, and the Americans in. <<

    This is your brain on drugs, Dave.

    The saying is about NATO, not the EU.

    Goldman never denied that the original saying (attributed to Lord Ismay) was about NATO. He’s just implying here what a lot of us have long believed: that the EU is really just the economic arm of NATO, and so it’s purpose is essentially the same.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Not Raul
    So the EU keeps Germany down? Germany is probably the major country that benefits the most from the EU. For one thing, it helps them increase exports.

    If the Germans thought that the EU was keeping them down, they would have left by now.
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  32. I wrote about this the other day. What we are seeing is the establishment trying to figure out how to get aboard the Trump Train now. Rich Lowry and Ramesh Ponnuru, whose last name my spell check changes to “ponderous”, are now talking up civic nationalism and needling the house neocons about Israel’s border fence and cultural chauvinism.

    They hope to co-opt what’s happening like they did the Tea Party movement. The Official Right™ in all of its forms, exists as a palace guard. This happened in the Reagan years. By the time he left office, the Bushies and neocons had beaten back the conservative challenge inside the GOP and inside Conservative Inc.

    We’ll have to wait and see how Trump does.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Shifting the Establishment in the direction of prudence and sanity is a good thing.
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  33. @pat
    I like Spengler.
    He's erudite, very knowledgeable in subjects ranging from finance to music.
    I don't agree with his almost evangelical
    belief that demography is destiny, but it's certainly plays an important role.
    He's Jewish, and I believe a convert if that's the right word to some kind of orthodoxy. In other words he's someone who believes in a God, and not only a God, but an approachable One.
    If he's an unabashed supportor of Israel I don't find that strange at all.
    He was an early Trump backer, and his rather harsh op-ed suggesting it was time for the Neocons to go was a joy to read

    Goldman was not an early Trump backer.

    Goldman was calling Trump voters losers back in May

    http://www.atimes.com/negotiate-this-mr-trump/

    In response to Trumps comments about Japan getting nukes, Goldman called him a narcissist who would be a disaster

    http://www.atimes.com/trumps-nuclear-arson-in-asia/

    Here is Goldman in April, mocking Trump and saying that his delegates would dump him for Cruz

    http://www.atimes.com/donald-trump-be-the-greatest-dealmaker-in-history/

    Last March, in his love letter to Cruz, Goldman had this to say about Trump:

    >> We keep hearing that Trump is a businessman who will “get things done.” That is utterly wrong: the most successful businessmen are very good at very limited number of things. Great entrepreneurs, as George Gilder wrote, are the kind of people who sit up all night thinking of better garbage routes. Trump is not even a particularly successful entrepreneur; if he had put the $100 million he inherited in 1978 into an index fund, he’d have twice as much money today. As a casino investor, he doesn’t compare to Sheldon Adelson, who came from poverty and now has ten times Trump’s wealth. In fact, Trump has the worst possible kind of background for a president: as the child of wealth running a private company, he is used to saying “Jump,” and having his lackeys say, “How long should I stay in the air?”

    Trump doesn’t read. He brags about his own ignorance. <<

    https://pjmedia.com/spengler/2016/03/25/ted-cruz-our-last-best-hope/2/

    So, no, Goldman was not an early Trump backer.

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  34. @pat
    I like Spengler.
    He's erudite, very knowledgeable in subjects ranging from finance to music.
    I don't agree with his almost evangelical
    belief that demography is destiny, but it's certainly plays an important role.
    He's Jewish, and I believe a convert if that's the right word to some kind of orthodoxy. In other words he's someone who believes in a God, and not only a God, but an approachable One.
    If he's an unabashed supportor of Israel I don't find that strange at all.
    He was an early Trump backer, and his rather harsh op-ed suggesting it was time for the Neocons to go was a joy to read

    If he’s an unabashed supportor of Israel I don’t find that strange at all.

    Someone who puts Israel first will always, at best, put the USA second. Spengler’s writing always takes on a deranged quality when – as is too often the case – he tries to defend policies that are obviously good for Israel and bad for the rest of the world, e.g., all those policies that Steve Sailer characterizes as invade the world/invite the world and the USA’s insanely belligerent projection of power into areas that are obviously Russian and Chinese spheres of influence.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Goldman is real smart but his judgment is iffy: e.g., he collaborated with Lyndon LaRouche on at least one book.

    I'm not as smart, but my judgment is a little more trustworthy.

    But of course I'm widely considered a dangerous wacko because I worry about whether Invade the World, Invite the World is truly prudent.

    , @Anonymous
    Spengler isn't just an Israel firster. He's an avowed Jewish supremacist. He's been writing quite explicitly for years now his own version of the Brooks and Rubin "dying white America" viewpoint, except he's been even more extreme and malicious about it. He's been writing that not only whites or Europeans are dying, but all the gentiles in the world are dying, and that gentiles who seek nationalism or tribalism are evil and pagan enemies of God, the implication being that the gentiles dying is a good thing. He basically couches the most ethnically hostile and malicious secular diaspora viewpoint in theological language.
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  35. @Anonymous
    Judging by the writers and content of the articles, it's a neocon journal that's pro-Trump. There are West Coast Straussians and other neocons who are relatively pro-Trump compared to more establishment neocons largely because they haven't had prominent policymaking jobs and because they're much less sanguine about recent US policy being good for the future of neoconnery.

    West Coast Straussians — NO!

    West Coast Offense — YES!

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  36. @Jus' Sayin'...

    If he’s an unabashed supportor of Israel I don’t find that strange at all.
     
    Someone who puts Israel first will always, at best, put the USA second. Spengler's writing always takes on a deranged quality when - as is too often the case - he tries to defend policies that are obviously good for Israel and bad for the rest of the world, e.g., all those policies that Steve Sailer characterizes as invade the world/invite the world and the USA's insanely belligerent projection of power into areas that are obviously Russian and Chinese spheres of influence.

    Goldman is real smart but his judgment is iffy: e.g., he collaborated with Lyndon LaRouche on at least one book.

    I’m not as smart, but my judgment is a little more trustworthy.

    But of course I’m widely considered a dangerous wacko because I worry about whether Invade the World, Invite the World is truly prudent.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    I’m widely considered a dangerous wacko
     
    Why do care so much what dangerous wackos think about you?
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  37. Nullify Iran is the ostensible objective, but really only a prerequisite. Unfortunately they don’t dare talk openly about what they’re hoping for.

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  38. @The Z Blog
    I wrote about this the other day. What we are seeing is the establishment trying to figure out how to get aboard the Trump Train now. Rich Lowry and Ramesh Ponnuru, whose last name my spell check changes to "ponderous", are now talking up civic nationalism and needling the house neocons about Israel's border fence and cultural chauvinism.

    They hope to co-opt what's happening like they did the Tea Party movement. The Official Right™ in all of its forms, exists as a palace guard. This happened in the Reagan years. By the time he left office, the Bushies and neocons had beaten back the conservative challenge inside the GOP and inside Conservative Inc.

    We'll have to wait and see how Trump does.

    Shifting the Establishment in the direction of prudence and sanity is a good thing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    And non-wackos know that there's no one who's contributed more to that movement than our esteemed host.
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  39. As a long time LaRouche watcher (I grew up in the shadow of his Virginia manse), I can tell you that Lyn was doing Trump decades before Trump was doing Trump.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Twinkie

    As a long time LaRouche watcher (I grew up in the shadow of his Virginia manse), I can tell you that Lyn was doing Trump decades before Trump was doing Trump.
     
    Did Lyn have Trump money? When you are poor and crazy, you are just crazy. When you are super rich and crazy, you are, er, idiosyncratic and complicated.
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  40. @Seamus Padraig
    Goldman never denied that the original saying (attributed to Lord Ismay) was about NATO. He's just implying here what a lot of us have long believed: that the EU is really just the economic arm of NATO, and so it's purpose is essentially the same.

    So the EU keeps Germany down? Germany is probably the major country that benefits the most from the EU. For one thing, it helps them increase exports.

    If the Germans thought that the EU was keeping them down, they would have left by now.

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  41. @Steve Sailer
    Goldman is real smart but his judgment is iffy: e.g., he collaborated with Lyndon LaRouche on at least one book.

    I'm not as smart, but my judgment is a little more trustworthy.

    But of course I'm widely considered a dangerous wacko because I worry about whether Invade the World, Invite the World is truly prudent.

    I’m widely considered a dangerous wacko

    Why do care so much what dangerous wackos think about you?

    Read More
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  42. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    If he’s an unabashed supportor of Israel I don’t find that strange at all.
     
    Someone who puts Israel first will always, at best, put the USA second. Spengler's writing always takes on a deranged quality when - as is too often the case - he tries to defend policies that are obviously good for Israel and bad for the rest of the world, e.g., all those policies that Steve Sailer characterizes as invade the world/invite the world and the USA's insanely belligerent projection of power into areas that are obviously Russian and Chinese spheres of influence.

    Spengler isn’t just an Israel firster. He’s an avowed Jewish supremacist. He’s been writing quite explicitly for years now his own version of the Brooks and Rubin “dying white America” viewpoint, except he’s been even more extreme and malicious about it. He’s been writing that not only whites or Europeans are dying, but all the gentiles in the world are dying, and that gentiles who seek nationalism or tribalism are evil and pagan enemies of God, the implication being that the gentiles dying is a good thing. He basically couches the most ethnically hostile and malicious secular diaspora viewpoint in theological language.

    Read More
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  43. @Steve Sailer
    Shifting the Establishment in the direction of prudence and sanity is a good thing.

    And non-wackos know that there’s no one who’s contributed more to that movement than our esteemed host.

    Read More
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  44. @anon
    TSMC is pretty state of the art; Samsung too. Not sure I accept the "remaining crown jewels" theory. GlobalFoundries, the fab arm of AMD and IBM is owned by Abu Dhabi, UAE and has a pretty international management team. Intel, considered to be a leading U.S. manufacturer, actually has lot of properties, both physical and intellectual, abroad.

    Not sure I accept the “remaining crown jewels” theory.

    To be sure, there is a HUGE amount of intellectual property theft and industrial espionage committed by China. But late-industrializers that try to catch up often engage in such behaviors (Europeans did the same earlier).

    Obviously, it should go without saying that we should be aware of such attempts and protect ourselves. Just because it’s a historical trend doesn’t mean we should tolerate it.

    Nonetheless, some commenters here live under the fantasy that only whites invent and that East Asians just copy. They’ve obviously never been to corporate research facilities in Japan or Korea.

    Although it’s not 100% certain that China is on the same path as Japan and Korea, the trend is broadly similar if delayed by 20-30 years.

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    • Replies: @Escher
    The point here is not that intellectual property is stolen by Chinese firms and the government. Taiwan did plenty of that to grow their own semiconductor industry, and now China is following closely in the footsteps of its renegade province.
    The point is that all the big E Asian companies relied heavily on government subsidies and support to get off the ground. The "free market" ain't so free.
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  45. @anonymous-antiskynetist
    As a long time LaRouche watcher (I grew up in the shadow of his Virginia manse), I can tell you that Lyn was doing Trump decades before Trump was doing Trump.

    As a long time LaRouche watcher (I grew up in the shadow of his Virginia manse), I can tell you that Lyn was doing Trump decades before Trump was doing Trump.

    Did Lyn have Trump money? When you are poor and crazy, you are just crazy. When you are super rich and crazy, you are, er, idiosyncratic and complicated.

    Read More
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  46. @Twinkie

    Not sure I accept the “remaining crown jewels” theory.
     
    To be sure, there is a HUGE amount of intellectual property theft and industrial espionage committed by China. But late-industrializers that try to catch up often engage in such behaviors (Europeans did the same earlier).

    Obviously, it should go without saying that we should be aware of such attempts and protect ourselves. Just because it's a historical trend doesn't mean we should tolerate it.

    Nonetheless, some commenters here live under the fantasy that only whites invent and that East Asians just copy. They've obviously never been to corporate research facilities in Japan or Korea.

    Although it's not 100% certain that China is on the same path as Japan and Korea, the trend is broadly similar if delayed by 20-30 years.

    The point here is not that intellectual property is stolen by Chinese firms and the government. Taiwan did plenty of that to grow their own semiconductor industry, and now China is following closely in the footsteps of its renegade province.
    The point is that all the big E Asian companies relied heavily on government subsidies and support to get off the ground. The “free market” ain’t so free.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Twinkie

    The point is that all the big E Asian companies relied heavily on government subsidies and support to get off the ground. The “free market” ain’t so free.
     
    1. Government subsidies are not a magic solution that makes companies suddenly competitive in the international market. The world is strewn with bloated and highly inefficient companies that grew fat on sheltered domestic market and heavy government subsidies.

    How and under what conditions subsidies are doled out are very, very important. You think Boeing, Chrysler, and GE never got subsidies from the U.S. taxpayers?

    2. East Asian governments have never subscribed to "the free market." Traditionally (that is, in the past), they had relatively small domestic markets, so it'd have been suicide for them to believe in a completely free international market. In other words, they have been economic nationalists. I agree with the view that we ought to follow that economic philosophy, at least as far as international trade is concerned.
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  47. @anon
    TSMC is pretty state of the art; Samsung too. Not sure I accept the "remaining crown jewels" theory. GlobalFoundries, the fab arm of AMD and IBM is owned by Abu Dhabi, UAE and has a pretty international management team. Intel, considered to be a leading U.S. manufacturer, actually has lot of properties, both physical and intellectual, abroad.

    Intel’s core R&D in advanced manufacturing (which is what has kept them ahead of the curve all these years) is exclusively conducted in Hillsboro, Oregon. Their biggest factories are still in the US, although that will possibly change as China lures them into growing their footprint over there.

    Read More
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  48. @Escher
    The point here is not that intellectual property is stolen by Chinese firms and the government. Taiwan did plenty of that to grow their own semiconductor industry, and now China is following closely in the footsteps of its renegade province.
    The point is that all the big E Asian companies relied heavily on government subsidies and support to get off the ground. The "free market" ain't so free.

    The point is that all the big E Asian companies relied heavily on government subsidies and support to get off the ground. The “free market” ain’t so free.

    1. Government subsidies are not a magic solution that makes companies suddenly competitive in the international market. The world is strewn with bloated and highly inefficient companies that grew fat on sheltered domestic market and heavy government subsidies.

    How and under what conditions subsidies are doled out are very, very important. You think Boeing, Chrysler, and GE never got subsidies from the U.S. taxpayers?

    2. East Asian governments have never subscribed to “the free market.” Traditionally (that is, in the past), they had relatively small domestic markets, so it’d have been suicide for them to believe in a completely free international market. In other words, they have been economic nationalists. I agree with the view that we ought to follow that economic philosophy, at least as far as international trade is concerned.

    Read More
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