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From the NYT:

Closing Education Gap Will Lift Economy, a Study Finds
By PATRICIA COHEN FEB. 2, 2015

Study after study has shown a yawning educational achievement gap between the poorest and wealthiest children in America. But what does this gap costs in terms of lost economic growth and tax revenue?

That’s what researchers at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth set out to discover in a new study that concluded the United States could ultimately enrich everybody by improving educational performance for the typical student.

When it comes to math and science scores, the United States lags most of the other 33 advanced industrialized countries that make up the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, ranking 24th, far behind Korea, Poland and Slovenia.

Moving up just a few notches to 19th — so that the average American score matched the O.E.C.D. average — would add 1.7 percent to the nation’s gross domestic product over the next 35 years, according to estimates by the Washington Center, a nonpartisan, liberal-leaning research group focused on narrowing inequality. That could lead to roughly $900 billion in higher government revenue, more than making up for the cost of such an effort.

White Americans outscored the OECD average on the 2012 PISA 518 to 497.

If Americans were able to match the scores reached in Canada, which ranks seventh on the O.E.C.D. scale, the United States’ gross domestic product would rise by an additional 6.7 percent, a cumulative increase of $10 trillion (after taking inflation into account) by the year 2050, the report estimated.

White Americans trailed Canadians by only 4 points. White and Asian Americans combined probably about equaled Canada.

Here’s Anatoly Karlin on 2009 PISA scores for immigrants (first and second generation) versus natives. Canada is much more selective than the U.S. and thus benefits from smarter average immigrants.

The words “immigration” or “immigrant” are not mentioned in the New York Times article.

Robert G. Lynch, an economist who wrote the Washington Center report, explained why he took the trouble to make these what-if calculations.

… One point of this exercise, Mr. Lynch explained, is to show that the added cost of improving educational achievement at the bottom would be more than made up for by the rise in economic output and tax revenue.

The study used math and science scores from the 2012 Program for International Student Assessment, a test widely used around the world for measuring and comparing educational achievement. The average combined score for the United States is 978, while the O.E.C.D. average is 995. The Canadian average is 1,044.

Eliminating the achievement gap in America would require raising the country’s average to 1,080, so that it would rank third behind South Korea (with an average score of 1,092) and Japan (with a 1,083 average). That stunning improvement, according to the center, would raise the total output in the United States by another 10 percent. Lifetime earnings of the poorest quarter would jump by 22 percent in this event.

As I’ve been saying for a long time, the conventional strategy of Closing the Gap by raising the bottom half’s performance by roughly a standard deviation while somehow not allowing the upper half to improve seems like a worse idea than my suggestion that our goal should be to raise everybody’s performance by half a standard deviation.

After all, the reality of diminishing marginal returns suggests that improving a half standard deviation is considerably less than half as difficult and more than twice as plausible as improving a full standard deviation. Moreover, my goal works under various combinations of the importance of nature and nurture, while the conventional wisdom’s goal is only possible if nurture is all important and nature is meaningless.

 
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  1. Canada is much more selective than the U.S. and thus benefits from smarter average immigrants.

    Are you sure? Foreigners with brains sounds even scarier than foreigners without.

    Read More
    • Replies: @grey enlightenment
    so you would rather have foreigners that suck welfare than foreigners who contribute?
    , @Art Deco
    Immigration and Employment Canada has a special pneumatic system to pitch them over the border if they get too troublesome. They show up in tubes at the Cato Institute and the Mercatus Center. That's how Northern Virginia got stuck with Alex Tabarrok.
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  2. There media appears to be more desperate or alarmist over the achievement gap than they usually have been. I wonder if they are beginning to realize it’s hopeless and that people may start noticing things?

    Read More
  3. Why not just close the jew-gentile gap? That would probably raise GDP even more, and it’s just as realistic.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim
    Good point. Whites are about 68% of the US population so raising the white gentile average from about 100 to say Ashekenazi Jewish levels of about 110-115 would presumably send the economy into the stratosphere.
  4. That stunning improvement, according to the center, would raise the total output in the United States by another 10 percent.

    Pffft! I have a better plan. Let’s bioengineer a generation of NBA-grade athletes who can earn $10 million/year. GDP will then climb into the quadrillions!

    Read More
    • Replies: @AnAnon
    Good point, the jobs just don't exist(obviously our bio-engineered athletes would not be able to obtian the lucrative contracts were there so many of them), in addition to "closing the gap" being pure fantasy.
  5. For the health of this country, and dealing with the realities of limited budgets, I think the strategy should be to increase the upper half at the expense of the lower half. Letting them have their ball games and letting them disrupt our classes hurts the upper half kids who do not have the advantage of private schools. Equal education is a privilege, not a right.

    Disrupt class, leave class for good.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Front toward enemy
    You sir are correct. My wife, an inner city teacher for 30 years, states that disruptive behavior is the single cause of student non achievement. Teachers spend most of their time trying to civilize a certain group of students who have no desire to learn and every desire to disrupt. However in today's educational climate all due care and restraint must be exercised when dealing with these "students." But let us not let the facts get in the way of the truth.
  6. What do you mean, “..not allowing the upper half to improve..?”

    Whom is putting a foot on the upper half? They’re helping the lower half because that is where the need is.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Economic Sophisms
    You mean "who"
    , @Hal

    Whom is putting a foot on the upper half?
     
    Who is putting a foot on whom? The lower half is putting their size 14s on the upper half.
    , @Jim Sweeney
    People who write "Whom is..." have no right to opine on improving education. They need to return to third or fourth grade grammar class.
    , @Front toward enemy
    All the help in the world will only marginally improve the lower half, and even with that improvement the yield will be slight. Additional resources directed toward the upper half will pull up scores if that is what you are after but the greatest benefit is that the upper half can and will achieve at a much greater rate and produce greater and substantial benefits. Even dog breeders know that the pick of the litter will train and advance much faster than the runts.
  7. How profound. Someone thought up the idea to Fix the Schools.

    I suppose the next phase will be for some megabillionaire to hire some high ranking educrat to write a fancy Pre-K through Ph.D. curriculum for him, then the megabillionaire will buy every media hack, talking head and politician he needs to to steamroll opposition to it. I know, let’s call it “Coming Core,” or something like that.

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  8. The louder a person complains about the “gap”, the less likely he is to have the guts to do what it would take to really close it, like having an IQ cutoff for immigrants, paying poor women to get their tubes tied, and requiring inner city kids to go to boarding schools.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    As you say a gap only exists so long as it can guarantee that more money can be spent trying to get that gap to close.
  9. As I’ve been saying for a long time, the conventional strategy of Closing the Gap by raising the bottom half’s performance by roughly a standard deviation while somehow not allowing the upper half to improve seems like a worse idea than my suggestion that our goal should be to raise everybody’s performance by half a standard deviation.

    America’s approach to public education is wasteful thanks to well-intentioned, but poorly thought-out policy. America wastes a lot of money educating dull to average students that will quickly forget what they learn, and have no use for what little they retain. The solution is to allocate more money to high-IQ students since they are more likely to benefit from more education (better ROI). To give you an idea of how useless our schools are, on the TV show Are You Smarter than a 5th Grader only one contestant, a Nobel Prize physicist, got all the questions right . 18 years of schooling little to nothing to show for it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @rod1963
    Smart kids will learn no matter what if they are interested in a particular subject. You don't help them by putting a teacher's college grad with a IQ of 95 as their instructor who knows nothing and doesn't care to.

    If you take for example the computer revolution of the 70's and early 80's. You had bright kids teaching themselves assembly language, writing their own interpreters and building their own hardware. Much of which was considered graduate level work.

    The best thing schools could do for the bright kids is to get out of their way and offer mentors for them instead, not some teacher college drone and certainly not drug them into a stupor because they bug the teacher or are bored to the gills in class.
  10. The improvement might not be sustainable. Closing the education gap presumably also closing the income gap. However for some group most of the children of the improved SES group will drop below their parents’ SES group, presumably below their parents’ education achievements.

    http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/01/how-black-middle-class-kids-become-black-lower-class-adults/384613/

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  11. Here is a truncated quote from the article cited in your post on Canada’s immigration system. I think this pretty much sums it up: “Canada’s (-2) system is mixed, with many immigrants of both high and low quality. The commentator celtthedog has an explanation that sounds plausible: “… Americans who cite Canada’s allegedly magnificent immigration system that only accepts highly skilled immigrants, need to acknowledge that accompanying this is a refugee programm, which lets in scores of pretty much worthless migrants. Canada’s system is 50% good, 50% atrocious.”

    I would also add that the ‘family reunification’ part of Canada’s system also contributes negatively. Refugees are not a huge part of the immigration inflow here, though there has been an increase from the Middle East and Africa in the last few years.

    The US adopting a Canadian style immigration system is a move in the right direction, but judging from the graph it would appear that Australia’s immigration system would provide the greatest rate of return.

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  12. @Reg Cæsar

    Canada is much more selective than the U.S. and thus benefits from smarter average immigrants.
     
    Are you sure? Foreigners with brains sounds even scarier than foreigners without.

    so you would rather have foreigners that suck welfare than foreigners who contribute?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    so you would rather have foreigners that suck welfare than foreigners who contribute?

     

    Where did I say I wanted any foreigners at all?

    The point was that smart aliens can cause tremendous damage, too.

    Remember this clever architecture student named Atta? What did he "contribute"?

    , @rod1963
    Actually we shouldn't import them at all because those imports are tribal and once their is enough of them and they get into management, white skinned engineer or scientist gets locked out. They also keep wages down as well.

    There is no upside to them.

    Ideally we should be cultivating our native talent, which we don't - our system tends to drug and alienate them to a large extent.

    Conformity and docility are valued traits in education and in corporate America. The kid who regurgitates the school solution like some animatronic parrot gets the nod as a intellect. The boy who questions too much and gets bored, gets drugged and labeled a troublemaker.
  13. “… gross domestic product would rise by an additional 6.7 percent, a cumulative increase of $10 trillion (after taking inflation into account) by the year 2050, the report estimated.”

    Yeah. That strikes me as pretty speculative. We are in an age where people are educated and cant’ find work. And when they can, we import H1B so that employers can have semi-slave labor they need.

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  14. “IQ cutoff for immigrants”

    Who’s going to serve lemonade to the country golf club elites if the U.S only allowed in high IQ immigrants ?

    “paying poor women to get their tubes tied,”

    The Democrats will complain that paying lower class women to have their tubes tied is class discrimination, racist and sexist. They will say it is a war on women (NAM women specifically) and a war on the poor (NAM poor specifically).

    Democrats prefer that women have straight outright abortions instead of having their tubes tied.

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  15. That’s the issue my parents had with school; it always was about moving the slowest average pace rather than the fastest.

    I’ve seen that repeated again in the next generation where schools just seem far more interested in average performance.

    The point is that our educational system is up for deep reform, when kids of all ages are only operating at their ability (and specialise much earlier).

    Read More
  16. @Marco Lalo
    What do you mean, "..not allowing the upper half to improve..?"

    Whom is putting a foot on the upper half? They're helping the lower half because that is where the need is.

    You mean “who”

    Read More
  17. @Marco Lalo
    What do you mean, "..not allowing the upper half to improve..?"

    Whom is putting a foot on the upper half? They're helping the lower half because that is where the need is.

    Whom is putting a foot on the upper half?

    Who is putting a foot on whom? The lower half is putting their size 14s on the upper half.

    Read More
  18. @grey enlightenment
    As I’ve been saying for a long time, the conventional strategy of Closing the Gap by raising the bottom half’s performance by roughly a standard deviation while somehow not allowing the upper half to improve seems like a worse idea than my suggestion that our goal should be to raise everybody’s performance by half a standard deviation.

    America's approach to public education is wasteful thanks to well-intentioned, but poorly thought-out policy. America wastes a lot of money educating dull to average students that will quickly forget what they learn, and have no use for what little they retain. The solution is to allocate more money to high-IQ students since they are more likely to benefit from more education (better ROI). To give you an idea of how useless our schools are, on the TV show Are You Smarter than a 5th Grader only one contestant, a Nobel Prize physicist, got all the questions right . 18 years of schooling little to nothing to show for it.

    Smart kids will learn no matter what if they are interested in a particular subject. You don’t help them by putting a teacher’s college grad with a IQ of 95 as their instructor who knows nothing and doesn’t care to.

    If you take for example the computer revolution of the 70′s and early 80′s. You had bright kids teaching themselves assembly language, writing their own interpreters and building their own hardware. Much of which was considered graduate level work.

    The best thing schools could do for the bright kids is to get out of their way and offer mentors for them instead, not some teacher college drone and certainly not drug them into a stupor because they bug the teacher or are bored to the gills in class.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    You don’t help them by putting a teacher’s college grad with a IQ of 95 as their instructor who knows nothing and doesn’t care to.

    Education Realist will put out a contract on you.
    , @NOTA
    Bright kids still need the guidance of "yes, you have to learn about this even though it bores you," lest we have adults who can write code but can't write a decent sentence.
    , @BurplesonAFB
    With online courseware we as a society should be able to have an extremely broad range of subjects that high school students can choose to learn about, and we should be able to get students the required number of high school credits (including whichever subjects we make mandatory) by age 16. Set the majority up with an apprenticeship/internship to start earning and learning in trades or business and let those who will actually benefit from a university education get an early start (most of undergrad should be done with online courseware + labs with TAs, we could do it with half the faculty or less). If we do that and stop denigrating motherhood as a choice for married women, we could probably kick off a legit baby boom among whites in the US.
  19. @grey enlightenment
    so you would rather have foreigners that suck welfare than foreigners who contribute?

    so you would rather have foreigners that suck welfare than foreigners who contribute?

    Where did I say I wanted any foreigners at all?

    The point was that smart aliens can cause tremendous damage, too.

    Remember this clever architecture student named Atta? What did he “contribute”?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    He contributed to the evolution of the iconic New York skyline. It took God six days to create the universe, but it took Atta only 102 minutes to reshape Lower Manhattan. How much more could a lowly architecture student have hoped to accomplish?

    If Howard Roark had organized some buddies to hijack a few jetliners, think ab0ut what he could have done!
  20. @Reg Cæsar

    Canada is much more selective than the U.S. and thus benefits from smarter average immigrants.
     
    Are you sure? Foreigners with brains sounds even scarier than foreigners without.

    Immigration and Employment Canada has a special pneumatic system to pitch them over the border if they get too troublesome. They show up in tubes at the Cato Institute and the Mercatus Center. That’s how Northern Virginia got stuck with Alex Tabarrok.

    Read More
  21. @rod1963
    Smart kids will learn no matter what if they are interested in a particular subject. You don't help them by putting a teacher's college grad with a IQ of 95 as their instructor who knows nothing and doesn't care to.

    If you take for example the computer revolution of the 70's and early 80's. You had bright kids teaching themselves assembly language, writing their own interpreters and building their own hardware. Much of which was considered graduate level work.

    The best thing schools could do for the bright kids is to get out of their way and offer mentors for them instead, not some teacher college drone and certainly not drug them into a stupor because they bug the teacher or are bored to the gills in class.

    You don’t help them by putting a teacher’s college grad with a IQ of 95 as their instructor who knows nothing and doesn’t care to.

    Education Realist will put out a contract on you.

    Read More
  22. @rod1963
    Smart kids will learn no matter what if they are interested in a particular subject. You don't help them by putting a teacher's college grad with a IQ of 95 as their instructor who knows nothing and doesn't care to.

    If you take for example the computer revolution of the 70's and early 80's. You had bright kids teaching themselves assembly language, writing their own interpreters and building their own hardware. Much of which was considered graduate level work.

    The best thing schools could do for the bright kids is to get out of their way and offer mentors for them instead, not some teacher college drone and certainly not drug them into a stupor because they bug the teacher or are bored to the gills in class.

    Bright kids still need the guidance of “yes, you have to learn about this even though it bores you,” lest we have adults who can write code but can’t write a decent sentence.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harold
    Hey!
    , @midtown
    I agree. My wife would like to homeschool our kids (they are still a ways from school age) and I am somewhat open to the idea but I told her they would have to study things they aren't particularly interested in as well as the things they are. My wife was basically unschooled, so she does not have a good context for this. And her spelling is hilariously bad. She says she regularly has a word misspelled in Word and the thesaurus that pops up has no idea what she's trying to write.
    , @Paul Mendez
    Bright kids still need the guidance of “yes, you have to learn about this even though it bores you,” lest we have adults who can write code but can’t write a decent sentence.

    I could not agree more.

    I have two highly intelligent nephews. They were allowed to coast in public high school since they were not disruptive. Their parents encouraged them to, "follow their passion." Now, one is a college dropout and the other an unemployed english major. However, both have encyclopedic knowledge of things like playing the bagpipes, the back stories of obscure manga characters and the differences between various techno music genres.
  23. @grey enlightenment
    so you would rather have foreigners that suck welfare than foreigners who contribute?

    Actually we shouldn’t import them at all because those imports are tribal and once their is enough of them and they get into management, white skinned engineer or scientist gets locked out. They also keep wages down as well.

    There is no upside to them.

    Ideally we should be cultivating our native talent, which we don’t – our system tends to drug and alienate them to a large extent.

    Conformity and docility are valued traits in education and in corporate America. The kid who regurgitates the school solution like some animatronic parrot gets the nod as a intellect. The boy who questions too much and gets bored, gets drugged and labeled a troublemaker.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest007
    What is amazing is how open the Asians are in their discrimination against Americans when it comes to high tech jobs.

    Shikha Dalmia admitted as much in a Reason.com article where she wrote:

    The Gang of Eight proposed raising the current 85,000 H-1Bs (which includes 20,000 for foreign students in STEM fields in American universities) to 110,000 initially and 180,000 eventually. In return, it would have imposed more bureaucracy on H-1B-dependent companies. Worse, companies whose workforces are 30 percent H-1B would have to pay exorbitant visa fees. And those with more than 75 percent would be banned from hiring more H-1Bs altogether. (This was actually a backhanded way of killing large, India-originated IT companies, such as Infosys, whose business model depends on bringing large numbers of techies from home.)
     
    See http://reason.com/archives/2015/01/06/let-a-lot-more-of-them-in

    What is the point of helping the economy when all of the economic benefit will flow to recent immigrants who will refuse to hire people outside the ethnic group?
  24. The conclusion of this study doesn’t seem consistent with circumstances. We’ve lost jobs and industries over the past 30+ years not because our workforce is too dumb, but because our workforce is too costly. Better-educated people expect higher wages and a better standard of living. So therefore…. huh?

    Best of the comments from the NYTimes article comments section.

    Also, click on the NYTimes top comment picks tab and Sailer’s comment is an NYTimes pick.

    Read More
  25. I propose that we ‘raise’ low achievement scores by offering a sort of affirmative action for our ‘underachieving’ students. Simply give all students with low scores on a test a handicap – such as in golf or college admissions. Using an Affirmative Scoring Standard (ASS) we can place our students on an equitable footing, one with the other. Problem solved. No child left behind, so to speak.

    If a student is one standard deviation from the norm, then eliminate that deviation by raising that student’s score to at least the norm. The student suffers no ill social or economic effects from the system and everyone lives happily ever after – or something like that. We do this for every other malfunctioning group, so what’s stopping us from using the ASS system for our most vulnerable citizens – our students.

    Read More
  26. Where are the jobs going to be if we do close the Gap?

    I went on the jobs website of a major New York bank today (starting with a C). About 60-70% of the IT jobs were in China or India.

    Read More
  27. @Marco Lalo
    What do you mean, "..not allowing the upper half to improve..?"

    Whom is putting a foot on the upper half? They're helping the lower half because that is where the need is.

    People who write “Whom is…” have no right to opine on improving education. They need to return to third or fourth grade grammar class.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harold
    Do they still teach grammar in America? They don’t here in NZ. Neither do they teach us how to punctuate (to which my comments bear witness). Both of these things we are expected to pick up by osmosis. The more naturally gifted pick them up, the less gifted don’t. Thereby ensuring a wide gap between the way the more and less gifted write and talk. Down with the oppressive grammar and punctuation rules of the patriarchy!
  28. Are the PISA tests g-loaded, or purely tests of acquired knowledge, or a little of both?

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  29. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Gee, the economy will lift and we’ll all be rich. I can’t wait for the checks to start coming in. First thing I want to do is to get that big gold chain I’ve been eying.
    Joking aside, the majority of “studies” are just so much cow dung. It’s probably an industry, “studies” made to order.

    Read More
  30. Zero Hedge has a good summary of the “skills gap” problem:

    Well – what they really meant was the right skills and the desperation to work for McJob wages.

    It’s an eye-opener.

    I think what’s happened in the US is that we’ve gotten a lot more efficient, labor-wise. The recession just accelerated the process. We’re entering the era where we have more people willing to do work than we have work needing to be done.

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  31. Priss Factor [AKA "K. Arujo"] says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Education.

    From K to 6, it’s mostly about instructing the same basic stuff to make everyone know the same stuff.

    From 7 to 12, it’s mostly about selecting the smart ones from the dumb ones.

    Education system is set up that way.

    So is athletics. Up to 8th grade, it’s same sports for everyone.

    From high school, it’s to see who has talent and who doesn’t.

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  32. @Jim Sweeney
    People who write "Whom is..." have no right to opine on improving education. They need to return to third or fourth grade grammar class.

    Do they still teach grammar in America? They don’t here in NZ. Neither do they teach us how to punctuate (to which my comments bear witness). Both of these things we are expected to pick up by osmosis. The more naturally gifted pick them up, the less gifted don’t. Thereby ensuring a wide gap between the way the more and less gifted write and talk. Down with the oppressive grammar and punctuation rules of the patriarchy!

    Read More
    • Replies: @John
    BS. People who (mis)use "whom" without knowing what it means and when to use it, use it only because they think it makes them sound smart.

    It has little to do with being "naturally gifted". How hard is it to google "who vs whom" if you have any natural curiosity about how or why it is used, or are in any way uncertain about which is correct? It take less than a minute to find out.

  33. @NOTA
    Bright kids still need the guidance of "yes, you have to learn about this even though it bores you," lest we have adults who can write code but can't write a decent sentence.

    Hey!

    Read More
  34. Are there more good jobs in America now or in the past? Are jobs getting better or worse?

    A 100 years ago, a McJob was done behind a mule with a plow.

    Does anyone seriously believe that there was a better time to live in America then right now?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harold
    Well, for what it’s worth, people in the past who worked with mule and plow felt they could afford a family and to bring their children up in a decent neighborhood with neighbourly neighbours.
    , @27 year old
    Are there more good jobs in America now or in the past? Are jobs getting better or worse? A 100 years ago, a McJob was done behind a mule with a plow. Does anyone seriously believe that there was a better time to live in America then right now?

    For the 28 millionth time, YES. 100 years ago was a better time to be a non-elite white person than now.

    How are you defining "good job"? Today you can have a "good job" where you make 3x the median income, and you can still struggle to afford to raise a family (even with responsible spending and good budgeting).

    More, physical labor provides a satisfaction that todays largely digital work cannot. Cube life destroys people

    , @dr kill
    Are you also from New Zealand?
    , @Chris Mallory
    I can easily say that the 1970's and 1980's were a better time to be living in American than right now.
    We were still relatively free and the deluge of 3rd world invaders from south of the border hadn't hit yet.
  35. Okay, so I went to the NYT’s article. The first picture is of black kids in a classroom, the most prominent one, in the centre, is wearing a shirt with the word “GAP” emblazoned on it. The caption reads, “A pre-k classroom in Brooklyn. When it comes to math and science scores, the United States lags many other advanced nations.” The next picture is of Koreans all studying studiously. The caption reads, “A classroom in Seoul, South Korea. When it comes to math and science scores, the United States ranks far behind Korea, Poland and Slovenia, according to a new study.”

    They’re just trolling right? Steve was this written by one of your iSteve trollbots? I think having the black kid with the word “GAP” emblazoned on him is going too far. It is too racist even for me.

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  36. @FWIW
    Are there more good jobs in America now or in the past? Are jobs getting better or worse?

    A 100 years ago, a McJob was done behind a mule with a plow.

    Does anyone seriously believe that there was a better time to live in America then right now?

    Well, for what it’s worth, people in the past who worked with mule and plow felt they could afford a family and to bring their children up in a decent neighborhood with neighbourly neighbours.

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  37. Oy, Steve, you know you can direct people to your archives at The Unz Review instead of your old blogspot site, right? And this after all Unz has done for you!

    (Not that I know what Unz has done for you, and, for all I know, it is outweighed by what you have done for him by bringing traffic here. In short: I but jest)

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/graph-of-2012-pisa-scores-for-65_4/

    vs.

    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2013/12/graph-of-2012-pisa-scores-for-65_4.html

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  38. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    A much cheaper band more effective strategy would simply to be to cutoff third world immigration completely.

    As a thought experiment, consider where the USA would be now, sans another 100 million largely unproductive persons added to the population, if the disastrous Kennedy/Johnson laws were never passed.

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  39. A few days ago, in a piece on Vdare, John Derbyshire cited this study:

    Child’s later-life intelligence ‘not influenced by parenting’

    Replace “parenting” with “schooling” — or perhaps, to be fairer, with “well-intended, gap-closing measures”. In other words, since “gap-closing measures” will never succeed to any significant degree, the hoped-for economic benefits will not follow — instead more capital will have been wasted. QED.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Twinkie

    Child’s later-life intelligence ‘not influenced by parenting’
     
    While evidence seems to pile on that the genetic components of IQ are predominant, that still leaves much else for the parents to shape. Ethics, for example. Or more generally "value inculcation."
    , @27 year old
    A few days ago, in a piece on Vdare, John Derbyshire cited this study:

    Child’s later-life intelligence ‘not influenced by parenting’


    Parentage tho
  40. “All We Have to Do …”

    First, assume that there is a can opener…

    White Americans trailed Canadians by only 4 points. White and Asian Americans combined probably about equaled Canada.

    Isn’t that basically the new demographic mix in Canada?

    Isn’t Canada around 77% white, 13% Asian and less than 5% blacks+Hispanics?

    Read More
  41. @eah
    A few days ago, in a piece on Vdare, John Derbyshire cited this study:

    Child's later-life intelligence 'not influenced by parenting'

    Replace "parenting" with "schooling" -- or perhaps, to be fairer, with "well-intended, gap-closing measures". In other words, since "gap-closing measures" will never succeed to any significant degree, the hoped-for economic benefits will not follow -- instead more capital will have been wasted. QED.

    Child’s later-life intelligence ‘not influenced by parenting’

    While evidence seems to pile on that the genetic components of IQ are predominant, that still leaves much else for the parents to shape. Ethics, for example. Or more generally “value inculcation.”

    Read More
  42. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Jean Cocteausten
    The louder a person complains about the "gap", the less likely he is to have the guts to do what it would take to really close it, like having an IQ cutoff for immigrants, paying poor women to get their tubes tied, and requiring inner city kids to go to boarding schools.

    As you say a gap only exists so long as it can guarantee that more money can be spent trying to get that gap to close.

    Read More
  43. I love the idea of this precise and predictable relationship between PISA scores and GDP. If we improve out average by 11 points that will increase GDP 7.4% which will increase government revenues (which is apparently the final cause of all education?) by $724.38 billion.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lurker
    Funny because our liberal friends are often at pains to remind us that correlation is not causation. Even if it requires a near-heroic act of not noticing.
  44. @Hal
    For the health of this country, and dealing with the realities of limited budgets, I think the strategy should be to increase the upper half at the expense of the lower half. Letting them have their ball games and letting them disrupt our classes hurts the upper half kids who do not have the advantage of private schools. Equal education is a privilege, not a right.

    Disrupt class, leave class for good.

    You sir are correct. My wife, an inner city teacher for 30 years, states that disruptive behavior is the single cause of student non achievement. Teachers spend most of their time trying to civilize a certain group of students who have no desire to learn and every desire to disrupt. However in today’s educational climate all due care and restraint must be exercised when dealing with these “students.” But let us not let the facts get in the way of the truth.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Front toward enemy:

    "My wife, an inner city teacher for 30 years, states that disruptive behavior is the single cause of student non achievement. Teachers spend most of their time trying to civilize a certain group of students who have no desire to learn and every desire to disrupt. However in today’s educational climate all due care and restraint must be exercised when dealing with these 'students.'"

    I would guess that this is probably one of the biggest reasons that people send their children to private schools instead of public ones.
    , @Hal
    Unless you have been there and have seen day after day wasted because "Joe" wants to destroy your class, you do not appreciate that this is the intent. Not possible to improve Joe, so the upper half gets lowered.

    Resource minded bloggers all point to 2015 as the year consequences of resource depletion start to affect everybody. A few symptoms of this are low commodity prices and structural failure of weak economic systems. Low commodity prices are caused by widespread economic weakness. The sea change will take many years; then as now there will be two tribes, the makers and the takers. Then as now the two tribes will be composed of the same people, only the makers will be making do with what they have rather than living comfortable lives, and the takers' criminality will be apparent.

    There is something we can do now. We can stop glorifying the tribe of the takers by refusing to acknowledge, support and coddle their stars, the non-productive members of society known as athletes.
  45. @Marco Lalo
    What do you mean, "..not allowing the upper half to improve..?"

    Whom is putting a foot on the upper half? They're helping the lower half because that is where the need is.

    All the help in the world will only marginally improve the lower half, and even with that improvement the yield will be slight. Additional resources directed toward the upper half will pull up scores if that is what you are after but the greatest benefit is that the upper half can and will achieve at a much greater rate and produce greater and substantial benefits. Even dog breeders know that the pick of the litter will train and advance much faster than the runts.

    Read More
  46. @eah
    A few days ago, in a piece on Vdare, John Derbyshire cited this study:

    Child's later-life intelligence 'not influenced by parenting'

    Replace "parenting" with "schooling" -- or perhaps, to be fairer, with "well-intended, gap-closing measures". In other words, since "gap-closing measures" will never succeed to any significant degree, the hoped-for economic benefits will not follow -- instead more capital will have been wasted. QED.

    A few days ago, in a piece on Vdare, John Derbyshire cited this study:

    Child’s later-life intelligence ‘not influenced by parenting’

    Parentage tho

    Read More
  47. @FWIW
    Are there more good jobs in America now or in the past? Are jobs getting better or worse?

    A 100 years ago, a McJob was done behind a mule with a plow.

    Does anyone seriously believe that there was a better time to live in America then right now?

    Are there more good jobs in America now or in the past? Are jobs getting better or worse? A 100 years ago, a McJob was done behind a mule with a plow. Does anyone seriously believe that there was a better time to live in America then right now?

    For the 28 millionth time, YES. 100 years ago was a better time to be a non-elite white person than now.

    How are you defining “good job”? Today you can have a “good job” where you make 3x the median income, and you can still struggle to afford to raise a family (even with responsible spending and good budgeting).

    More, physical labor provides a satisfaction that todays largely digital work cannot. Cube life destroys people

    Read More
  48. @dude
    Why not just close the jew-gentile gap? That would probably raise GDP even more, and it's just as realistic.

    Good point. Whites are about 68% of the US population so raising the white gentile average from about 100 to say Ashekenazi Jewish levels of about 110-115 would presumably send the economy into the stratosphere.

    Read More
  49. @countenance
    Are the PISA tests g-loaded, or purely tests of acquired knowledge, or a little of both?

    they are not g loaded

    Read More
  50. @NOTA
    Bright kids still need the guidance of "yes, you have to learn about this even though it bores you," lest we have adults who can write code but can't write a decent sentence.

    I agree. My wife would like to homeschool our kids (they are still a ways from school age) and I am somewhat open to the idea but I told her they would have to study things they aren’t particularly interested in as well as the things they are. My wife was basically unschooled, so she does not have a good context for this. And her spelling is hilariously bad. She says she regularly has a word misspelled in Word and the thesaurus that pops up has no idea what she’s trying to write.

    Read More
  51. @rod1963
    Actually we shouldn't import them at all because those imports are tribal and once their is enough of them and they get into management, white skinned engineer or scientist gets locked out. They also keep wages down as well.

    There is no upside to them.

    Ideally we should be cultivating our native talent, which we don't - our system tends to drug and alienate them to a large extent.

    Conformity and docility are valued traits in education and in corporate America. The kid who regurgitates the school solution like some animatronic parrot gets the nod as a intellect. The boy who questions too much and gets bored, gets drugged and labeled a troublemaker.

    What is amazing is how open the Asians are in their discrimination against Americans when it comes to high tech jobs.

    Shikha Dalmia admitted as much in a Reason.com article where she wrote:

    The Gang of Eight proposed raising the current 85,000 H-1Bs (which includes 20,000 for foreign students in STEM fields in American universities) to 110,000 initially and 180,000 eventually. In return, it would have imposed more bureaucracy on H-1B-dependent companies. Worse, companies whose workforces are 30 percent H-1B would have to pay exorbitant visa fees. And those with more than 75 percent would be banned from hiring more H-1Bs altogether. (This was actually a backhanded way of killing large, India-originated IT companies, such as Infosys, whose business model depends on bringing large numbers of techies from home.)

    See http://reason.com/archives/2015/01/06/let-a-lot-more-of-them-in

    What is the point of helping the economy when all of the economic benefit will flow to recent immigrants who will refuse to hire people outside the ethnic group?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    "What is amazing is how open the Asians are in their discrimination against Americans when it comes to high tech jobs."

    I predict that once whites no longer comprise a majority of the U.S. population, and once we have a critical mass of minorities in high level positions throughout our economy, we will start seeing "studies" that show that preferring your own group is "normal" and that whites need to get over the fact that they are no longer in charge of things.

    , @Anonymous
    "What is the point of helping the economy when all of the economic benefit will flow to recent immigrants who will refuse to hire people outside the ethnic group?"

    Also, what's the point of importing a new elite? We have a lot of smart people in our country, many of whom are probably under-employed. Also, why would we import any foreign doctors? There are many very smart, well-educated Americans who would like to go to med. school but aren't able to get in. Can't we educate a few more doctors here?

    And, as others have argued, the U.S. probably should not contribute to brain drain from developing nations.

  52. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Front toward enemy
    You sir are correct. My wife, an inner city teacher for 30 years, states that disruptive behavior is the single cause of student non achievement. Teachers spend most of their time trying to civilize a certain group of students who have no desire to learn and every desire to disrupt. However in today's educational climate all due care and restraint must be exercised when dealing with these "students." But let us not let the facts get in the way of the truth.

    Front toward enemy:

    “My wife, an inner city teacher for 30 years, states that disruptive behavior is the single cause of student non achievement. Teachers spend most of their time trying to civilize a certain group of students who have no desire to learn and every desire to disrupt. However in today’s educational climate all due care and restraint must be exercised when dealing with these ‘students.’”

    I would guess that this is probably one of the biggest reasons that people send their children to private schools instead of public ones.

    Read More
  53. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @guest007
    What is amazing is how open the Asians are in their discrimination against Americans when it comes to high tech jobs.

    Shikha Dalmia admitted as much in a Reason.com article where she wrote:

    The Gang of Eight proposed raising the current 85,000 H-1Bs (which includes 20,000 for foreign students in STEM fields in American universities) to 110,000 initially and 180,000 eventually. In return, it would have imposed more bureaucracy on H-1B-dependent companies. Worse, companies whose workforces are 30 percent H-1B would have to pay exorbitant visa fees. And those with more than 75 percent would be banned from hiring more H-1Bs altogether. (This was actually a backhanded way of killing large, India-originated IT companies, such as Infosys, whose business model depends on bringing large numbers of techies from home.)
     
    See http://reason.com/archives/2015/01/06/let-a-lot-more-of-them-in

    What is the point of helping the economy when all of the economic benefit will flow to recent immigrants who will refuse to hire people outside the ethnic group?

    “What is amazing is how open the Asians are in their discrimination against Americans when it comes to high tech jobs.”

    I predict that once whites no longer comprise a majority of the U.S. population, and once we have a critical mass of minorities in high level positions throughout our economy, we will start seeing “studies” that show that preferring your own group is “normal” and that whites need to get over the fact that they are no longer in charge of things.

    Read More
  54. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @guest007
    What is amazing is how open the Asians are in their discrimination against Americans when it comes to high tech jobs.

    Shikha Dalmia admitted as much in a Reason.com article where she wrote:

    The Gang of Eight proposed raising the current 85,000 H-1Bs (which includes 20,000 for foreign students in STEM fields in American universities) to 110,000 initially and 180,000 eventually. In return, it would have imposed more bureaucracy on H-1B-dependent companies. Worse, companies whose workforces are 30 percent H-1B would have to pay exorbitant visa fees. And those with more than 75 percent would be banned from hiring more H-1Bs altogether. (This was actually a backhanded way of killing large, India-originated IT companies, such as Infosys, whose business model depends on bringing large numbers of techies from home.)
     
    See http://reason.com/archives/2015/01/06/let-a-lot-more-of-them-in

    What is the point of helping the economy when all of the economic benefit will flow to recent immigrants who will refuse to hire people outside the ethnic group?

    “What is the point of helping the economy when all of the economic benefit will flow to recent immigrants who will refuse to hire people outside the ethnic group?”

    Also, what’s the point of importing a new elite? We have a lot of smart people in our country, many of whom are probably under-employed. Also, why would we import any foreign doctors? There are many very smart, well-educated Americans who would like to go to med. school but aren’t able to get in. Can’t we educate a few more doctors here?

    And, as others have argued, the U.S. probably should not contribute to brain drain from developing nations.

    Read More
  55. @Harold
    Do they still teach grammar in America? They don’t here in NZ. Neither do they teach us how to punctuate (to which my comments bear witness). Both of these things we are expected to pick up by osmosis. The more naturally gifted pick them up, the less gifted don’t. Thereby ensuring a wide gap between the way the more and less gifted write and talk. Down with the oppressive grammar and punctuation rules of the patriarchy!

    BS. People who (mis)use “whom” without knowing what it means and when to use it, use it only because they think it makes them sound smart.

    It has little to do with being “naturally gifted”. How hard is it to google “who vs whom” if you have any natural curiosity about how or why it is used, or are in any way uncertain about which is correct? It take less than a minute to find out.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harold

    BS.
     
    How dare you! I never, never, write BS comments. Well, okay, occasionally I write something stupid. In fact, sometimes I write things that are so stupid, so damaging to my reputation, that I wonder if honourable suicide is my only recourse. But this was not one of those times.

    People who (mis)use “whom” without knowing what it means and when to use it, use it only because they think it makes them sound smart.

     

    Yes, I agree.

    It has little to do with being “naturally gifted”. How hard is it to google “who vs whom” if you have any natural curiosity about how or why it is used, or are in any way uncertain about which is correct? It take less than a minute to find out.
     
    Well, I agree with this too. Though I’d bet there is still a correlation between natural gifts and the tendency to use ‘who’ and ‘whom’ correctly, even if mediated through “natural curiosity,” the naturally gifted tending to have more of it. In general good grammar and poor, among those who have recieved no instruction therein, undoubtedly correlate with natural giftedness and the lack thereof, even if it is mostly a reflection of how much reading one has done.

    Wait, what are we disagreeing about? I wasn’t defending the mistaken use of ‘whom’ or its perpetrator. I just wanted to know if they even taught grammar in America. Then I pointed out that, ironically as per the topic at hand, not doing so only serves to widen gaps even though its removal from the curriculum is supported by the same type that is concerned by such gaps, as I alluded to in my final—sarcastic—sentence.

    Down with the patriarchy!
    , @Jim
    The Indo-European case system makes its last stand in English with "who" vs. "whom".
    , @ben tillman

    It has little to do with being “naturally gifted”. How hard is it to google “who vs whom” if you have any natural curiosity about how or why it is used, or are in any way uncertain about which is correct? It take less than a minute to find out.
     
    And it's something that can be taught in five seconds: you use "who" where you would use "he", and you use "whom" where you would use "him".

    Or "who" is a subject, and "whom" is an object.

    To make both points, it might take you 10 seconds.

  56. A lightbulb just went on in my head while reading this! Similar to the phrase “don’t fight the last war”, I would argue also “fight the correct war”. This issue is not about student achievement, and probably never has been. Asking “cui bono?” tells you all you need to know. The teachers and unions are protecting their own interests. It is unlikely that *any* arguments will change their positions of always demanding more.

    Read More
  57. I can tell you a few things about the situation in Canada.

    First, the educational system is nothing to shout about. The teachers are overpaid, and the strong students are not challenged nearly enough – at least in school. STEM education is not great. (And non-STEM education is, naturally, completely infested by political correctness.) Last time I checked they don’t teach programming at school, and the math and physics they teach is rather low-level.
    At the university level, the STEM programs are completely overrun by immigrants and/or immigrants’ children. The natives (and I don’t mean Indians), being ill-prepared in mathematics and related disciplines, and being unwilling to compete with the Asians, have began to avoid STEM deliberately.

    At the workplace, there is heavy-duty discrimination against immigrants. First, their foreign degrees are, for practical purposes, held to be invalid. Second, their foreign work-experience (including to a lesser degree US experience) is ignored in favor of “Canadian work-experience.” A strong accent is placed on “social skills,” which seems to be a code-phrase for being Canadian-born & immaculately politically correct. Obviously, immigrants, especially Asian ones, respond by hiring their own once after attaining senior positions.

    The Canadian economy, on the overall, is a primitive raw-materials extraction economy combined with tons of paper-pushing “services.” (Gotta have paper-pushing or we’d all be unemployed.) There is little real high-tech to speak of; and a lot of it is American-based. PhD’s tend to leak from Canada to the US (where the real action is); but the Canadians answer by importing more PhD’s from abroad – who have a very tough time landing jobs in Canada.

    I’ll conclude with this – there is, currently, a controversy in some Canadian provinces regarding mathematical education. This controversy is almost entirely led by STEM immigrants (Asian and Eastern European; including a hot Asian doctor lady) who are sincerely appalled at the state of mathematical education in Canada. There are also some Canadian-born mathematicians. On the defensive side of the argument are hordes of Canadian-born people, mostly with backgrounds in “education.”

    http://blogs.edmontonjournal.com/2014/06/18/alberta-government-makes-progress-on-fixing-math-curriculum-but/

    ———

    One other note – 30-40 years ago, Canada was almost entirely lily white. Then for some reason they decided they wanted immigration. Maybe to put down the Frenchies, I don’t know. So now Canada is about 85% white; but with a caveat. The provincial areas are almost entirely white. But the cities, where the real money and power resides, are like theme parks of globalization. Everything from white South African refugees to Sikhs with their hats and beards can be found.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harold
    Recently I was in Toronto, where I met a nice young Indian lady who had just recieved her first teaching position, her class was almost entirely Asian (i think, in any case they weren’t white), she was miffed, she wanted to teach adorable little white children!.
    , @Art Deco
    The Canadian economy, on the overall, is a primitive raw-materials extraction economy combined with tons of paper-pushing “services.”
    --
    About 17% of value added is accounted for by extractive industries. Natural resources rents amount to 4%, almost precisely the global median. Manufacturing accounts for 11% of gdp, almost precisely what it does in the United States. No clue whence came the idea that services people voluntarily pay for are somehow worthless and their contribution to domestic product a mirage. Have to tell my doctor that and maybe he'll stop charging my insurer.
    , @Jim
    Robert Langlands is Canadian, at least by birth.
    , @Perspective
    Excellent Post!

    The government has gone out of its way to make a lot of people miserable here. First you have recent very highly educated immigrants who feel totally dejected because they cannot find meaningful employment in their field of study. As you said, the Canadian economy is not designed to absorb both educated immigrants and university graduates. Underemployment abounds as a result. Canadian born people are largely dismayed by the rapid demographic change that at times even bubbles to the surface in the form of moans and groans. Housing prices (especially Toronto and Vancouver) are way over valued because of constrained growth due to population growth and 'greenbelt' legislation.
    , @SFG
    For what it's worth, at least white South Africans have some place to go. They're slowly being killed over there.
  58. @John
    BS. People who (mis)use "whom" without knowing what it means and when to use it, use it only because they think it makes them sound smart.

    It has little to do with being "naturally gifted". How hard is it to google "who vs whom" if you have any natural curiosity about how or why it is used, or are in any way uncertain about which is correct? It take less than a minute to find out.

    BS.

    How dare you! I never, never, write BS comments. Well, okay, occasionally I write something stupid. In fact, sometimes I write things that are so stupid, so damaging to my reputation, that I wonder if honourable suicide is my only recourse. But this was not one of those times.

    People who (mis)use “whom” without knowing what it means and when to use it, use it only because they think it makes them sound smart.

    Yes, I agree.

    It has little to do with being “naturally gifted”. How hard is it to google “who vs whom” if you have any natural curiosity about how or why it is used, or are in any way uncertain about which is correct? It take less than a minute to find out.

    Well, I agree with this too. Though I’d bet there is still a correlation between natural gifts and the tendency to use ‘who’ and ‘whom’ correctly, even if mediated through “natural curiosity,” the naturally gifted tending to have more of it. In general good grammar and poor, among those who have recieved no instruction therein, undoubtedly correlate with natural giftedness and the lack thereof, even if it is mostly a reflection of how much reading one has done.

    Wait, what are we disagreeing about? I wasn’t defending the mistaken use of ‘whom’ or its perpetrator. I just wanted to know if they even taught grammar in America. Then I pointed out that, ironically as per the topic at hand, not doing so only serves to widen gaps even though its removal from the curriculum is supported by the same type that is concerned by such gaps, as I alluded to in my final—sarcastic—sentence.

    Down with the patriarchy!

    Read More
  59. @jimbojones
    I can tell you a few things about the situation in Canada.

    First, the educational system is nothing to shout about. The teachers are overpaid, and the strong students are not challenged nearly enough - at least in school. STEM education is not great. (And non-STEM education is, naturally, completely infested by political correctness.) Last time I checked they don't teach programming at school, and the math and physics they teach is rather low-level.
    At the university level, the STEM programs are completely overrun by immigrants and/or immigrants' children. The natives (and I don't mean Indians), being ill-prepared in mathematics and related disciplines, and being unwilling to compete with the Asians, have began to avoid STEM deliberately.

    At the workplace, there is heavy-duty discrimination against immigrants. First, their foreign degrees are, for practical purposes, held to be invalid. Second, their foreign work-experience (including to a lesser degree US experience) is ignored in favor of "Canadian work-experience." A strong accent is placed on "social skills," which seems to be a code-phrase for being Canadian-born & immaculately politically correct. Obviously, immigrants, especially Asian ones, respond by hiring their own once after attaining senior positions.

    The Canadian economy, on the overall, is a primitive raw-materials extraction economy combined with tons of paper-pushing "services." (Gotta have paper-pushing or we'd all be unemployed.) There is little real high-tech to speak of; and a lot of it is American-based. PhD's tend to leak from Canada to the US (where the real action is); but the Canadians answer by importing more PhD's from abroad - who have a very tough time landing jobs in Canada.

    I'll conclude with this - there is, currently, a controversy in some Canadian provinces regarding mathematical education. This controversy is almost entirely led by STEM immigrants (Asian and Eastern European; including a hot Asian doctor lady) who are sincerely appalled at the state of mathematical education in Canada. There are also some Canadian-born mathematicians. On the defensive side of the argument are hordes of Canadian-born people, mostly with backgrounds in "education."
    http://blogs.edmontonjournal.com/2014/06/18/alberta-government-makes-progress-on-fixing-math-curriculum-but/
    ---------

    One other note - 30-40 years ago, Canada was almost entirely lily white. Then for some reason they decided they wanted immigration. Maybe to put down the Frenchies, I don't know. So now Canada is about 85% white; but with a caveat. The provincial areas are almost entirely white. But the cities, where the real money and power resides, are like theme parks of globalization. Everything from white South African refugees to Sikhs with their hats and beards can be found.

    Recently I was in Toronto, where I met a nice young Indian lady who had just recieved her first teaching position, her class was almost entirely Asian (i think, in any case they weren’t white), she was miffed, she wanted to teach adorable little white children!.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SFG
    Yeah, amusingly, other races aren't nearly as convinced white people are horrible as black and liberal whites are.

    Then again, I recall reading of a Chinese book that claimed there were three races, the white, the yellow, and the black, and that the white and the yellow race were stronger and would eventually fight.
  60. @jimbojones
    I can tell you a few things about the situation in Canada.

    First, the educational system is nothing to shout about. The teachers are overpaid, and the strong students are not challenged nearly enough - at least in school. STEM education is not great. (And non-STEM education is, naturally, completely infested by political correctness.) Last time I checked they don't teach programming at school, and the math and physics they teach is rather low-level.
    At the university level, the STEM programs are completely overrun by immigrants and/or immigrants' children. The natives (and I don't mean Indians), being ill-prepared in mathematics and related disciplines, and being unwilling to compete with the Asians, have began to avoid STEM deliberately.

    At the workplace, there is heavy-duty discrimination against immigrants. First, their foreign degrees are, for practical purposes, held to be invalid. Second, their foreign work-experience (including to a lesser degree US experience) is ignored in favor of "Canadian work-experience." A strong accent is placed on "social skills," which seems to be a code-phrase for being Canadian-born & immaculately politically correct. Obviously, immigrants, especially Asian ones, respond by hiring their own once after attaining senior positions.

    The Canadian economy, on the overall, is a primitive raw-materials extraction economy combined with tons of paper-pushing "services." (Gotta have paper-pushing or we'd all be unemployed.) There is little real high-tech to speak of; and a lot of it is American-based. PhD's tend to leak from Canada to the US (where the real action is); but the Canadians answer by importing more PhD's from abroad - who have a very tough time landing jobs in Canada.

    I'll conclude with this - there is, currently, a controversy in some Canadian provinces regarding mathematical education. This controversy is almost entirely led by STEM immigrants (Asian and Eastern European; including a hot Asian doctor lady) who are sincerely appalled at the state of mathematical education in Canada. There are also some Canadian-born mathematicians. On the defensive side of the argument are hordes of Canadian-born people, mostly with backgrounds in "education."
    http://blogs.edmontonjournal.com/2014/06/18/alberta-government-makes-progress-on-fixing-math-curriculum-but/
    ---------

    One other note - 30-40 years ago, Canada was almost entirely lily white. Then for some reason they decided they wanted immigration. Maybe to put down the Frenchies, I don't know. So now Canada is about 85% white; but with a caveat. The provincial areas are almost entirely white. But the cities, where the real money and power resides, are like theme parks of globalization. Everything from white South African refugees to Sikhs with their hats and beards can be found.

    The Canadian economy, on the overall, is a primitive raw-materials extraction economy combined with tons of paper-pushing “services.”

    About 17% of value added is accounted for by extractive industries. Natural resources rents amount to 4%, almost precisely the global median. Manufacturing accounts for 11% of gdp, almost precisely what it does in the United States. No clue whence came the idea that services people voluntarily pay for are somehow worthless and their contribution to domestic product a mirage. Have to tell my doctor that and maybe he’ll stop charging my insurer.

    Read More
    • Replies: @silviosilver

    No clue whence came the idea that services people voluntarily pay for are somehow worthless and their contribution to domestic product a mirage.
     
    The commies had similar ideas about measuring production. Their concept of 'net material product' excluded most services.

    The real question is why you felt the need to respond intelligently to someone calling the Canadian economy "primitive."
  61. @Front toward enemy
    You sir are correct. My wife, an inner city teacher for 30 years, states that disruptive behavior is the single cause of student non achievement. Teachers spend most of their time trying to civilize a certain group of students who have no desire to learn and every desire to disrupt. However in today's educational climate all due care and restraint must be exercised when dealing with these "students." But let us not let the facts get in the way of the truth.

    Unless you have been there and have seen day after day wasted because “Joe” wants to destroy your class, you do not appreciate that this is the intent. Not possible to improve Joe, so the upper half gets lowered.

    Resource minded bloggers all point to 2015 as the year consequences of resource depletion start to affect everybody. A few symptoms of this are low commodity prices and structural failure of weak economic systems. Low commodity prices are caused by widespread economic weakness. The sea change will take many years; then as now there will be two tribes, the makers and the takers. Then as now the two tribes will be composed of the same people, only the makers will be making do with what they have rather than living comfortable lives, and the takers’ criminality will be apparent.

    There is something we can do now. We can stop glorifying the tribe of the takers by refusing to acknowledge, support and coddle their stars, the non-productive members of society known as athletes.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chris Mallory
    "We can stop glorifying the tribe of the takers by refusing to acknowledge, support and coddle their stars, the non-productive members of society known as government employees."


    FIFY

    A pro athlete is more useful than any government employee. I can and do choose to ignore pro athletics. I am not given that chance with the parasites working for the government.
  62. Steve has coined the perfect motto for our Idiocracy in the making: “All We Have To Do.”

    It should replace “In God We Trust” on the Great Seal of the United States.

    Read More
  63. @jimbojones
    I can tell you a few things about the situation in Canada.

    First, the educational system is nothing to shout about. The teachers are overpaid, and the strong students are not challenged nearly enough - at least in school. STEM education is not great. (And non-STEM education is, naturally, completely infested by political correctness.) Last time I checked they don't teach programming at school, and the math and physics they teach is rather low-level.
    At the university level, the STEM programs are completely overrun by immigrants and/or immigrants' children. The natives (and I don't mean Indians), being ill-prepared in mathematics and related disciplines, and being unwilling to compete with the Asians, have began to avoid STEM deliberately.

    At the workplace, there is heavy-duty discrimination against immigrants. First, their foreign degrees are, for practical purposes, held to be invalid. Second, their foreign work-experience (including to a lesser degree US experience) is ignored in favor of "Canadian work-experience." A strong accent is placed on "social skills," which seems to be a code-phrase for being Canadian-born & immaculately politically correct. Obviously, immigrants, especially Asian ones, respond by hiring their own once after attaining senior positions.

    The Canadian economy, on the overall, is a primitive raw-materials extraction economy combined with tons of paper-pushing "services." (Gotta have paper-pushing or we'd all be unemployed.) There is little real high-tech to speak of; and a lot of it is American-based. PhD's tend to leak from Canada to the US (where the real action is); but the Canadians answer by importing more PhD's from abroad - who have a very tough time landing jobs in Canada.

    I'll conclude with this - there is, currently, a controversy in some Canadian provinces regarding mathematical education. This controversy is almost entirely led by STEM immigrants (Asian and Eastern European; including a hot Asian doctor lady) who are sincerely appalled at the state of mathematical education in Canada. There are also some Canadian-born mathematicians. On the defensive side of the argument are hordes of Canadian-born people, mostly with backgrounds in "education."
    http://blogs.edmontonjournal.com/2014/06/18/alberta-government-makes-progress-on-fixing-math-curriculum-but/
    ---------

    One other note - 30-40 years ago, Canada was almost entirely lily white. Then for some reason they decided they wanted immigration. Maybe to put down the Frenchies, I don't know. So now Canada is about 85% white; but with a caveat. The provincial areas are almost entirely white. But the cities, where the real money and power resides, are like theme parks of globalization. Everything from white South African refugees to Sikhs with their hats and beards can be found.

    Robert Langlands is Canadian, at least by birth.

    Read More
  64. @John
    BS. People who (mis)use "whom" without knowing what it means and when to use it, use it only because they think it makes them sound smart.

    It has little to do with being "naturally gifted". How hard is it to google "who vs whom" if you have any natural curiosity about how or why it is used, or are in any way uncertain about which is correct? It take less than a minute to find out.

    The Indo-European case system makes its last stand in English with “who” vs. “whom”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ogunsiron
    Personal pronouns, for some reason, seem an impregnable bastion of the case system in all indo-european language families that I'm familiar with.
  65. I’ve always wondered what a study would look like if they had the same purpose in a different direction:

    How much money could state and local governments save on Police and Emergency Services if there weren’t blacks and Hispanics in the United States? On prisons? On community outreach programs?

    If we had closed borders how many lives would be saved per year from murder or drug running?

    Or, better yet, what would America be like if we decreased the wealth gap towards the black or Hispanic average for all Americans?

    Might start noticing things if we did that though… and we can’t have that, right?

    Read More
  66. ” predict that once whites no longer comprise a majority of the U.S. population, and once we have a critical mass of minorities in high level positions throughout our economy, we will start seeing “studies” that show that preferring your own group is “normal” and that whites need to get over the fact that they are no longer in charge of things.”

    That are already studies right now showing that Black pride is normal and healthy mentally for Blacks.

    Read More
  67. @International Jew

    That stunning improvement, according to the center, would raise the total output in the United States by another 10 percent.
     
    Pffft! I have a better plan. Let's bioengineer a generation of NBA-grade athletes who can earn $10 million/year. GDP will then climb into the quadrillions!

    Good point, the jobs just don’t exist(obviously our bio-engineered athletes would not be able to obtian the lucrative contracts were there so many of them), in addition to “closing the gap” being pure fantasy.

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  68. The conventional wisdom is that the best way to help the poor is to give them more education, but perhaps a better way is to reduce underemployment among those from middle class backgrounds. With graduate underemployment running at 40 percent it’s hardly surprising a lot of those with low levels of education can’t find jobs.

    There are a lot of relatively smart people who are underemployed due to outsourcing, treatable mental health issues, poor career advice, social isolation, over-education, lack of practical skills etc. Why not try to get more of these people into higher levels jobs or self-employment and leave more low-level jobs and small business opportunities open to those with lower levels of education?

    Of course being honest about how many college graduates are working in low-level service jobs might be a bit embarrassing for the education industrial complex, so it will probably never happen.

    Read More
    • Replies: @MarkinLa
    The reality is that most of what happens in the working world is an illusion anyway. I always laugh at the libertarians and their idiotic "what someone is worth" nonsense. Why is somebody like Lloyd Blankfein worth hundreds of millions because the government allowed this useless parasite to steal it. However, there are people who truly are worth a lot who are rich. I worked for a company founded by such a person.

    Why not go one step farther on this illusion ad put people to work solving problems that need solving knowing that it really doesn't matter if they succeed or not. So what if no progress is made. We already see that in the solar energy field - a big chunk of money has been written off and the world didn't end. We have the Department of Education which has been a world leader in this wastage endeavor.

    There are plenty of fields where people could be put to good use. Of course the budget deficit would explode but we already know we don't plan to ever pay any of it back anyway so why just make it a bit more obvious.
  69. @jimbojones
    I can tell you a few things about the situation in Canada.

    First, the educational system is nothing to shout about. The teachers are overpaid, and the strong students are not challenged nearly enough - at least in school. STEM education is not great. (And non-STEM education is, naturally, completely infested by political correctness.) Last time I checked they don't teach programming at school, and the math and physics they teach is rather low-level.
    At the university level, the STEM programs are completely overrun by immigrants and/or immigrants' children. The natives (and I don't mean Indians), being ill-prepared in mathematics and related disciplines, and being unwilling to compete with the Asians, have began to avoid STEM deliberately.

    At the workplace, there is heavy-duty discrimination against immigrants. First, their foreign degrees are, for practical purposes, held to be invalid. Second, their foreign work-experience (including to a lesser degree US experience) is ignored in favor of "Canadian work-experience." A strong accent is placed on "social skills," which seems to be a code-phrase for being Canadian-born & immaculately politically correct. Obviously, immigrants, especially Asian ones, respond by hiring their own once after attaining senior positions.

    The Canadian economy, on the overall, is a primitive raw-materials extraction economy combined with tons of paper-pushing "services." (Gotta have paper-pushing or we'd all be unemployed.) There is little real high-tech to speak of; and a lot of it is American-based. PhD's tend to leak from Canada to the US (where the real action is); but the Canadians answer by importing more PhD's from abroad - who have a very tough time landing jobs in Canada.

    I'll conclude with this - there is, currently, a controversy in some Canadian provinces regarding mathematical education. This controversy is almost entirely led by STEM immigrants (Asian and Eastern European; including a hot Asian doctor lady) who are sincerely appalled at the state of mathematical education in Canada. There are also some Canadian-born mathematicians. On the defensive side of the argument are hordes of Canadian-born people, mostly with backgrounds in "education."
    http://blogs.edmontonjournal.com/2014/06/18/alberta-government-makes-progress-on-fixing-math-curriculum-but/
    ---------

    One other note - 30-40 years ago, Canada was almost entirely lily white. Then for some reason they decided they wanted immigration. Maybe to put down the Frenchies, I don't know. So now Canada is about 85% white; but with a caveat. The provincial areas are almost entirely white. But the cities, where the real money and power resides, are like theme parks of globalization. Everything from white South African refugees to Sikhs with their hats and beards can be found.

    Excellent Post!

    The government has gone out of its way to make a lot of people miserable here. First you have recent very highly educated immigrants who feel totally dejected because they cannot find meaningful employment in their field of study. As you said, the Canadian economy is not designed to absorb both educated immigrants and university graduates. Underemployment abounds as a result. Canadian born people are largely dismayed by the rapid demographic change that at times even bubbles to the surface in the form of moans and groans. Housing prices (especially Toronto and Vancouver) are way over valued because of constrained growth due to population growth and ‘greenbelt’ legislation.

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  70. @FWIW
    Are there more good jobs in America now or in the past? Are jobs getting better or worse?

    A 100 years ago, a McJob was done behind a mule with a plow.

    Does anyone seriously believe that there was a better time to live in America then right now?

    Are you also from New Zealand?

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  71. Does anyone seriously believe that there was a better time to live in America then right now?

    I suppose the Americans in alternate reality #49109128547etc, where they said “no thanks” to the proposed 1965 immigration bill, the similar immigration bills proposed in ’66, ’67, ’68, ’69, ’70, spring ’71, fall ’71, spring ’72, fall ’72, 1st quarter ’73, 2nd quarter ’73, 3rd quarter ’73, 4th quarter ’73, January ’74, February ’74, etc., etc., ad infinitum, are having a much better time than we are.

    Good point. Whites are about 68% of the US population so raising the white gentile average from about 100 to say Ashekenazi Jewish levels of about 110-115 would presumably send the economy into the stratosphere.

    Hey, if you’re fantasizing, might as well fantasize about the inputs, too.

    What is the point of helping the economy when all of the economic benefit will flow to recent immigrants who will refuse to hire people outside the ethnic group?

    Race-replacement.

    Read More
  72. @jimbojones
    I can tell you a few things about the situation in Canada.

    First, the educational system is nothing to shout about. The teachers are overpaid, and the strong students are not challenged nearly enough - at least in school. STEM education is not great. (And non-STEM education is, naturally, completely infested by political correctness.) Last time I checked they don't teach programming at school, and the math and physics they teach is rather low-level.
    At the university level, the STEM programs are completely overrun by immigrants and/or immigrants' children. The natives (and I don't mean Indians), being ill-prepared in mathematics and related disciplines, and being unwilling to compete with the Asians, have began to avoid STEM deliberately.

    At the workplace, there is heavy-duty discrimination against immigrants. First, their foreign degrees are, for practical purposes, held to be invalid. Second, their foreign work-experience (including to a lesser degree US experience) is ignored in favor of "Canadian work-experience." A strong accent is placed on "social skills," which seems to be a code-phrase for being Canadian-born & immaculately politically correct. Obviously, immigrants, especially Asian ones, respond by hiring their own once after attaining senior positions.

    The Canadian economy, on the overall, is a primitive raw-materials extraction economy combined with tons of paper-pushing "services." (Gotta have paper-pushing or we'd all be unemployed.) There is little real high-tech to speak of; and a lot of it is American-based. PhD's tend to leak from Canada to the US (where the real action is); but the Canadians answer by importing more PhD's from abroad - who have a very tough time landing jobs in Canada.

    I'll conclude with this - there is, currently, a controversy in some Canadian provinces regarding mathematical education. This controversy is almost entirely led by STEM immigrants (Asian and Eastern European; including a hot Asian doctor lady) who are sincerely appalled at the state of mathematical education in Canada. There are also some Canadian-born mathematicians. On the defensive side of the argument are hordes of Canadian-born people, mostly with backgrounds in "education."
    http://blogs.edmontonjournal.com/2014/06/18/alberta-government-makes-progress-on-fixing-math-curriculum-but/
    ---------

    One other note - 30-40 years ago, Canada was almost entirely lily white. Then for some reason they decided they wanted immigration. Maybe to put down the Frenchies, I don't know. So now Canada is about 85% white; but with a caveat. The provincial areas are almost entirely white. But the cities, where the real money and power resides, are like theme parks of globalization. Everything from white South African refugees to Sikhs with their hats and beards can be found.

    For what it’s worth, at least white South Africans have some place to go. They’re slowly being killed over there.

    Read More
  73. My understanding is that Canada has a much higher percentage of indigenous people (“First Nation” and Inuit). They are more like 5% of the population of Canada, vs less than 1% in the US. I’m sure that drags down Canada’s score somewhat.

    Read More
  74. @josh
    I love the idea of this precise and predictable relationship between PISA scores and GDP. If we improve out average by 11 points that will increase GDP 7.4% which will increase government revenues (which is apparently the final cause of all education?) by $724.38 billion.

    Funny because our liberal friends are often at pains to remind us that correlation is not causation. Even if it requires a near-heroic act of not noticing.

    Read More
  75. White Americans trailed Canadians by only 4 points

    Maybe the diversity not only brings down the avg. score, but also acts as brakes for the potentially more advanced learners … no student being left behind.

    Read More
  76. @Harold
    Recently I was in Toronto, where I met a nice young Indian lady who had just recieved her first teaching position, her class was almost entirely Asian (i think, in any case they weren’t white), she was miffed, she wanted to teach adorable little white children!.

    Yeah, amusingly, other races aren’t nearly as convinced white people are horrible as black and liberal whites are.

    Then again, I recall reading of a Chinese book that claimed there were three races, the white, the yellow, and the black, and that the white and the yellow race were stronger and would eventually fight.

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  77. @NOTA
    Bright kids still need the guidance of "yes, you have to learn about this even though it bores you," lest we have adults who can write code but can't write a decent sentence.

    Bright kids still need the guidance of “yes, you have to learn about this even though it bores you,” lest we have adults who can write code but can’t write a decent sentence.

    I could not agree more.

    I have two highly intelligent nephews. They were allowed to coast in public high school since they were not disruptive. Their parents encouraged them to, “follow their passion.” Now, one is a college dropout and the other an unemployed english major. However, both have encyclopedic knowledge of things like playing the bagpipes, the back stories of obscure manga characters and the differences between various techno music genres.

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  78. This “achievement gap” problem will soon solve itself.

    White students no longer to be majority in school

    See, the only reason there was “gap” is because white students were the norm, and NAM underachievement was noticeable vis-a-vis the norm. But soon NAM achievement levels will be the norm, and voila, no “gap”. QED.

    So stop worrying already.

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  79. @John
    BS. People who (mis)use "whom" without knowing what it means and when to use it, use it only because they think it makes them sound smart.

    It has little to do with being "naturally gifted". How hard is it to google "who vs whom" if you have any natural curiosity about how or why it is used, or are in any way uncertain about which is correct? It take less than a minute to find out.

    It has little to do with being “naturally gifted”. How hard is it to google “who vs whom” if you have any natural curiosity about how or why it is used, or are in any way uncertain about which is correct? It take less than a minute to find out.

    And it’s something that can be taught in five seconds: you use “who” where you would use “he”, and you use “whom” where you would use “him”.

    Or “who” is a subject, and “whom” is an object.

    To make both points, it might take you 10 seconds.

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  80. @Art Deco
    The Canadian economy, on the overall, is a primitive raw-materials extraction economy combined with tons of paper-pushing “services.”
    --
    About 17% of value added is accounted for by extractive industries. Natural resources rents amount to 4%, almost precisely the global median. Manufacturing accounts for 11% of gdp, almost precisely what it does in the United States. No clue whence came the idea that services people voluntarily pay for are somehow worthless and their contribution to domestic product a mirage. Have to tell my doctor that and maybe he'll stop charging my insurer.

    No clue whence came the idea that services people voluntarily pay for are somehow worthless and their contribution to domestic product a mirage.

    The commies had similar ideas about measuring production. Their concept of ‘net material product’ excluded most services.

    The real question is why you felt the need to respond intelligently to someone calling the Canadian economy “primitive.”

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  81. @FWIW
    Are there more good jobs in America now or in the past? Are jobs getting better or worse?

    A 100 years ago, a McJob was done behind a mule with a plow.

    Does anyone seriously believe that there was a better time to live in America then right now?

    I can easily say that the 1970′s and 1980′s were a better time to be living in American than right now.
    We were still relatively free and the deluge of 3rd world invaders from south of the border hadn’t hit yet.

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  82. @Hal
    Unless you have been there and have seen day after day wasted because "Joe" wants to destroy your class, you do not appreciate that this is the intent. Not possible to improve Joe, so the upper half gets lowered.

    Resource minded bloggers all point to 2015 as the year consequences of resource depletion start to affect everybody. A few symptoms of this are low commodity prices and structural failure of weak economic systems. Low commodity prices are caused by widespread economic weakness. The sea change will take many years; then as now there will be two tribes, the makers and the takers. Then as now the two tribes will be composed of the same people, only the makers will be making do with what they have rather than living comfortable lives, and the takers' criminality will be apparent.

    There is something we can do now. We can stop glorifying the tribe of the takers by refusing to acknowledge, support and coddle their stars, the non-productive members of society known as athletes.

    “We can stop glorifying the tribe of the takers by refusing to acknowledge, support and coddle their stars, the non-productive members of society known as government employees.”

    FIFY

    A pro athlete is more useful than any government employee. I can and do choose to ignore pro athletics. I am not given that chance with the parasites working for the government.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hal

    “We can stop glorifying the tribe of the takers by refusing to acknowledge, support and coddle their stars, the non-productive members of society known as government employees.
     
    It's rude and dishonest to misquote. I said ...athletes, not government employees.

    Government everywhere is flawed, but I know of few instances where academic integrity is sacrificed to make sure some gal gets a job at the SSA.

    My point is that it makes it makes little sense to rail on and on about failing schools, then to devote even more time to the entertainment known as professional sports. My point is that resource depletion is an inconvenient truth that will overwhelm the current fascination, but that takers and makers will still be present, so unless we intend to glorify the tribe of takers, which you apparently do not as evidence by your attack on all government, then we should put athletes in their rightful place.
  83. I sent in a comment to the New York Times, very polite and carefully balanced in tone, hinting that there might possibly be a genetic component to the observed underperformance of minority children. The comment was censored out of the system and did not appear. I think any comment that mentions all three concepts, intelligence, genetics, and ethnic differences in performance, is verboten in the comments threads of the New York Times. This was a very gentle comment but it had all three elements at different points in the same paragraph, hence verboten. Will that type of censorship work or will it eventually collapse?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Truth
    You wrote a comment to the world's most influential newspaper and you weren't one of the 3 responses chosen to appear in print? Dude, the one thing I've come to appreciate this site for is giving me a window as to the amount of racism white guys face every day. If the fact that the Times wouldn't select your letter for print doesn't display this, nothing does.
  84. @Reg Cæsar

    so you would rather have foreigners that suck welfare than foreigners who contribute?

     

    Where did I say I wanted any foreigners at all?

    The point was that smart aliens can cause tremendous damage, too.

    Remember this clever architecture student named Atta? What did he "contribute"?

    He contributed to the evolution of the iconic New York skyline. It took God six days to create the universe, but it took Atta only 102 minutes to reshape Lower Manhattan. How much more could a lowly architecture student have hoped to accomplish?

    If Howard Roark had organized some buddies to hijack a few jetliners, think ab0ut what he could have done!

    Read More
  85. @Chris Mallory
    "We can stop glorifying the tribe of the takers by refusing to acknowledge, support and coddle their stars, the non-productive members of society known as government employees."


    FIFY

    A pro athlete is more useful than any government employee. I can and do choose to ignore pro athletics. I am not given that chance with the parasites working for the government.

    “We can stop glorifying the tribe of the takers by refusing to acknowledge, support and coddle their stars, the non-productive members of society known as government employees.

    It’s rude and dishonest to misquote. I said …athletes, not government employees.

    Government everywhere is flawed, but I know of few instances where academic integrity is sacrificed to make sure some gal gets a job at the SSA.

    My point is that it makes it makes little sense to rail on and on about failing schools, then to devote even more time to the entertainment known as professional sports. My point is that resource depletion is an inconvenient truth that will overwhelm the current fascination, but that takers and makers will still be present, so unless we intend to glorify the tribe of takers, which you apparently do not as evidence by your attack on all government, then we should put athletes in their rightful place.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    The NFL, the most popular and lucrative professional sports league in the US, had revenues of $6 billion in 2013, a large percentage of which was television rights payments from the networks. The league has to work to stay relevant to their fans to remain profitable. The numbers are pretty small beer in the grand scheme.

    The total outlay for K-12 public education was $538 billion in 2012. A more thorough search may turn up the numbers for 2014, but can we agree that the number is larger for last year? For this investment, a term the Left loves to use when talking about education, we have declining test scores on "renormed" tests, citizens with no clue as to their rights and responsibilities as citizens, a vast bureaucratic edifice zigging and zagging like St. Vitus on meth according to the dictates of the latest education craze, and an over-benefited and under-worked cadres whose very problems are created by the same misguided people they heartily support.

    I say "Go Patriots"!
  86. @unpc downunder
    The conventional wisdom is that the best way to help the poor is to give them more education, but perhaps a better way is to reduce underemployment among those from middle class backgrounds. With graduate underemployment running at 40 percent it's hardly surprising a lot of those with low levels of education can't find jobs.

    There are a lot of relatively smart people who are underemployed due to outsourcing, treatable mental health issues, poor career advice, social isolation, over-education, lack of practical skills etc. Why not try to get more of these people into higher levels jobs or self-employment and leave more low-level jobs and small business opportunities open to those with lower levels of education?

    Of course being honest about how many college graduates are working in low-level service jobs might be a bit embarrassing for the education industrial complex, so it will probably never happen.

    The reality is that most of what happens in the working world is an illusion anyway. I always laugh at the libertarians and their idiotic “what someone is worth” nonsense. Why is somebody like Lloyd Blankfein worth hundreds of millions because the government allowed this useless parasite to steal it. However, there are people who truly are worth a lot who are rich. I worked for a company founded by such a person.

    Why not go one step farther on this illusion ad put people to work solving problems that need solving knowing that it really doesn’t matter if they succeed or not. So what if no progress is made. We already see that in the solar energy field – a big chunk of money has been written off and the world didn’t end. We have the Department of Education which has been a world leader in this wastage endeavor.

    There are plenty of fields where people could be put to good use. Of course the budget deficit would explode but we already know we don’t plan to ever pay any of it back anyway so why just make it a bit more obvious.

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  87. @rod1963
    Smart kids will learn no matter what if they are interested in a particular subject. You don't help them by putting a teacher's college grad with a IQ of 95 as their instructor who knows nothing and doesn't care to.

    If you take for example the computer revolution of the 70's and early 80's. You had bright kids teaching themselves assembly language, writing their own interpreters and building their own hardware. Much of which was considered graduate level work.

    The best thing schools could do for the bright kids is to get out of their way and offer mentors for them instead, not some teacher college drone and certainly not drug them into a stupor because they bug the teacher or are bored to the gills in class.

    With online courseware we as a society should be able to have an extremely broad range of subjects that high school students can choose to learn about, and we should be able to get students the required number of high school credits (including whichever subjects we make mandatory) by age 16. Set the majority up with an apprenticeship/internship to start earning and learning in trades or business and let those who will actually benefit from a university education get an early start (most of undergrad should be done with online courseware + labs with TAs, we could do it with half the faculty or less). If we do that and stop denigrating motherhood as a choice for married women, we could probably kick off a legit baby boom among whites in the US.

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  88. @Peter Johnson
    I sent in a comment to the New York Times, very polite and carefully balanced in tone, hinting that there might possibly be a genetic component to the observed underperformance of minority children. The comment was censored out of the system and did not appear. I think any comment that mentions all three concepts, intelligence, genetics, and ethnic differences in performance, is verboten in the comments threads of the New York Times. This was a very gentle comment but it had all three elements at different points in the same paragraph, hence verboten. Will that type of censorship work or will it eventually collapse?

    You wrote a comment to the world’s most influential newspaper and you weren’t one of the 3 responses chosen to appear in print? Dude, the one thing I’ve come to appreciate this site for is giving me a window as to the amount of racism white guys face every day. If the fact that the Times wouldn’t select your letter for print doesn’t display this, nothing does.

    Read More
    • Replies: @peter johnson
    Not for print in the letters section, for the comments thread in the on-line version. There are 277 comments allowed through the censorship filter. Everything is published in the on-line comments thread, unless it has profanity, threats of violence, or it mentions genetics, intelligence and ethnic differences in performance. Those comments are censored out.
  89. @Truth
    You wrote a comment to the world's most influential newspaper and you weren't one of the 3 responses chosen to appear in print? Dude, the one thing I've come to appreciate this site for is giving me a window as to the amount of racism white guys face every day. If the fact that the Times wouldn't select your letter for print doesn't display this, nothing does.

    Not for print in the letters section, for the comments thread in the on-line version. There are 277 comments allowed through the censorship filter. Everything is published in the on-line comments thread, unless it has profanity, threats of violence, or it mentions genetics, intelligence and ethnic differences in performance. Those comments are censored out.

    Read More
  90. @Jim
    The Indo-European case system makes its last stand in English with "who" vs. "whom".

    Personal pronouns, for some reason, seem an impregnable bastion of the case system in all indo-european language families that I’m familiar with.

    Read More
  91. @Hal

    “We can stop glorifying the tribe of the takers by refusing to acknowledge, support and coddle their stars, the non-productive members of society known as government employees.
     
    It's rude and dishonest to misquote. I said ...athletes, not government employees.

    Government everywhere is flawed, but I know of few instances where academic integrity is sacrificed to make sure some gal gets a job at the SSA.

    My point is that it makes it makes little sense to rail on and on about failing schools, then to devote even more time to the entertainment known as professional sports. My point is that resource depletion is an inconvenient truth that will overwhelm the current fascination, but that takers and makers will still be present, so unless we intend to glorify the tribe of takers, which you apparently do not as evidence by your attack on all government, then we should put athletes in their rightful place.

    The NFL, the most popular and lucrative professional sports league in the US, had revenues of $6 billion in 2013, a large percentage of which was television rights payments from the networks. The league has to work to stay relevant to their fans to remain profitable. The numbers are pretty small beer in the grand scheme.

    The total outlay for K-12 public education was $538 billion in 2012. A more thorough search may turn up the numbers for 2014, but can we agree that the number is larger for last year? For this investment, a term the Left loves to use when talking about education, we have declining test scores on “renormed” tests, citizens with no clue as to their rights and responsibilities as citizens, a vast bureaucratic edifice zigging and zagging like St. Vitus on meth according to the dictates of the latest education craze, and an over-benefited and under-worked cadres whose very problems are created by the same misguided people they heartily support.

    I say “Go Patriots”!

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