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"Roma:" Alfonso Cuarón and the Feudal Spirit
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Roma is a nice little black & white movie about growing up upper middle class in Mexico City in 1971.

It’s the first film from Alfonso Cuaron, one of the Three Amigos of Mexican directors (along with Innaritu and Del Toro) whose movies always get lots of Oscar attention, since his 2013 astronaut film Gravity. Unfortunately, it’s suffering from The Artist’s curse in which the Academy and end of year lists overhype an interesting small film that would be more fun to stumble upon without grandiose expectations.

Cuaron, whose father was a rare Mexican nuclear physicist and his mother was a biochemist, grew up in Roma, the fashionable Mexico City neighborhood where his his very white family and their Mixtec-speaking Indian servants lived. (In one scene they go to the beach and the children get sunburned while the maid, of course, does not.)

Presumably, the title Roma is also a nod to the neorealist style of 1940s Italian movies filmed on low budgets in Rome, such as Rome, Open City and The Bicycle Thief.

One of their young Indio maids is the main character of what plot there is. Roma is intended as a tribute to this faithful family retainer. There are similar tributes to similar servants with the proper feudal spirit in the childhood memoirs of other privileged high achievers, such as Nabokov and Churchill. iSteve Commenter Paul Rise notes:

Cuaron holds the narcissism so many successful Mexican men do, he is saying – look at this noble savage, more loyal than any dog. She did so much and is so responsible for my important, world scale success. She nurtured and enabled the gift to civilization that I am.

That’s harsh but reasonably fair. Keep in mind that I feel that Cuaron’s self-satisfied nostalgia is justified. He is a fine movie director and I am glad that he had loyal servants to provide him with a nice upbringing. It’s pleasant to see him reproduce childhood moments that inspired his movies decades later: e.g., the kids go to see Marooned, the 1969 astronaut movie that served as a first draft for Gravity.

For a film shot in a neorealist style with no color and no musical score, just a lot of incidental sound (such as the constantly barking dogs that I too associate with Mexico), Roma cost a substantial $15 million. Cuaron reproduced the townhouse he grew up in meticulously. But maybe he should have been a little more fanciful because Casa Cuaron turns out to have been lacking in Nabokovian splendor.

He also spent expansively on Felliniesque crowd scenes, such as the background in one scene where, while the main character walks down the street oblivious, an outdoor circus performer is shot out of a cannon. I also liked the kung-fu fascists scene in which Cuaron has assembled hundreds of rightwing martial artists under the guidance of the American deep state.

But the best stuff is various childhood memories filmed from a 3 foot tall boy’s point of view, such as his father nightly parking his huge Ford Galaxy in their driveway, which is only one inch wider than the car. (I think I might have been to this neighborhood, where my friend’s aunt owned a four story townhouse, on a 1979 RV roadtrip. Driving across Mexico City the next morning was a memorable lesson in just how wide a Winnebago is. For 25 miles, we had to delegate passengers to look out the window and pull in the side mirrors whenever another large vehicle approached.)

On the other hand, lots of talented directors have made this kind of boyhood memories film (e.g., Tornatore’s Cinema Paradiso, Zeffirelli’s Tea with Mussolini, Malick’s Tree of Life and Linklater’s Boyhood), and Roma doesn’t stand out from them. Part of the problem is that Cuaron is trying to tell the story of his Mixtec-speaking maid, but nine year old boys, even ones who are future film directors, aren’t that observant about what life looks like to people of other sexes, races, classes, and ages.

So, while Roma is not wholly lacking in incident, it is lacking in dramatic tension, other than the usual fear inherent in Mexican life that at any moment somebody could get maimed in another random accident caused by the ambient carelessness.

Also, the cinematography is uninspired. You expect a black and white art film to look crisp, right? But Cuaron’s usual cameraman, three-time Oscar winner Emmanuel Lubezki, was unavailable, so Cuaron did the camera work himself. Roma came out muddy looking in low-contrast B&W.

Also, Cuaron edited his autobiographical movie himself. Editor Cuaron was very generous to Director Cuaron over how many extra seconds to linger on each shot. Perhaps my chair was uncomfortable, but that was a pretty long 135 minutes.

A final problem is that life in Mexico is just less visually appealing than life in Italy. Thus the most commercially successful movie recently set in Mexico, Pixar’s Coco, totally revamped what Mexico looks like. (Cuaraon, personally, has lived in London since 2000.)

The Three Amigos are big shots because they make cool looking movies, not because they are philosophical geniuses. Many of their films are kind of ridiculous, such as Cuaron’s Children of Men, Innaritu’s Babel and Birdman, and del Toro’s Oscar winner about the lady who has sex with a frog, My Favorite Color Is Red. Roma is neither ridiculous nor cool looking, so it’s a little meh.

Note: every other critic in the world loved loved loved this movie.

Roma is now on Netflix.

 
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  1. Daniel H says:

    >>Note: every other critic in the world loved loved loved this movie.

    Yep, what do they say? the soft bigotry of low expectations.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @FredCDobbs
  2. Anon[643] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    Get your buzzfeed cookware.

  3. Altai says:

    Steve forgot to mention this piece of high artistry.

    The Hellboy films seem to be highly faithful to the source material (That virtually nobody other than Del Toro was that much of comics nerd to ever read) and rely on Ron Pealman’s charisma to carry them. (A bit like Milla Jovovich in the Resident Evil films.)

    I should also hope somebody asked Cuaron if he has any domestic help in the inceasingly-Dubaised London and if he thinks he really needs them and how much he pays them.

  4. Anon[643] • Disclaimer says:

    every other critic in the world loved loved loved this movie

    Hopefully they will stop referring to Indios as ‘Latinos’ after seeing this. Indios are the conquered helot race of the Latinos.

    PS. What does the howling music in the trailer have to do with the Indio woman in the movie?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  5. Anon[643] • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel H

    Yep, what do they say? the soft bigotry of low expectations.

    Cuaron is all over the place. He certainly has talent. GRAVITY was quite a feat. CHILDREN OF MEN had some nifty film-making even though it’s pretty retarded.

    His GREAT EXPECTATIONS sucked so bad I had to turn it off.

    I don’t feel like watching some Harry Potter movie.

    But Y TU MAMA is one fine film. I just about loathed every character in it, but it felt true about life and moved me at the end. Even total dipshits have a heart.

  6. Is there any country in the world more badly served by black and white photography than colorful Mexico?

    It’s a shame that some stupid envy of a Gringo New York idea of monochrome elegance has a Mexican director crippling his own work.

    I love the Roma neighborhood so I will certainly be seeing this one. It’s full of history and great architecture, even though it just popped up around 1910 at the end of the opulent dictatorship of Porfirio Díaz. Sometimes it’s like a museum of 20th century Latin American cool. And it’s always a romantic place to walk the parks and boulevards.

    One of Mexico’s great poets—José Emilio Pacheco—grew up in the Roma in the 50s. His childhood memoir Las Batallas en el Desierto would make a beautiful film (in color, please), so I’m looking forward to Cuarón’s.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    , @Dumbo
    , @syonredux
    , @Anon
  7. prosa123 says:

    So how did Dad get out of the Ford after he parked it?

  8. Incidentally, I finally saw “Boyhood” and it was a complete drag. The only interesting part was the subplot about the alcoholic stepfather. A lot has been made to do about the young lead actor and how he was filmed over several years from a child to a teenager. The risk there was that you don’t know whether or not the child will turn into a crappy actor when he gets older. Luckily for the director, he seemed to do fine on the later scenes. The same can’t be described for the director’s daughter, who he self-indulgently cast as the older sister. Her later scenes were painful to watch.

    • Replies: @Anon
  9. Carol says:

    I think all black and white movies have been muddy since the 1940s. Did they forget how to do lighting? Some of the Serious Dramas like Streetcar and Virginia Woolf weren’t bad I guess.

    Still, the bright contrasts were lost.

    • Replies: @Anon
  10. Anon[246] • Disclaimer says:

    Tokyo parking spaces for most homes are pretty tight. As with most things in Japan the most friction-free way to get through life is to measure and buy things that fit with plenty of room to spare, cars, furniture, appliances. There is a special class of very small cars and trucks here, kei-cars, but even the normal class of cars come in some very small sizes, but tall, with large interiors. The Nissan Cube is one that made it to the U.S. My sister got one and was initially embarassed to drive it in pick-up heavy Texas, but she grew to really love it. And you can wear a 10-gallon cowboy hat inside it.

  11. Yarro says:

    Another black and white movie came out this year, and the topic is more appropriate–Poland in the 1950s.

    https://variety.com/2018/film/news/european-film-awards-handed-out-live-and-updating-1203090651/

    “Cold War,” Pawel Pawlikowski’s black-and-white romance set in the 1950s, scooped the prizes for best film, director and screenplay at the 31st edition of the European Film Awards on Saturday.

    “Cold War” star Joanna Kulig also won the award for best actress. Marcello Fonte, the star of Matteo Garrone’s “Dogman,” won for best actor.

  12. jim jones says:

    Maybe I need to get a maid if they work that hard.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  13. El Dato says:

    OT Nederdraad

    Water cannon, firecrackers as rally against UN migration pact turns violent in Brussels

    Not sure whether the Moroccan population of Brussels is participating.

    From the web:

    Brussels has a population of over 2 million spread across 19 municipalities. Approximately 30% of the population are foreigners that were not born in Belgium. The majority of immigrants come to Brussels from other parts of the European Union, although steady immigration from outside of the EU has continued through the years.

    Brussels has a large concentration of Muslims from Turkey and Morocco, with some estimates placing the city population of Muslims as high as 25%. Most residents have no religious affiliation, and for those that do practice, Roman Catholicism is the religion of choice. About 10% of Catholics in Brussels regularly attend church services. Minority faiths practiced in the area include Buddhism, Judaism, Anglicanism and Islam.

    • Replies: @Altai
  14. I’ve long loved a lot of Mexican popular (and folkish) culture and always been disappointed at prestige Mexican film..
    One problem with Mexico (a deliriously visual country) is that the artist class tends to be white and upper class and live a sheltered sterile existence (for security and cultural reasons).
    Thus they tend to know little about their less well off countrymen who they either despise or idealize in unrealistic ways (often informed by half-baked pseudo-Marxist ideas, which doesn’t stop them from exploiting them).
    This is a problem in a lot of Latin American countries where the upper classes have little to no civic engagement with their societies. They’re not invested in them and so they can’t really make insightful or interesting art about them.
    Italian film makers cared a lot about Italy, Mexican filmmakers think they’re too good for Mexico and mostly want to work in Hollywood or Europe and make films about interesting white people.

    • Replies: @Anon
  15. slumber_j says:
    @(((Owen)))

    I was going to make your point about color and Mexico and thanks to you no longer need to. But yeah: what an unbelievably bad decision.

  16. Me gustan las películas de Los Tres Amigos.

    — El Guapo

    • LOL: Kylie
  17. songbird says:

    Makes me wonder a bit when color started to infiltrate Mexican media. Wiki brings up 1957 for the first Mexican color film. 1963 for the first TV show.

  18. Excellent addition of snark at the end.

  19. Wilkey says:

    Cuaron: “Watch me glamorize a place I sure as hell don’t want to live in any more.”

    Makers of “Coco”: “Here, see the beauty of Mexico and its culture! How dare you stop people from leaving this tragic shithole!”

    We need to come up with a word that combines the term “shithole” with “paradise,” with maybe a nod to the glorious, magnificent culture created by people living in said shithole. (The Germans probably already have one, 28 syllables long.) I am now taking suggestions.

    But no offense to Cuaron. He is easily the best of the three amigos. Innaritu’s stuff is pretty damn good, too. Del Toro’s stuff is overrated shite.

  20. Roma is now on Netflix.

    Hmm. Sounds better than their usual offering of a miscegenation porn laden lecture.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    , @Mr. Anon
    , @Anon
  21. anonymous[308] • Disclaimer says:

    Y tu mama tambien was a pretty good film about being an adolescent male in Mexico–and honest about the narrow interests of adolescent males.

    I’m guessing Cuaron finds a boyhood movie like Cinema Paradiso tacky. Too bad. Now that’s an evocative film about a boy in a certain time and place.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  22. It appear that the racist Steve Sailer resents that Mexico has nuclear physicists and produces good directors.

    • Replies: @Anon
  23. @Wilkey

    We need to come up with a word that combines the term “shithole” with “paradise,”

    You already have one. It’s “Latin America”.

    • Agree: Futurethirdworlder
  24. Dumbo says:

    Cuaraon, personally, has lived in London since 2000.

    Mexico is not that bad if you have some money. Fred Reed is there. Several other American gringos are there too. I probably would prefer to live in Mexico than in London at this time. Besides the weather, London now has also become a multicultural hellhole, it probably has more blacks that all of Mexico, and is extremely expensive.

    P.S. It is spelled “Cuarón”, with an accent. A strange surname by the way, supposedly Spanish but I could find only examples of Mexican people with that family name.

    • Replies: @syonredux
  25. Sean says:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giulio_Andreotti#Influence_on_culture

    As the state undersecretary in charge of entertainment in 1949, Andreotti established import limits and screen quotas, and provided loans to Italian production firms. The measures were aimed at preventing American productions from dominating the market against Neorealist films, a genre which exhibitors complained lacked stars and was held in low esteem by the public. As he phrased it, there were to be ‘Less rags, more legs’. Raunchy comedies and historical dramas with voluptuous toga-clad actresses became the staple of the Italian film industry. To ensure that state funds were not used to prop up commercially unsustainable films, the screenplays were vetted, thereby creating a form of preproduction censorship. It was intended that Italian studios use part of their profits for high-quality films.[18] However, Vittorio De Sica’s Umberto D., which depicted the lonely life of a retired man, could only strike government officials as a dangerous throwback, due to the opening scene featuring police breaking up a demonstration of old pensioners and the ending scene featuring Umberto’s aborted suicide attempt. In a public letter to De Sica, Andreotti castigated him for his “wretched service to his fatherland.”[19]

    https://www.syfy.com/syfywire/del-toro-the-fishman%E2%80%99s-butt-in-the-shape-of-water-is-sexy-by-design
    Although it already was pretty self-evident, even from just a fleeting glance, now we’ve got hard evidence that the amphibious derriere of Elisa Esposito’s love interest was always meant to bring the sexy. Del Toro himself is saying as much, in fact, in the film’s official art book, Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water: Creating a Fairy Tale for Troubled Times. “When it came to his sex appeal, one attribute was key,” the book explains. “The amphibian man had to have a great butt.”
    Del Toro says he relied on the taste of the females in his family to decide when the character design of the amphibian man, played by Doug Jones, had finally passed the eye test.

  26. anonymous[338] • Disclaimer says:
    @Wilkey

    Parahole ?

    • Replies: @Anon
  27. Escher says:
    @prosa123

    Probably one of their skinny servants did the parking.

  28. Escher says:

    Del Toro’s “The shape of water” has got to be one of the worst and most overrated movies I had the misfortune to (partially) watch.

  29. Huisache says:

    Mexico can look great in black and white. Edward Weston and Tina Modotti and Bravo and a hundred other superb photographers have done so

    Like the Roma district

    • Replies: @Anon
  30. Concerning the seemingly high budget — I see from the trailer that there are outside scenes, set in the 1970s, and the city. That kind of thing can run up your budget pretty quickly, I’ve been told (cars!). I’ve heard the suggestion for writers spec scripts to not have your story take place in the past, or if it has to, to have as many scenes set in rooms as possible.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @anon
  31. ” . . . ambient carelessness.”

    I’m gonna steal that one.

  32. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @Wilkey

    We already have a word for that. It’s called nostalgia, which is a Greek word combining “nostos” for “return home”, and “algos” for “pain, suffering”. Everybody looks back upon their childhood fondly and regards it as a paradise in retrospect, regardless of objective circumstances.

  33. Have any American films ever made use of Mexico’s natural scenery? Mexico has snowcapped volcanoes, mountains, badlands, jungles further south . . . And it all rivals but looks different than what you’ll find in the Sierras, Utah, and other American West locales. North and Central Mexico would be a great place to film Westerns, road pictures, post-apocalypse fare, but I don’t think it ever caught on as an American filming location, despite its relative proximity to Hollywood.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @kimchilover
  34. Dumbo says:
    @(((Owen)))

    When I first heard the title of the movie, I thought it was about Rome (Roma in Italian). I guess it the choice of black and white must be related to Italian neorealism, and to elicit feelings of nostalgia for a world long gone (it’s a cliche, but even today movies use black and white for flashbacks). But yeah, it was probably not the best idea, especially if the photography is not nice or crisp.

    I haven’t watched many of Cuarón’s movies, but Iñarittu and Del Toro seem to be a bit overrated, perhaps because of their Mexican heritage. Birdman was not very good, except for the “one shot” thing. But maybe that was part of the problem, they had to build the whole plot around that trick. Although the original story was pretty dumb in any case.

  35. @prosa123

    Por el clavo detrás del asiento trasero que da al baúl donde se enceuntra picaporte de salida.

  36. JimB says:

    A Portrait of the Artist as a Young White Privileged Man.

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
  37. syonredux says:
    @(((Owen)))

    Is there any country in the world more badly served by black and white photography than colorful Mexico?

    It says something about a country if doesn’t look good in Black & White….And what it says isn’t good….

  38. Cuaron, whose father was a rare Mexican nuclear physicist…

    As opposed to a whole caravan of nuclear physicists from Honduras, which produces so many that they can’t find work at home.

  39. syonredux says:

    (Cuaraon, personally, has lived in London since 2000.)

    And Guillermo del Toro maintains residences in LA and Canada….Anyone know where Iñárritu lives most of the time?

    • Replies: @anonymous
  40. anonymous[308] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    Is there anything more obnoxious than the bourgeois expats who love to tell you how uncivilized and unsophisticated and uncultured America is? I run into this shit all the time in a college town. Bosnians and Lebanese and Indians and Brazilians…

    “Yet Iñárritu has not been a specifically Mexican director for some time. He was one of three world-beating, commercially minded directors who spearheaded a new surge of energy in their nation’s cinema – the others being Alfonso Cuarón (Gravity, Children of Men) and genre specialist Guillermo del Toro (Pan’s Labyrinth, Crimson Peak). None of them now directs at home: the last of Iñárritu’s films to feature Mexican themes was Babel. He has lived in the US for 14 years, moving to Los Angeles with his wife – designer María Eladia Hagerman – and their daughter María and son Eliseo, now 20 and 18 respectively. Their move came after Iñárritu’s parents had both been victims of violent robbery in Mexico City. “My mother was assaulted and beaten, and her teeth were broken. My father was taken for six hours in a trunk – they stole 5,000 pesos,” Iñárritu says with a mirthless laugh. “It’s like literally 50 dollars. It was a very, very scary moment to be there.”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Anon
    , @syonredux
  41. Kylie says:

    I highly recommend the Mexican thriller, Bajo La Sal, directed by Mario Muñoz. It held my interest from start to finish and the lead actor, Humberto Zurita, was very good.

    And yes, it’s in color.

  42. Bill B. says:
    @Wilkey

    We need to come up with a word that combines the term “shithole” with “paradise,”

    How about parashite?

    I mean we already almost have this word for people who leave paradise because it is a shithole: parasite.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
  43. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Wilkey

    The Henson-esque muppet building side of Del Toro is at least adequate.

  44. Tyrion 2 says:
    @AnotherDad

    You’re so 2017. 2018 is for cartoon series about fabulous drag queen superheros.

  45. Paul Rise says:

    It’s a great film, basically a love letter from an educated upper class anglo Mexican to their house slave. Has more in common with certain types of southern and colonial literature.

    It’s a fine black and white film, watch it in HD. Very well directed, but definitely over directed at times.

    Has three classic sequences – the country hacienda new years weekend, the fascist kung fu camp, and the maternity ward, and at least one really good sequence – the corpus christi demonstration.

    A morbid but not violent sequence during the new years weekend with dogs is one of the key scenes to understanding the movie. Dogs are very important in the movie. A close friend said, not kindly, it is a movie about heroic mexican dogs.

    As someone who grew up in the texas valley at nearly the same time, so close Mexico we may as well have been there, the new years party scenes made my heart ache with nostalgia.

    Cuaron holds the narcissism so many successful Mexican men do, he is saying – look at this noble savage, more loyal than any dog, She did so much and is so responsible for my important, world scale success. She nurtured and enabled the gift to civilization that I am.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Anon
  46. @syonredux

    Thank you for those, particularly Steichen’s Flatiron building, surely one of the finest photographs ever composed.

    You know, we actually did attract valuable immigrants once. Luxembourg was sending its best.

  47. Mr. Anon says:
    @AnotherDad

    Hmm. Sounds better than their usual offering of a miscegenation porn laden lecture.

    Or teeny-bopper satanism with a hard, degenerate edge.

  48. @Daniel H

    You just stole my first thought when coming to the end of SS’s piece. I was going to bring up celebration of “vibrance”, but…….same idea.

    They have no idea how dreary and predictable they are.

    Every awards show will be chock full of attendees picking out just the right gowns for browns for the affair. (That’s just my first crack at it. Hopefully someone can improve on it. LOL)

  49. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    Architecturally, isn’t Mexico City much more impressive than American cities. It’s a mix of Spanish colonial and French architecture, along with some striking modernist buildings. The only real American competitors would be New York or Chicago, and that’s because they’re drastically different in style with their dense skyscrapers.

    NYC looks especially good in black and white because it’s a gray, drab city of densely packed skyscrapers with lots of shadows.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    , @Dtbb
    , @syonredux
  50. @Wilkey

    Wilkey, I offer Shitopolis.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
  51. @prosa123

    pro, I visited the house of a mid level Japanese executive who lived outside of Tokyo. He had a car, which was rare for those who worked in Tokyo, but his driveway was the unusual feature. His drive way was a ramp that could be raised in the front, allowing the car to fit in his tiny drive without extending into the street. In Mexico City just leave your car on the street and someone will park it for you. Probably never see it again though.

  52. CJ says:

    I’m on a lifetime boycott of this guy for The Children of Men. Steve says he watches stuff so we don’t have to … the way Cuaron obliterated a fine novel and replaced it with toxic sludge told me all I want to know about him.

  53. I had heard of this film – and was ready to dismiss until 1) your diss of Cuaron’s “Children of Men (2006)” which is one of my all-time faves and 2) the re-rendition of intro from “Dark Side of the Moon” on Trailer that makes me want to see/hear it just for that alone.

    Plus – at least for me – a Canadian – there is a lack of perspective on Mexico in this country. We appear to visit it for vacations often but do not have the same pre-occupation with living RIGHT NEXT DOOR to it as so many Americans in Texas and California. I am very interested in learning more about the zeitgeist of that country thru it’s remarkable capital Mexico City (that I have never visited despite frequent trips to Cancun/Puerto Vallarta) and I suspect this film may help.

    I may add to other “off the wall” Mexico film “Like Water For Chocolate (1992)” that was and remains part of my feelings towards Mexico-American relations. https://youtu.be/xMFRJadD6Mo

  54. Anon[212] • Disclaimer says:
    @Wilkey

    combines the term “shithole” with “paradise,”

    Shipotle

  55. Wilkey says:
    @Buffalo Joe

    Hahaha.

    Or maybe “Shitopia” – a shithole utopia, full of people who create mess in their own land, but will come join us on magic dirt and make America a utopia.

  56. Romanian says: • Website

    There’s a lot Steve may like in the Mexican HBO series Sr Avila, about a society of hitmen in Ciudad de Mexico posing as undertakers.

  57. This is a test. This is only a test.

  58. @Seth Largo

    Durango was the locale of many Westerns. You can visit John Wayne’s suite at the motel there.

  59. @LemmusLemmus

    There are a bunch of scenes of people walking down the street that probably cost a lot in terms of renting old but shiny cars.

  60. @anonymous

    The first half of Cinema Paradiso is wonderful.

  61. @Anon

    I don’t recall any music in the movie at all other than brass bands marching by and the like. Presumably they added some to the trailer because music makes video more enjoyable.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Autochthon
  62. @prosa123

    He would park it next to the double doorway on the right and slide across the bench front seat and get out the left side.

    • LOL: prosa123
  63. @anonymous

    So two of the Three Amigos had their fathers kidnapped by Mexican criminals.

  64. Lurker says:

    Cuaron’s Children of Men kind of ridiculous? But surely it was a brave and timely reminder about the dangers of evil white men and how a quiet, dignified female Person of Diversity can save the world?

  65. TheJester says:

    I’m not surprised that the Hollywood crowd is gaga over “Roma”. They are at the forefront of the pathology in our culture that reaches into our schools, universities, and other institutions.

    It starts with politically correct and comfortable illusions. After a time they believe their illusions … which then become delusions. Next, the deluded have faux intellectual discussions among themselves as if their delusions mean something. Then, these become hallucinations.

    Ergo, one does not need a vibrant drug culture (although it helps) to discover that a large percentage of his or her country’s population is hallucinating.

    It is difficult if not impossible have a coherent or rational discussion with people who are hallucinating. This is the problem that the “political right” has with the “political left”.

    P.S. Did I use all of my pronouns correctly?

  66. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @(((Owen)))

    Is there any country in the world more badly served by black and white photography than colorful Mexico?

    Maybe the point is by diluting the color aspect, people will focus more on the characters.

    After all, if the center of this movie is some Indio woman who works as a maid, the reality is pretty stark for her. Also, locals often don’t see the beauty around them because it’s everyday reality to them. Color is touristy.

  67. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @prosa123

    So how did Dad get out of the Ford after he parked it?

    He hired 20 indios to carry it out.

  68. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    Incidentally, I finally saw “Boyhood” and it was a complete drag.

    It’s sort of interesting. I wish it had been done more in DAZED AND CONFUSED mode than in earnest mode.

    But I can see how it is special in a way. It’s nearly impossible to chronicle the development of a character from boyhood to young manhood. Sure, you can use different actors, but it’s rarely convincing. APARAJITO is Satyajit Ray begins with character as young boy and then shows him few yrs later as an adolescent, but the two hardly resemble one another.

    Between childhood and adulthood, the physical changes are drastic and yet there is also great deal of continuity in looks. It’s the same person turned into a different person. That contradiction of continuity and transformation is hard to convey by using different actors or by using makeup to make a young actor seem younger or older.

    Now, one can easily make a movie about earlier childhood into later childhood. A 9 yr old actor can play someone from 7 yr old to 11 yr old. It’s also doable to cover only teenage yrs. A actor who is 15 can play high freshman to highschool senior. But if the time frame is stretched beyond that, it begins to look fake.
    Of course, adult characters have far greater range. Orson Welles at the age of 26 convincingly played an old man. I think the use of two actors for LOVE AND MERCY was totally unnecessary. The guy who played young Wilson could have played the older.. and Cusack, with proper makeup and maybe some CGI touches, could have been made into a young Wilson.

    But, it’s been near impossible to follow a character from childhood to adulthood even though it’s only span of 8 yrs or so. Look at Annakin in PHANTOM and ATTACK. Same problem as with APARAJITO. Young Anni and Older Anni don’t seem the like person.

    This is why most movies about young people have narrow time frame(only within childhood or only within adolescence or only within young adulthood)… or only show snippets of them at others stages of life(because it looks so artificial). Linklater finally filled in this void by showing the process of going from childhood to adulthood in film. Too bad he was overly Ken-Burnsy about it and ended up with an actor that fizzled as he grew older. In later yrs, he seemed to just hang around than be a character. I don’t remember a damn thing about him.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @anon
  69. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Carol

    I think all black and white movies have been muddy since the 1940s.

    The problem with recent b/w movies is that b/w is used as an arty fetish.

    In the past, it was just the norm. Sure, there was some superb b/w cinematography but it wasn’t self-conscious because b/w was simply the norm. They were just trying to be stylistic, not using b/w itself as a stylistic statement.

  70. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @cliff arroyo

    Thus they tend to know little about their less well off countrymen who they either despise or idealize in unrealistic ways (often informed by half-baked pseudo-Marxist ideas, which doesn’t stop them from exploiting them).

    This is why Y TU MAMA TAMBIEN is a good movie. It shows how the privilege kids ape everything ‘modern’ and American yet move through so much of Mexico that is still ‘localez’ and ‘third world’.

  71. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad

    Hmm. Sounds better than their usual offering of a miscegenation porn laden lecture.

    Mexico = Miscegenation

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  72. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Gurney Halleck

    It appear that the racist Steve Sailer resents that Mexico has nuclear physicists and produces good directors.

    Si, but why they come to Hollywood to make movies if they love Mexico so much?

    Personally, I think Cuaron has very uneven talent. Inarritu has something to be sure, but he over-reaches with his hug-the-world theme.
    As for Del Toro, he doesn’t know the ABC’s of film-making. He makes childish crap on the one hand and then wins lots of accolades with propaganda movies like “I had sex with a fish to fight racism.” PANS LABY was one of the most putrid piece of film-making I’ve ever seen. I can respect a lefty film like LAND AND FREEDOM but not that ugly political porn by Del Toro.

  73. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Huisache

    Mexico can look great in black and white.

    QUE VIVA MEXICO.

  74. @Anon

    Cinema Paradiso is great for the first hour when it’s about the little boy, but then when it switches to a mopey older kid for the next part in the memoir it loses momentum.

    Scorsese is experimenting with digitally deaging elderly stars like De Niro and Pesci for “The Irishman.” We’ll see how it turns out.

    • Replies: @Anon
  75. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous

    None of them now directs at home: the last of Iñárritu’s films to feature Mexican themes was Babel.

    But keep in mind… much of California is now Mexican.

    • Replies: @syonredux
  76. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Great ending though. The grown up man actually resembles the little kid.

  77. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Paul Rise

    Cuaron holds the narcissism so many successful Mexican men do, he is saying – look at this noble savage, more loyal than any dog, She did so much and is so responsible for my important, world scale success. She nurtured and enabled the gift to civilization that I am.

    Now, we need Authentic Jazzman to make a movie about Magic Negress maid who done turn him onto jazz at the ‘tender age of nine’.

    • Replies: @donut
  78. anon[349] • Disclaimer says:

    The Three Amigos are big shots because they make cool looking movies, not because they are philosophical geniuses. Many of their films are kind of ridiculous, such as Cuaron’s Children of Men, Innaritu’s Babel and Birdman…

    You can say that again. If they’d cut the artsy-fartsy crap out of Birdman, you’d have a great backstage drama. Instead you have a great backstage drama with a load of artsy-fartsy crap awkwardly shoehorned in.

    A lot of artists suffer from this terrible urge to be profound, when really they should just concentrate on telling stories and let the brainiacs at universities figure out what it all means.

  79. @Anon

    Not Cuaron’s or Del Toro’s ancestry. Maybe a little bit of Innaritu’s.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @syonredux
  80. @Lurker

    Wait is Clive Owen a white man? Who saved the saviour-girl’s ass in that movie?

    • Replies: @Lurker
  81. anon[349] • Disclaimer says:
    @LemmusLemmus

    There’s probably a Netflix premium as well. There’s a reason all these bigshots are working with Netflix, and it’s not because of the incredible prestige that internet streaming video has.

  82. anon[349] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Personally, filmmakers should just accept this limitation: they can’t convincingly show the same character at all points of his life, so don’t try: instead, write around it. How necessary is it to see him as a completely different-looking boy/old man?

    That said, it’s not the end of the world, particularly if the film is good enough that we don’t care. Ray Liotta does not look like a 20-yr old at the start of Goodfellas, but who ever really notices?

    • Replies: @kimchilover
  83. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Did Cuaron’s papa bang the maid and have a mixed-race kid on the side?

    Isn’t one of the guys in Y TU MAMA the product of some rich white guy and his maid, but it was supposed to be sort of okay because it happened when indigenous-ness was all the rave among the elite lefty set in Mexico?

  84. Wilkey says:
    @Bill B.

    That’s pretty good. Maybe “parascheiss” – scheiss is German for shit, right?

  85. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    The trailer music makes you think.

    It sounds like some Negress.

    In the US, the master-servant relationship was white and black.

    In Mexico, the master-servant relationship was white and brown.

    In the US, whites outnumbered blacks. In Mexico, browns outnumbered whites.

    But it seems the white minority in Mexico more effectively lorded over browns than white majority did over blacks in the US.

    It is HBD. If browns were bigger, naturally more aggressive, and dominant in sports, the racial dynamics would surely have been different in Mexico. Browns would have kicked white butt in sports and began to act cocky and arrogant. But being a smaller and more passive people than whites, they accepted their lot as the servant race. The dog race. Mass psychology is ‘identificationary’, i.e. even though the masses don’t amount to much, they strongly identify with their representative icons. So, even though most blacks don’t have the stuff to be great pro athletes, they still identify with black sports stars as embodiment of all blackness. This is why idols and icons matter so greatly. The Brown masses in Mexico didn’t have their own version of Jack Johnson and Muhammad Ali. As such, they remained the cuckezers than turned whites into cuckezers. (With blacks, Law of Jungle Warrior is the ultimate law. Blacks respect power more than justice. What makes blacks so angry about history is not much slavery and discrimination but the sense that lame inferior white boys done keep them down. But if whites had been dominant in sports all through US history, blacks would be all like, “Whitey, he bad and cool! He be my hero and shi*.”

    Despite their smaller numbers in the US, blacks began to beat up whites, and that filled them with pride. Their macho pride + natural aggression led to a very different racial dynamics in the US.
    White elites in Mexico should be grateful that the browns are more like Guillermo than Mike Tyson.

    The Indio character in ROMA sounds like some woman in Japanese movies. The one who loves to serve. Quiet, passive, devoted. But if in Japan, it’s Japanese master and Japanese servant, it’s white master and brown servant in Mexico.

    But then, this servant mentality in Mexico predates the arrival of whites. In the US, American Indians were roaming hunter-savage-warriors. They were proud. No wonder they were called ‘braves’. Each tribe had warriors, and just about every male in the tribe was raised to be hunter-warrior.
    In Mexico with considerable native civilization, there was already a master class and servant class. So, original Mexico was more like India or Japan than the world of American Indians. So, the masses of native Mexicans didn’t go from savage pride to servility but from serving one master to another.
    And in this, there is a huge cultural and narrative-divide between Mexican Indios and American Indians(who had a stronger sense of pride and independence, and as such, was less suited to take on role of servants).

    It’s been said the creation of Israel was like the founding of America by conquerors and founders and settlers. True in a way. Zionists were like cowboys, and Palestinians were like Indians pushed off the land. But in another way, Zionism was like a scenario of American Indians reclaiming the land from whites(and others). After all, unlike European Imperialists, Jews have a historical and cultural claim to the Holy Land. They can say, “We were the ‘Indians’ who lost the land due to Roman invasion and later Arab invasions.” So, even though Jews grabbed Palestine like cowboys took the West, they also played the role of Indians-who-miraculously-reclaimed-the-land-from-cowboy-invaders.

    Maybe American Indians should run with this idea. They should come up with something like Indian-Zionism or Inzionism. Indians should argue that, just like Jews got to reclaim the Holy Land, their dream is to reclaim America. And that means NO MORE IMMIGRATION. Only whites, blacks of slave ancestry, and Mexicans in SW areas can stay. All must go back. And the national priority should be to culturally, demographically, and politically revive the Indian community. White patriots should take up this theme to stop the Immigration-Invasion and Diversity-as-Imperialism. In the name of the Indians or Inzions.

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
  86. Daniel H says:

    My favorite Mexican film is “Bring me the Head of Alfredo Garcia.” Very Mexican, from a gringo’s point of view. Other than that, give me Cantinflas.

  87. @jim jones

    Mexican maids in CA that speak little English are incredibly hard workers. And they’re devoted to their masters and mistresses completely. If you have extra room in your house and garage for her and her car, I highly recommend it.

  88. @Lurker

    The movie was so far from the book I’m surprised PD James didn’t sue. The movie was puerile and dull.

    The book was haunting and deep. I recommend it to whomever hasn’t read it yet.

  89. @prosa123

    See the photo accompanying the post of Cuaron wedged between the Ford and the garage wall taking a picture of the actress getting in the left side of the car.

  90. syonredux says:
    @Dumbo

    Cuaraon, personally, has lived in London since 2000.

    Mexico is not that bad if you have some money.

    Kidnapping is a big problem in Mexico. Given what happened to Guillermo Del Toro, I can understand why celebrity directors might prefer not to live there….

    I probably would prefer to live in Mexico than in London at this time. Besides the weather,

    Too hot.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  91. syonredux says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Not Cuaron’s or Del Toro’s ancestry. Maybe a little bit of Innaritu’s.

    Be fair. Del Toro could be half-Hobbit…

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Altai
  92. syonredux says:
    @Anonymous

    Architecturally, isn’t Mexico City much more impressive than American cities.

    It’s got some nice architecture. Of course, the air is lousy (“Makesicko City”).

    NYC looks especially good in black and white because it’s a gray, drab city of densely packed skyscrapers with lots of shadows.

    Dunno. Paris and Rome also look great in Black & White.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  93. @Seth Largo

    Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (one bleak but fantastic film) was entirely shot in Mexico and looks fantastic. El Topo is another that looks pretty stunning.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @(((Owen)))
  94. syonredux says:
    @anonymous

    Iñárritu’s films to feature Mexican themes was Babel. He has lived in the US for 14 years, moving to Los Angeles with his wife – designer María Eladia Hagerman – and their daughter María and son Eliseo, now 20 and 18 respectively.

    María Eladia Hagerman

  95. syonredux says:
    @Anon

    None of them now directs at home: the last of Iñárritu’s films to feature Mexican themes was Babel.

    But keep in mind… much of California is now Mexican.

    Probably why del Toro also maintains a residence in Toronto….

  96. There are similar tributes to similar servants with the proper feudal spirit in the childhood memoirs of other privileged high achievers, such as Nabokov and Churchill.

    And David Duke. Really.

  97. @anon

    I’d argue that Liotta looks considerably older by the end of Goodfellas through the simple trick of making him look like a severely paranoid coke-head that hasn’t slept in days…he looks so terrible by the time the helicopter is following him.

  98. @syonredux

    Paris and Rome also look great in Black & White.

    Thanks to Cartier-Bresson and Doisneau. Check these out:

    • Replies: @Anon
  99. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    https://www.genesiskel.com/the-collector/

    Siskel came across his most prized possession, however, in 1978 when he purchased the white polyester suit worn by actor John Travolta in the film “Saturday Night Fever.” Paying approximately $2,000 for the suit, Siskel earned more than 72-times that when 17 years later he sold it for $145,000 at a Christie’s auction.

  100. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    As worthless a director as Peter Jackson.

  101. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @kimchilover

    Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia

    That is a mess. An interesting mess but a mess.

    PAT GARRETT & BILLY THE KID was shot in Mexico and looks terrific. It’s like watching a series of paintings.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    , @kimchilover
  102. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    VERA CRUZ is a fun adventure in Mexico.

  103. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    One helluva movie by British Alex Cox.

  104. Dtbb says:
    @Anonymous

    Mexico City is sinking because they pump all the ground water out. That and air quality and overcrowding make it almost unlivable. You can have it.

  105. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    B/W, even when not great, looks good enough. It’s very elementary, and there are few distractions.

    This is why B/W is better than bad use of color, and for the most part, color was not used well for much of movie history. A lot of old color looks pasty, lacking in subtlety.

    But color cinematography has greatly advanced over the years, and with computer technology, they can add stuff to improve it further. Once, it was rare to see a color film with truly great cinematography. Now, even low-budget indie-movies have really good use of color.

    When Truffaut went from b/w to color, it often didn’t look good. It looked great in FAHRENHEIT 451 which was shot by master Nicholas Roeg. But films like MISSISSIPPI MERMAID, BRIDE WORE BLACK, STOLEN KISSES, and etc looked lackluster. His one other color film that looked esp good was TWO ENGLISH GIRLS.

    Color requires more care, and if there care isn’t there, it was better to go with B/W. Bertolucci’s SPIDER’S STRATAGEM looks crappy in color.

    PURPLE NOON has great color.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    , @Reg Cæsar
  106. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    PG & BTK is one of the best films to look at. It has dramatic problems, unresolved moral issues, and downright craziness, but what a ‘tone ballad’.

    THE WILD BUNCH also has superb cinematography, one of the absolute best.

    Peckinpah’s use of Mexico in MAJOR DUNDEE was memorable too.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Major_Dundee#Principal_photography

    Interesting that Mexico has been THE Latin American nation that got the most attention. Mexico and Spain seem similar in geography, which is why Spaghettis made good use of Spain for location.

    Why did Mexico get more love than other Latin American nations? More passion than most? Proximity to US made its history more interesting? (It was Cuba for awhile in the 1960s, but Cuban Revolution was nothing like the violent Mexican Revolution that attracted revolutionary volunteers from all over the world — much like the Spanish Civil War did. More than most Latin American nations, Mexico was often caught at the crossroads of great empires, like when the French got involved in a big way, which is the backdrop of MAJOR DUNDEE).

    I recall at the Barcelona Olympics, the entry of the Mexican team got an especial applause from the Spanish audience.

  107. @Anon

    God I love BMTHOAG (if it is a mess, it’s a mess with a consistent worldview: nihilism).

    I’d argue that the theatrical cut of Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid was a genuine mess but was vastly improved by the much latter laser disc “director’s cut” (now available on DVD). The latter cut isn’t perfect, but still qualifies as one of the top 20 Westerns of all time (and at the very least, the hippie aesthetic was in such full force during the shoot that it’s probably the most historically accurate Western in terms of outlaw hair length)! I’m in the minority, but I also think Bob Dylan’s “Alias” character is pretty effective and endearing…and yeah, Knocking on Heaven’s Door wed to that scene can still bring a tear to my eye.

    I love that Sailer’s movie reviews can generate such a consistently large number of comments (we all wish we were film critics at heart)!

  108. Altai says:
    @El Dato

    From the pictures I saw on EuroNews there were a lot of Flemmish flags. The narrative at EuroNews was to blame it on Vlaams Belang and more recent and often not centralised anti-immigration and Flemmish nationalist groups.

  109. Altai says:
    @syonredux

    It’s like looking at Ed Sheeren’s future.

    There was a great moment during the Oscar’s when Jimmy Kimmel’s stereotypical Amerindian Mexican sidekick went to embrace Tel Toro in the pretence that they were kin in any sense and it was so awkward. They have no shared ancestry or shared socio-economic background. Tel Toro may as well have grown up on a different planet.

  110. syonredux says:
    @Anon

    Always liked the use of color in Powell and Pressburger’s Black Narcissus:

  111. “Roma is intended as a tribute to this faithful family retainer. There are similar tributes to similar servants with the proper feudal spirit in the childhood memoirs of other privileged high achievers, such as Nabokov and Churchill.”

    How about the Bush family? The irony is that George HW and Barbara’s longtime faithful retainer was greatly helped for gaining US citizenship.

    “Thus the most commercially successful movie recently set in Mexico, Pixar’s Coco, totally revamped what Mexico looks like”

    Way wait. Mexico doesn’t look like how it did in Coco? Seriously? Coco is holds up pretty well for a Pixel kids film, Steve, and it could just be a classic years from now. What greatly helps Coco, aside from the good music, is the storyline and fairly compelling characters. It’s a bit reminiscent of Disney’s Pinocchio. And Pinocchio remains a classic.

  112. Lurker says:
    @Another German Reader

    His role is to show us that a white man can have no higher calling than laying down his life for a Person of Diversity.

  113. Lurker says:

    It would seem two out of the Three Amigos subscribe to a form of telescopic nationalism.

  114. Pepe says:

    I’m just pissed off that one of these three major white directors finally does a movie about Mexico, and it takes place in the early 70’s. It’s like they’re all frightened to do a Mexican movie dealing with the reality of violence, corruption and inequality in Mexico today. Maybe they think it would help Trump’s agenda. Sicario II did an OK job.

    • Replies: @cliff arroyo
  115. anonymous[338] • Disclaimer says:
    @Wilkey

    Turd-world … duh!

  116. @Steve Sailer

    Cuaron was interviewed about this film recently for radio. They made the point the film has no score at all; all sound and music is solely that which occurs solely from mis-en-scene of the film.

    Cuaron also went on and on about how bold he was to address a poor woman, who was (he passionately reminded the listeners) not merely poor but “indigenous” (!), and lamented noisily when the interviewer pointed out all the males in the film were “pretty much jerks” that it is “unquestionable” that men – not only in Mexico, but globally – are all, sadly, “less than generous.”

    I found myself nodding in vehement agreement, remembering how egalitarian and wisely generous females like Elizabeth I, Catherine the Great, Imelda Marcos, Evita Peron, and – most remarkably, recently, and generously of all! – Angela Merkel and Theresa May were when, for a change, women had some real power in this horrible, patriarchal world. We need only look to Merkel to see the need for more female power!

    • Replies: @Anon
  117. @syonredux

    Mexico Ciry actually isn’t all that hot because of its altitude. Bogatá is the same. Latitude alone does not dictate climate.

    #Geography is fundamental.

    • Replies: @syonredux
  118. @Pepe

    It’s a by product of the lack of civic engagement in Mexico, the elite don’t care about the country and openly despise and ridicule those who do.
    Mexican filmmakers are of their class, not their nation and are content to pay some meaningless lip service rather than engage in real problems of Mexico.
    Which is why their work, though technically proficient, is hollow and sterile.

  119. syonredux says:
    @Autochthon

    Mexico Ciry actually isn’t all that hot because of its altitude. Bogatá is the same. Latitude alone does not dictate climate.

    #Geography is fundamental.

    The statement that I was responding to was about Mexico in general:

    I probably would prefer to live in Mexico than in London at this time. Besides the weather,

    There are certainly places in Mexico that have climates that can be tolerated by Europeans….But, overall, the country is far too hot for an Anglo like myself….

  120. syonredux says:
    @Anonymous

    NYC’s architecture is more varied than people think….

  121. @Anon

    But in another way, Zionism was like a scenario of American Indians reclaiming the land from whites(and others). After all, unlike European Imperialists, Jews have a historical and cultural claim to the Holy Land. They can say, “We were the ‘Indians’ who lost the land due to Roman invasion and later Arab invasions.”

    The endless calculus of “historical claims” to land is nonsense only notable for how selectively it is applied.

    The only rational benchmark is to admit that Right of Conquest is real and legitimate .

    • Replies: @Anon
  122. donut says:
    @Anon

    “Now, we need Authentic Jazzman to make a movie about Magic Negress maid who done turn him onto jazz at the ‘tender age of nine’.”

    Let sleeping dogs lie .

  123. @syonredux

    That shot of the Flatiron Building is fabulous. But in Mexico you wouldn’t have dreary flat rain and bare trees to put in the foreground. The trees would be jacarandas in purple exuberance or buganvillas in neon pink bloom.

    The rain would splash down violently and then evaporate quickly once the afternoon monsoon stopped and the bright cheer of sunshine came back out. Or there might be ankle-deep hail brightly reflecting the streetlights for a few hours four or five times a year, rapidly melting away.

    No. Mexico is a gorgeous country, but it’s a country for color film.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @syonredux
  124. @(((Owen)))

    Jacarandas are spectacular trees. In the spring of 1974 my father and I stopped in Xalapa, a Mexican town halfway up the escarpment, at 4600 feet elevation, between the central highlands and the eastern coastal plains and it was wall to wall lavender jacaranda trees. Ulysses S. Grant fought his way into Xalapa in 1847. He called Jalapa “decidedly the most beautiful place I ever saw in my life” and its climate “the best in the world.”

    Although I was talking to a man who owned a jacaranda tree and he said the problem is that you have rake up after them three times per year: the purple flowers, the leaves, and the seed pods.

    • Replies: @Dtbb
  125. @kimchilover

    A few Mel Gibson experimental movies in this century have been shot in Mexico.

    A few movies are shot in Mexico for technical reasons, without any Mexican scenery. Titanic was shot in Mexico because the Sea of Cortés was the best place to build the largest filming tank ever built.

    Luis Estrada, the best modern Mexican filmmaker that stayed in Mexico and made Mexican films, does all his work in Mexico: La Dictadura Perfecta, Ley de Herodes, Infierno.

    A lot of the Robert Rodriguez spectacles are made in Mexico. El Mariachi was spare and great; Once Upon A Time in Mexico was an entertaining mess.

    I adore Head of Alfredo Garcia. Peckinpah made several great films in Mexico: Pat Garrett and Billy The Kid and The Wild Bunch, too.

    Some Burt Lancaster vehicles: The Professionals and Vera Cruz.

    About half of John Wayne’s late career movies were made in Durango, where he lived.

    The delightful adaptation William Shakespeare’s Romeo + Juliet was mostly made in Mexico City siting for Verona in the 1990s.

    A few key scenes in the wonderful 1970s LA Sam Altman noir classic The Long Goodbye were in a mountain town just outside Mexico City called Tepoztlán.

    The very good Denzel Washington remake of Man On Fire is set beautifully in the Condesa, right next door to the Roma district. Plus some scenes up the hill in luxe Lomas de Chapultepec and the slums that border it.

    There’s no evidence Sergio Leone made any films in Mexico, not even Duck You Sucker which is set tightly into the Mexican Civil War and dressed expertly to look like Mexico.

  126. Anon[347] • Disclaimer says:
    @Cloudbuster

    Just sayin….

    Indians would make good mascots for opposing immigration-invasion.

  127. Anon[347] • Disclaimer says:
    @Autochthon

    males in the film were “pretty much jerks” that it is “unquestionable” that men – not only in Mexico, but globally – are all, sadly, “less than generous.”

    Women spend half the day staring into a mirror and half their money on clothes and makeup.

  128. @Anon

    That’s the only good part of the movie, the fresa kids alienated and disoriented in the naco part of the country (which is almost all of it).

    In Mexican Spanish, fresa and naco are yin and yang locked in an eternal cultural conflict and almost everything interesting in the country is naco (as is the lion’s share of social dysfunction).

    a beginning (superficial) explanation:
    https://www.mexperience.com/pride-and-prejudice-the-naco-versus-the-fresa/

    • Replies: @Anon
  129. @Anon

    That’s the only good part of the movie, the fresa kids alienated and disoriented in the naco part of the country (which is almost all of it).

    In Mexican Spanish, fresa and naco are yin and yang locked in an eternal cultural conflict and almost everything interesting in the country is naco (as is the lion’s share of social dysfunction).

    a beginning (superficial) explanation:
    https://www.mexperience.com/pride-and-prejudice-the-naco-versus-the-fresa/

  130. Anon[347] • Disclaimer says:

    Remarkable movie by a Negro who has genuine curiosity and understanding of white folks and all their nuances. And a very good eye. If I didn’t know the credits, I would have thought for sure that a white guy directed this.

    Another interesting movie by a Negro.

    These directors are moving away from the idea that a black artist must always be ‘black’.

  131. Anon[327] • Disclaimer says:

    Was the movie shot on film? Because if not, it’s a color movie with saturation set to zero in post. The muddiness or lack thereof depends on the digital filters applied before the restoration.

    A black and white movie shot on film requires an experienced cinematographer who uses stock of varying speed and pushes and pulls it in development depending on the lighting and the desired effect for each scene.

    I think a lot of black and white stocks have been discontinued, perhaps nearly all.

  132. @syonredux

    A friend lived in Guaymas for several years and said he was convinced that this was the place that manufactured heat for the rest of the country. Like living inside your dishwasher during the drying cycle.

  133. @Anon

    The Green Room had a very eerie use of color, but it was entirely appropriate to the story.

    Eric Rohmer moved to color quite deftly, but that may be just his choice of locations and actresses speaking.

  134. Dtbb says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Did he mention what he called the seed pods? I imagine it is similar to what we call them in florida.

  135. Anonymous[111] • Disclaimer says:

    Sailer can review this movie but has never reviewed a single movie with Deborah Harry in it.
    She must be needing to work harder.

  136. syonredux says:
    @(((Owen)))

    No. Mexico is a gorgeous country, but it’s a country for color film.

    Another sign of the deep divide between Anglo-America and Mexico.The USA should only accept immigrants from countries that look good in Black & White:

    • Replies: @Anon
  137. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @cliff arroyo

    That’s the only good part of the movie, the fresa kids alienated and disoriented in the naco part of the country (which is almost all of it).

    No, there’s more. It tells a very human history, esp as the ending makes us review the story in our minds.

    There are two kinds of endings. One that brings resolution to the story, its conclusion.
    The other kind makes us reconsider everything we’ve seen, and Y TU MAMA TAMBIEN does just that. In a way, it saved the film for me because I didn’t care for the characters. The film-making was very fine but every character seemed like an idiot or tard. Why should I watch a Mexican beavis and butthead and some idiot whore? Why should I follow them around doing stupid shi*? And are we to believe that it’s okay for a woman to act like that because her hubber cheated on her? Two wrongs don’t make a right. And why fool around with those two clowns?

    But we find out at the end that she died of cancer, and that makes us review(in our mind) everything that happened in a different light. Sure, she still acted like a slut, but in her time of greatest need — when she needed support upon knowing of her illness — , her self-absorbed and self-pitying hubber confessed of his infidelity and asked her to feel sorry for him. Wounded beyond repair, it was her way of living life and imparting a part of herself to the two clowns.

    And even though most of what they did was drink and have sex — and take life for granted — in their travel and tryst, it is precisely the awareness of life’s full bloom and fall that imbues a sobering tragic sense in the two fellas.

    So, the effect of the film was strange. I initially despised the idiot characters as merely trashy but found myself reassessing the entire story with the revelation at the end.

  138. syonredux says:
    @Anon

    I adore Head of Alfredo Garcia. Peckinpah made several great films in Mexico: Pat Garrett and Billy The Kid and The Wild Bunch, too.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/features/the-ten-best-westerns-69006.html

    Ah, the top ten list. Always an amusing parlor game…..Here’s mine

    My Darling Clementine: John Ford’s beautiful (and tragic) myth about the making of law and order..

    Man of the West: Anthony Mann made a lot of first-class, noir-inflected Westerns, but this one is my personal favorite.

    The Wild Bunch: Nihilistic (loyalty to comrades is about the only virtue that the film stands by) but gorgeous….The death of the Western as prelude to the First World War….

    Red River: Machtpolitik vs liberalism in the Old West….Noteworthy for how the cynical Hawks avoids tragedy at the climax….

    The Searchers: …..Whereas the sentimental Ford avoids reconciliation….Perhaps only the sentimental can truly embrace tragedy…

    The Tall T: As with Mann, Boetticher (who has my vote for greatest “B” Western director) has a lot of good films on his CV. The Tall T and Ride Lonesome are pretty much tied at number one, at least in my mind. I’m giving the nod to T just because I’m in a Richard Boone frame of mind….

    Once Upon a Time in the West: I’m not much for Spaghetti Westerns (Too operatic for my tastes), but this one is my favorite….

    The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford:The most recent film on my list….. The Western takes on the cult of celebrity. Great cinematography by Roger Deakins….

    Fort Apache: Best film in Ford’s “cavalry trilogy.”

    The Magnificent Seven: Maybe the most purely entertaining Western ever made….

    • Replies: @Anon
  139. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    Another sign of the deep divide between Anglo-America and Mexico.

    The art of Mexico is the mural, which has no value without color.

    But I hate murals.

  140. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    That’s a fine list except for MAGNIFICENT SEVEN which is crying out to be a Musical. It should have been Wild West Side Story.

    MS is reasonably entertaining, but I’m always waiting for the fellas to break out in song and dance… but it never comes.

    I recall Pauline Kael once wrote “What great western?” She wasn’t exactly putting down the genre though it wasn’t her favorite. Her point was that Westerns are best as popular entertainment than ‘serious statement’. It’s no wonder she loathed SHANE. George Stevens was a very SERIOUS director. Personally, I love SHANE. And BIG COUNTRY, the first movie that truly put the idea of Americanism in me head. THAT should be America, but now it’s all humpback mountain BS. As if two cowpokes poking each other in the ass wasn’t enough, there was Dallas Beware Club with a freaking tranny.

    Kael didn’t like preachy stuff, but she loved RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY which is a preachy movie. But maybe it was because its sense of morals were personal than social or religious. And it has some really good dialogue:

    Steve Judd: …I realized I’d learned a lesson: the value of self-respect.
    Gil Westrum: What’s that worth on the open market?
    Steve Judd: Nothing to some people; but a great deal to me. But I lost it. These last years, the only work I was able to get was in places like Kate’s back there… bartender, stick man, bouncer, what have you. Not much to brag on. Now, I’m gettin’ back a little respect for myself. I intend to keep it, with the help of you and that boy back there. Good to be workin’ again, Gil.
    Gil Westrum: Yeah. [Pause] Partner, you know what’s on the back of a poor man when he dies? The clothes of pride. And they’re not a bit warmer to him dead than they were when he was alive. [Pause] Is that all you want, Steve?
    Steve Judd: [Considers] All I want is to enter my house justified.

    I’m not sure LONG RIDERS counts as a Western. Its conflict is South vs North. I just love that movie even though it’s about killers. Jesse James is one serious guy. The look on his face when he says, “My family is something you don’t talk about, Cole Younger.” Now, that is one serious man. And his wife is the finest kind of woman to ever grace the silver screen. Tough, proud, and supportive. All womenfolk should model themselves on her. The courting scene is just wonderful.
    WILD BUNCH is a much greater movie but it’s too powerful and you can’t relax to it. Also, it’s about men without home. LONG RIDERS is about guys on the prowl, but they do have a sense of home. “We done it for Dixie and nothing else.” And a great line by David Carradine: “You’re a whore.”

    CIMARRON, the only Western to win best pic before UNFORGIVEN is maybe the most overlooked Western. I think it’s great. Along with BIG TRAIL(a greater work), it is a Western before a set of formula took hold and greatly limited the genre’s range of events and themes. A truly sprawling work that is much more than about gunmen. Edna Ferber could sure tell a story.

    GERNOMINO was a total flop but is maybe the best work about Indians. But people preferred the dreadful DANCES(which might have worked as a musical). Walter Hill had a pretty good 90s. He also made WILD BILL featuring one of Jeff Bridges best peformances. And LAST MAN STANDING was a fine gangster-western.

    Speaking of Bridges, he was too huff-and-puff in TRUE GRIT. He would have been better talking in his natural voice. Re-viewing it, it seemed a bit better. I couldn’t stand the girl and still can’t stand her. Is she supposed to be like a proxy-Jew? She is like a neocon who insists on getting it her way. Because her father was killed and she wants to find the killer, it’s like all the world must move heaven and earth to bring forth her vision of justice.
    Even though the grown-up version of her looks anglo, the girl-self looks rather exotic: part Indian and Negro, like the Old Mose character in SEARCHERS. Anyway, because of her vendetta and insistence, a whole bunch of people get killed. She’s like a one-girl neocon machine. Bodies pile up here, there, everywhere. It’s like the whole world must revolve around her personal sense of justice.

    There is a great moment in the movie with the horse. That ranks as among the greatest in cinema. Coens are very good with animals. I can’t get that haunting image of the wounded cat in LLEWYN DAVIS limping into wintry cold. The scene with the horse in TRUE GRITS has tragic beauty, the way it conveys desperation of the moment in contrast to and in conflation with eternity of stars. The two individuals and the horse seem absurdly insignificant in relation to the vast dark sky but, at the same time, they are like part of the constellation and the stars are cosmic-astrological projections of our hope and dreams. It’s a question in the Bible. Does God not care or is He with us always?
    And there is the Coens theme of the tragic cost of everything. Life is always a competition for priorities. In choosing one, another goes neglected. Or another must be sacrificed. And the horse must be sacrificed for the girl to live. Just like the cat must be sacrificed(along with aborted kid) for Lleywn to be free. There is never total justice. There is justice for one at the expense of another.
    It’s like a bunch of lives must be sacrificed to make the world right for Leo in MILLER’S CROSSING. Still, there is nobility in making sacrifices for another. In contrast, everyone in NO COUNTRY is just out for number one.

    • Replies: @syonredux
  141. An excellent entry in the My Maid genre is a Hong Kong film called A Simple Life:

  142. syonredux says:
    @Anon

    I’m not sure LONG RIDERS counts as a Western. Its conflict is South vs North. I just love that movie even though it’s about killers. Jesse James is one serious guy. The look on his face when he says, “My family is something you don’t talk about, Cole Younger.” Now, that is one serious man. And his wife is the finest kind of woman to ever grace the silver screen. Tough, proud, and supportive. All womenfolk should model themselves on her. The courting scene is just wonderful.

    Eh. You’ve got your Western purists out there, the kind of people who will only accept films that are set within the trans-Mississippi USA during the period stretching from 1865 to 1890, but I’m not one of them. It excludes too many good/great films (e.g., The Wild Bunch). Besides, the aftermath of the Civil is a big part of Western mythology, and Jesse James stories have traditionally been counted as part of the genre. So, yeah, I count The Long Riders as a Western. And it’s a good one. I particularly liked how the brothers in the film (James bros, Younger bros, Miller bros, and Ford bros) were all played by real-life siblings.

    Personally, I love SHANE.

    As I’ve said elsewhere, it’s good but over-directed. Looking at some of those scenes, I can just imagine Stevens waiting for the clouds to be in exactly the right position….

    Is she supposed to be like a proxy-Jew? She is like a neocon who insists on getting it her way. Because her father was killed and she wants to find the killer, it’s like all the world must move heaven and earth to bring forth her vision of justice.

    Remorseless Protestant. I recall that the Coens talked about her embodying that kind of mentality….

    Even though the grown-up version of her looks anglo, the girl-self looks rather exotic: part Indian and Negro, like the Old Mose character in SEARCHERS.

    Since we never saw her mother, I just figured that she was part-Amerind (Oklahoma frontier and all that)…

    Anyway, because of her vendetta and insistence, a whole bunch of people get killed. She’s like a one-girl neocon machine. Bodies pile up here, there, everywhere. It’s like the whole world must revolve around her personal sense of justice.

    Lotta Westerns work that way…..

    In contrast, everyone in NO COUNTRY is just out for number one.

    Was Tommy Lee Jones’ sheriff out for himself? He always struck me as a good but ineffectual man…..

    • Replies: @Anon
  143. Anon[287] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    Lotta Westerns work that way…..

    Actually no. Most Westerns are about some hero who takes matters into his own hands. It’s his problem and a matter of pride. Like in HIGH NOON. He can’t run because he would be a ‘craven coward’.

    In TRUE GRIT, Rooster has no dog in the fight. Sure, the girl’s father was killed but the West is filled with brutality. The driving force is the girl who, on her won, could not realize her vendetta. So, she has drive others like they’re horses or something. The scene about horse-trading suggests as much. (Spielberg made WAR HORSE, a musing on goyim as a horse.)

    And she seems to have no sympathy for anyone. She wants this job done and drives Rooster and the other guy to keep moving and get the bad guy. And it has to her way, with the guy tried in the jurisdiction of her choice.

    Emotionally, the only creature really bonds with is blacky the horse. But it has to be killed so that she could live.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    , @syonredux
  144. syonredux says:
    @Anon

    Actually no. Most Westerns are about some hero who takes matters into his own hands. It’s his problem and a matter of pride. Like in HIGH NOON. He can’t run because he would be a ‘craven coward’.

    Yeah, but there are plenty of Westerns where other motives are at work. E.g., Jimmy Stewart’s bounty hunter in The Naked Spur or Randolph Scott’s vengeance-seeking hero in Ride Lonesome…..

    In TRUE GRIT, Rooster has no dog in the fight. Sure, the girl’s father was killed but the West is filled with brutality.

    And, as a law-enforcement official, it’s his duty to bring malefactors to justice….but he only cares about money….

    The driving force is the girl who, on her won, could not realize her vendetta.

    Well, yeah….A little girl will have certain problems in the vendetta department…

    So, she has drive others like they’re horses or something. The scene about horse-trading suggests as much. (Spielberg made WAR HORSE, a musing on goyim as a horse.)

    Nah, she drives them via a purely human emotion:greed. The desire for money.

    And she seems to have no sympathy for anyone. She wants this job done and drives Rooster and the other guy to keep moving and get the bad guy. And it has to her way, with the guy tried in the jurisdiction of her choice.

    Of course, LaBoeuf is similarly insistent that the trial has to occur in a jurisdiction of his choice….

    Emotionally, the only creature really bonds with is blacky the horse. But it has to be killed so that she could live.

    A comment on the WASP love of animals? George Orwell has a bit where he talks about how only Brits and Americans get soppy over animals…

    • Replies: @Anon
  145. syonredux says:
    @Anon

    Incidentally, you’ve reminded me how much I hated Kim Darby in the Wayne version….

    So cutesy…..Makes me want to vomit….

    • Replies: @Anon
  146. Okay I went out to see this in the theatre because it’s in town only three days. (Though it will doubtless be continuing a long run when I return to Mexico next month; my most visited movie house is located dead center between Roma Sur and Roma Norte.)

    Firstly, the historic reproduction is magnificent. And not just in Roma, but also Nezahualcóyotl and the Historic Center.

    The Roma was an established and built out neighborhood in 1971, so it looks similar to today. You can tell which are the later buildings and which the earlier, the Porfiriato style, the Art Deco, the Mexican modern. But they’re all mixed up, so it takes a lot of magic to isolate the past. Insurgentes, the busiest street in the biggest city in the Western Hemisphere has been transformed multiple times since then. I remember road crews working all night, one block at a time, resurfacing or reserving lanes for different transit modes moving down the street from one end of the city to the other. And Cuarón manages to make it look like 1971 in every aspect. Much technique and much deserving of applause.

    Nezahualcóyotl didn’t really exist in 1971 as it does now. It’s now a poorly planned urban neighborhood with running water, electricity, services, public health, a subway line, and some attempt to avoid flooding (though avoidance is not possible given its elevation on a low seasonally dry lakebed). The slummy conditions of the boyfriends there is typical of the epoch. When Tony Scott came to make Man On Fire, Neza was the neighborhood he went to visit at night to exercise his tough guy living dangerously urge hanging with gangsters where life is cheap (with bodyguards, of course). So Cuarón had to rebuild it from scratch. It looks great.

    The movie houses depicted are largely gone or abandoned in disrepair, but Cuarón reproduces them beautifully. I remember a few old ones from the 1990s that are now gone and know the others only in photos. It’s good for cinema culture to remember them. The shot where the boyfriend runs from responsibility is gorgeous and far too long, even though it has to be that long.

    I missed not seeing the gorgeous local Roma site of Cinema Balmori which may have escaped Cuarón’s memory. It was demolished before 1977, but I don’t know how long before.

    The black and white is as unfortunate as I expected, muddy and uninspiring.

    I still cannot hear about a Ford Galaxy in any movie without being lifted out of my cinematic trance and into Spaceballs. Unfortunately the pronunciation in Spanish is a copy of that in English.

    The principal subject of the movie is awful. Why do I need to see a movie about that. Yuck. Births outnumbered deaths by 20MM in the 1970s, so it wasn’t even the typical experience.

    I still hear Mixtec and Nahuatl on the streets in outer districts and even see public announcements in Nahuatl in the very-far-out extremely Mexican places. But the movie thinks it was even more common in the 1970s. In the 1920s, Mexico was majority non-Spanish speaking according to Sec’y of Education José Vasconcelos, so I expect that’s right. But Spanish has the same cultural globalism force as English and is wiping out alternatives. Probably for the best but melancholy to see diversity weeded out.

  147. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    She looks like Little Debbie.

    “What we have here is a failure to communicate.”

  148. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says: • Website
    @syonredux

    Yeah, but there are plenty of Westerns where other motives are at work. E.g., Jimmy Stewart’s bounty hunter in The Naked Spur or Randolph Scott’s vengeance-seeking hero in Ride Lonesome…..

    But they all have agency. Stewart and Scott may keep their agendas hidden, but it is theirs. They want to do it their way. Even the hero in SHANE, who decides to defend a community, has to do it on his terms. It is a world of pride where a man has to stand on his own two feet. That’s also why the boy’s father won’t let Shane face down the baddie. It’s a matter of pride. HE must do it even if it means sure death. And Shane understands this and starts a brawl to make the eventual face-down with Jack Palance his own. He wasn’t led to do it but did it of his own volition. This is why bounty hunters were usually seen as trash in most Westerns. They might go after the bad guy… but only for money. Bounty Hunters became cool only with the nihlistic Spaghettis. The iconic hero of the Western does it out of free will and individual agency.

    And, as a law-enforcement official, it’s his duty to bring malefactors to justice….but he only cares about money…. Nah, she drives them via a purely human emotion:greed. The desire for money.

    But it’s not a lot of money(like in BIG LEBOWSKI). Also, Rooster is somewhere between lawman and bounty-hunter. It’s his nature. Also, money was not the main motivating factor. She has to go to where he sleeps and rouse him out of bed. If not for her insistence, he might have taken on an easier job. He does have a crude sense of right and wrong, but if not for the girl, he wouldn’t have bothered to find the killer and bring him to justice. And there are surely other ways he could made money. What really puts him on the saddle is that the girl won’t take NO for an answer. She is so very insistence, like Holly Hunter who is the driving force in the movie full of men who are either weak, confused, dazed, or lazy in RAISING ARIZONA. Similarly, the most insistent and incessant character in FARGO is the female cop who just won’t let it go. In contrast, Tommy Lee Jones in NO COUNTRY seems in defeatist mode. The scene with the female cop and the sullen Indian is like the scene with the girl and a bunch of men in TRUE GRIT.

    As the story continues, Rooster gradually takes a liking to the girl. It’s like a horse takes a liking to its rider. A horse is bigger and more powerful animal but has no sense of purpose. It’s the rider that gives it meaning. Rooster has been a tough old boy and has quite a reputation. But his life lacked direction. The girl supplies it to him. When she is spanked by the Matt Damon’s character, he intervenes like a horse may feel protective of its rider. As time passes, it’s not about money. On some level, he comes to admire her will and sense of agency.
    This sort of explains why Con Inc. became so besotted with Neocons. Neocons were upstarts and newcomers(and maybe not really conservative), but they were a bundle of energy, had a sense of direction and vision so lacking among Conservatives who were into nostalgia or anxious about change. Bill Buckley was like Norton in Honeymooners. Amusing but without direction. Neocons were like Ralphie boy. They had the passion, and just like Norton always goes along with Ralphie boy, Bill Buckley went with the Neocons who had the idea of, bang zoom, punching enemies to the moon. Neocons had ‘sex appeal’ as centerfolds of National Review and Weekly Standard. (In all this, Paleo-Cons proved to be like Alice who talks good sense, but Alice was never able to stop Ralphie boy from yet another folly. The relationship between Neocons and Conservatism was also like White Slavery. It’s like Jewish gangsters wooed Slavic women with roses and chocolate and promised them good job/life in Israel, but when they arrived, they were forced into prostitution. White Conservatism just became a political sex slave of Zionist-Globalism. And this is why Jewish Power reacted to Trump like he’s Travis Bickle or something.)

    In the court scene that introduces Rooster, we see that he’s a rough old boy. Neither justice nor money is what’s really on his mind. Violence is just a part of his life, a means for him to make just enough money and get enough action in his waking hours. If the girl hadn’t entered his life, he never would have known meaning and purpose.
    Paradoxically, she’s drawn to him for his amorality whereas he grows drawn to her for her moralism. She is so hellbent on getting the killer of her father that she wants a real tough guy who will DO ANYTHING(even against the law) to drag the villain to justice. In a similar way, Neocons don’t want real moralists among their goy allies. The morality is to be decided by Neocons only. They do the thinking, while goys in Conservatism Inc carry out the actions, esp in war. A real moralist will notice the contradictions in Neocon positions. In contrast, a rough old boy like John McCain or John Bolton won’t ask questions and just serve as iron horse and attack dog for the Neocons.

    Notice how Rooster treats Indian kids in contrast to how he comes to regard her.

    Indians are stolid people without much in the way of words or direction. So, Rooster just treats them as objects to kick around. (One wonders how US history might have been different if American Indians has personalities of Asian Indians and talked up a storm in every encounter with whites. “Manhattan for this stupid necklace? Who are you kidding?” This is why White America with guns but no words is helpless against the ever-talkative Jewish power.) Btw, I like how Coens depict the prejudice of the times without preachiness of “LOOK, RACISM!” Unlike Indians(and plenty of whites in the movie), she is verbally gifted and very focused in whatever she does. (One thing she can’t do is shoot a gun.) *Interesting. Search for Simpsons Babu Homer on youtube and you get baby instead of babu. I guess Hindus got some pull in high-tech now. https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=simpsons+babu+homer&sp=mAEB


    Of course, LaBoeuf is similarly insistent that the trial has to occur in a jurisdiction of his choice….

    But she does prevail, and he comes around, consciously or not, to serving her agenda. Also, even his insistence of taking the guy to Texas lacks true agency. He’s doing to that to win respect because the victim was an important man, a Senator. So, he is serving a higher authority, whereas the girl is serving her own personal vendetta.

    A comment on the WASP love of animals? George Orwell has a bit where he talks about how only Brits and Americans get soppy over animals…

    Coens certainly love animals. I think many Jews do love animals. Darren Aronofsky is maybe a vegetarian? NOAH was about love of nature and animals. Sean Hannity said Mark Levin loves animals. They were driving one day and Levin saw a turtle or tortoise in the middle of the road and got out of the dog to put in a safe place. (I do this a lot on camping trips too.) A Jewish kid I knew had a grandma who took wonderful care of gerbils and dogs.

    Anyway, when it comes to the horse, one wonders how much Rooster is aware that he is like the horse he is riding. The horse, of course, has NO IDEA why it’s been taken here, there, everywhere. It lacks agency and goes where the rider takes it. It goes as far as it can go and then collapses. Rooster kills the horse but then carries her until he can’t run anymore either and nearly collapses. As a human, he is more understanding than the horse, but he also doesn’t really know why he went so far to serve this agenda of this girl with a strong-will.
    And this theme is addressed in HAIL CAESAR as well. Why is the goy Catholic exec so loyal to unseen Mogul? He’s a tough guy and all, but apart from Jesus, he finds meaning in life by serving a godlike figure of stronger will and vision. (And Jesus was a Jew too whose vision made even the Romans bow down before Him.)

    As for ‘remorseless Wasps’, which other people have been rather remorseless in the game of power? Just ask the Palestinians, Iraqis who died of disease from sanctions, Libyans, Syrians, and Europeans facing massive demographic change. And Russians in the 90s.

    I would say one difference is that Wasp remorseless has more an universalist pedigree because the core faith and value system of Wasps has been Protestantism. So, in the end, Wasp Protestantism became remorseless in facing up to its own historical ‘crimes’. Notice the sheer ruthlessness and virulence of ‘good whites’ in their neo-puritanical PC to stamp out ‘racism’ even though it does great harm to other whites. Even though Wasp history has been very race-ist in practice, Wasp mentality believes in a single rule of right and wrong for all of humanity as taught by Christianity. So, when Wasps became aware of their own hypocrisy, they went about ruthlessly and remorselessly attacking anyone with the slightest whiff of ‘racism’.

    In contrast, Jews, because of their Covenant-Consciousness, were comfortable with having two sets of worldviews: one for Jews and one for goyim. And even upon realizing the contradictions, they weren’t much perturbed because they’d always believed in Two Worlds: the World of Goys and World of Jews, with the former being made to serve the latter.

    The ultimate logic of Protestant logic is that all the world must believe in the same truth and be judged the same way. The ultimate logic of Judaism is that Jews are the Chosen and must never forget it, and all the world must be bent to the will of the people favored by God, history, or power of will. So, if wasps have a single-world view, Jews have a double-world view. Wasps eventually come around to thinking all peoples must be treated alike, whereas Jews believe that how Jews treat Jews and Jewish things could(and should) be different from how Jews treat goyim and goy things.

    Jewish-Wasp relations is an important topic. In some ways, Jews may feel closer to Protestants than to any other people. Judaism was anti-idolatrous, and as such, Jewish merchants were likely to invest their wealth in more business and concentrate on text than on images. Anglos were like this. Protestantism stripped away the idolatry of Catholicism, and few people have been as word-centric as the Anglos who lagged the French and Germans in Art and Music, that is until the gained predominance with Pop Music.

    Both Jews and Anglos were more likely to reinvest their wealth in more enterprise than just build mega-mansions and splurge on expensive parties. And yet, this also made them the two top competitors, and the rivalry also made for some bad blood.

    Still, on some level, Jews must understand that Jewish power is only as good as the power of the host nation. After all, there were many talented Jews in Russia, Italy, Middle East, Latin America, and etc. But Jewish talent could never overcome the general talent of the population. It’s like, no matter how talented a rider, he can go only so far as the horse is able. Even the best rider can only do so much with a weak horse. Imagine if all Jews immigrated to black nations. How much could they achieve with the blacks as their economic and managerial base?

    So, if ALL Jews had been in second-rate nations like Italy or Russia, they could have done only so much despite their IQ and talent. Jews truly realized their full potentials in Northern Protestant nations and the US that was made by Northern Protestants. That was a very powerful horse for Jews to ride on. And yet, Jews won’t forget the times when the horse threw the Jewish rider off its back and kicked him in the head once. So, he treats the horse badly. But if that horse goes, good luck in finding another one.

  149. Transit anachronisms.

    The protagonists should have been riding the subway in the scenes outside the Roma. When they went to the Centro Histórico theaters, the Alameda Central, and La Casa del Pavo (still there today and still looking like its last renovation in the 1940s, just as it did in 1971), the easiest and cheapest way to get there would have been on the subway. The Insurgentes station in the Roma opened in 1969, as did Isabel La Catolica near the theaters and restaurant while Zócalo and Bellas Artes, even closer, opened in 1970.

    On the trip to Ciudad Nezahualcóyotl, the station at Zaragoza was the closest and by far the best way to make the long journey to Neza at that time. The buses to connect out there all left from the Zaragoza metro station.

    The STC has extensive historic photo archives for reconstructing old transit vehicles and stations and is eager to help. Some of the electric buses and street furniture so painstakingly recreated must have depended on their archives.

    But we never saw the subway at all.

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