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Accused Sex Murderer of Mollie Tibbetts, Cristhian Rivera, Worked as "John Budd"
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John Budd

From Des Moines Register:

Immigrant charged in Tibbetts’ death used ‘John Budd’ alias to secure job at Yarrabee Farms

Ryan Foley, Associated Press Published 6:49 p.m. CT Sept. 5, 2018 | Updated 6:56 p.m. CT Sept. 5, 2018

The Mexican man charged with abducting and killing an Iowa college student was known for years on the dairy farm where he worked by another name: John Budd.

Isn’t John Budd a Keanu Reeves movie in which he takes bloody vengeance upon the bad guys who killed his beloved potted dope plant by overwatering it?

The alias has emerged as Cristhian Bahena Rivera’s employer, a dairy farm operation owned by a prominent Republican family, faces questions over whether its managers were aware of any warning signs that he may have been in the country illegally.

The name under which Rivera was hired and paid for the last four years was confirmed by three people with knowledge of his employment history, according to the Associated Press. … One of the people said Rivera’s work identity as John Budd appears in official government records.

… Lori Chesser, an immigration employment lawyer advising the farm, said that companies cannot discriminate against workers based on how they look or how their names sound.

Farm officials have said Bahena Rivera presented an out-of-state photo ID and a Social Security number when he was hired in 2014, and they believed he was the person depicted in those documents until his arrest last month.

The farm followed legal requirements to examine the documents and determined “that they appeared genuine on their face and related to the person presenting them,” Chesser said. “Questioning a name or other characteristic would violate the anti-discrimination provisions of the law.” …

A commenter has found a photo of an actual guy named John Budd, a high ranking executive at Sonic Burger headquarters. Apparently, though, noticing that sex murderer “John Budd” doesn’t look much like a real John Budd is against the law.

The farm did not use the government’s voluntary E-Verify system, which allows companies to verify the identity and immigration status of job applicants. …

It’s unclear whether E-Verify would have detected any red flags with Bahena Rivera’s claimed identity, but the farm has said it used a different government service to confirm that the name and Social Security number matched. …

Employers typically do not face legal consequences for hiring a worker under false documents as long as they were not involved in obtaining them and had no other obvious reason to suspect they are fraudulent, said Bob Teig, a retired federal prosecutor in Iowa.

“Absent unusual circumstances, it would be difficult to show they knew any more than what they were told,” Teig said, adding that it would be “pretty racist” to assume a John Budd could not be Hispanic.

Here’s another John Budd, who works in the packaging and containers field in the Denver area.

Whether anyone else knew Bahena Rivera as John Budd is unclear. The 24-year-old had a Facebook page under his real name, and his account listed many friends from the central Iowa area. He has a girlfriend and a young daughter, his former attorney has said.

… Erica Johnson, an advocate who directs the American Friends Service Committee’s immigration program in Iowa, said the case highlights the “precarious position” that immigrant workers and their employers face.

“We have an immigration system that doesn’t account for the labor needs or economic realities of Iowa businesses and farms,” she said. “So what do you do? Do you rightly not racially profile people and take the information they give you because you need workers?”

Big business and big liberals all agree: you can’t bake a diverse omelet without smashing a few 20-year-old girls’ skulls. What’s a little sex murder versus the moral atrocity that would be skepticism about whether Cristhian Bahena Rivera’s real name is actually John Budd?

 
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  1. “The Mexican man charged with abducting and killing an Iowa college student was known for years on the dairy farm where he worked by another name: John Budd. ”

    A perfectly reasonable mistake. In high school I had a fake id with the name Chizuko Wasabi and a photo of a 70 year old Japanese woman.

    Whenever the ID got a less than celebratory look from the store clerk, I made sure to mention something about who we are, or diversity, or the SPLC and usually I got a free slim jim to go with my 12 pack of Milwaukee’s Best.

    • LOL: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    LOL

    and, FIRST!
  2. So to question whether a man who speaks little or no English and who has a Facebook page under the name of Cristhian Bahena Rivera is really named “John Budd” is racist and illegal. Not only is it OK to look the other way but the law COMMANDS us to be stupid and ignore all common sense (at least according to the dairy farmer’s lawyer). But if he told you that his name was Juan and you insisted on calling him John, that would be racist and illegal too.

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas

    So to question whether a man who speaks little or no English and who has a Facebook page under the name of Cristhian Bahena Rivera is really named “John Budd” is racist and illegal. Not only is it OK to look the other way but the law COMMANDS us to be stupid and ignore all common sense (at least according to the dairy farmer’s lawyer). But if he told you that his name was Juan and you insisted on calling him John, that would be racist and illegal too.
     
    This sort of humiliation in getting you to assiduously ignore the obvious is as the kids say "a feature, not a bug." They want you dispirited.

    We get in a back and forth with the left over immigration generally and their false statistics about illegal crime. But the higher rate of crime by illegals is almost besides the point - it's the anarcho-tyranny of the the law touching every aspect of the average American's life contrasted with the open lawlessness of the illegal immigration racket that drives normal people red with rage.
    , @BenKenobi
    https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=chutzpah
    , @Dave Pinsen
    They probably thought he was a John Budd with better food.
    , @istevefan
    I can't find the link, but I recall a few years back some firm in Nebraska was sued by the Obama administration under disparate impact, I believe, for requiring prospective employees to show their birth certificates. My recall of the details might be fuzzy, but the gist of it was the company was trying to avoid hiring illegals and the government sued them for it.
    , @AnotherDad
    In a decent and serious nation lawyer scum like this Lori Chesser, SJW scum like this Erica Johnson and greedy farmer scum like the Lang family would all be deported. We don't need garbage like this in our nation.
    , @Wilkey
    This is how the enforcement provisions of the 1986 were so quickly gutted. They argued that requiring businesses to check documents was discriminatory against Hispanic job applicants, so they removed them or even banned them. Even now businesses face almost no threat of fees for failing to validate the legal status of their employees, vs. a the very real threat of an EEOC or ACLU or private lawsuit for doing so PLUS the fact that it it raises the cost of hiring.

    Leftists have made it illegal to use common sense to enforce the law. It doesn't matter that the odds that a Hispanic person who spokes little or no English is living here illegally is like 1 in 3, 2hile for whites (or for people with good English skills in general) the odds of being here illegally are vanishingly small. The Left is doing everything it can to make enforcement of the law (see also: the TSA) impossible, exorbitantly costly and/or as inconvenient as possible to as many people as possible. The biggest threat to our freedom as Americans is the banning of common sense.
  3. Victimizing young women is not a job Americans won’t do. We need operations like this in Spanish:

    • Replies: @moshe
    The fact that there is a single person on the planet who watched that and believed it was real has me on my knees praying that God Almighty in his infinite wisdom and mercy sends a flood to destroy mankind once and for all.
  4. If you’re in search of irony, present your credentials to the third world immigrant working at TSA or the DMV. They will rake you over the coals for being white af. Didn’t you know that America is a Nation of Immigrants? If you’re not an immigrant, leave now. Or get what’s coming to you.

    • Replies: @Hail

    Didn’t you know that America is a Nation of Immigrants?
     
    There should be an extension of this, something like:

    "a Nation of Immigrants not Natives"...

    ...but that would bleed into the post-1990s term 'Native American' referring to Amerindians.

    It occurs to me that no one has ever used the "Nation of Immigrants" bludgeon to shut-up actual Amerindians. "Stop complaining about poor conditions on the reservation, bigot! Don't you know this continent belongs to immigrants?" Nor is Nation of Immigrants ever used against slave-ancestry Blacks, nor against certain other smaller groups.

    When people use the political slogan "Nation of Immigrants," they are using it against White-Protestants and defacto-Protestant White Catholics -- amounting to perhaps 175 million Americans today, i.e., the Trump Base With No Name (probably at about 50% of the legal-citizen national population among the age 20-70 cohort, with at least a +15 for voters [which includes over-70s).
  5. “….it would be “pretty racist” to assume a John Budd could not be Hispanic.”

    “Could”, but exceptionally unlikely. What if his name was Don’trelle?

    Every day I read something more stupid than the last.

  6. “Absent unusual circumstances, it would be difficult to show they knew any more than what they were told,” Teig said, adding that it would be “pretty racist” to assume a John Budd could not be Hispanic.

    An adult man actually believes this.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    An adult man actually believes this.

     

    Does he really, or is he faking it? The future of the West may hinge on the answer to that single question.
    , @Trevor H.
    A majority of the people in the country believe it.
    , @Jack D
    No of course he doesn't believe it. No one is that stupid, let alone a Federal prosecutor. Rather, this is what we call "a legal fiction" - a lie that the legal system consents to in order to grease the wheels of society. Obviously, EVERYONE involved understood instantly that John Budd was not his real name but the law has given them permission (in fact DEMANDED) that they ignore the obvious so that we can have cheap milk and rich Republican dairy farm owners. A dead white girl or two is a small price to pay for cheap milk and the Vail condo of the farm family. Modern corporato-leftism is all about ignoring the obvious.
  7. Rivera was likely a fan of Herman Melville, and chose his adopted surname as an homage to the great American author. He’s no lowbrow identity thief, that’s for certain.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    Now see, with my eagle eyes I'd notice that McLovin signs its name with a trailing 'g' which is a dead giveaway. But the INS doesn't want people like me on board :(
  8. I don’t think even publishing brutal crime scene photos would sober people up. It’s like their brains shut off and refuse to see what’s right in front of them, or worse what’s literally happening to themselves and their families. Is there such a thing as an un-survival instinct? Not fight or flight, but now quiet acceptance of death? Feels like there should be a long German word for it.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Cortes
    There’s a certain amount of generational dumbness around. The other day a 25 year old nephew had to be forcibly removed from the intended drop line of a tree his dad was felling; neither of his parents are morons.
    Txt smrts yeah! Real life brains? Not so much.
    , @Another Canadian
    Leervernichtungsgefuehl?
    , @Hail

    their brains shut off and refuse to see what’s right in front of them
     
    Thought Experiment:

    How would people have reacted to the 'John Budd' Sex-Stalker-Murder incident in:

    1818
    1858
    1898
    1938
    1978
    2018

    (Forty-year intervals.)

    My impression is the 1938 to 1978 period would have the biggest gap in reactions from local people. As for when he 'brains shut off' point begins in my arbitrary 40-year-interval game, perhaps it is 1978 already. The thing is, in 1978-Iowa there were so few (near zero) illegal Mexican sex-stalker-murderers roaming around that it wasn't an issue.
    , @Bard of Bumperstickers
    Gezombieapocalyptunggessellschaft.
  9. “We have an immigration system that doesn’t account for the labor needs or economic realities of Iowa businesses and farms,” she said. “So what do you do? Do you rightly not racially profile people and take the information they give you because you need workers?”

    The AFSC hack quoted above can join the archduke of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in crying me a river. Time for real wages for U.S. workers to rise for the first time in a generation, especially after the tax cuts.

    • Replies: @RVBlake
    The Republican rep for our rural congressional district in northern Wisconsin recently announced on his Facebook page his plan to sponsor the importation of "guest" workers to help out farmers suffering labor shortages, with the assurance that this was a temporary fix. The comments were not supportive.
  10. It’s quite disingenuous of them to claim that the “only” thing they can do is check that the name and social security number match, without resorting to evil discrimination. How about they check: Is John Budd with the given SSN alive? Is he employed already? Does he live within a reasonable distance of the employer? Is he receiving disability or unemployment benefits? Does his age match the person’s claimed age? All of those things could be checked very easily and quickly and would not involve any sort of discrimination.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Logan
    It is blindingly obvious they knew he was almost certainly an illegal alien. They didn't care. The only investigation they were interested in was the bare minimum necessary to pretend they were following the law.
  11. Billy Budd was taken?!!

    • Replies: @Thirdtwin
    "Billy Budd was taken?!!"

    As was John Doe, I guess.
  12. Haven Monahan owns the farm.

    • LOL: Mr. Rational
  13. Anon[394] • Disclaimer says:

    As someone on the receiving end of a whole lot of government regulation, I can tell you the way to fix this. Of course, there should be employer sanctions. But also follow other regulattory bodies, and not only require an action, but require obsessive documentation of the action. And make the sanctions for both requirements the same level of seriousness.

    Specifically, require all the following:

    – Only citizens or properly visa’d people can be hired.

    – ID and documentation has to be checked.

    – The process of checking has to be documented: Digital photographs required of the applicant, and the ID checked, as specified resolution and focus quality. ID must be point by point checked against a list of points provided by the goverment, such as under magnification does the microtype at the upper left corner of the Virginia driver’s license have the state motto, “Canis meus id comedit”? By requiring a named employee, or contractor, to photograph and affirm a step by step process, they cannot later say “We looked at it and it seemed OK.” It’s auditable. If the documentation of the checking process is lost, hey, the sanction for not having that is the same as the sanction for hiring an illegal, so six of one, half a dozen of the other. You get fined or jailed or whatever either way.

    Many years ago an FBI agent showed me a large book that they had access to with details about ID cards of all kinds, from every state. They used that when checking IDs. I’m sure that it has been put online somewhere by this point for goverment use.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    The Virginia state motto is "my dog ate it"? Always thought it was "sic semper tyrannosaurus."
  14. I was born in the late 1940s to an immigrant family from India and turned 12 in 1960. First, there were two 1960s; 1960 thru 1963/64 and then beyond. The first three years were a continuation of the 1950s, no real difference. I don’t recall ‘Duck and Cover’ in the 60s, that may have been a 50s thing. Rock and Roll was in a tailspin, all we were getting was Frankie Avalon, Fabian and such. Some of the ‘doo-wop’ groups were still there but the hard rockers weren’t around. Plastic was the thing, everything was covered in plastic. The new space age material. I asked my Mom once why she covered everything in vinyl. She laffed and said, it was the thing everyone was doing. There was no AC. The only place you could find AC was in a movie theatre. JFK was President and the press loved him in the way that they loved Barack Obama. For most of the press he could do no wrong, nor could Jackie or any of the Kennedys. The press had endless stories of touch football at the Kennedy compound, The Kennedy children and the Kennedy brothers. So everybody played touch football too. Viet Nam was still a distant police action; it did get press coverage but it was mostly of the Viet-Namese. American cars ruled. Automotive engineering was a different world from today. The things were fucking hugh and ran like Giant sloths. Bench seats front and rear that could fit a family of nine w/o a hitch. Gee, I loved those seats. Plus I was small enuff to ride in the shelf under the rear window. The National Highway system was copied from the Nazis and had just got under way under Eisenhower. So when you drove inter-city or inter-state it was on two lane blacktops for much or all of the way. Air travel was just beginning and people still traveled by train. Imagine telling your friends today that you’re taking a train to California or New York. Air travel was a different world from today. Every passenger was treated like a prince or princess. And the staff all had Hollywood good looks. BTW, no searching or security at all. I remember (latter 60s) buying a ticket at the airport and walking on to the flight. Often we got to walk onto the tarmac to board. All the staff smiling and greeting us like we were royalty. Smoking was allowed everywhere and the booze flowed on the flights. Folks dressed to fly. It was an occasion. The only foreign cars I recall from the early 60s was the occasional VW beetle or Mercede Benz. Japanese cars are still in the future- at least on the east coast. Back on the ground, there were supermarkets (remember I’m a city kid) but not as large as today. I remember we did much of our food shopping at neighborhood stores. A loaf of bread was 15 Cents, a hamburger at a local restaurant was 25 cents. A pack of cigarettes was 21 cents. And a newspaper was 4 cents. I remember some of these prices because as a kid I was often sent to a store to buy these items. My Mom would go to the A&P and buy a week or two of groceries for about $20. The groceries would be loaded into one or two big, paper bags which it was my job to carry. The big grocery chains in NY then were A&P and Bohacks. Latter there was a cute girl teenager cashier at the Bohacks who would let me buy any amount of stuff for the price of one item. How did I ever fuck that up. A pair of Clarks Desert Boots was about $5. In NYC, nobody wore blue jeans; That was farmers’ clothes; That’s gonna change soon. A 45 RPM record (top 10) was about 50 cents. Elvis was no longer on the charts as he had been drafted. Many young men went into the army or other military as there was still a draft of two years active duty. Fellows would volunteer for the draft to get it out of the way. But you could only volunteer for the draft in the army. There was no draft for other branches of the military. Racism was alive and very healthy. God save the poor black man that ventured into a white neighborhood. I have spoken to many black men, my age, that told me they would turn down jobs or other opportunities rather then venture into some white or ethnic areas. And the reverse was true. I remember being told not to go into certain black neighborhoods and recall being stopped once by a group of young blacks about something but nothing came of it, I was about 11 or 12. In NYC, at least, suburban flight was beginning, and every once in a while a friend or relative would move to the suburbs- never to be seen again. It was also the beginning of traffic jams. We played in the streets and parks all day and well into the night. Me? As long as I was home for dinner I was cool. It was not unusual to be out with your friends all day. Seeing your parents for the evening meal and then out again. Also, this was when extended families lived nearby so you had cousins and friends all around. Then JFK was shot and a month latter came The Beatles. LBJ was President and Viet Nam loomed ahead. Everything Changed. When JFK was shot it was a week of national mourning. Think 9/11. Everything closed, except churches. All schools, businesses, gov’t offices, etc. TV was Black and white and it was 15 hours or so of news coverage of the assassination, funeral, transfer of power. BTW there was no 24 hour TV back then. Everyone was solemn, no joking around and everyone in the country assumed that everyone in Dallas was guilty to some degree. Premarital sex was still a big no man’s land. As a teenager, we would dream about making-out or coping a feel. Holding a breast while while making out was heaven and you had to work for it. Weeks and months of being the BF. Finger-fucking was always beyond me. If your girl got pregnant, you got married that week. Dropped out of high school and got a job. Every year there was a couple that disappeared and folks would whisper that some girl was in ‘trouble’. Then came the Beatles and everything changed. Then Civil rights protest, and Viet Nam. Now begins the 60s people talk about. 77.8k Views · What did it feel like to live in the ’60s? What was it like to grow up in the 1960s? How was life in the 60s in the USA? How well has Mad Men depicted the life of Americans in the 60s? What was life like in the Netherlands during the 60s? In the early sixties I lived in Virginia at Ft. Meyer. Andy Griffith show and lots of westerns. Everything was still very clean and family orientated in a weird way. If you didn’t want there to be S E X in the show you had widowers. Bonanza, My Three Sons, Mayberry. Then we moved to Hawaii. Skateboards and surfing songs. The Beatles were just becoming big. Viet Nam was stirring. JFK got killed and they had his funeral for days on every channel. Interstates were just being built. We drove across country on highways including route 66, Medgar Evers was murdered. A Black sgt in my neighbor hood threatened the people who owned the car from Mississippi. My mother told me to never tell anyone I was from Miss. We moved to Louisiana and the Viet Nam war started appearing on the six o’clock news. People trusted Walter Cronkite, Chet Huntley and David Brinkley. The music was still friendly…Jimmy Mack, Paul Revere and the Raiders, the Rollingstones. There were riots on TV, cities burning, and Dr, King was murdered. Then Bobby Kennedy. The music changed. If you’re going to San Francisco, be sure to wear some flowers in your hair….until Altamont. Then all those hippies started getting hooked on heroin and free love became less free. My Dad went to Viet Nam and we moved to Miss. I was so ought of place, but I loved my grandparents and could have lived on their farm. Woodstock and Alice’s Restaurant. Jimmy Hendrix opened for the Monkees…..Dark Shadows was what all the young folks watched. Where the Action Is! Soul Train! Hullabaloo, Laugh In. They Call Me Mellow Yellow. We All Live in a Yellow Submarine! Strawberry Fields Forever. Then one night I was listening to the radio while in bed. I heard Jimmy Mack and then Knight in Rusted Armor and I knew something just died. An era, an innocence that was never coming back. From now on it was We were flying low, hit something in the air! InnaGodadavida. Gonna be a hooker on Bleaker Street. I was eighteen when the sixties ended. 1.4k Views · Originally Answered: What was life like in the 1960s? I was born in 1965; so my experience was limited. I also can only answer about the USA but here goes. Median household income: lower than today, but growing. Fruits and vegetables were still largely seasonal. Portions in restaurants were smaller. People did not mind as long as raises came through every year. Less privacy. Houses were smaller measured by square footage. Moreover, the privacy was mostly for parents. I can remember growing up in a three-bedroom house. My parents had the brilliant idea of putting my brother and I in the same bedroom but then setting aside the spare bedroom for toys. Not surprisingly, my brother and I often fought like cats and dogs. Technology. Our house had two phones. Neither cordless. No computers. Really rich business people had phones in their cars; these were radios. I ran into one guy who hated having to add a car phone in the mid 1980s when cell phones came out; he missed the quiet when he drove. Cars were big and heavy. I think fifteen miles per gallon was good. Gas was cheap — I remember when people howled because gas hit $0.50 per gallon. I remember my folks getting a new car roughly every five years usually because they did not engage in regular maintenance. I take much better care of a car today and my 2005 Ford Taurus with 147,000 miles runs better than my old man’s cars with fewer than 50,000 miles. It helps that I check my Grease Monkey Sticker and know when to bring the car in for regular service. Retail was more expensive with higher margins. Kmart was the only big discounter and it was almost as bad then as it is today. Department stores had 100% margins. Skipping around, I remember spending more on a suit in 1985 (okay my grandparents bought it for my debating tournaments) than I pay today; of course the material and fit were both a little better then. Television. Three big networks. Local television added PBS and a few local independent stations showing reruns. Cartoons were a few hours in the afternoon and Sunday mornings. With one color television in the house (if you were lucky) you watched what dad or grandpop picked. Travel. I did not leave the USA at this time. Every year, however, we picked up my successful grandparents at the airport. Every year, they took a tour-group vacation. Since my grandfather had been working since he was 10 years old, it is hard to be jealous. Americans abroad were treated like gods — provided they stick to the safe tours in friendly countries. Less precision. I remember as a kid Burger King’s “Have it Your Way“ slogan. In those pre-computer days, forget it. My brother was a picky eater, and the fast-food restaurant inevitably got his order wrong. A scene inevitably ensued. Thanks for the A2A, Jai 12k Views · · Answer requested by Light, refreshing, idealistic, hopeful, and fun. In 1966 I hitch hiked to LA and hung out with the other hippies on the strip, indulging in the hedonism of sex, drugs, and rock and roll. It was a wonderful life for an 18-year old. I went to college and got a little more serious without losing those previous activities. The civil rights movement, supporting women’s liberation, and anti-war demonstrations were hopeful struggles to make the country and the world a better place. Although we failed to completely change the world in that decade we at least established efforts that are still on-going to improve the world we live in. Having aged considerably since then has moderated my raw hedonism and recklessness, but not changed my desire for and participation in the same efforts. And I may be old now, at least I got to see all the best bands live.

    • Agree: jim jones
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    This looks like an interesting post, but I stopped reading about a third of the way through because no paragraphs.
    , @Hail
    I don't know what kind of trolling and/or bot activity this is, but this post is copied (with possible slight additions or alterations) from here:

    https://www.quora.com/What-was-life-like-in-the-60s

    , @Neuday
    tldr: Boomer Prajeet fully assimilated, enjoying the degeneracy of the 60's and 70's, then writes meandering narcissistic Boomerpoast.
    , @Anon
    I remember when people howled because gas hit $0.50 per gallon. I remember my folks getting a new car roughly every five years usually because they did not engage in regular maintenance. I take much better care of a car today and my 2005 Ford Taurus with 147,000 miles runs better than my old man’s cars with fewer than 50,000 miles.

    In 1979 during the (second) "oil shock", I was 14 y/o and working as a gas jockey at suburban Mobile gas station right off a heavily traveled northeast interstate. The price of a gallon of gas cracked $1. One Saturday, I worked a 12-hour day, non-stop pumping gas one car after the other w/o a break. The line snaked for 3 miles down the road.

    I'm still driving a '00 Ford Taurus w/ 125K miles, as the second owner. Bought it from National Car Rental in '01 w/ 20K miles for $11K in mint condition. It's been a cream-puff.
    , @AnotherDad
    Plagiarized or not, this is unreadable with paragraphs. Paragraphs are handy--break your thoughts up into separate bite sized bits and they are much more easily digestible.
    , @Eric Novak
    So you hitchhiked to LA as an infant?
  15. @Reg Cæsar
    Victimizing young women is not a job Americans won't do. We need operations like this in Spanish:



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-RJJ9Xln8n0

    The fact that there is a single person on the planet who watched that and believed it was real has me on my knees praying that God Almighty in his infinite wisdom and mercy sends a flood to destroy mankind once and for all.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The fact that there is a single person on the planet who watched that and believed it was real has me on my knees praying that God Almighty in his infinite wisdom and mercy sends a flood to destroy mankind once and for all.

     

    Whether or not it's real is irrelevant. It was fun, and can give us ideas.
  16. A majority of the White Women i have seen in California are dating either a Black guy or a Hispanic and they are not fat and obese as Most of the Cucks on this Website would like to claim. White “man” cannot compete with Black Men or other Men of Color in the sexual marketplace. Men of Color are strong creative disciplined athletic and have fought their whole lives white men are weak dull effeminate clumsy and play video games Is it any wonder that white girls crave Black Men? FACT IS THAT DAYS OF RACISM ARE OVER AND I AM HALF JEWISH., MY ANCESTORS FACED ANTI SEMITISM(which will be over) AS WELL. I WANT SOMEBODY TO REFUTE MY ARGUMENTS.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    A majority of the White Women i have seen in California are dating either a Black guy
     
    Specifically, he's referring to Van Vuys and Chattsworth, and "dating."
    , @anonymous

    I WANT SOMEBODY TO REFUTE MY ARGUMENTS.
     
    I WANT SOMEONE TO TEACH YOU PROPER GRAMMAR.
    , @Redneck farmer
    Unfortunately for you Mike, blacks and Hispanics "know" all about the Jews.
    , @Anon
    I’ve lived in California all my life and I never see White women dating black men.
    If you do see a White woman with a black man how do you know they are dating? Do you follow them to see what they’re doing and where they go?
    , @Jack D
    Tiny Duck, is that you?

    I think Cristhian Rivera must have had trouble competing for white girls in the sexual marketplace and so resorted to shoplifting. Pablo "They" Gomez had trouble competing for white girls (or boys) in the sexual marketplace too. I don't think being a 5'2" Mestizo/illegal alien/minimum wage farm worker really gives you much traction with white college girls in the sexual marketplace. Nor is "Hey, Mami, you so fine" really an effective pickup line.
    , @Lurker
    Woeful troll. 0/10
  17. • Replies: @Hail
    Is this a new form of comment-filtering (approval) or did Hemid submit a blank post?
  18. John Budd, Billy Budd, whatever it takes.

  19. @Alec Leamas
    Rivera was likely a fan of Herman Melville, and chose his adopted surname as an homage to the great American author. He's no lowbrow identity thief, that's for certain.

    http://bedfordandbowery.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/1313166894-mclovin-id.jpg

    Now see, with my eagle eyes I’d notice that McLovin signs its name with a trailing ‘g’ which is a dead giveaway. But the INS doesn’t want people like me on board :(

  20. Pedro Homicidialis would have been a better name for this guy but that’s hindsight.

  21. Anonymous[276] • Disclaimer says:

    “When The U.S. Government Tried To Replace Migrant Farmworkers With High Schoolers”

    https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2018/07/31/634442195/when-the-u-s-government-tried-to-replace-migrant-farmworkers-with-high-schoolers

    Randy Carter is a member of the Director’s Guild of America and has notched some significant credits during his Hollywood career. Administrative assistant on The Conversation. Part of the casting department for Apocalypse Now. Longtime first assistant director on Seinfeld. Work on The Blues Brothers, The Godfather II and more.

    But the one project that Carter regrets never working on is a script he wrote that got optioned twice but was never produced. It’s about the summer a then-17-year-old Carter and thousands of American teenage boys heeded the call of the federal government … to work on farms.

    The year was 1965. On Cinco de Mayo, newspapers across the country reported that Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz wanted to recruit 20,000 high schoolers to replace the hundreds of thousands of Mexican agricultural workers who had labored in the United States under the so-called Bracero Program. Started in World War II, the program was an agreement between the American and Mexican governments that brought Mexican men to pick harvests across the U.S. It ended in 1964, after years of accusations by civil rights activists like Cesar Chavez that migrants suffered wage theft and terrible working and living conditions.

    But farmers complained — in words that echo today’s headlines — that Mexican laborers did the jobs that Americans didn’t want to do, and that the end of the Bracero Program meant that crops would rot in the fields.

    Wirtz cited this labor shortage and a lack of summer jobs for high schoolers as reason enough for the program. But he didn’t want just any band geek or nerd — he wanted jocks.

    “They can do the work,” Wirtz said at a press conference in Washington, D.C., announcing the creation of the project, called A-TEAM — Athletes in Temporary Employment as Agricultural Manpower. “They are entitled to a chance at it.” Standing beside him to lend gravitas were future Baseball Hall of Famers Stan Musial and Warren Spahn and future Pro Football Hall of Famer Jim Brown.

    Over the ensuing weeks, the Department of Labor, the Department of Agriculture, and the President’s Council on Physical Fitness bought ads on radio and in magazines to try to lure lettermen. “Farm Work Builds Men!” screamed one such promotion, which featured 1964 Heisman Trophy winner John Huarte….

  22. @Jack D
    So to question whether a man who speaks little or no English and who has a Facebook page under the name of Cristhian Bahena Rivera is really named "John Budd" is racist and illegal. Not only is it OK to look the other way but the law COMMANDS us to be stupid and ignore all common sense (at least according to the dairy farmer's lawyer). But if he told you that his name was Juan and you insisted on calling him John, that would be racist and illegal too.

    So to question whether a man who speaks little or no English and who has a Facebook page under the name of Cristhian Bahena Rivera is really named “John Budd” is racist and illegal. Not only is it OK to look the other way but the law COMMANDS us to be stupid and ignore all common sense (at least according to the dairy farmer’s lawyer). But if he told you that his name was Juan and you insisted on calling him John, that would be racist and illegal too.

    This sort of humiliation in getting you to assiduously ignore the obvious is as the kids say “a feature, not a bug.” They want you dispirited.

    We get in a back and forth with the left over immigration generally and their false statistics about illegal crime. But the higher rate of crime by illegals is almost besides the point – it’s the anarcho-tyranny of the the law touching every aspect of the average American’s life contrasted with the open lawlessness of the illegal immigration racket that drives normal people red with rage.

    • Agree: eah, Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Mike Krauthammer
    Blah blah blah. America's TFR is so low that it needs immigration. Most of the work in farms and other low skilled sectors is done by Immigrants from Latin America. You should think before commenting.
    , @anonymous

    We get in a back and forth with the left over immigration generally and their false statistics about illegal crime. But the higher rate of crime by illegals is almost besides the point – it’s the anarcho-tyranny of the the law touching every aspect of the average American’s life contrasted with the open lawlessness of the illegal immigration racket that drives normal people red with rage.
     
    Boy, is that well-put. Unfortunately most 'normal people' are enthralled by the entertainment/propaganda complex whose effects pretty much suffocate all normal human impulses.
    , @AnotherDad

    We get in a back and forth with the left over immigration generally and their false statistics about illegal crime. But the higher rate of crime by illegals is almost besides the point – it’s the anarcho-tyranny of the the law touching every aspect of the average American’s life contrasted with the open lawlessness of the illegal immigration racket that drives normal people red with rage.
     
    What Anonymous said--i.e. well said Alec.

    I have to obey the law and pay my taxes … to people who have open contempt and allow--heck encourage--utter lawlessness on immigration.

    Again--where's Trump? Let's have the election on exactly this issue.
    , @moshe
    Well yes, ignoring the sacred blood miraculously oozing forth from Christ is a perilous thing to do.

    https://people.com/bodies/transgender-activist-freebleed-men-can-menstruate/
    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    Another commendation for this post; it's very well-stated, Alec.

    This whole story certainly makes me borderline incoherent with fury, but these days I am not sure that makes me 'normal'.

    I talk to too many people who cannot grasp why the farcical, obscenely-unjust immigration situation in the USA is a problem.

    I try to explain the way it's worked for me, living in a foreign country, and how I've had to obey the law assiduously to avoid trouble. I get blank looks.

    I guess they really believe that the 'normal' rules do not -- and indeed should not and must not -- apply in the USA. We really are special.

    , @eah
    https://s26.postimg.cc/e35wn0a49/theodore_dalrymple_quote.jpg
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    AGREED with all the other folks agreeing, Mr. Leamas. I want to add something though. Because of that very anarcho-tyranny, the numbers on illegal alien crime are very inaccurate. I had Ron Unz himself graciously write me back under one of the articles telling me that his 100,000 words on the subject of hispanic crime rates beat anything VDare has to say about it.

    Hey, Mr. Unz is a very bright guy, and he can deal with numbers. However, you can do all the calculations you want, and write 100,000 words, but it's only as good as some basic inputs that common sense may tell you are bogus. Conviction rates of illegal aliens - how does that work? Jose gets busted, high-tails it to Mexico, and comes back next year as a guy named Hose-B. All the stolen identities gum up all the numbers.
  23. @Jack D
    So to question whether a man who speaks little or no English and who has a Facebook page under the name of Cristhian Bahena Rivera is really named "John Budd" is racist and illegal. Not only is it OK to look the other way but the law COMMANDS us to be stupid and ignore all common sense (at least according to the dairy farmer's lawyer). But if he told you that his name was Juan and you insisted on calling him John, that would be racist and illegal too.
  24. @Alec Leamas

    So to question whether a man who speaks little or no English and who has a Facebook page under the name of Cristhian Bahena Rivera is really named “John Budd” is racist and illegal. Not only is it OK to look the other way but the law COMMANDS us to be stupid and ignore all common sense (at least according to the dairy farmer’s lawyer). But if he told you that his name was Juan and you insisted on calling him John, that would be racist and illegal too.
     
    This sort of humiliation in getting you to assiduously ignore the obvious is as the kids say "a feature, not a bug." They want you dispirited.

    We get in a back and forth with the left over immigration generally and their false statistics about illegal crime. But the higher rate of crime by illegals is almost besides the point - it's the anarcho-tyranny of the the law touching every aspect of the average American's life contrasted with the open lawlessness of the illegal immigration racket that drives normal people red with rage.

    Blah blah blah. America’s TFR is so low that it needs immigration. Most of the work in farms and other low skilled sectors is done by Immigrants from Latin America. You should think before commenting.

    • Troll: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Blah blah blah. America’s TFR is so low that it needs immigration.
     
    Or perhaps America's TFR is low because of immigration. We don't need a high TFR anyway. Endless growth is the economic model of cancer. It doesn't work.

    You should have stopped at "blah blah blah" - it's the most insightful thing you said, idiot.
  25. Christhian Rivera =

    Rich hire variants.
    Has river trichina.
    His rich narrative.

    Christhian Bahena Rivera =

    Aha, vibrant hair enriches!

    “John Budd” has its own attractive connotations.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    lack of water - plants are 8 hours of dead. Toilet, anything, sucks, - don't do it.
  26. BUT: At some point it will be hilarious if they can not get an apartment/motel/license/car/rental/massage etc. without a credit card or cold cash…or a weird story.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    I wish Google could install: watching chumps being destroyed.
  27. @Lagertha
    BUT: At some point it will be hilarious if they can not get an apartment/motel/license/car/rental/massage etc. without a credit card or cold cash...or a weird story.

    I wish Google could install: watching chumps being destroyed.

  28. He has a girlfriend and a young daughter

    Well, gosh, give the dude a break, at least he managed to make a contribution to the next generation of Americans.

  29. @Reg Cæsar
    Christhian Rivera =

    Rich hire variants.
    Has river trichina.
    His rich narrative.

    Christhian Bahena Rivera =

    Aha, vibrant hair enriches!



    "John Budd" has its own attractive connotations.

    https://thumbs.dreamstime.com/z/flower-bed-original-made-toilet-49544628.jpg

    lack of water – plants are 8 hours of dead. Toilet, anything, sucks, – don’t do it.

  30. … Lori Chesser, an immigration employment lawyer advising the farm, said that companies cannot discriminate against workers based on how they look or how their names sound.

    Yeah, they can and they must. That’s the law.

  31. @Jack D
    So to question whether a man who speaks little or no English and who has a Facebook page under the name of Cristhian Bahena Rivera is really named "John Budd" is racist and illegal. Not only is it OK to look the other way but the law COMMANDS us to be stupid and ignore all common sense (at least according to the dairy farmer's lawyer). But if he told you that his name was Juan and you insisted on calling him John, that would be racist and illegal too.

    They probably thought he was a John Budd with better food.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    https://corporate.sonicdrivein.com/leadership/john-budd/
  32. Just a theory I came up with years ago. Could all these illegal workers with fake names and social security numbers be propping up that system. They work for years with no chance of collecting that money taken out of their checks automatically and the government not only knows it but encourages it on the sly.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    This falsehood has to die. When these illegals get to retirement age, they submit an affidavit to SSA stating that they have paid SSA taxes under such and such a name and SSN. Social Security is then legally required to pay them. Best part. SSA has no idea how old they really are.
    I have an acquaintance high up in SSA who let me know the real scoop.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    It's not just what JMcG wrote in reply, Dtbb. (I don't know all that he does about it.) When these illegal aliens get into the system with their fake identities, do you think they come out owing money to the IRS, or getting refunds? My friend worked at one of the quick-refund tax place for a few seasons. He told me that they come in giving names of all sorts of made-up dependents. Some may not be made up, but they live in Mexico. The government just buys all that stuff because Anarcho-tyranny. What's to stop these people from getting NOT ONLY their refunds, but their Earned Income Credit for making such low money.

    How can they live on such low money, you ask? Let me tell you, Dtbb: The American welfare state provides free WIC (food for kids, supposedly), cheap housing, and hospital care at the emergency room. That's being paid by working Americans' income, property, and sales taxes, oh and on their medical bills, per "muh Socialist healthcare, excuse me 'single payer'".

    I hope you don't feel any anger from me on this. I just got mad thinking about it all. I know about this stuff, Dtbb, from personal experience and from reading VDare.com for 15 years or so.
  33. I recently had a chat with an American girl. She passionately told me she’d read some book on how there were loads of types of intelligence. We all have a type. She then added that to make all children feel good we needed to just call them all intelligent as per her ‘theory’.

    This post reminds me of that. There is a concerted effort to make everyone amazing and special and everything good through pretense. Of course, to enforce pretense is to try to enforce ignorance of the real world, which is not sensible.

    Still, it is socially awkward, even when you’re on your own, to think and speak uncomfortable truths.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Anon
    That's the theory of multiple intelligences by Howard Gardner, a Harvard psychologist, as described in his non-peer reviewed popular book Frames of Mind. It's one of the more notorious "neuromyths," along with "learning styles" and "left/right brain theory."

    https://bigthink.com/neurobonkers/its-time-for-teachers-to-wake-up-to-neuromyths

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_of_multiple_intelligences

    Unlike things like IQ and five factor personality, multiple intelligences has no psychometric tests associated with it, and is just a guy coming up with a theory.

    In his book Real Education Charles Murray discusses multiple intelligences, seemingly favorably, in an early chapter. I thought Murray had lost his mind until I saw what he was doing. He wanted to show that it's silly and cruel to force-feed math and English to high school students who are just too low IQ to handle it. By temporarily seeming to endorse multiple intelligences, he could pick out Gardner's musical and athletic intelligences and observe that you don't force someone who is tone deaf to take years and years of music classes, and similarly with someone who is obviously not good at athletics, and he notes that nobody thinks it's weird or immoral to point out that people have different musical and athletic ability levels, so the same should be true for cognitive intelligence.

    Murray points out that three of Gardner's multiple intelligences are just IQ, since IQ measures the general intelligence factor underlying math, language, and several other skills. The other four or five "intelligences" are skills that are not intelligence.
  34. O/T

    This is the future that the Left wants:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=286&v=SeNUNPWqUF4

    Everything they do, they must beg permission from a hostile black government.

  35. anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alec Leamas

    So to question whether a man who speaks little or no English and who has a Facebook page under the name of Cristhian Bahena Rivera is really named “John Budd” is racist and illegal. Not only is it OK to look the other way but the law COMMANDS us to be stupid and ignore all common sense (at least according to the dairy farmer’s lawyer). But if he told you that his name was Juan and you insisted on calling him John, that would be racist and illegal too.
     
    This sort of humiliation in getting you to assiduously ignore the obvious is as the kids say "a feature, not a bug." They want you dispirited.

    We get in a back and forth with the left over immigration generally and their false statistics about illegal crime. But the higher rate of crime by illegals is almost besides the point - it's the anarcho-tyranny of the the law touching every aspect of the average American's life contrasted with the open lawlessness of the illegal immigration racket that drives normal people red with rage.

    We get in a back and forth with the left over immigration generally and their false statistics about illegal crime. But the higher rate of crime by illegals is almost besides the point – it’s the anarcho-tyranny of the the law touching every aspect of the average American’s life contrasted with the open lawlessness of the illegal immigration racket that drives normal people red with rage.

    Boy, is that well-put. Unfortunately most ‘normal people’ are enthralled by the entertainment/propaganda complex whose effects pretty much suffocate all normal human impulses.

    • Replies: @Detective Club
    What happens on TeeVee is real. What happens in the real world is open to conjecture.
  36. The two most powerful tools we could use to deter illegal immigration are electronic verification for employment and bio-metric ID. Both go hand in hand.The ironic thing is that they are also the most “humane” ways to get rid of them as well but TPTB will anything to make sure they never come to fruition.

    In some countries you simply cannot function without ‘papers’. If illegals could not work, travel, vote, rent an apartment, or conduct financial transactions such as banking or wiring money you would see them running for the border. There would be no deportation force, no splitting of families, and no pictures of people being rousted.

    For the ones who refused to leave we would still have ICE but it would become much easier to find the needles without the haystack.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Logan
    All true.

    However, a good many Americans, especially many conservatives, have a visceral objection to being routinely asked for their papers.

    A system that will effectively identify illegal aliens will require legal aliens and citizens to also carry papers to prove their status. No way around it.
  37. never buy the Christian label: charity & churches, or every denomination which are eager-beavers to beaver and roger their adolescents.

    • Replies: @Fred Boynton
    Predators go where the prey is. Always be suspicious of charities and churches or any religion, as well as teachers (particularly drama, music, non-STEM teachers), coaches, etc.... Anybody who wants to be around children who aren't their blood relatives should be regarded with suspicion.
    , @republic
    Only Christian church worth attending is the Orthodox Church.
  38. @Jack D
    So to question whether a man who speaks little or no English and who has a Facebook page under the name of Cristhian Bahena Rivera is really named "John Budd" is racist and illegal. Not only is it OK to look the other way but the law COMMANDS us to be stupid and ignore all common sense (at least according to the dairy farmer's lawyer). But if he told you that his name was Juan and you insisted on calling him John, that would be racist and illegal too.

    I can’t find the link, but I recall a few years back some firm in Nebraska was sued by the Obama administration under disparate impact, I believe, for requiring prospective employees to show their birth certificates. My recall of the details might be fuzzy, but the gist of it was the company was trying to avoid hiring illegals and the government sued them for it.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    These are the people pledging to abolish ICE, and who chant "No Borders, No Nations, F your Stupid Deportations" so that's pretty much par for the course.
  39. @istevefan
    I can't find the link, but I recall a few years back some firm in Nebraska was sued by the Obama administration under disparate impact, I believe, for requiring prospective employees to show their birth certificates. My recall of the details might be fuzzy, but the gist of it was the company was trying to avoid hiring illegals and the government sued them for it.

    These are the people pledging to abolish ICE, and who chant “No Borders, No Nations, F your Stupid Deportations” so that’s pretty much par for the course.

  40. One of the problems with diversity is that we are not all on the same team. In a homogeneous culture where everybody has a stake, the less able root for the more able because they will benefit by having the most competent people in right places. It is like being the worst player on a team that wins the world series. There is a spot on the hierarchy for everyone. But once that contract is broken, everybody becomes a potential competitor and everything is relative. Someone else’s success is a threat because they might leave you behind and someone’s failure is a threat to the rest because there is no reason to mitigate it and it can be used to drag other people down..

  41. @Jack D
    So to question whether a man who speaks little or no English and who has a Facebook page under the name of Cristhian Bahena Rivera is really named "John Budd" is racist and illegal. Not only is it OK to look the other way but the law COMMANDS us to be stupid and ignore all common sense (at least according to the dairy farmer's lawyer). But if he told you that his name was Juan and you insisted on calling him John, that would be racist and illegal too.

    In a decent and serious nation lawyer scum like this Lori Chesser, SJW scum like this Erica Johnson and greedy farmer scum like the Lang family would all be deported. We don’t need garbage like this in our nation.

    • Replies: @bomag

    would all be deported...
     
    Agree.
  42. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:

    ” … but the farm has said it used a different government service to confirm that the name and Social Security number matched. …”

    I went to the Register to confirm that thus endeth the paragraph. Where I also learned that the preceding paragraph snipped by Mr. Sailer reports that the farm’s manager initially claimed use of the E-Verify system, but had since apologized for this mistaken statement. Apparently, even at that, the Register doesn’t find pertinent the question, “Oh, which different government service was that?”

    This is a good example of how Establishment news media feed cowed Americans the ignorance they crave.

    Does anyone know the answer to my hypothetical reporter’s question?

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    Exactly. What is this 'different government service'? No one seems to care.
  43. OT: what does Mr. Sailer think about the recent brouhaha between Woodward and Trump, and the anonymous staffer who stirred up more dirt in his NYT Op-Ed?

    • Replies: @Lot
    Don't have time to list every clue I found, but I'd bet 2-1 it is Mattis for the reasons above.

    When I first read a short description of the article, my initial thought was the known disloyal McGahn or one of the Wall Street crew. But there is little about economics there, a lot about foreign policy and our allies being neglected.

    As for the content, I am cool with replacing Trump with Pence. When he was in the House, he co-sponsored bills to end the diversity visa lottery and end birthright citizenship.
  44. The farm did not use the government’s voluntary E-Verify system, which allows companies to verify the identity and immigration status of job applicants. …

    Mandatory E-verify. Seriously in this day and age this is downright trivial. Cell phone picture sent in with documents. Heck there are fingerprint apps now too–send those in. Banks process hundreds of millions of transactions a day. We can’t get the government to verify what–i’m guessing–around 100000 hirings a day?

    Where is Trump?

    Talking about some POS book? Omarosa? Spar with the weasels at the NYT all you like, but how about the job you were elected to do–Making America Great Again?

    • Agree: Digital Samizdat, densa
    • Replies: @Detective Club
    Trump could have declassified the 2016 FISA warrant long ago. He could have fired Sessions, Rosenstein, Mueller long ago. Trump was the best GOP candidate in 2016. As President in 2017 and 2018, not so much. Trump likes to play games while the country goes to Hell in a hand basket. For Trump, it's always been all about him and nothing but him. When he argues and tweets he is blissfully happy. The small important stuff bores him. He's fixated about what the Lefty press says about him when he shouldn't give a tinker's damn.
    https://youtu.be/OQrzrNDTa5w
    Still and all, Obama and Hillary were so bad you had to vote for Trump if you valued your stinkin' White hide. If the Dems take control of the House in Nov., Trump might finally see that there are better things to do in life besides Tweeting. One can only hope.
  45. @Alec Leamas

    So to question whether a man who speaks little or no English and who has a Facebook page under the name of Cristhian Bahena Rivera is really named “John Budd” is racist and illegal. Not only is it OK to look the other way but the law COMMANDS us to be stupid and ignore all common sense (at least according to the dairy farmer’s lawyer). But if he told you that his name was Juan and you insisted on calling him John, that would be racist and illegal too.
     
    This sort of humiliation in getting you to assiduously ignore the obvious is as the kids say "a feature, not a bug." They want you dispirited.

    We get in a back and forth with the left over immigration generally and their false statistics about illegal crime. But the higher rate of crime by illegals is almost besides the point - it's the anarcho-tyranny of the the law touching every aspect of the average American's life contrasted with the open lawlessness of the illegal immigration racket that drives normal people red with rage.

    We get in a back and forth with the left over immigration generally and their false statistics about illegal crime. But the higher rate of crime by illegals is almost besides the point – it’s the anarcho-tyranny of the the law touching every aspect of the average American’s life contrasted with the open lawlessness of the illegal immigration racket that drives normal people red with rage.

    What Anonymous said–i.e. well said Alec.

    I have to obey the law and pay my taxes … to people who have open contempt and allow–heck encourage–utter lawlessness on immigration.

    Again–where’s Trump? Let’s have the election on exactly this issue.

  46. Anon[449] • Disclaimer says:
    @Tyrion 2
    I recently had a chat with an American girl. She passionately told me she'd read some book on how there were loads of types of intelligence. We all have a type. She then added that to make all children feel good we needed to just call them all intelligent as per her 'theory'.

    This post reminds me of that. There is a concerted effort to make everyone amazing and special and everything good through pretense. Of course, to enforce pretense is to try to enforce ignorance of the real world, which is not sensible.

    Still, it is socially awkward, even when you're on your own, to think and speak uncomfortable truths.

    That’s the theory of multiple intelligences by Howard Gardner, a Harvard psychologist, as described in his non-peer reviewed popular book Frames of Mind. It’s one of the more notorious “neuromyths,” along with “learning styles” and “left/right brain theory.”

    https://bigthink.com/neurobonkers/its-time-for-teachers-to-wake-up-to-neuromyths

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_of_multiple_intelligences

    Unlike things like IQ and five factor personality, multiple intelligences has no psychometric tests associated with it, and is just a guy coming up with a theory.

    In his book Real Education Charles Murray discusses multiple intelligences, seemingly favorably, in an early chapter. I thought Murray had lost his mind until I saw what he was doing. He wanted to show that it’s silly and cruel to force-feed math and English to high school students who are just too low IQ to handle it. By temporarily seeming to endorse multiple intelligences, he could pick out Gardner’s musical and athletic intelligences and observe that you don’t force someone who is tone deaf to take years and years of music classes, and similarly with someone who is obviously not good at athletics, and he notes that nobody thinks it’s weird or immoral to point out that people have different musical and athletic ability levels, so the same should be true for cognitive intelligence.

    Murray points out that three of Gardner’s multiple intelligences are just IQ, since IQ measures the general intelligence factor underlying math, language, and several other skills. The other four or five “intelligences” are skills that are not intelligence.

  47. @Alec Leamas

    So to question whether a man who speaks little or no English and who has a Facebook page under the name of Cristhian Bahena Rivera is really named “John Budd” is racist and illegal. Not only is it OK to look the other way but the law COMMANDS us to be stupid and ignore all common sense (at least according to the dairy farmer’s lawyer). But if he told you that his name was Juan and you insisted on calling him John, that would be racist and illegal too.
     
    This sort of humiliation in getting you to assiduously ignore the obvious is as the kids say "a feature, not a bug." They want you dispirited.

    We get in a back and forth with the left over immigration generally and their false statistics about illegal crime. But the higher rate of crime by illegals is almost besides the point - it's the anarcho-tyranny of the the law touching every aspect of the average American's life contrasted with the open lawlessness of the illegal immigration racket that drives normal people red with rage.

    Well yes, ignoring the sacred blood miraculously oozing forth from Christ is a perilous thing to do.

    https://people.com/bodies/transgender-activist-freebleed-men-can-menstruate/

  48. I think it is Mattis who wrote the NYT op ed.

    Right now speculation is on Pence because of the word lodestar. No way!

    General Clues:

    1. Author has a high opinion of McCain.
    2. Author speaks proudly of how Trump admin people ignore him on foreign policy matters.
    3. Author does not appear to be part of the Bannon-Sessions-Miller restrictionism first wing of the Trump admin.
    4. Author is well read, and has the verbal tics of a high-IQ military guy.
    5. Author is hostile to Russia (Mattis is more worried, correctly, by Islam and China, but is def anti-Putin too).

    Textual Clues -
    6. Mattis just used the “democratic institutions” phrase in the op-ed. (March 21 2018 press conference)
    7. The op-ed uses the fancy “Ours is” locution. Mattis did the same in April 2018 in comments after meeting the Dutch defense minister: “300 years after the Treaty of Utrecht, we know ours is a world”
    8. Mattis gave an implied rejection of Trump’s anti-press comment, talking about how he swore to uphold the first amendment.
    9. Both Mattis and the Op-Ed use “working diligently.” Mattis on June 8 speaking with the Nato SecGen in Belguim.

    The first group of clues led me to Kelly and Mattis. But one after another I found Mattis tics in the Op Ed, but not anything to indicate Kelly.

    I scanned some speeches from both. The overall style of both and the op-ed again say high IQ general. But Mattis has more of a grand and academic style, much like the op-ed.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    You might be right with your sleuthing. All things considered Mattis will not care about the Deep State one way or another. He is numb to it. He has been seeing it in action for years as multi billion dollar contracts for useless weapons system get doled out to those Fed. contractors (read Lockheed and other huge corps) with the best lobbyists and Senators and Reps in their stable.
    , @anonymous
    You may indeed be correct--I certainly don't know. But what I do know is that NYT editors work pretty intensively on op-eds before publication. I can't say that they're always supremely competent, and I can't say that they work as intensively with one contributor as with another, but they do watch what gets put out in front of the public very carefully.
    , @Alec Leamas
    It's almost certainly someone whose name and position you've never heard.

    "Lodestar" is a legal term of art in Federal litigation practice in fee shifting cases. My guess is that the author is law-trained.

    The rote recitation of principles of Chamber of Commerce style "conservatism" leads me to believe that the author has served in a past GOP administration (a Bushie), or had been a Congressional staffer for a GOP member of congress. The author was and remains "Never Trump" but is a careerist who insinuated himself or herself into the administration for the typical careerist reasons.
  49. Is there any chance this NYT op ed hit job is parody? Godfrey Elfwick’s Sistine Chapel?

  50. @anonymous
    " ... but the farm has said it used a different government service to confirm that the name and Social Security number matched. …"

    I went to the Register to confirm that thus endeth the paragraph. Where I also learned that the preceding paragraph snipped by Mr. Sailer reports that the farm's manager initially claimed use of the E-Verify system, but had since apologized for this mistaken statement. Apparently, even at that, the Register doesn't find pertinent the question, "Oh, which different government service was that?"

    This is a good example of how Establishment news media feed cowed Americans the ignorance they crave.

    Does anyone know the answer to my hypothetical reporter's question?

    Exactly. What is this ‘different government service’? No one seems to care.

  51. Pointing out that an American was murdered by an illegal living in our country for years using an obviously fake name is a racist narrative and anyone mentioning it needs to be shamed for hijacking a completely unpreventable tragedy to advocate any kind of enforcement of our immigration laws.

    On the other hand, using it to promote a narrative about the “precarious position that immigrant workers and their employers face” due to the fact that “We have an immigration system that doesn’t account for the labor needs or economic realities of Iowa businesses and farms,” is an acceptable interpretation of the facts.

  52. @Alec Leamas

    So to question whether a man who speaks little or no English and who has a Facebook page under the name of Cristhian Bahena Rivera is really named “John Budd” is racist and illegal. Not only is it OK to look the other way but the law COMMANDS us to be stupid and ignore all common sense (at least according to the dairy farmer’s lawyer). But if he told you that his name was Juan and you insisted on calling him John, that would be racist and illegal too.
     
    This sort of humiliation in getting you to assiduously ignore the obvious is as the kids say "a feature, not a bug." They want you dispirited.

    We get in a back and forth with the left over immigration generally and their false statistics about illegal crime. But the higher rate of crime by illegals is almost besides the point - it's the anarcho-tyranny of the the law touching every aspect of the average American's life contrasted with the open lawlessness of the illegal immigration racket that drives normal people red with rage.

    Another commendation for this post; it’s very well-stated, Alec.

    This whole story certainly makes me borderline incoherent with fury, but these days I am not sure that makes me ‘normal’.

    I talk to too many people who cannot grasp why the farcical, obscenely-unjust immigration situation in the USA is a problem.

    I try to explain the way it’s worked for me, living in a foreign country, and how I’ve had to obey the law assiduously to avoid trouble. I get blank looks.

    I guess they really believe that the ‘normal’ rules do not — and indeed should not and must not — apply in the USA. We really are special.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    America wasn't always like this. I remember talking about the immigration process with my parents, who came to the US in the early '50s. After the war, there was a special quota opened for refugees (not just Jews - a lot of Ukrainian and German ethnic Nazi collaborators got in too) but there were still many hoops that you had to jump through (pretty much the same process that exists for legal immigrants today) - there was an extensive application and an interview and you needed to have a sponsor and a clean record, etc. BTW, if you were a male of draft age, as soon as you arrived you were drafted. Some of their friends didn't make it thru the process and ended up having to go to Australia or Israel. The idea that you could just walk across the border and buy some obviously phony papers and you were in was unthinkable.
  53. @Escher
    OT: what does Mr. Sailer think about the recent brouhaha between Woodward and Trump, and the anonymous staffer who stirred up more dirt in his NYT Op-Ed?

    Don’t have time to list every clue I found, but I’d bet 2-1 it is Mattis for the reasons above.

    When I first read a short description of the article, my initial thought was the known disloyal McGahn or one of the Wall Street crew. But there is little about economics there, a lot about foreign policy and our allies being neglected.

    As for the content, I am cool with replacing Trump with Pence. When he was in the House, he co-sponsored bills to end the diversity visa lottery and end birthright citizenship.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    https://www.businessinsider.com/lodestar-trump-resistance-op-ed-new-york-times-who-wrote-2018-9

    But it has also been reported in the past that staffers who give the press anonymous quotes sometimes use idioms or phrases often employed by other members of the Trump administration to throw the president off.

    "To cover my tracks, I usually pay attention to other staffers' idioms and use that in my background quotes. That throws the scent off me," a White House official told Axios in May.
     
    , @anonymous
    Speaking of odds, you do know that real odds are being laid, just off-shore?

    https://nypost.com/2018/09/05/bookies-place-odds-on-anonymous-white-house-official/

    It's kind of fun, in an end-of-empire sort of way. Après nous, le deluge.

    I bet that 'lodestar' is a decoy. Mattis: short, never married, no kids, Catholic. Hmm.

  54. And you’ve also got Billy Budd, the opera by Benjamin Britten, and Roy Budd, the late, distinguished English composer of film music, most notably the haunting theme music of the original (1971) ‘Get Carter’ movie.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    To all you railroad buffs out there, the haunting theme sequence of the 1971 Get Carter movie is notable in featuring an English Electric Deltic Diesel locomotive - the finest Diesel locomotive ever to feature on Britain's railroads. The loco was distinguished by its exceptionally high power/weight two stroke diesel engine with cylinders aligned in a 'D' or delta shape. It was originally a marine diesel engine for warships. Manufactured by that great and ancient English engineering firm of Napier - a firm which had roots in the 1700s, and whose nameplate graced the sides of the Deltic.

    The good old days. The 1970s the last decade in which England was still great and still English. The decade of Ted Heath, coal strikes and the scandals of Lords Lucan and Lambton.

    Nothing like a bit of nostalgia.

    Some kind soul, please post the YouTube video.
  55. @The Anti-Gnostic

    “Absent unusual circumstances, it would be difficult to show they knew any more than what they were told,” Teig said, adding that it would be “pretty racist” to assume a John Budd could not be Hispanic.
     
    An adult man actually believes this.

    An adult man actually believes this.

    Does he really, or is he faking it? The future of the West may hinge on the answer to that single question.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Does he really, or is he faking it? The future of the West may hinge on the answer to that single question.
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vn_PSJsl0LQ
  56. I retweeted the “Have you seen her?” tweet about Mollie Tibbetts when she went missing, and as much as I didn’t want it to be the case, my immediate assumption was that she’d been killed by an illegal alien, since there’d been enough similar cases.

    Illegal aliens attacking young white women out jogging seems to be a trend that’s never named as one. Have any sociologists or criminologists studied it? The earliest case that comes to mind is the murder of Chandra Levy, around the turn of the millennium, but I remember reading about a case in Colorado somewhere, one in California, etc.

    What drives it? Rivera had a girlfriend, albeit a non-thin Latina – is it a Portnoy-style desire to shtup a representative of the dominant ethnic group, without knowing enough English to woo them? Is it rage at being part of a helot class that white women don’t acknowledge as potential mates?

    • Replies: @Logan
    Is it rage at being part of a helot class that white women don’t acknowledge as potential mates?

    I have a theory along these lines that is wildly unpopular.

    In the old days, a young woman propositioned by a man could tell him, "I'm not that kind of girl." This "let him down easy," as she was, or claimed to be, rejecting all illicit sexual activity, not the man himself as being unworthy of being considered a potential mate.

    This still works, to some extent, for a married woman. But media universally portrays single young women as being eager to immediately jump into bed with any sexually attractive man they meet.

    So, any refusal by a young woman to do so immediately becomes an intensely personal rejection of the man as a person. Such rejection often, not unreasonably, is responded to with anger. I would assume the anger is intensified when he assumes the rejection is based on his race or ethnicity.

    BTW, what a loser this guy is! I frequently approach random young women while they're jogging, and they almost always disappear into the weeds with me for a little afternoon delight. /s

  57. @Rajkumar Rao
    I was born in the late 1940s to an immigrant family from India and turned 12 in 1960. First, there were two 1960s; 1960 thru 1963/64 and then beyond. The first three years were a continuation of the 1950s, no real difference. I don’t recall ‘Duck and Cover’ in the 60s, that may have been a 50s thing. Rock and Roll was in a tailspin, all we were getting was Frankie Avalon, Fabian and such. Some of the ‘doo-wop’ groups were still there but the hard rockers weren’t around. Plastic was the thing, everything was covered in plastic. The new space age material. I asked my Mom once why she covered everything in vinyl. She laffed and said, it was the thing everyone was doing. There was no AC. The only place you could find AC was in a movie theatre. JFK was President and the press loved him in the way that they loved Barack Obama. For most of the press he could do no wrong, nor could Jackie or any of the Kennedys. The press had endless stories of touch football at the Kennedy compound, The Kennedy children and the Kennedy brothers. So everybody played touch football too. Viet Nam was still a distant police action; it did get press coverage but it was mostly of the Viet-Namese. American cars ruled. Automotive engineering was a different world from today. The things were fucking hugh and ran like Giant sloths. Bench seats front and rear that could fit a family of nine w/o a hitch. Gee, I loved those seats. Plus I was small enuff to ride in the shelf under the rear window. The National Highway system was copied from the Nazis and had just got under way under Eisenhower. So when you drove inter-city or inter-state it was on two lane blacktops for much or all of the way. Air travel was just beginning and people still traveled by train. Imagine telling your friends today that you’re taking a train to California or New York. Air travel was a different world from today. Every passenger was treated like a prince or princess. And the staff all had Hollywood good looks. BTW, no searching or security at all. I remember (latter 60s) buying a ticket at the airport and walking on to the flight. Often we got to walk onto the tarmac to board. All the staff smiling and greeting us like we were royalty. Smoking was allowed everywhere and the booze flowed on the flights. Folks dressed to fly. It was an occasion. The only foreign cars I recall from the early 60s was the occasional VW beetle or Mercede Benz. Japanese cars are still in the future- at least on the east coast. Back on the ground, there were supermarkets (remember I’m a city kid) but not as large as today. I remember we did much of our food shopping at neighborhood stores. A loaf of bread was 15 Cents, a hamburger at a local restaurant was 25 cents. A pack of cigarettes was 21 cents. And a newspaper was 4 cents. I remember some of these prices because as a kid I was often sent to a store to buy these items. My Mom would go to the A&P and buy a week or two of groceries for about $20. The groceries would be loaded into one or two big, paper bags which it was my job to carry. The big grocery chains in NY then were A&P and Bohacks. Latter there was a cute girl teenager cashier at the Bohacks who would let me buy any amount of stuff for the price of one item. How did I ever fuck that up. A pair of Clarks Desert Boots was about $5. In NYC, nobody wore blue jeans; That was farmers’ clothes; That’s gonna change soon. A 45 RPM record (top 10) was about 50 cents. Elvis was no longer on the charts as he had been drafted. Many young men went into the army or other military as there was still a draft of two years active duty. Fellows would volunteer for the draft to get it out of the way. But you could only volunteer for the draft in the army. There was no draft for other branches of the military. Racism was alive and very healthy. God save the poor black man that ventured into a white neighborhood. I have spoken to many black men, my age, that told me they would turn down jobs or other opportunities rather then venture into some white or ethnic areas. And the reverse was true. I remember being told not to go into certain black neighborhoods and recall being stopped once by a group of young blacks about something but nothing came of it, I was about 11 or 12. In NYC, at least, suburban flight was beginning, and every once in a while a friend or relative would move to the suburbs- never to be seen again. It was also the beginning of traffic jams. We played in the streets and parks all day and well into the night. Me? As long as I was home for dinner I was cool. It was not unusual to be out with your friends all day. Seeing your parents for the evening meal and then out again. Also, this was when extended families lived nearby so you had cousins and friends all around. Then JFK was shot and a month latter came The Beatles. LBJ was President and Viet Nam loomed ahead. Everything Changed. When JFK was shot it was a week of national mourning. Think 9/11. Everything closed, except churches. All schools, businesses, gov’t offices, etc. TV was Black and white and it was 15 hours or so of news coverage of the assassination, funeral, transfer of power. BTW there was no 24 hour TV back then. Everyone was solemn, no joking around and everyone in the country assumed that everyone in Dallas was guilty to some degree. Premarital sex was still a big no man’s land. As a teenager, we would dream about making-out or coping a feel. Holding a breast while while making out was heaven and you had to work for it. Weeks and months of being the BF. Finger-fucking was always beyond me. If your girl got pregnant, you got married that week. Dropped out of high school and got a job. Every year there was a couple that disappeared and folks would whisper that some girl was in ‘trouble’. Then came the Beatles and everything changed. Then Civil rights protest, and Viet Nam. Now begins the 60s people talk about. 77.8k Views · What did it feel like to live in the '60s? What was it like to grow up in the 1960s? How was life in the 60s in the USA? How well has Mad Men depicted the life of Americans in the 60s? What was life like in the Netherlands during the 60s? In the early sixties I lived in Virginia at Ft. Meyer. Andy Griffith show and lots of westerns. Everything was still very clean and family orientated in a weird way. If you didn’t want there to be S E X in the show you had widowers. Bonanza, My Three Sons, Mayberry. Then we moved to Hawaii. Skateboards and surfing songs. The Beatles were just becoming big. Viet Nam was stirring. JFK got killed and they had his funeral for days on every channel. Interstates were just being built. We drove across country on highways including route 66, Medgar Evers was murdered. A Black sgt in my neighbor hood threatened the people who owned the car from Mississippi. My mother told me to never tell anyone I was from Miss. We moved to Louisiana and the Viet Nam war started appearing on the six o’clock news. People trusted Walter Cronkite, Chet Huntley and David Brinkley. The music was still friendly…Jimmy Mack, Paul Revere and the Raiders, the Rollingstones. There were riots on TV, cities burning, and Dr, King was murdered. Then Bobby Kennedy. The music changed. If you’re going to San Francisco, be sure to wear some flowers in your hair….until Altamont. Then all those hippies started getting hooked on heroin and free love became less free. My Dad went to Viet Nam and we moved to Miss. I was so ought of place, but I loved my grandparents and could have lived on their farm. Woodstock and Alice’s Restaurant. Jimmy Hendrix opened for the Monkees…..Dark Shadows was what all the young folks watched. Where the Action Is! Soul Train! Hullabaloo, Laugh In. They Call Me Mellow Yellow. We All Live in a Yellow Submarine! Strawberry Fields Forever. Then one night I was listening to the radio while in bed. I heard Jimmy Mack and then Knight in Rusted Armor and I knew something just died. An era, an innocence that was never coming back. From now on it was We were flying low, hit something in the air! InnaGodadavida. Gonna be a hooker on Bleaker Street. I was eighteen when the sixties ended. 1.4k Views · Originally Answered: What was life like in the 1960s? I was born in 1965; so my experience was limited. I also can only answer about the USA but here goes. Median household income: lower than today, but growing. Fruits and vegetables were still largely seasonal. Portions in restaurants were smaller. People did not mind as long as raises came through every year. Less privacy. Houses were smaller measured by square footage. Moreover, the privacy was mostly for parents. I can remember growing up in a three-bedroom house. My parents had the brilliant idea of putting my brother and I in the same bedroom but then setting aside the spare bedroom for toys. Not surprisingly, my brother and I often fought like cats and dogs. Technology. Our house had two phones. Neither cordless. No computers. Really rich business people had phones in their cars; these were radios. I ran into one guy who hated having to add a car phone in the mid 1980s when cell phones came out; he missed the quiet when he drove. Cars were big and heavy. I think fifteen miles per gallon was good. Gas was cheap — I remember when people howled because gas hit $0.50 per gallon. I remember my folks getting a new car roughly every five years usually because they did not engage in regular maintenance. I take much better care of a car today and my 2005 Ford Taurus with 147,000 miles runs better than my old man’s cars with fewer than 50,000 miles. It helps that I check my Grease Monkey Sticker and know when to bring the car in for regular service. Retail was more expensive with higher margins. Kmart was the only big discounter and it was almost as bad then as it is today. Department stores had 100% margins. Skipping around, I remember spending more on a suit in 1985 (okay my grandparents bought it for my debating tournaments) than I pay today; of course the material and fit were both a little better then. Television. Three big networks. Local television added PBS and a few local independent stations showing reruns. Cartoons were a few hours in the afternoon and Sunday mornings. With one color television in the house (if you were lucky) you watched what dad or grandpop picked. Travel. I did not leave the USA at this time. Every year, however, we picked up my successful grandparents at the airport. Every year, they took a tour-group vacation. Since my grandfather had been working since he was 10 years old, it is hard to be jealous. Americans abroad were treated like gods — provided they stick to the safe tours in friendly countries. Less precision. I remember as a kid Burger King’s “Have it Your Way“ slogan. In those pre-computer days, forget it. My brother was a picky eater, and the fast-food restaurant inevitably got his order wrong. A scene inevitably ensued. Thanks for the A2A, Jai 12k Views · · Answer requested by Light, refreshing, idealistic, hopeful, and fun. In 1966 I hitch hiked to LA and hung out with the other hippies on the strip, indulging in the hedonism of sex, drugs, and rock and roll. It was a wonderful life for an 18-year old. I went to college and got a little more serious without losing those previous activities. The civil rights movement, supporting women’s liberation, and anti-war demonstrations were hopeful struggles to make the country and the world a better place. Although we failed to completely change the world in that decade we at least established efforts that are still on-going to improve the world we live in. Having aged considerably since then has moderated my raw hedonism and recklessness, but not changed my desire for and participation in the same efforts. And I may be old now, at least I got to see all the best bands live.

    This looks like an interesting post, but I stopped reading about a third of the way through because no paragraphs.

  58. Anonymous[320] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    And you've also got Billy Budd, the opera by Benjamin Britten, and Roy Budd, the late, distinguished English composer of film music, most notably the haunting theme music of the original (1971) 'Get Carter' movie.

    To all you railroad buffs out there, the haunting theme sequence of the 1971 Get Carter movie is notable in featuring an English Electric Deltic Diesel locomotive – the finest Diesel locomotive ever to feature on Britain’s railroads. The loco was distinguished by its exceptionally high power/weight two stroke diesel engine with cylinders aligned in a ‘D’ or delta shape. It was originally a marine diesel engine for warships. Manufactured by that great and ancient English engineering firm of Napier – a firm which had roots in the 1700s, and whose nameplate graced the sides of the Deltic.

    The good old days. The 1970s the last decade in which England was still great and still English. The decade of Ted Heath, coal strikes and the scandals of Lords Lucan and Lambton.

    Nothing like a bit of nostalgia.

    Some kind soul, please post the YouTube video.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    It's hard to visualize a Deltic engine (and even harder to imagine that it actually worked):

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Napier_Deltic#/media/File:Napier_Deltic_Animation.gif

    You'll note that there are 3 crankshafts ( 2 turning clockwise and 1 counterclockwise). The 3 crankshafts have to be geared to each other. And that's just for one cylinder bank - typically an engine would have several banks.

    These engines were so finicky to get sorted that the usual policy when they needed service was to swap them out and send the broken engine back to the manufacturer. They were the kind of thing that ran great when everything was perfectly aligned but if anything was the least bit off it would all go to hell. Thus they were never a big seller.
    , @res

    Some kind soul, please post the YouTube video.
     
    Here you go. Thanks for the background.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhisIT_CuQ8
  59. “Hola… I am… Dan Halen.”

  60. In an ethnostate — you know, as intended by the Founding Fathers — this would not have been a problem: he would have stuck out like a sore thumb.

    …and they believed he was the person depicted in those documents until his arrest last month.

    OK then — an honest mistake.

    I wonder if the Davis Brown Law Firm will update Ms Chesser’s profile:

    When employers identify a foreign national as the best candidate for the job, they count on Lori’s guidance navigating the immigration maze. Lori has assisted organizations hiring scientists, investors, entrepreneurs, researchers, doctors, artists, religious workers, athletes, and other professionals to legally live and work in the United States.

  61. @Lot
    I think it is Mattis who wrote the NYT op ed.

    Right now speculation is on Pence because of the word lodestar. No way!

    General Clues:

    1. Author has a high opinion of McCain.
    2. Author speaks proudly of how Trump admin people ignore him on foreign policy matters.
    3. Author does not appear to be part of the Bannon-Sessions-Miller restrictionism first wing of the Trump admin.
    4. Author is well read, and has the verbal tics of a high-IQ military guy.
    5. Author is hostile to Russia (Mattis is more worried, correctly, by Islam and China, but is def anti-Putin too).

    Textual Clues -
    6. Mattis just used the "democratic institutions" phrase in the op-ed. (March 21 2018 press conference)
    7. The op-ed uses the fancy "Ours is" locution. Mattis did the same in April 2018 in comments after meeting the Dutch defense minister: "300 years after the Treaty of Utrecht, we know ours is a world"
    8. Mattis gave an implied rejection of Trump's anti-press comment, talking about how he swore to uphold the first amendment.
    9. Both Mattis and the Op-Ed use "working diligently." Mattis on June 8 speaking with the Nato SecGen in Belguim.

    The first group of clues led me to Kelly and Mattis. But one after another I found Mattis tics in the Op Ed, but not anything to indicate Kelly.

    I scanned some speeches from both. The overall style of both and the op-ed again say high IQ general. But Mattis has more of a grand and academic style, much like the op-ed.

    You might be right with your sleuthing. All things considered Mattis will not care about the Deep State one way or another. He is numb to it. He has been seeing it in action for years as multi billion dollar contracts for useless weapons system get doled out to those Fed. contractors (read Lockheed and other huge corps) with the best lobbyists and Senators and Reps in their stable.

    • Replies: @Lot
    I think I have a 70% chance of being right. Surprised nobody else is pushing this theory. Everyone else is obsessed with "lodestar." By itself, sure it points to Pence who used the term a lot.

    Every other clue says general and the phrase analysis says Mattis. Would Pence make a big point point out of praising McCain? No way, Pence is a hard core Tea Party faction guy, who largely hated McCain. The Pence-ists are clearly wrong.
  62. a dairy farm operation owned by a prominent Republican family

    Back in the day, I used to refer to people like this – contemptuously – as “pocketbook Republicans.”

    • Replies: @Carbon blob
    I'm curious to know how much this farm receives in government subsidies.
  63. @Twinkie

    a dairy farm operation owned by a prominent Republican family
     
    Back in the day, I used to refer to people like this - contemptuously - as “pocketbook Republicans.”

    I’m curious to know how much this farm receives in government subsidies.

  64. @Lot
    Don't have time to list every clue I found, but I'd bet 2-1 it is Mattis for the reasons above.

    When I first read a short description of the article, my initial thought was the known disloyal McGahn or one of the Wall Street crew. But there is little about economics there, a lot about foreign policy and our allies being neglected.

    As for the content, I am cool with replacing Trump with Pence. When he was in the House, he co-sponsored bills to end the diversity visa lottery and end birthright citizenship.

    https://www.businessinsider.com/lodestar-trump-resistance-op-ed-new-york-times-who-wrote-2018-9

    But it has also been reported in the past that staffers who give the press anonymous quotes sometimes use idioms or phrases often employed by other members of the Trump administration to throw the president off.

    “To cover my tracks, I usually pay attention to other staffers’ idioms and use that in my background quotes. That throws the scent off me,” a White House official told Axios in May.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    Thanks. Pretty firm documentation of the 'decoy' claim.
  65. @The Last Real Calvinist

    An adult man actually believes this.

     

    Does he really, or is he faking it? The future of the West may hinge on the answer to that single question.

    Does he really, or is he faking it? The future of the West may hinge on the answer to that single question.

  66. @Mike Krauthammer
    A majority of the White Women i have seen in California are dating either a Black guy or a Hispanic and they are not fat and obese as Most of the Cucks on this Website would like to claim. White “man” cannot compete with Black Men or other Men of Color in the sexual marketplace. Men of Color are strong creative disciplined athletic and have fought their whole lives white men are weak dull effeminate clumsy and play video games Is it any wonder that white girls crave Black Men? FACT IS THAT DAYS OF RACISM ARE OVER AND I AM HALF JEWISH., MY ANCESTORS FACED ANTI SEMITISM(which will be over) AS WELL. I WANT SOMEBODY TO REFUTE MY ARGUMENTS.

    A majority of the White Women i have seen in California are dating either a Black guy

    Specifically, he’s referring to Van Vuys and Chattsworth, and “dating.”

    • Replies: @Skyler
    They know who has the Blow.
  67. The dumbass Whites in this country have caused this problem.

  68. anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot
    I think it is Mattis who wrote the NYT op ed.

    Right now speculation is on Pence because of the word lodestar. No way!

    General Clues:

    1. Author has a high opinion of McCain.
    2. Author speaks proudly of how Trump admin people ignore him on foreign policy matters.
    3. Author does not appear to be part of the Bannon-Sessions-Miller restrictionism first wing of the Trump admin.
    4. Author is well read, and has the verbal tics of a high-IQ military guy.
    5. Author is hostile to Russia (Mattis is more worried, correctly, by Islam and China, but is def anti-Putin too).

    Textual Clues -
    6. Mattis just used the "democratic institutions" phrase in the op-ed. (March 21 2018 press conference)
    7. The op-ed uses the fancy "Ours is" locution. Mattis did the same in April 2018 in comments after meeting the Dutch defense minister: "300 years after the Treaty of Utrecht, we know ours is a world"
    8. Mattis gave an implied rejection of Trump's anti-press comment, talking about how he swore to uphold the first amendment.
    9. Both Mattis and the Op-Ed use "working diligently." Mattis on June 8 speaking with the Nato SecGen in Belguim.

    The first group of clues led me to Kelly and Mattis. But one after another I found Mattis tics in the Op Ed, but not anything to indicate Kelly.

    I scanned some speeches from both. The overall style of both and the op-ed again say high IQ general. But Mattis has more of a grand and academic style, much like the op-ed.

    You may indeed be correct–I certainly don’t know. But what I do know is that NYT editors work pretty intensively on op-eds before publication. I can’t say that they’re always supremely competent, and I can’t say that they work as intensively with one contributor as with another, but they do watch what gets put out in front of the public very carefully.

  69. @Lot
    Don't have time to list every clue I found, but I'd bet 2-1 it is Mattis for the reasons above.

    When I first read a short description of the article, my initial thought was the known disloyal McGahn or one of the Wall Street crew. But there is little about economics there, a lot about foreign policy and our allies being neglected.

    As for the content, I am cool with replacing Trump with Pence. When he was in the House, he co-sponsored bills to end the diversity visa lottery and end birthright citizenship.

    Speaking of odds, you do know that real odds are being laid, just off-shore?

    https://nypost.com/2018/09/05/bookies-place-odds-on-anonymous-white-house-official/

    It’s kind of fun, in an end-of-empire sort of way. Après nous, le deluge.

    I bet that ‘lodestar’ is a decoy. Mattis: short, never married, no kids, Catholic. Hmm.

  70. Billy Budd would have been a more poignant name-choice.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Billy Budd would have been a more poignant name-choice.
     
    Billy Budd killed a sadistic creep in a fit of anger. This guy murdered a young woman.

    Bigger Thomas would have been a better fake-name for him.
  71. @MEH 0910
    https://www.businessinsider.com/lodestar-trump-resistance-op-ed-new-york-times-who-wrote-2018-9

    But it has also been reported in the past that staffers who give the press anonymous quotes sometimes use idioms or phrases often employed by other members of the Trump administration to throw the president off.

    "To cover my tracks, I usually pay attention to other staffers' idioms and use that in my background quotes. That throws the scent off me," a White House official told Axios in May.
     

    Thanks. Pretty firm documentation of the ‘decoy’ claim.

  72. @Mike Krauthammer
    A majority of the White Women i have seen in California are dating either a Black guy or a Hispanic and they are not fat and obese as Most of the Cucks on this Website would like to claim. White “man” cannot compete with Black Men or other Men of Color in the sexual marketplace. Men of Color are strong creative disciplined athletic and have fought their whole lives white men are weak dull effeminate clumsy and play video games Is it any wonder that white girls crave Black Men? FACT IS THAT DAYS OF RACISM ARE OVER AND I AM HALF JEWISH., MY ANCESTORS FACED ANTI SEMITISM(which will be over) AS WELL. I WANT SOMEBODY TO REFUTE MY ARGUMENTS.

    I WANT SOMEBODY TO REFUTE MY ARGUMENTS.

    I WANT SOMEONE TO TEACH YOU PROPER GRAMMAR.

    • Replies: @tyrone
    It's tiny duck and he's trying his best.
  73. @Space Ghost
    It's quite disingenuous of them to claim that the "only" thing they can do is check that the name and social security number match, without resorting to evil discrimination. How about they check: Is John Budd with the given SSN alive? Is he employed already? Does he live within a reasonable distance of the employer? Is he receiving disability or unemployment benefits? Does his age match the person's claimed age? All of those things could be checked very easily and quickly and would not involve any sort of discrimination.

    It is blindingly obvious they knew he was almost certainly an illegal alien. They didn’t care. The only investigation they were interested in was the bare minimum necessary to pretend they were following the law.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  74. @Anon87
    I don't think even publishing brutal crime scene photos would sober people up. It's like their brains shut off and refuse to see what's right in front of them, or worse what's literally happening to themselves and their families. Is there such a thing as an un-survival instinct? Not fight or flight, but now quiet acceptance of death? Feels like there should be a long German word for it.

    There’s a certain amount of generational dumbness around. The other day a 25 year old nephew had to be forcibly removed from the intended drop line of a tree his dad was felling; neither of his parents are morons.
    Txt smrts yeah! Real life brains? Not so much.

  75. @Prof. Woland
    The two most powerful tools we could use to deter illegal immigration are electronic verification for employment and bio-metric ID. Both go hand in hand.The ironic thing is that they are also the most "humane" ways to get rid of them as well but TPTB will anything to make sure they never come to fruition.

    In some countries you simply cannot function without 'papers'. If illegals could not work, travel, vote, rent an apartment, or conduct financial transactions such as banking or wiring money you would see them running for the border. There would be no deportation force, no splitting of families, and no pictures of people being rousted.

    For the ones who refused to leave we would still have ICE but it would become much easier to find the needles without the haystack.

    All true.

    However, a good many Americans, especially many conservatives, have a visceral objection to being routinely asked for their papers.

    A system that will effectively identify illegal aliens will require legal aliens and citizens to also carry papers to prove their status. No way around it.

    • Replies: @Anon
    When you get a job you have to show your social security card and state ID to HR when you fill out the payroll forms. That’s standard for every job and every company in the country. It’s federal law.

    “ routinely asked for their papers” How often do people get a new job?

    , @Jack D
    There's a new thing now in PA (don't know whether they do it in other states) where, when you want to buy beer or wine, they ask you for ID (which they then scan and which must go into a database somewhere - someday it will leak out that Republican candidate X has a frequent fondness for Chardonnay) even if you are (like me) pretty obviously well north of your 21st birthday. I don't like it but I do it because I guess this way they don't have to embarrass 30 year old Asian men who look like they are 16 - same logic as feeling the crotch of 90 year old white women so as not to "profile" young Muslim men.

    Likewise, if I want to buy some Sudafed - same drill - they record your name and address so that meth heads can't buy enough Sudafed to convert to meth.

    And getting on an airplane - fuggedaboutit without ID. And you can't even go to Canada any more without a passport.

    So, you don't need "papers" as long as you never leave your home, but otherwise, that ship has sailed.

    This is all of a piece with how the leftist state works - if it is something that they really care about, they have no problem burdening the hell out of you and business - no burden is too great to save the whales from plastic bags or whatever. But if it is in their interest NOT to care (like voter ID or checking whether this little brown man is really named John Budd) then suddenly whatever it is "burdensome" and impossible to comply with and blah, blah, blah.
    , @Fred Boynton
    I don't know what century you're living in but certainly here in 21st century America, white Americans need to show their papers to "work, travel, vote, rent an apartment, or conduct financial transactions such as banking or wiring money" and do pretty much anything else involving living. At least since the 1990's white Americans have been required to allow employers and landlords to conduct background checks and credit checks on them. This state of affairs has largely been thrust upon us by the "conservatives" that you ridiculously claim are somehow against forcing people to show their papers. What these "conservatives" are against is expecting non-white invaders to show their papers or even have papers while busy-bodying white Americans everyday of their surveillanced lives.
    , @PNWmossback
    The opposition to a Nstional ID card has always been strong in this country. It's been considered the hasllmark of a totalitarian government. At the inception of the Social Security system, it was stated that it would not be a National ID. But it has become one, especially in the financial arena
    , @PNWmossback
    The opposition to a Nstional ID card has always been strong in this country. It's been considered the hasllmark of a totalitarian government. At the inception of the Social Security system, it was stated that it would not be a National ID. But it has become one, especially in the financial arena.

    I give up. I've been flipped out of the comments window three times with this posting.
    , @Milo Minderbinder
    Resident Aliens in the US have been required to carry their Green Cards with them since the 1940s.
  76. @Anon
    As someone on the receiving end of a whole lot of government regulation, I can tell you the way to fix this. Of course, there should be employer sanctions. But also follow other regulattory bodies, and not only require an action, but require obsessive documentation of the action. And make the sanctions for both requirements the same level of seriousness.

    Specifically, require all the following:

    -- Only citizens or properly visa'd people can be hired.

    -- ID and documentation has to be checked.

    -- The process of checking has to be documented: Digital photographs required of the applicant, and the ID checked, as specified resolution and focus quality. ID must be point by point checked against a list of points provided by the goverment, such as under magnification does the microtype at the upper left corner of the Virginia driver's license have the state motto, "Canis meus id comedit"? By requiring a named employee, or contractor, to photograph and affirm a step by step process, they cannot later say "We looked at it and it seemed OK." It's auditable. If the documentation of the checking process is lost, hey, the sanction for not having that is the same as the sanction for hiring an illegal, so six of one, half a dozen of the other. You get fined or jailed or whatever either way.

    Many years ago an FBI agent showed me a large book that they had access to with details about ID cards of all kinds, from every state. They used that when checking IDs. I'm sure that it has been put online somewhere by this point for goverment use.

    The Virginia state motto is “my dog ate it”? Always thought it was “sic semper tyrannosaurus.”

  77. Today’s liberalism in a nutshell: the feelings of a criminal illegal alien are more important than the safety and well being of actual Americans.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  78. @Dave Pinsen
    I retweeted the "Have you seen her?" tweet about Mollie Tibbetts when she went missing, and as much as I didn't want it to be the case, my immediate assumption was that she'd been killed by an illegal alien, since there'd been enough similar cases.

    Illegal aliens attacking young white women out jogging seems to be a trend that's never named as one. Have any sociologists or criminologists studied it? The earliest case that comes to mind is the murder of Chandra Levy, around the turn of the millennium, but I remember reading about a case in Colorado somewhere, one in California, etc.

    What drives it? Rivera had a girlfriend, albeit a non-thin Latina - is it a Portnoy-style desire to shtup a representative of the dominant ethnic group, without knowing enough English to woo them? Is it rage at being part of a helot class that white women don't acknowledge as potential mates?

    Is it rage at being part of a helot class that white women don’t acknowledge as potential mates?

    I have a theory along these lines that is wildly unpopular.

    In the old days, a young woman propositioned by a man could tell him, “I’m not that kind of girl.” This “let him down easy,” as she was, or claimed to be, rejecting all illicit sexual activity, not the man himself as being unworthy of being considered a potential mate.

    This still works, to some extent, for a married woman. But media universally portrays single young women as being eager to immediately jump into bed with any sexually attractive man they meet.

    So, any refusal by a young woman to do so immediately becomes an intensely personal rejection of the man as a person. Such rejection often, not unreasonably, is responded to with anger. I would assume the anger is intensified when he assumes the rejection is based on his race or ethnicity.

    BTW, what a loser this guy is! I frequently approach random young women while they’re jogging, and they almost always disappear into the weeds with me for a little afternoon delight. /s

    • Replies: @Anon
    Most of the women hating old codgers in this site think all young women are depraved sluts owing to having no personal knowledge of young women
    , @Kylie
    "BTW, what a loser this guy is! I frequently approach random young women while they’re jogging, and they almost always disappear into the weeds with me for a little afternoon delight."

    So...Logan's Run meets Starland Vocal Band.
    Nice.
    , @S. Anonyia
    How is the anger reasonable or sane? Rejection is part of life and should be an opportunity for self improvement.

    Lots of women get dumped after only a couple of dates or get outright rejected by attractive high status guys. Is it reasonable if they poison the guy or slash his tires or get their brothers to beat the crap out of him?

    Besides, plenty of sex crimes happened in the 70s when many young girls did use the "I'm not that kind of girl" let down.

    , @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    I would assume the anger is intensified when he assumes the rejection is based on his race or ethnicity.
     
    Yet another reason for the 2nd Amendment.
  79. It’s all absurd but the issue is that you can’t use common sense in much of anything these days. The lawyer for the farm is absolutely right, if the managers balked at his identity based on his race not fitting the name, they’d be accused of discrimination.

    The Obama admin went after firms that scrutinized the IDs of the employees.

    • Agree: Logan, Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Cortes
    It’s the “Sommersby” identity theft collusion strategy. See:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Return_of_Martin_Guerre

    Everything’s great when it’s all wonderful but the moment reality bites, it’s all legalistic CYA time.

    , @Anon
    You’re right, but it was long before the Obama administration . It was a court finding that the civil rights division of the department of justice decided to make into administrative law.

    I dug into the DOJ website. The fines for document abuse can be up to $375,000. Document abuse is noticing that the false ID is false.
    I’m sure that it was a coalition of farmers food processors and restaurants that funded the lawsuit that resulted in a finding that demanding authentic ID was national origin discrimination

    And being SJWs and White hating Democrats, I doubt that the Tibbetts family will sue Yarrabee farms for wrongful death.
  80. @Ed
    It’s all absurd but the issue is that you can’t use common sense in much of anything these days. The lawyer for the farm is absolutely right, if the managers balked at his identity based on his race not fitting the name, they’d be accused of discrimination.

    The Obama admin went after firms that scrutinized the IDs of the employees.

    It’s the “Sommersby” identity theft collusion strategy. See:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Return_of_Martin_Guerre

    Everything’s great when it’s all wonderful but the moment reality bites, it’s all legalistic CYA time.

  81. @Mike Krauthammer
    A majority of the White Women i have seen in California are dating either a Black guy or a Hispanic and they are not fat and obese as Most of the Cucks on this Website would like to claim. White “man” cannot compete with Black Men or other Men of Color in the sexual marketplace. Men of Color are strong creative disciplined athletic and have fought their whole lives white men are weak dull effeminate clumsy and play video games Is it any wonder that white girls crave Black Men? FACT IS THAT DAYS OF RACISM ARE OVER AND I AM HALF JEWISH., MY ANCESTORS FACED ANTI SEMITISM(which will be over) AS WELL. I WANT SOMEBODY TO REFUTE MY ARGUMENTS.

    Unfortunately for you Mike, blacks and Hispanics “know” all about the Jews.

  82. @Alec Leamas

    So to question whether a man who speaks little or no English and who has a Facebook page under the name of Cristhian Bahena Rivera is really named “John Budd” is racist and illegal. Not only is it OK to look the other way but the law COMMANDS us to be stupid and ignore all common sense (at least according to the dairy farmer’s lawyer). But if he told you that his name was Juan and you insisted on calling him John, that would be racist and illegal too.
     
    This sort of humiliation in getting you to assiduously ignore the obvious is as the kids say "a feature, not a bug." They want you dispirited.

    We get in a back and forth with the left over immigration generally and their false statistics about illegal crime. But the higher rate of crime by illegals is almost besides the point - it's the anarcho-tyranny of the the law touching every aspect of the average American's life contrasted with the open lawlessness of the illegal immigration racket that drives normal people red with rage.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  83. American Friends Service Committee. When IS Mr Sailer going to get around to pointing out this evil organisation, and it’s negative effect on America?

    • Agree: Stan d Mute
  84. American friends service committee why am I not surprised? No wonder the English outlawed the original subversive SJWs.

    Seriously, although they stay out of the news, the Quakers are as bad as ACLU and SPLC and the rest of the anti White coalition.

    • Replies: @RVBlake
    The U. S. Conference of Catholic Bishops has a horse in that race, as well.
  85. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ed
    It’s all absurd but the issue is that you can’t use common sense in much of anything these days. The lawyer for the farm is absolutely right, if the managers balked at his identity based on his race not fitting the name, they’d be accused of discrimination.

    The Obama admin went after firms that scrutinized the IDs of the employees.

    You’re right, but it was long before the Obama administration . It was a court finding that the civil rights division of the department of justice decided to make into administrative law.

    I dug into the DOJ website. The fines for document abuse can be up to $375,000. Document abuse is noticing that the false ID is false.
    I’m sure that it was a coalition of farmers food processors and restaurants that funded the lawsuit that resulted in a finding that demanding authentic ID was national origin discrimination

    And being SJWs and White hating Democrats, I doubt that the Tibbetts family will sue Yarrabee farms for wrongful death.

    • Replies: @Daisy Hogg
    Their case against Potter Concrete is very telling. They claim that the company discriminated because they used E-Verify to check the work eligibility of foreign nationals only. You know, the thing E-Verify was created for. Have a gander:

    “Employers cannot create discriminatory hurdles for work-authorized non-U.S. citizens or naturalized citizens in the employment eligibility verification process, which includes the E-Verify program,” said Acting Assistant Attorney General Jocelyn Samuels for the Civil Rights Division.
     
    How are you supposed to check that they're authorized to work when it's discrimination to do so? That's right, you can't, unless you want to pay a hefty fine.
  86. @Logan
    Is it rage at being part of a helot class that white women don’t acknowledge as potential mates?

    I have a theory along these lines that is wildly unpopular.

    In the old days, a young woman propositioned by a man could tell him, "I'm not that kind of girl." This "let him down easy," as she was, or claimed to be, rejecting all illicit sexual activity, not the man himself as being unworthy of being considered a potential mate.

    This still works, to some extent, for a married woman. But media universally portrays single young women as being eager to immediately jump into bed with any sexually attractive man they meet.

    So, any refusal by a young woman to do so immediately becomes an intensely personal rejection of the man as a person. Such rejection often, not unreasonably, is responded to with anger. I would assume the anger is intensified when he assumes the rejection is based on his race or ethnicity.

    BTW, what a loser this guy is! I frequently approach random young women while they're jogging, and they almost always disappear into the weeds with me for a little afternoon delight. /s

    Most of the women hating old codgers in this site think all young women are depraved sluts owing to having no personal knowledge of young women

    • Replies: @L Woods

    Most of the white knighting old codgers on this site think most young women aren't depraved sluts owning to having no personal knowledge of young women
     
    FIFY betaboi
  87. @Logan
    All true.

    However, a good many Americans, especially many conservatives, have a visceral objection to being routinely asked for their papers.

    A system that will effectively identify illegal aliens will require legal aliens and citizens to also carry papers to prove their status. No way around it.

    When you get a job you have to show your social security card and state ID to HR when you fill out the payroll forms. That’s standard for every job and every company in the country. It’s federal law.

    “ routinely asked for their papers” How often do people get a new job?

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    You have to supply your SS# but you don't have to show the card. When you fill out your W-4

    https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/fw4.pdf

    the number is there for the IRS and the state to check on your existence and start taxing you.

    My niece applied for jobs all over her area and was turned down for all of them. I mean even the most menial, low-paying jobs too. Turns out there was a problem with her SS#. Apparently someone else was using her number so it made hers look fake. She got a new SS# and was hired immediately.
    , @Prof. Woland
    The Federal Gov. has different data bases. For people going on Medicare and Social Security they use the SAVE data base v. a different one for voting and another for employment, and another for handling nukes.

    The cost for a 65 year old on Medicare is probably about $18,000 and it is probably much higher for someone one who is 80 or 90. The top tier for SS is probably about $4,000 per month or $48,000 per year. So clearly, our government checks people out closely when they get these benefits, just not so much when they apply for work or vote. We don't hear a peep then.
  88. @Mike Krauthammer
    A majority of the White Women i have seen in California are dating either a Black guy or a Hispanic and they are not fat and obese as Most of the Cucks on this Website would like to claim. White “man” cannot compete with Black Men or other Men of Color in the sexual marketplace. Men of Color are strong creative disciplined athletic and have fought their whole lives white men are weak dull effeminate clumsy and play video games Is it any wonder that white girls crave Black Men? FACT IS THAT DAYS OF RACISM ARE OVER AND I AM HALF JEWISH., MY ANCESTORS FACED ANTI SEMITISM(which will be over) AS WELL. I WANT SOMEBODY TO REFUTE MY ARGUMENTS.

    I’ve lived in California all my life and I never see White women dating black men.
    If you do see a White woman with a black man how do you know they are dating? Do you follow them to see what they’re doing and where they go?

  89. @Anonymous
    To all you railroad buffs out there, the haunting theme sequence of the 1971 Get Carter movie is notable in featuring an English Electric Deltic Diesel locomotive - the finest Diesel locomotive ever to feature on Britain's railroads. The loco was distinguished by its exceptionally high power/weight two stroke diesel engine with cylinders aligned in a 'D' or delta shape. It was originally a marine diesel engine for warships. Manufactured by that great and ancient English engineering firm of Napier - a firm which had roots in the 1700s, and whose nameplate graced the sides of the Deltic.

    The good old days. The 1970s the last decade in which England was still great and still English. The decade of Ted Heath, coal strikes and the scandals of Lords Lucan and Lambton.

    Nothing like a bit of nostalgia.

    Some kind soul, please post the YouTube video.

    It’s hard to visualize a Deltic engine (and even harder to imagine that it actually worked):

    You’ll note that there are 3 crankshafts ( 2 turning clockwise and 1 counterclockwise). The 3 crankshafts have to be geared to each other. And that’s just for one cylinder bank – typically an engine would have several banks.

    These engines were so finicky to get sorted that the usual policy when they needed service was to swap them out and send the broken engine back to the manufacturer. They were the kind of thing that ran great when everything was perfectly aligned but if anything was the least bit off it would all go to hell. Thus they were never a big seller.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    That's what killed the Deltic.

    Few were ever built, and they had a rather short working life.

    Apparently, the engine was so complicated that British Rail personnel working at the depot were unable to overhaul or repair them - all engines had to shipped over to the Napier works in Acton, London, for servicing, and then shipped back to the appropriate motive power depot.
    , @res
    Thanks, Jack. Your "image" isn't really one. Wikipedia likes to use pages containing the actual image file which are named as if they really were an image. You need to get to the actual image link itself (right click, copy image address on the image itself) to embed here. You can tell you have the right link if the only thing you see is the image (notice navigation buttons and additional text at your link). I'm not sure if animated gifs work here. Let's see.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e4/Napier_Deltic_Animation.gif

    Here is the Wikipedia article itself. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Napier_Deltic
    The intake and exhaust handling is interesting. The additional crankshafts complexity is somewhat compensated for by not needing valves or camshafts.
  90. @Anon87
    I don't think even publishing brutal crime scene photos would sober people up. It's like their brains shut off and refuse to see what's right in front of them, or worse what's literally happening to themselves and their families. Is there such a thing as an un-survival instinct? Not fight or flight, but now quiet acceptance of death? Feels like there should be a long German word for it.

    Leervernichtungsgefuehl?

    • Replies: @Anon87
    Google Translate struggled with that, but "empty extermination feeling" seems close? Not bad.
  91. @anonymous

    I WANT SOMEBODY TO REFUTE MY ARGUMENTS.
     
    I WANT SOMEONE TO TEACH YOU PROPER GRAMMAR.

    It’s tiny duck and he’s trying his best.

  92. @Anonymous

    A majority of the White Women i have seen in California are dating either a Black guy
     
    Specifically, he's referring to Van Vuys and Chattsworth, and "dating."

    They know who has the Blow.

  93. @anonymous

    We get in a back and forth with the left over immigration generally and their false statistics about illegal crime. But the higher rate of crime by illegals is almost besides the point – it’s the anarcho-tyranny of the the law touching every aspect of the average American’s life contrasted with the open lawlessness of the illegal immigration racket that drives normal people red with rage.
     
    Boy, is that well-put. Unfortunately most 'normal people' are enthralled by the entertainment/propaganda complex whose effects pretty much suffocate all normal human impulses.

    What happens on TeeVee is real. What happens in the real world is open to conjecture.

  94. @AnotherDad

    The farm did not use the government’s voluntary E-Verify system, which allows companies to verify the identity and immigration status of job applicants. …
     
    Mandatory E-verify. Seriously in this day and age this is downright trivial. Cell phone picture sent in with documents. Heck there are fingerprint apps now too--send those in. Banks process hundreds of millions of transactions a day. We can't get the government to verify what--i'm guessing--around 100000 hirings a day?

    Where is Trump?

    Talking about some POS book? Omarosa? Spar with the weasels at the NYT all you like, but how about the job you were elected to do--Making America Great Again?

    Trump could have declassified the 2016 FISA warrant long ago. He could have fired Sessions, Rosenstein, Mueller long ago. Trump was the best GOP candidate in 2016. As President in 2017 and 2018, not so much. Trump likes to play games while the country goes to Hell in a hand basket. For Trump, it’s always been all about him and nothing but him. When he argues and tweets he is blissfully happy. The small important stuff bores him. He’s fixated about what the Lefty press says about him when he shouldn’t give a tinker’s damn.

    Still and all, Obama and Hillary were so bad you had to vote for Trump if you valued your stinkin’ White hide. If the Dems take control of the House in Nov., Trump might finally see that there are better things to do in life besides Tweeting. One can only hope.

  95. @Lot
    I think it is Mattis who wrote the NYT op ed.

    Right now speculation is on Pence because of the word lodestar. No way!

    General Clues:

    1. Author has a high opinion of McCain.
    2. Author speaks proudly of how Trump admin people ignore him on foreign policy matters.
    3. Author does not appear to be part of the Bannon-Sessions-Miller restrictionism first wing of the Trump admin.
    4. Author is well read, and has the verbal tics of a high-IQ military guy.
    5. Author is hostile to Russia (Mattis is more worried, correctly, by Islam and China, but is def anti-Putin too).

    Textual Clues -
    6. Mattis just used the "democratic institutions" phrase in the op-ed. (March 21 2018 press conference)
    7. The op-ed uses the fancy "Ours is" locution. Mattis did the same in April 2018 in comments after meeting the Dutch defense minister: "300 years after the Treaty of Utrecht, we know ours is a world"
    8. Mattis gave an implied rejection of Trump's anti-press comment, talking about how he swore to uphold the first amendment.
    9. Both Mattis and the Op-Ed use "working diligently." Mattis on June 8 speaking with the Nato SecGen in Belguim.

    The first group of clues led me to Kelly and Mattis. But one after another I found Mattis tics in the Op Ed, but not anything to indicate Kelly.

    I scanned some speeches from both. The overall style of both and the op-ed again say high IQ general. But Mattis has more of a grand and academic style, much like the op-ed.

    It’s almost certainly someone whose name and position you’ve never heard.

    “Lodestar” is a legal term of art in Federal litigation practice in fee shifting cases. My guess is that the author is law-trained.

    The rote recitation of principles of Chamber of Commerce style “conservatism” leads me to believe that the author has served in a past GOP administration (a Bushie), or had been a Congressional staffer for a GOP member of congress. The author was and remains “Never Trump” but is a careerist who insinuated himself or herself into the administration for the typical careerist reasons.

    • Replies: @Lot
    Lots of words have specific meanings in legal, medical, academic etc jargon, but are used different outside this.

    Pence used lodestar a lot in ways that have nothing to do with legal bills, and he did it expecting generally educated audiences to understand him. It is a word whose context usually gives you a good general idea of its meaning, if not its specific original meaning of "star that doesn't move so is useful in navigation."
  96. @Anonspc
    Billy Budd was taken?!!

    “Billy Budd was taken?!!”

    As was John Doe, I guess.

  97. @The Anti-Gnostic

    “Absent unusual circumstances, it would be difficult to show they knew any more than what they were told,” Teig said, adding that it would be “pretty racist” to assume a John Budd could not be Hispanic.
     
    An adult man actually believes this.

    A majority of the people in the country believe it.

  98. @Russ

    “We have an immigration system that doesn’t account for the labor needs or economic realities of Iowa businesses and farms,” she said. “So what do you do? Do you rightly not racially profile people and take the information they give you because you need workers?”
     
    The AFSC hack quoted above can join the archduke of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in crying me a river. Time for real wages for U.S. workers to rise for the first time in a generation, especially after the tax cuts.

    The Republican rep for our rural congressional district in northern Wisconsin recently announced on his Facebook page his plan to sponsor the importation of “guest” workers to help out farmers suffering labor shortages, with the assurance that this was a temporary fix. The comments were not supportive.

  99. @AnotherDad
    In a decent and serious nation lawyer scum like this Lori Chesser, SJW scum like this Erica Johnson and greedy farmer scum like the Lang family would all be deported. We don't need garbage like this in our nation.

    would all be deported…

    Agree.

  100. @Anon
    American friends service committee why am I not surprised? No wonder the English outlawed the original subversive SJWs.

    Seriously, although they stay out of the news, the Quakers are as bad as ACLU and SPLC and the rest of the anti White coalition.

    The U. S. Conference of Catholic Bishops has a horse in that race, as well.

  101. Years ago I denied service to a man whose social security number came up on my computer as the same as someone he said was his father, whose name was also identical.

    A few months later I received a call from one of our corporate lawyers. That man and his ‘father’ had filed a lawsuit against the company for what I had done. (I wondered who the lawyers were who took their case and who probably encouraged it in the first place.)

    I answered our attorney’s questions. Essentially, it was all about logic, which I explained:

    1) If one person presents a social security number identical to another’s, then I have no way of knowing which one of them, if any, corresponds to that number.

    2) The number is already on file as belonging to the other person, claimed by the person in front of me as being his father, and having the exact same name.

    3) I cannot legally do my particular business with this person in front of me, because I cannot establish his identity, and because the identification presented is identical to another person.

    Our friendly company lawyer never called me back. There was no case.

    The apparent father and son (if they even were) were Mexican.

  102. @Mike Krauthammer
    Blah blah blah. America's TFR is so low that it needs immigration. Most of the work in farms and other low skilled sectors is done by Immigrants from Latin America. You should think before commenting.

    Blah blah blah. America’s TFR is so low that it needs immigration.

    Or perhaps America’s TFR is low because of immigration. We don’t need a high TFR anyway. Endless growth is the economic model of cancer. It doesn’t work.

    You should have stopped at “blah blah blah” – it’s the most insightful thing you said, idiot.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  103. @The Alarmist
    Billy Budd would have been a more poignant name-choice.

    Billy Budd would have been a more poignant name-choice.

    Billy Budd killed a sadistic creep in a fit of anger. This guy murdered a young woman.

    Bigger Thomas would have been a better fake-name for him.

  104. I have nothing but contempt for the poor girl’s father, who felt the need to virtue signal after his daughter was raped and murdered. The proper response would be outrage at whatever circumstances permitted this crime to happen. In my view, he has earned the cruel memes that have been generated about him.

    • Agree: Kylie
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    Agreed. Molly Tibbetts was young and stupid--in part no doubt from being raised by this creep.

    Pa Tibbets is a full grown man, needs social approval like a 14-year old girl and refuses to do the basic job of a man--protect his family, his nation. His is not a man. And does not deserve to live in America, does not deserve to have his line continue, because he is unwilling to take on the single responsible for that--defense.
  105. @Trevor H.
    If you're in search of irony, present your credentials to the third world immigrant working at TSA or the DMV. They will rake you over the coals for being white af. Didn't you know that America is a Nation of Immigrants? If you're not an immigrant, leave now. Or get what's coming to you.

    Didn’t you know that America is a Nation of Immigrants?

    There should be an extension of this, something like:

    “a Nation of Immigrants not Natives”…

    …but that would bleed into the post-1990s term ‘Native American’ referring to Amerindians.

    It occurs to me that no one has ever used the “Nation of Immigrants” bludgeon to shut-up actual Amerindians. “Stop complaining about poor conditions on the reservation, bigot! Don’t you know this continent belongs to immigrants?” Nor is Nation of Immigrants ever used against slave-ancestry Blacks, nor against certain other smaller groups.

    When people use the political slogan “Nation of Immigrants,” they are using it against White-Protestants and defacto-Protestant White Catholics — amounting to perhaps 175 million Americans today, i.e., the Trump Base With No Name (probably at about 50% of the legal-citizen national population among the age 20-70 cohort, with at least a +15 for voters [which includes over-70s).

    • Agree: Trevor H.
  106. @Anon87
    I don't think even publishing brutal crime scene photos would sober people up. It's like their brains shut off and refuse to see what's right in front of them, or worse what's literally happening to themselves and their families. Is there such a thing as an un-survival instinct? Not fight or flight, but now quiet acceptance of death? Feels like there should be a long German word for it.

    their brains shut off and refuse to see what’s right in front of them

    Thought Experiment:

    How would people have reacted to the ‘John Budd’ Sex-Stalker-Murder incident in:

    1818
    1858
    1898
    1938
    1978
    2018

    (Forty-year intervals.)

    My impression is the 1938 to 1978 period would have the biggest gap in reactions from local people. As for when he ‘brains shut off’ point begins in my arbitrary 40-year-interval game, perhaps it is 1978 already. The thing is, in 1978-Iowa there were so few (near zero) illegal Mexican sex-stalker-murderers roaming around that it wasn’t an issue.

    • Replies: @densa
    In 1858 Kansas the best thing that would have happened to him is he would have been lynched. Most legal lynchings were carried out on Whites, not Blacks or Amerindians.

    Course, then there was vigilante justice that didn't wait on formalities. Most of these were for claim jumping or horse thieving. In 1858 there was a moratorium on political murder in an effort to end the tit for tat of the Border Wars. They were keen to adopt a legal system, which is now being retrograded to a selective justice based again on politics.

    I think this murder would have been big news in 1978. Lots of shock. In 2018 we resign ourselves to the erosion of all that was once achieved.
  107. @Rajkumar Rao
    I was born in the late 1940s to an immigrant family from India and turned 12 in 1960. First, there were two 1960s; 1960 thru 1963/64 and then beyond. The first three years were a continuation of the 1950s, no real difference. I don’t recall ‘Duck and Cover’ in the 60s, that may have been a 50s thing. Rock and Roll was in a tailspin, all we were getting was Frankie Avalon, Fabian and such. Some of the ‘doo-wop’ groups were still there but the hard rockers weren’t around. Plastic was the thing, everything was covered in plastic. The new space age material. I asked my Mom once why she covered everything in vinyl. She laffed and said, it was the thing everyone was doing. There was no AC. The only place you could find AC was in a movie theatre. JFK was President and the press loved him in the way that they loved Barack Obama. For most of the press he could do no wrong, nor could Jackie or any of the Kennedys. The press had endless stories of touch football at the Kennedy compound, The Kennedy children and the Kennedy brothers. So everybody played touch football too. Viet Nam was still a distant police action; it did get press coverage but it was mostly of the Viet-Namese. American cars ruled. Automotive engineering was a different world from today. The things were fucking hugh and ran like Giant sloths. Bench seats front and rear that could fit a family of nine w/o a hitch. Gee, I loved those seats. Plus I was small enuff to ride in the shelf under the rear window. The National Highway system was copied from the Nazis and had just got under way under Eisenhower. So when you drove inter-city or inter-state it was on two lane blacktops for much or all of the way. Air travel was just beginning and people still traveled by train. Imagine telling your friends today that you’re taking a train to California or New York. Air travel was a different world from today. Every passenger was treated like a prince or princess. And the staff all had Hollywood good looks. BTW, no searching or security at all. I remember (latter 60s) buying a ticket at the airport and walking on to the flight. Often we got to walk onto the tarmac to board. All the staff smiling and greeting us like we were royalty. Smoking was allowed everywhere and the booze flowed on the flights. Folks dressed to fly. It was an occasion. The only foreign cars I recall from the early 60s was the occasional VW beetle or Mercede Benz. Japanese cars are still in the future- at least on the east coast. Back on the ground, there were supermarkets (remember I’m a city kid) but not as large as today. I remember we did much of our food shopping at neighborhood stores. A loaf of bread was 15 Cents, a hamburger at a local restaurant was 25 cents. A pack of cigarettes was 21 cents. And a newspaper was 4 cents. I remember some of these prices because as a kid I was often sent to a store to buy these items. My Mom would go to the A&P and buy a week or two of groceries for about $20. The groceries would be loaded into one or two big, paper bags which it was my job to carry. The big grocery chains in NY then were A&P and Bohacks. Latter there was a cute girl teenager cashier at the Bohacks who would let me buy any amount of stuff for the price of one item. How did I ever fuck that up. A pair of Clarks Desert Boots was about $5. In NYC, nobody wore blue jeans; That was farmers’ clothes; That’s gonna change soon. A 45 RPM record (top 10) was about 50 cents. Elvis was no longer on the charts as he had been drafted. Many young men went into the army or other military as there was still a draft of two years active duty. Fellows would volunteer for the draft to get it out of the way. But you could only volunteer for the draft in the army. There was no draft for other branches of the military. Racism was alive and very healthy. God save the poor black man that ventured into a white neighborhood. I have spoken to many black men, my age, that told me they would turn down jobs or other opportunities rather then venture into some white or ethnic areas. And the reverse was true. I remember being told not to go into certain black neighborhoods and recall being stopped once by a group of young blacks about something but nothing came of it, I was about 11 or 12. In NYC, at least, suburban flight was beginning, and every once in a while a friend or relative would move to the suburbs- never to be seen again. It was also the beginning of traffic jams. We played in the streets and parks all day and well into the night. Me? As long as I was home for dinner I was cool. It was not unusual to be out with your friends all day. Seeing your parents for the evening meal and then out again. Also, this was when extended families lived nearby so you had cousins and friends all around. Then JFK was shot and a month latter came The Beatles. LBJ was President and Viet Nam loomed ahead. Everything Changed. When JFK was shot it was a week of national mourning. Think 9/11. Everything closed, except churches. All schools, businesses, gov’t offices, etc. TV was Black and white and it was 15 hours or so of news coverage of the assassination, funeral, transfer of power. BTW there was no 24 hour TV back then. Everyone was solemn, no joking around and everyone in the country assumed that everyone in Dallas was guilty to some degree. Premarital sex was still a big no man’s land. As a teenager, we would dream about making-out or coping a feel. Holding a breast while while making out was heaven and you had to work for it. Weeks and months of being the BF. Finger-fucking was always beyond me. If your girl got pregnant, you got married that week. Dropped out of high school and got a job. Every year there was a couple that disappeared and folks would whisper that some girl was in ‘trouble’. Then came the Beatles and everything changed. Then Civil rights protest, and Viet Nam. Now begins the 60s people talk about. 77.8k Views · What did it feel like to live in the '60s? What was it like to grow up in the 1960s? How was life in the 60s in the USA? How well has Mad Men depicted the life of Americans in the 60s? What was life like in the Netherlands during the 60s? In the early sixties I lived in Virginia at Ft. Meyer. Andy Griffith show and lots of westerns. Everything was still very clean and family orientated in a weird way. If you didn’t want there to be S E X in the show you had widowers. Bonanza, My Three Sons, Mayberry. Then we moved to Hawaii. Skateboards and surfing songs. The Beatles were just becoming big. Viet Nam was stirring. JFK got killed and they had his funeral for days on every channel. Interstates were just being built. We drove across country on highways including route 66, Medgar Evers was murdered. A Black sgt in my neighbor hood threatened the people who owned the car from Mississippi. My mother told me to never tell anyone I was from Miss. We moved to Louisiana and the Viet Nam war started appearing on the six o’clock news. People trusted Walter Cronkite, Chet Huntley and David Brinkley. The music was still friendly…Jimmy Mack, Paul Revere and the Raiders, the Rollingstones. There were riots on TV, cities burning, and Dr, King was murdered. Then Bobby Kennedy. The music changed. If you’re going to San Francisco, be sure to wear some flowers in your hair….until Altamont. Then all those hippies started getting hooked on heroin and free love became less free. My Dad went to Viet Nam and we moved to Miss. I was so ought of place, but I loved my grandparents and could have lived on their farm. Woodstock and Alice’s Restaurant. Jimmy Hendrix opened for the Monkees…..Dark Shadows was what all the young folks watched. Where the Action Is! Soul Train! Hullabaloo, Laugh In. They Call Me Mellow Yellow. We All Live in a Yellow Submarine! Strawberry Fields Forever. Then one night I was listening to the radio while in bed. I heard Jimmy Mack and then Knight in Rusted Armor and I knew something just died. An era, an innocence that was never coming back. From now on it was We were flying low, hit something in the air! InnaGodadavida. Gonna be a hooker on Bleaker Street. I was eighteen when the sixties ended. 1.4k Views · Originally Answered: What was life like in the 1960s? I was born in 1965; so my experience was limited. I also can only answer about the USA but here goes. Median household income: lower than today, but growing. Fruits and vegetables were still largely seasonal. Portions in restaurants were smaller. People did not mind as long as raises came through every year. Less privacy. Houses were smaller measured by square footage. Moreover, the privacy was mostly for parents. I can remember growing up in a three-bedroom house. My parents had the brilliant idea of putting my brother and I in the same bedroom but then setting aside the spare bedroom for toys. Not surprisingly, my brother and I often fought like cats and dogs. Technology. Our house had two phones. Neither cordless. No computers. Really rich business people had phones in their cars; these were radios. I ran into one guy who hated having to add a car phone in the mid 1980s when cell phones came out; he missed the quiet when he drove. Cars were big and heavy. I think fifteen miles per gallon was good. Gas was cheap — I remember when people howled because gas hit $0.50 per gallon. I remember my folks getting a new car roughly every five years usually because they did not engage in regular maintenance. I take much better care of a car today and my 2005 Ford Taurus with 147,000 miles runs better than my old man’s cars with fewer than 50,000 miles. It helps that I check my Grease Monkey Sticker and know when to bring the car in for regular service. Retail was more expensive with higher margins. Kmart was the only big discounter and it was almost as bad then as it is today. Department stores had 100% margins. Skipping around, I remember spending more on a suit in 1985 (okay my grandparents bought it for my debating tournaments) than I pay today; of course the material and fit were both a little better then. Television. Three big networks. Local television added PBS and a few local independent stations showing reruns. Cartoons were a few hours in the afternoon and Sunday mornings. With one color television in the house (if you were lucky) you watched what dad or grandpop picked. Travel. I did not leave the USA at this time. Every year, however, we picked up my successful grandparents at the airport. Every year, they took a tour-group vacation. Since my grandfather had been working since he was 10 years old, it is hard to be jealous. Americans abroad were treated like gods — provided they stick to the safe tours in friendly countries. Less precision. I remember as a kid Burger King’s “Have it Your Way“ slogan. In those pre-computer days, forget it. My brother was a picky eater, and the fast-food restaurant inevitably got his order wrong. A scene inevitably ensued. Thanks for the A2A, Jai 12k Views · · Answer requested by Light, refreshing, idealistic, hopeful, and fun. In 1966 I hitch hiked to LA and hung out with the other hippies on the strip, indulging in the hedonism of sex, drugs, and rock and roll. It was a wonderful life for an 18-year old. I went to college and got a little more serious without losing those previous activities. The civil rights movement, supporting women’s liberation, and anti-war demonstrations were hopeful struggles to make the country and the world a better place. Although we failed to completely change the world in that decade we at least established efforts that are still on-going to improve the world we live in. Having aged considerably since then has moderated my raw hedonism and recklessness, but not changed my desire for and participation in the same efforts. And I may be old now, at least I got to see all the best bands live.

    I don’t know what kind of trolling and/or bot activity this is, but this post is copied (with possible slight additions or alterations) from here:

    https://www.quora.com/What-was-life-like-in-the-60s

    • Replies: @Trevor H.
    There needs to be a message length limit around here, that much is certain.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    The original has plenty of mistakes, too. Elvis was never off the charts. The Colonel had anticipated the draft, and had records ready to release throughout the King's stint in the Army.

    And quoting Bloodrock's D.O.A. is just plain weird.
  108. @Rajkumar Rao
    I was born in the late 1940s to an immigrant family from India and turned 12 in 1960. First, there were two 1960s; 1960 thru 1963/64 and then beyond. The first three years were a continuation of the 1950s, no real difference. I don’t recall ‘Duck and Cover’ in the 60s, that may have been a 50s thing. Rock and Roll was in a tailspin, all we were getting was Frankie Avalon, Fabian and such. Some of the ‘doo-wop’ groups were still there but the hard rockers weren’t around. Plastic was the thing, everything was covered in plastic. The new space age material. I asked my Mom once why she covered everything in vinyl. She laffed and said, it was the thing everyone was doing. There was no AC. The only place you could find AC was in a movie theatre. JFK was President and the press loved him in the way that they loved Barack Obama. For most of the press he could do no wrong, nor could Jackie or any of the Kennedys. The press had endless stories of touch football at the Kennedy compound, The Kennedy children and the Kennedy brothers. So everybody played touch football too. Viet Nam was still a distant police action; it did get press coverage but it was mostly of the Viet-Namese. American cars ruled. Automotive engineering was a different world from today. The things were fucking hugh and ran like Giant sloths. Bench seats front and rear that could fit a family of nine w/o a hitch. Gee, I loved those seats. Plus I was small enuff to ride in the shelf under the rear window. The National Highway system was copied from the Nazis and had just got under way under Eisenhower. So when you drove inter-city or inter-state it was on two lane blacktops for much or all of the way. Air travel was just beginning and people still traveled by train. Imagine telling your friends today that you’re taking a train to California or New York. Air travel was a different world from today. Every passenger was treated like a prince or princess. And the staff all had Hollywood good looks. BTW, no searching or security at all. I remember (latter 60s) buying a ticket at the airport and walking on to the flight. Often we got to walk onto the tarmac to board. All the staff smiling and greeting us like we were royalty. Smoking was allowed everywhere and the booze flowed on the flights. Folks dressed to fly. It was an occasion. The only foreign cars I recall from the early 60s was the occasional VW beetle or Mercede Benz. Japanese cars are still in the future- at least on the east coast. Back on the ground, there were supermarkets (remember I’m a city kid) but not as large as today. I remember we did much of our food shopping at neighborhood stores. A loaf of bread was 15 Cents, a hamburger at a local restaurant was 25 cents. A pack of cigarettes was 21 cents. And a newspaper was 4 cents. I remember some of these prices because as a kid I was often sent to a store to buy these items. My Mom would go to the A&P and buy a week or two of groceries for about $20. The groceries would be loaded into one or two big, paper bags which it was my job to carry. The big grocery chains in NY then were A&P and Bohacks. Latter there was a cute girl teenager cashier at the Bohacks who would let me buy any amount of stuff for the price of one item. How did I ever fuck that up. A pair of Clarks Desert Boots was about $5. In NYC, nobody wore blue jeans; That was farmers’ clothes; That’s gonna change soon. A 45 RPM record (top 10) was about 50 cents. Elvis was no longer on the charts as he had been drafted. Many young men went into the army or other military as there was still a draft of two years active duty. Fellows would volunteer for the draft to get it out of the way. But you could only volunteer for the draft in the army. There was no draft for other branches of the military. Racism was alive and very healthy. God save the poor black man that ventured into a white neighborhood. I have spoken to many black men, my age, that told me they would turn down jobs or other opportunities rather then venture into some white or ethnic areas. And the reverse was true. I remember being told not to go into certain black neighborhoods and recall being stopped once by a group of young blacks about something but nothing came of it, I was about 11 or 12. In NYC, at least, suburban flight was beginning, and every once in a while a friend or relative would move to the suburbs- never to be seen again. It was also the beginning of traffic jams. We played in the streets and parks all day and well into the night. Me? As long as I was home for dinner I was cool. It was not unusual to be out with your friends all day. Seeing your parents for the evening meal and then out again. Also, this was when extended families lived nearby so you had cousins and friends all around. Then JFK was shot and a month latter came The Beatles. LBJ was President and Viet Nam loomed ahead. Everything Changed. When JFK was shot it was a week of national mourning. Think 9/11. Everything closed, except churches. All schools, businesses, gov’t offices, etc. TV was Black and white and it was 15 hours or so of news coverage of the assassination, funeral, transfer of power. BTW there was no 24 hour TV back then. Everyone was solemn, no joking around and everyone in the country assumed that everyone in Dallas was guilty to some degree. Premarital sex was still a big no man’s land. As a teenager, we would dream about making-out or coping a feel. Holding a breast while while making out was heaven and you had to work for it. Weeks and months of being the BF. Finger-fucking was always beyond me. If your girl got pregnant, you got married that week. Dropped out of high school and got a job. Every year there was a couple that disappeared and folks would whisper that some girl was in ‘trouble’. Then came the Beatles and everything changed. Then Civil rights protest, and Viet Nam. Now begins the 60s people talk about. 77.8k Views · What did it feel like to live in the '60s? What was it like to grow up in the 1960s? How was life in the 60s in the USA? How well has Mad Men depicted the life of Americans in the 60s? What was life like in the Netherlands during the 60s? In the early sixties I lived in Virginia at Ft. Meyer. Andy Griffith show and lots of westerns. Everything was still very clean and family orientated in a weird way. If you didn’t want there to be S E X in the show you had widowers. Bonanza, My Three Sons, Mayberry. Then we moved to Hawaii. Skateboards and surfing songs. The Beatles were just becoming big. Viet Nam was stirring. JFK got killed and they had his funeral for days on every channel. Interstates were just being built. We drove across country on highways including route 66, Medgar Evers was murdered. A Black sgt in my neighbor hood threatened the people who owned the car from Mississippi. My mother told me to never tell anyone I was from Miss. We moved to Louisiana and the Viet Nam war started appearing on the six o’clock news. People trusted Walter Cronkite, Chet Huntley and David Brinkley. The music was still friendly…Jimmy Mack, Paul Revere and the Raiders, the Rollingstones. There were riots on TV, cities burning, and Dr, King was murdered. Then Bobby Kennedy. The music changed. If you’re going to San Francisco, be sure to wear some flowers in your hair….until Altamont. Then all those hippies started getting hooked on heroin and free love became less free. My Dad went to Viet Nam and we moved to Miss. I was so ought of place, but I loved my grandparents and could have lived on their farm. Woodstock and Alice’s Restaurant. Jimmy Hendrix opened for the Monkees…..Dark Shadows was what all the young folks watched. Where the Action Is! Soul Train! Hullabaloo, Laugh In. They Call Me Mellow Yellow. We All Live in a Yellow Submarine! Strawberry Fields Forever. Then one night I was listening to the radio while in bed. I heard Jimmy Mack and then Knight in Rusted Armor and I knew something just died. An era, an innocence that was never coming back. From now on it was We were flying low, hit something in the air! InnaGodadavida. Gonna be a hooker on Bleaker Street. I was eighteen when the sixties ended. 1.4k Views · Originally Answered: What was life like in the 1960s? I was born in 1965; so my experience was limited. I also can only answer about the USA but here goes. Median household income: lower than today, but growing. Fruits and vegetables were still largely seasonal. Portions in restaurants were smaller. People did not mind as long as raises came through every year. Less privacy. Houses were smaller measured by square footage. Moreover, the privacy was mostly for parents. I can remember growing up in a three-bedroom house. My parents had the brilliant idea of putting my brother and I in the same bedroom but then setting aside the spare bedroom for toys. Not surprisingly, my brother and I often fought like cats and dogs. Technology. Our house had two phones. Neither cordless. No computers. Really rich business people had phones in their cars; these were radios. I ran into one guy who hated having to add a car phone in the mid 1980s when cell phones came out; he missed the quiet when he drove. Cars were big and heavy. I think fifteen miles per gallon was good. Gas was cheap — I remember when people howled because gas hit $0.50 per gallon. I remember my folks getting a new car roughly every five years usually because they did not engage in regular maintenance. I take much better care of a car today and my 2005 Ford Taurus with 147,000 miles runs better than my old man’s cars with fewer than 50,000 miles. It helps that I check my Grease Monkey Sticker and know when to bring the car in for regular service. Retail was more expensive with higher margins. Kmart was the only big discounter and it was almost as bad then as it is today. Department stores had 100% margins. Skipping around, I remember spending more on a suit in 1985 (okay my grandparents bought it for my debating tournaments) than I pay today; of course the material and fit were both a little better then. Television. Three big networks. Local television added PBS and a few local independent stations showing reruns. Cartoons were a few hours in the afternoon and Sunday mornings. With one color television in the house (if you were lucky) you watched what dad or grandpop picked. Travel. I did not leave the USA at this time. Every year, however, we picked up my successful grandparents at the airport. Every year, they took a tour-group vacation. Since my grandfather had been working since he was 10 years old, it is hard to be jealous. Americans abroad were treated like gods — provided they stick to the safe tours in friendly countries. Less precision. I remember as a kid Burger King’s “Have it Your Way“ slogan. In those pre-computer days, forget it. My brother was a picky eater, and the fast-food restaurant inevitably got his order wrong. A scene inevitably ensued. Thanks for the A2A, Jai 12k Views · · Answer requested by Light, refreshing, idealistic, hopeful, and fun. In 1966 I hitch hiked to LA and hung out with the other hippies on the strip, indulging in the hedonism of sex, drugs, and rock and roll. It was a wonderful life for an 18-year old. I went to college and got a little more serious without losing those previous activities. The civil rights movement, supporting women’s liberation, and anti-war demonstrations were hopeful struggles to make the country and the world a better place. Although we failed to completely change the world in that decade we at least established efforts that are still on-going to improve the world we live in. Having aged considerably since then has moderated my raw hedonism and recklessness, but not changed my desire for and participation in the same efforts. And I may be old now, at least I got to see all the best bands live.

    tldr: Boomer Prajeet fully assimilated, enjoying the degeneracy of the 60′s and 70′s, then writes meandering narcissistic Boomerpoast.

    • Replies: @Hail
    The post was copied from what somebody wrote on Quora, possibly by a bot, or if not by some kind of human troll spammer.

    One clue suggesting a bot is that the original on Quora had paragraphs.
  109. @Hemid

    Is this a new form of comment-filtering (approval) or did Hemid submit a blank post?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Hemid is the sound of one hand clapping.
  110. @Anon
    Most of the women hating old codgers in this site think all young women are depraved sluts owing to having no personal knowledge of young women

    Most of the white knighting old codgers on this site think most young women aren’t depraved sluts owning to having no personal knowledge of young women

    FIFY betaboi

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    AGREED, Mr. Woods, but #257 is a girl, maybe a gammagirl.
  111. @Hail
    Is this a new form of comment-filtering (approval) or did Hemid submit a blank post?

    Hemid is the sound of one hand clapping.

  112. @Logan
    All true.

    However, a good many Americans, especially many conservatives, have a visceral objection to being routinely asked for their papers.

    A system that will effectively identify illegal aliens will require legal aliens and citizens to also carry papers to prove their status. No way around it.

    There’s a new thing now in PA (don’t know whether they do it in other states) where, when you want to buy beer or wine, they ask you for ID (which they then scan and which must go into a database somewhere – someday it will leak out that Republican candidate X has a frequent fondness for Chardonnay) even if you are (like me) pretty obviously well north of your 21st birthday. I don’t like it but I do it because I guess this way they don’t have to embarrass 30 year old Asian men who look like they are 16 – same logic as feeling the crotch of 90 year old white women so as not to “profile” young Muslim men.

    Likewise, if I want to buy some Sudafed – same drill – they record your name and address so that meth heads can’t buy enough Sudafed to convert to meth.

    And getting on an airplane – fuggedaboutit without ID. And you can’t even go to Canada any more without a passport.

    So, you don’t need “papers” as long as you never leave your home, but otherwise, that ship has sailed.

    This is all of a piece with how the leftist state works – if it is something that they really care about, they have no problem burdening the hell out of you and business – no burden is too great to save the whales from plastic bags or whatever. But if it is in their interest NOT to care (like voter ID or checking whether this little brown man is really named John Budd) then suddenly whatever it is “burdensome” and impossible to comply with and blah, blah, blah.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob, Logan
    • Replies: @Johann Ricke

    There’s a new thing now in PA (don’t know whether they do it in other states) where, when you want to buy beer or wine, they ask you for ID (which they then scan and which must go into a database somewhere – someday it will leak out that Republican candidate X has a frequent fondness for Chardonnay) even if you are (like me) pretty obviously well north of your 21st birthday. I don’t like it but I do it because I guess this way they don’t have to embarrass 30 year old Asian men who look like they are 16 – same logic as feeling the crotch of 90 year old white women so as not to “profile” young Muslim men.
     
    That may be so that straw buyers for underage drinkers are easily detected.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    I got into that very thing with a young guy (not in Pennsylvania) at the grocery over a 6-pack, who told me "you need to know how to pick your battles." I left the beer and chips on the check-out counter.
  113. @Dtbb
    Just a theory I came up with years ago. Could all these illegal workers with fake names and social security numbers be propping up that system. They work for years with no chance of collecting that money taken out of their checks automatically and the government not only knows it but encourages it on the sly.

    This falsehood has to die. When these illegals get to retirement age, they submit an affidavit to SSA stating that they have paid SSA taxes under such and such a name and SSN. Social Security is then legally required to pay them. Best part. SSA has no idea how old they really are.
    I have an acquaintance high up in SSA who let me know the real scoop.

  114. Any relation to South African distance runner Zola Budd?

  115. @Mike Krauthammer
    A majority of the White Women i have seen in California are dating either a Black guy or a Hispanic and they are not fat and obese as Most of the Cucks on this Website would like to claim. White “man” cannot compete with Black Men or other Men of Color in the sexual marketplace. Men of Color are strong creative disciplined athletic and have fought their whole lives white men are weak dull effeminate clumsy and play video games Is it any wonder that white girls crave Black Men? FACT IS THAT DAYS OF RACISM ARE OVER AND I AM HALF JEWISH., MY ANCESTORS FACED ANTI SEMITISM(which will be over) AS WELL. I WANT SOMEBODY TO REFUTE MY ARGUMENTS.

    Tiny Duck, is that you?

    I think Cristhian Rivera must have had trouble competing for white girls in the sexual marketplace and so resorted to shoplifting. Pablo “They” Gomez had trouble competing for white girls (or boys) in the sexual marketplace too. I don’t think being a 5’2″ Mestizo/illegal alien/minimum wage farm worker really gives you much traction with white college girls in the sexual marketplace. Nor is “Hey, Mami, you so fine” really an effective pickup line.

    • LOL: Mr. Rational
  116. @Lagertha
    never buy the Christian label: charity & churches, or every denomination which are eager-beavers to beaver and roger their adolescents.

    Predators go where the prey is. Always be suspicious of charities and churches or any religion, as well as teachers (particularly drama, music, non-STEM teachers), coaches, etc…. Anybody who wants to be around children who aren’t their blood relatives should be regarded with suspicion.

  117. Big business and big liberals all agree: you can’t bake a diverse omelet without smashing a few 20-year-old girls’ skulls. What’s a little sex murder versus the moral atrocity that would be skepticism about whether Cristhian Bahena Rivera’s real name is actually John Budd?

    Feeling a lil’ less than sanguine today, Steve?

  118. @Anon87
    I don't think even publishing brutal crime scene photos would sober people up. It's like their brains shut off and refuse to see what's right in front of them, or worse what's literally happening to themselves and their families. Is there such a thing as an un-survival instinct? Not fight or flight, but now quiet acceptance of death? Feels like there should be a long German word for it.

    Gezombieapocalyptunggessellschaft.

    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    "Gezombieapocalyptunggessellschaft."

    Freudenweisentoten.

    (Joy in white death)
  119. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Another commendation for this post; it's very well-stated, Alec.

    This whole story certainly makes me borderline incoherent with fury, but these days I am not sure that makes me 'normal'.

    I talk to too many people who cannot grasp why the farcical, obscenely-unjust immigration situation in the USA is a problem.

    I try to explain the way it's worked for me, living in a foreign country, and how I've had to obey the law assiduously to avoid trouble. I get blank looks.

    I guess they really believe that the 'normal' rules do not -- and indeed should not and must not -- apply in the USA. We really are special.

    America wasn’t always like this. I remember talking about the immigration process with my parents, who came to the US in the early ’50s. After the war, there was a special quota opened for refugees (not just Jews – a lot of Ukrainian and German ethnic Nazi collaborators got in too) but there were still many hoops that you had to jump through (pretty much the same process that exists for legal immigrants today) – there was an extensive application and an interview and you needed to have a sponsor and a clean record, etc. BTW, if you were a male of draft age, as soon as you arrived you were drafted. Some of their friends didn’t make it thru the process and ended up having to go to Australia or Israel. The idea that you could just walk across the border and buy some obviously phony papers and you were in was unthinkable.

    • Replies: @Hail

    you needed to have a sponsor
     
    Churches were often sponsors for Christian refugees. The church would seek out a church member volunteer to host the refugee(s) for a period, while they acclimated to U.S. life.

    Somehow, by the 1990s, the same churches that brought in Christian refugees (ethnocultural kin) a half-century earlier, had transitioned to bringing in the most alien possible people like Somalis...
  120. @The Anti-Gnostic

    “Absent unusual circumstances, it would be difficult to show they knew any more than what they were told,” Teig said, adding that it would be “pretty racist” to assume a John Budd could not be Hispanic.
     
    An adult man actually believes this.

    No of course he doesn’t believe it. No one is that stupid, let alone a Federal prosecutor. Rather, this is what we call “a legal fiction” – a lie that the legal system consents to in order to grease the wheels of society. Obviously, EVERYONE involved understood instantly that John Budd was not his real name but the law has given them permission (in fact DEMANDED) that they ignore the obvious so that we can have cheap milk and rich Republican dairy farm owners. A dead white girl or two is a small price to pay for cheap milk and the Vail condo of the farm family. Modern corporato-leftism is all about ignoring the obvious.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad

    ... so that we can have cheap milk and rich Republican dairy farm owners.
     
    Actually we don't need this garbage to have cheap milk.

    We have this thing called "technology"--i.e. white guys figuring out how to produce stuff faster, easier or better.

    Waiting around for some good harvesting weather last October, my Uncle took me out farm touring. One guy--not even a big operator, he had <100 cows--had put in these automatic milkers.
    http://umash.umn.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/LelyRobot.jpg

    The cows amble in when they are ready. The milker uses lasers to locate the tits, sprays a sanitizer and has brushes to get everything clean, then attaches the milkers, milks until the flow is over, detaches and cuts the cow loose. I saw a bit of cow contention for the next stop in line, but overall it's pretty basically a zero grunt-labor operation. (The feed and manure operation in the barn is automated in the usual fashion.) There simply is no need to have some guys in boots and bibs staring at the ass end of cows all day.

    In a sane America, these machines would be handling cow tits and Molly Tibbett's tits would be feeding her baby.

    , @Svigor

    Obviously, EVERYONE involved understood instantly that John Budd was not his real name but the law has given them permission (in fact DEMANDED) that they ignore the obvious so that we can have cheap milk and rich Republican dairy farm owners. A dead white girl or two is a small price to pay for cheap milk and the Vail condo of the farm family. Modern corporato-leftism is all about ignoring the obvious.
     
    We could double farm workers' wages, and the cost of the products they bring to market would only go up a few points because labor's only a small fraction of retail price.

    It's just to make their employers a lil' richer; wages are a bigger share of their costs.

    , @Jonathan Mason

    Obviously, EVERYONE involved understood instantly that John Budd was not his real name but the law has given them permission (in fact DEMANDED) that they ignore the obvious so that we can have cheap milk and rich Republican dairy farm owners.
     
    As you say, obviously.

    But one of the important aspects of applying for a legitimate visa is that there have to be criminal background checks, police reports, and so on. It is entirely unclear to me whether Billy Budd, or Pablo Escobar, or whatever his real name is, had some overseas criminal record or should have been on a sex offender registry--or whether this monstrous crime was just something that occurred to him on the spur of the moment, and he thought it seemed like a good idea at the time. (Possibly she had threatened to report him to ICE and then, like Billy Budd, he was rendered inchoate and struck her down, or like Zola Budd he tripped up an attractive American female runner by mistake and then panicked.)

  121. @Anon
    When you get a job you have to show your social security card and state ID to HR when you fill out the payroll forms. That’s standard for every job and every company in the country. It’s federal law.

    “ routinely asked for their papers” How often do people get a new job?

    You have to supply your SS# but you don’t have to show the card. When you fill out your W-4

    https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/fw4.pdf

    the number is there for the IRS and the state to check on your existence and start taxing you.

    My niece applied for jobs all over her area and was turned down for all of them. I mean even the most menial, low-paying jobs too. Turns out there was a problem with her SS#. Apparently someone else was using her number so it made hers look fake. She got a new SS# and was hired immediately.

  122. Any relation to Billy Budd, the sailor?

    • Replies: @Cortes
    Or to Catherine Zeta Jones?

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3So_2VU20vc
  123. @Jack D
    America wasn't always like this. I remember talking about the immigration process with my parents, who came to the US in the early '50s. After the war, there was a special quota opened for refugees (not just Jews - a lot of Ukrainian and German ethnic Nazi collaborators got in too) but there were still many hoops that you had to jump through (pretty much the same process that exists for legal immigrants today) - there was an extensive application and an interview and you needed to have a sponsor and a clean record, etc. BTW, if you were a male of draft age, as soon as you arrived you were drafted. Some of their friends didn't make it thru the process and ended up having to go to Australia or Israel. The idea that you could just walk across the border and buy some obviously phony papers and you were in was unthinkable.

    you needed to have a sponsor

    Churches were often sponsors for Christian refugees. The church would seek out a church member volunteer to host the refugee(s) for a period, while they acclimated to U.S. life.

    Somehow, by the 1990s, the same churches that brought in Christian refugees (ethnocultural kin) a half-century earlier, had transitioned to bringing in the most alien possible people like Somalis…

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Even HIAS (the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society) who sponsored my parents is in on this racket now. You have to understand that all "non-profits" eventually devolve into businesses/rackets because the people working their don't want to lose their nice cushy jobs. So when polio was cured, the "March of Dimes" didn't go out of business, they just found some other disease to profit from.
  124. Anonymous[321] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    It's hard to visualize a Deltic engine (and even harder to imagine that it actually worked):

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Napier_Deltic#/media/File:Napier_Deltic_Animation.gif

    You'll note that there are 3 crankshafts ( 2 turning clockwise and 1 counterclockwise). The 3 crankshafts have to be geared to each other. And that's just for one cylinder bank - typically an engine would have several banks.

    These engines were so finicky to get sorted that the usual policy when they needed service was to swap them out and send the broken engine back to the manufacturer. They were the kind of thing that ran great when everything was perfectly aligned but if anything was the least bit off it would all go to hell. Thus they were never a big seller.

    That’s what killed the Deltic.

    Few were ever built, and they had a rather short working life.

    Apparently, the engine was so complicated that British Rail personnel working at the depot were unable to overhaul or repair them – all engines had to shipped over to the Napier works in Acton, London, for servicing, and then shipped back to the appropriate motive power depot.

  125. @Anonymous
    To all you railroad buffs out there, the haunting theme sequence of the 1971 Get Carter movie is notable in featuring an English Electric Deltic Diesel locomotive - the finest Diesel locomotive ever to feature on Britain's railroads. The loco was distinguished by its exceptionally high power/weight two stroke diesel engine with cylinders aligned in a 'D' or delta shape. It was originally a marine diesel engine for warships. Manufactured by that great and ancient English engineering firm of Napier - a firm which had roots in the 1700s, and whose nameplate graced the sides of the Deltic.

    The good old days. The 1970s the last decade in which England was still great and still English. The decade of Ted Heath, coal strikes and the scandals of Lords Lucan and Lambton.

    Nothing like a bit of nostalgia.

    Some kind soul, please post the YouTube video.

    Some kind soul, please post the YouTube video.

    Here you go. Thanks for the background.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Thanks.
  126. @Lagertha
    never buy the Christian label: charity & churches, or every denomination which are eager-beavers to beaver and roger their adolescents.

    Only Christian church worth attending is the Orthodox Church.

  127. @Jack D
    It's hard to visualize a Deltic engine (and even harder to imagine that it actually worked):

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Napier_Deltic#/media/File:Napier_Deltic_Animation.gif

    You'll note that there are 3 crankshafts ( 2 turning clockwise and 1 counterclockwise). The 3 crankshafts have to be geared to each other. And that's just for one cylinder bank - typically an engine would have several banks.

    These engines were so finicky to get sorted that the usual policy when they needed service was to swap them out and send the broken engine back to the manufacturer. They were the kind of thing that ran great when everything was perfectly aligned but if anything was the least bit off it would all go to hell. Thus they were never a big seller.

    Thanks, Jack. Your “image” isn’t really one. Wikipedia likes to use pages containing the actual image file which are named as if they really were an image. You need to get to the actual image link itself (right click, copy image address on the image itself) to embed here. You can tell you have the right link if the only thing you see is the image (notice navigation buttons and additional text at your link). I’m not sure if animated gifs work here. Let’s see.

    Here is the Wikipedia article itself. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Napier_Deltic
    The intake and exhaust handling is interesting. The additional crankshafts complexity is somewhat compensated for by not needing valves or camshafts.

    • Replies: @Jack D

    The additional crankshafts complexity is somewhat compensated for by not needing valves or camshafts.
     
    That's true in any 2 cycle engine (well not any - some 2 cycles scavenge the intake from side ports but use tappet valves in the head for the exhaust). The Deltic did have camshafts anyway, which were used to drive the fuel injection pumps ( not shown in this simplified diagram). And you needed a separate pump for each cylinder.

    While the Deltic is a clever concept on paper (or in an animation), the real life implementation was "a highly strung unit, requiring careful maintenance" according to the Wiki. In other words, it was a big pain in the ass to keep running properly and needed highly skilled mechanics. The solution (sending the engines back to the factory every time they needed work) might have been marginally workable (if not cheap) in a small country like the UK, that could never have worked in the vast US .

  128. @Hail

    you needed to have a sponsor
     
    Churches were often sponsors for Christian refugees. The church would seek out a church member volunteer to host the refugee(s) for a period, while they acclimated to U.S. life.

    Somehow, by the 1990s, the same churches that brought in Christian refugees (ethnocultural kin) a half-century earlier, had transitioned to bringing in the most alien possible people like Somalis...

    Even HIAS (the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society) who sponsored my parents is in on this racket now. You have to understand that all “non-profits” eventually devolve into businesses/rackets because the people working their don’t want to lose their nice cushy jobs. So when polio was cured, the “March of Dimes” didn’t go out of business, they just found some other disease to profit from.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    true
    , @Lot
    Bush made this problem worse with his "faith based" welfare programs.

    In theory not a bad idea, in practice "Catholic Charities" and "Lutheran Social Services" now get most of their money from the feds and are run by far left anti-white maniacs, and they have become as large and powerful as the privately funded church hierarchy. And unlike fed programs, charities can be involved with aggro lobbying.
    , @AnotherDad

    Even HIAS (the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society) who sponsored my parents is in on this racket now. You have to understand that all “non-profits” eventually devolve into businesses/rackets because the people working their don’t want to lose their nice cushy jobs. So when polio was cured, the “March of Dimes” didn’t go out of business, they just found some other disease to profit from.
     
    Exactly. As Lot points out in the upper-Midwest, Catholic Charities and Lutheran Social Services are the slimy refugee racketeers.

    But that's the key point--it's a racket. And more government created soft jobs for girls-with-BAs. The job being to dump racially, ethnically and culturally incompatible people onto the taxpayers ... while of course patting themselves on the back about "helping people".

    Misplaced/misdirected female nurturing is a huge component of our present crisis. Women naturally have these strong nurturing feelings to take good care of their own children!.

    "Progressives" have managed to not only crush white educated female fertility, but also to turn their still extant nurturing instinct back against their own people. Literally turn them into weapons of mass destruction.

    The level of sheer evil here is beyond belief.
  129. John Budd is almost as bad as Donald R. DeCicco. Here is the scene from the Coneheads movie in which Beldar is found out to be an illegal alien and his boss arranges for him to get a SSN assigned to one Donald R. DeCicco.

  130. @res
    Thanks, Jack. Your "image" isn't really one. Wikipedia likes to use pages containing the actual image file which are named as if they really were an image. You need to get to the actual image link itself (right click, copy image address on the image itself) to embed here. You can tell you have the right link if the only thing you see is the image (notice navigation buttons and additional text at your link). I'm not sure if animated gifs work here. Let's see.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e4/Napier_Deltic_Animation.gif

    Here is the Wikipedia article itself. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Napier_Deltic
    The intake and exhaust handling is interesting. The additional crankshafts complexity is somewhat compensated for by not needing valves or camshafts.

    The additional crankshafts complexity is somewhat compensated for by not needing valves or camshafts.

    That’s true in any 2 cycle engine (well not any – some 2 cycles scavenge the intake from side ports but use tappet valves in the head for the exhaust). The Deltic did have camshafts anyway, which were used to drive the fuel injection pumps ( not shown in this simplified diagram). And you needed a separate pump for each cylinder.

    While the Deltic is a clever concept on paper (or in an animation), the real life implementation was “a highly strung unit, requiring careful maintenance” according to the Wiki. In other words, it was a big pain in the ass to keep running properly and needed highly skilled mechanics. The solution (sending the engines back to the factory every time they needed work) might have been marginally workable (if not cheap) in a small country like the UK, that could never have worked in the vast US .

  131. @Anon
    When you get a job you have to show your social security card and state ID to HR when you fill out the payroll forms. That’s standard for every job and every company in the country. It’s federal law.

    “ routinely asked for their papers” How often do people get a new job?

    The Federal Gov. has different data bases. For people going on Medicare and Social Security they use the SAVE data base v. a different one for voting and another for employment, and another for handling nukes.

    The cost for a 65 year old on Medicare is probably about $18,000 and it is probably much higher for someone one who is 80 or 90. The top tier for SS is probably about $4,000 per month or $48,000 per year. So clearly, our government checks people out closely when they get these benefits, just not so much when they apply for work or vote. We don’t hear a peep then.

  132. @Clyde
    You might be right with your sleuthing. All things considered Mattis will not care about the Deep State one way or another. He is numb to it. He has been seeing it in action for years as multi billion dollar contracts for useless weapons system get doled out to those Fed. contractors (read Lockheed and other huge corps) with the best lobbyists and Senators and Reps in their stable.

    I think I have a 70% chance of being right. Surprised nobody else is pushing this theory. Everyone else is obsessed with “lodestar.” By itself, sure it points to Pence who used the term a lot.

    Every other clue says general and the phrase analysis says Mattis. Would Pence make a big point point out of praising McCain? No way, Pence is a hard core Tea Party faction guy, who largely hated McCain. The Pence-ists are clearly wrong.

    • Replies: @EdwardM
    And Pence would not do such a thing. Right?
    , @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/JohnWSmith/status/1037437719369183232
    , @MEH 0910
    Among all the theories covered in this piece, this clever theory has also occurred to me:

    http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2018/09/theories-who-wrote-trump-op-ed.html


    The author is a MAGA true believer attempting to frame White House foes.

    Back in May, one of the Trump administration’s many anonymous leakers told Axios, “To cover my tracks, I usually pay attention to other staffers’ idioms and use that in my background quotes. That throws the scent off me.”

    Making no mention of immigration, using stodgy turns of phrase, and praising McCain is exactly what someone like Stephen Miller might do if he wanted to frame certain colleagues, prompting his “erratic” boss to carry out a purge.
     

    Although why would the New York Times knowingly cooperate with that?
    , @S. Anonyia
    Just because Pence hates McCain doesn't mean he isn't willing to use his ghost to help accomplish one of his goals. Pence was quoted at one point as saying "god wants me to be President."

    I think it was probably a no-name lower-level staffer who wrote the article BUT if it was someone truly close to Trump there's a good chance it was Pence. Maybe Pence thinks he's on a sinking ship for real this time and wants to justify staying in power if something happens to Trump.

  133. @Alec Leamas
    It's almost certainly someone whose name and position you've never heard.

    "Lodestar" is a legal term of art in Federal litigation practice in fee shifting cases. My guess is that the author is law-trained.

    The rote recitation of principles of Chamber of Commerce style "conservatism" leads me to believe that the author has served in a past GOP administration (a Bushie), or had been a Congressional staffer for a GOP member of congress. The author was and remains "Never Trump" but is a careerist who insinuated himself or herself into the administration for the typical careerist reasons.

    Lots of words have specific meanings in legal, medical, academic etc jargon, but are used different outside this.

    Pence used lodestar a lot in ways that have nothing to do with legal bills, and he did it expecting generally educated audiences to understand him. It is a word whose context usually gives you a good general idea of its meaning, if not its specific original meaning of “star that doesn’t move so is useful in navigation.”

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Lots of words have specific meanings in legal, medical, academic etc jargon, but are used different outside this.

     

    Of course they do, and "lodestar" was a word in English use before it became a term of legal art. But it has since fallen out of common use in the English language, while it continued in common use in the practice of law.

    My point isn't that someone can't have a linguistic quirk or fondness for a certain anachronistic word - my point is that it is more likely that someone who uses a word that is in common use in a certain walk of like but not commonly used elsewhere is of that stated walk of life.
  134. @MikeatMikedotMike
    "The Mexican man charged with abducting and killing an Iowa college student was known for years on the dairy farm where he worked by another name: John Budd. "


    A perfectly reasonable mistake. In high school I had a fake id with the name Chizuko Wasabi and a photo of a 70 year old Japanese woman.

    Whenever the ID got a less than celebratory look from the store clerk, I made sure to mention something about who we are, or diversity, or the SPLC and usually I got a free slim jim to go with my 12 pack of Milwaukee's Best.

    LOL

    and, FIRST!

  135. @Logan
    All true.

    However, a good many Americans, especially many conservatives, have a visceral objection to being routinely asked for their papers.

    A system that will effectively identify illegal aliens will require legal aliens and citizens to also carry papers to prove their status. No way around it.

    I don’t know what century you’re living in but certainly here in 21st century America, white Americans need to show their papers to “work, travel, vote, rent an apartment, or conduct financial transactions such as banking or wiring money” and do pretty much anything else involving living. At least since the 1990′s white Americans have been required to allow employers and landlords to conduct background checks and credit checks on them. This state of affairs has largely been thrust upon us by the “conservatives” that you ridiculously claim are somehow against forcing people to show their papers. What these “conservatives” are against is expecting non-white invaders to show their papers or even have papers while busy-bodying white Americans everyday of their surveillanced lives.

  136. @Jack D
    Even HIAS (the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society) who sponsored my parents is in on this racket now. You have to understand that all "non-profits" eventually devolve into businesses/rackets because the people working their don't want to lose their nice cushy jobs. So when polio was cured, the "March of Dimes" didn't go out of business, they just found some other disease to profit from.

    true

  137. @Jack D
    Even HIAS (the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society) who sponsored my parents is in on this racket now. You have to understand that all "non-profits" eventually devolve into businesses/rackets because the people working their don't want to lose their nice cushy jobs. So when polio was cured, the "March of Dimes" didn't go out of business, they just found some other disease to profit from.

    Bush made this problem worse with his “faith based” welfare programs.

    In theory not a bad idea, in practice “Catholic Charities” and “Lutheran Social Services” now get most of their money from the feds and are run by far left anti-white maniacs, and they have become as large and powerful as the privately funded church hierarchy. And unlike fed programs, charities can be involved with aggro lobbying.

  138. @Hail

    their brains shut off and refuse to see what’s right in front of them
     
    Thought Experiment:

    How would people have reacted to the 'John Budd' Sex-Stalker-Murder incident in:

    1818
    1858
    1898
    1938
    1978
    2018

    (Forty-year intervals.)

    My impression is the 1938 to 1978 period would have the biggest gap in reactions from local people. As for when he 'brains shut off' point begins in my arbitrary 40-year-interval game, perhaps it is 1978 already. The thing is, in 1978-Iowa there were so few (near zero) illegal Mexican sex-stalker-murderers roaming around that it wasn't an issue.

    In 1858 Kansas the best thing that would have happened to him is he would have been lynched. Most legal lynchings were carried out on Whites, not Blacks or Amerindians.

    Course, then there was vigilante justice that didn’t wait on formalities. Most of these were for claim jumping or horse thieving. In 1858 there was a moratorium on political murder in an effort to end the tit for tat of the Border Wars. They were keen to adopt a legal system, which is now being retrograded to a selective justice based again on politics.

    I think this murder would have been big news in 1978. Lots of shock. In 2018 we resign ourselves to the erosion of all that was once achieved.

    • Replies: @Hail

    I think this murder would have been big news in 1978
     
    It was big news here in 2018, as well, because Iowa has so few murders.

    Iowa was consistently among the bottom-five murder rates in the USA in the 1990s and 2000s, but ticked up by the mid-2010s. I don't know the origin of this but it could be Diversity and a small-scale version of the Ferguson Effect, and/or Drugs (which is, anyway, fueled by Diverse drug cartels and dealers).

    Murder Rate in Iowa
    2010: 1.2
    2014: 1.9
    2016: 2,3

    If 1.2/100,000 is supposed to be Iowa's baseline murder rate in the 2010s without Diversity or drugs, how many marginal murders were there in 2016?

    - 38: Hypothetical murders at the 1.2/100,000 rate in 2016
    - 72: Observed murders in Iowa, 2016 [at 2.3/100,000 rate]

    = 35 marginal murders in 2016 alone. Who were these people? How many are out-and-out Mollie Tibbets-style Diversity Victims?

    _______________

    (Note: Trump won Iowa 52-42, the best R result in Iowa of the post-1990 era. Before Trump, the best R showing was the 50-49 Bush-Kerry '04 squeak Bush victory with a Whiter electorate.)
    , @Fred Boynton
    In the early 1980s my Upper Midwest town and county had its first ever murder. A shopkeeper murdered his assistant/mistress in a fit of passion. It was certainly big news in the local media but I don't know if it made it out into the wider world.

    Following the Reagan/Republicans amnesty the area began getting squatamalans and by the end of the 1990s and continuing until today, the county has just under a murder a year. The perps are all squatamalans and the victims are mostly other squatamalans but some are white girls. None of these stories make it out into the wider world and most of them barely register locally. The locals just believe it's part of God's plan and there's nothing you can do about it and even if you could do something about it it would be racist and you're not a racist commie pinko are you?

    It is interesting to think about why Mollie Tibbetts became a story and so many others don't. She's probably better looking than most and was college student at University of Iowa which makes her more compelling than most on both counts. The wealthy PR/CoC father from CA Bay Area who is likely gay seems to have been the catalyst who turned this from a local to national even international story. He and the rest of the family clearly did not expect or want the perp to be anything other than a white guy and it would be interesting to find out who it was they thought it really was and/or who they wanted it to be. They seemed genuinely surprised/shocked it was one of the squats and wouldn't have made it a story if they'd even suspected it would be a squat. The family turned a sad story even sadder with their post-suspect-apprehension behavior and made themselves and their kind look awful to the rest of the country.
  139. @Jack D
    There's a new thing now in PA (don't know whether they do it in other states) where, when you want to buy beer or wine, they ask you for ID (which they then scan and which must go into a database somewhere - someday it will leak out that Republican candidate X has a frequent fondness for Chardonnay) even if you are (like me) pretty obviously well north of your 21st birthday. I don't like it but I do it because I guess this way they don't have to embarrass 30 year old Asian men who look like they are 16 - same logic as feeling the crotch of 90 year old white women so as not to "profile" young Muslim men.

    Likewise, if I want to buy some Sudafed - same drill - they record your name and address so that meth heads can't buy enough Sudafed to convert to meth.

    And getting on an airplane - fuggedaboutit without ID. And you can't even go to Canada any more without a passport.

    So, you don't need "papers" as long as you never leave your home, but otherwise, that ship has sailed.

    This is all of a piece with how the leftist state works - if it is something that they really care about, they have no problem burdening the hell out of you and business - no burden is too great to save the whales from plastic bags or whatever. But if it is in their interest NOT to care (like voter ID or checking whether this little brown man is really named John Budd) then suddenly whatever it is "burdensome" and impossible to comply with and blah, blah, blah.

    There’s a new thing now in PA (don’t know whether they do it in other states) where, when you want to buy beer or wine, they ask you for ID (which they then scan and which must go into a database somewhere – someday it will leak out that Republican candidate X has a frequent fondness for Chardonnay) even if you are (like me) pretty obviously well north of your 21st birthday. I don’t like it but I do it because I guess this way they don’t have to embarrass 30 year old Asian men who look like they are 16 – same logic as feeling the crotch of 90 year old white women so as not to “profile” young Muslim men.

    That may be so that straw buyers for underage drinkers are easily detected.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    That may be so that straw buyers for underage drinkers are easily detected.
     
    That doesn't make me feel any better about that kind of thing, Johann. Does anyone remember (a Mr. Vin Suprynowitz does.*) when Americans used to laugh at the whole "papers, please!" business in the movies because we were Americans and lived free? Not anymore.

    * More in Part 2 and Part 3.
    , @S. Anonyia
    Straw buyers for the youth-surely one of the most pressing issues in 2018 America!

    Anyone who never got someone to buy drinks for them while they were under 21 is either from a wacky religion or a socially inept loser.

  140. @Lot
    I think I have a 70% chance of being right. Surprised nobody else is pushing this theory. Everyone else is obsessed with "lodestar." By itself, sure it points to Pence who used the term a lot.

    Every other clue says general and the phrase analysis says Mattis. Would Pence make a big point point out of praising McCain? No way, Pence is a hard core Tea Party faction guy, who largely hated McCain. The Pence-ists are clearly wrong.

    And Pence would not do such a thing. Right?

  141. @Lot
    I think I have a 70% chance of being right. Surprised nobody else is pushing this theory. Everyone else is obsessed with "lodestar." By itself, sure it points to Pence who used the term a lot.

    Every other clue says general and the phrase analysis says Mattis. Would Pence make a big point point out of praising McCain? No way, Pence is a hard core Tea Party faction guy, who largely hated McCain. The Pence-ists are clearly wrong.
    • Replies: @L Woods
    I doubt it’s anyone so high ranking, but if it were, I wouldn’t be the least bit surprised to learn the weasel is one of “our” stuffed uniforms.
    , @Lot
    Yes, almost all unique phrases match up with Mattis. No sign of Kelly's work using "first principles."

    Mattis also seems to enjoy writing. Probably not true of most suspects.

    I do not think it is a prank or false flag.

    Could be a lower level guy despite what the NYT says. But again, the overall tone is brainy military guy, not upper-middle GOP DC bureaucrat.
  142. @Jack D
    No of course he doesn't believe it. No one is that stupid, let alone a Federal prosecutor. Rather, this is what we call "a legal fiction" - a lie that the legal system consents to in order to grease the wheels of society. Obviously, EVERYONE involved understood instantly that John Budd was not his real name but the law has given them permission (in fact DEMANDED) that they ignore the obvious so that we can have cheap milk and rich Republican dairy farm owners. A dead white girl or two is a small price to pay for cheap milk and the Vail condo of the farm family. Modern corporato-leftism is all about ignoring the obvious.

    … so that we can have cheap milk and rich Republican dairy farm owners.

    Actually we don’t need this garbage to have cheap milk.

    We have this thing called “technology”–i.e. white guys figuring out how to produce stuff faster, easier or better.

    Waiting around for some good harvesting weather last October, my Uncle took me out farm touring. One guy–not even a big operator, he had <100 cows–had put in these automatic milkers.
    The cows amble in when they are ready. The milker uses lasers to locate the tits, sprays a sanitizer and has brushes to get everything clean, then attaches the milkers, milks until the flow is over, detaches and cuts the cow loose. I saw a bit of cow contention for the next stop in line, but overall it's pretty basically a zero grunt-labor operation. (The feed and manure operation in the barn is automated in the usual fashion.) There simply is no need to have some guys in boots and bibs staring at the ass end of cows all day.

    In a sane America, these machines would be handling cow tits and Molly Tibbett’s tits would be feeding her baby.

    • Replies: @Trevor H.
    Or, even more radically, we can admit that perhaps nature's way is right and that cow's milk is intended for calves. Ah but then we'd have all these dairy cattle rotting in the fields. Plus we do need some low-fat frozen yoghurt now and then. And coffee creamer.
    , @Jack D
    No matter how much you automate, you are still going to need at least a few guys. I think the articles mentioned that 10 people worked on this farm including "John Budd" (I wonder who the others are - "George Washington", "Abraham Lincoln" , "Suka Maidik", etc.?) - I don't know how many cows but the impression was that it was a big operation. I'm sure that if they had switched the leather sofas from real leather to faux leather at the Vail condo, they could have afforded to get real Americans instead of faux ones working in the barn but how can we ask the rent seeking capitalists of America to sit on sticky Naugahyde? That would violate international law or something.
    , @Lot
    Thank you, love the mental image of Elsie, Bessie and their sisters jostling to be next up for the robo-laser-milker.
  143. @Mike Krauthammer
    A majority of the White Women i have seen in California are dating either a Black guy or a Hispanic and they are not fat and obese as Most of the Cucks on this Website would like to claim. White “man” cannot compete with Black Men or other Men of Color in the sexual marketplace. Men of Color are strong creative disciplined athletic and have fought their whole lives white men are weak dull effeminate clumsy and play video games Is it any wonder that white girls crave Black Men? FACT IS THAT DAYS OF RACISM ARE OVER AND I AM HALF JEWISH., MY ANCESTORS FACED ANTI SEMITISM(which will be over) AS WELL. I WANT SOMEBODY TO REFUTE MY ARGUMENTS.

    Woeful troll. 0/10

  144. @Hail
    I don't know what kind of trolling and/or bot activity this is, but this post is copied (with possible slight additions or alterations) from here:

    https://www.quora.com/What-was-life-like-in-the-60s

    There needs to be a message length limit around here, that much is certain.

    • Replies: @Hail

    There needs to be a message length limit
     
    I thought Ron had put in something whereby a message over a certain length automatically got a "More" tag after x words, to prevent this possible-bot's 2,200-word textvalanche from becoming a scroll-nuisance.
  145. @Logan
    All true.

    However, a good many Americans, especially many conservatives, have a visceral objection to being routinely asked for their papers.

    A system that will effectively identify illegal aliens will require legal aliens and citizens to also carry papers to prove their status. No way around it.

    The opposition to a Nstional ID card has always been strong in this country. It’s been considered the hasllmark of a totalitarian government. At the inception of the Social Security system, it was stated that it would not be a National ID. But it has become one, especially in the financial arena

  146. @AnotherDad

    ... so that we can have cheap milk and rich Republican dairy farm owners.
     
    Actually we don't need this garbage to have cheap milk.

    We have this thing called "technology"--i.e. white guys figuring out how to produce stuff faster, easier or better.

    Waiting around for some good harvesting weather last October, my Uncle took me out farm touring. One guy--not even a big operator, he had <100 cows--had put in these automatic milkers.
    http://umash.umn.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/LelyRobot.jpg

    The cows amble in when they are ready. The milker uses lasers to locate the tits, sprays a sanitizer and has brushes to get everything clean, then attaches the milkers, milks until the flow is over, detaches and cuts the cow loose. I saw a bit of cow contention for the next stop in line, but overall it's pretty basically a zero grunt-labor operation. (The feed and manure operation in the barn is automated in the usual fashion.) There simply is no need to have some guys in boots and bibs staring at the ass end of cows all day.

    In a sane America, these machines would be handling cow tits and Molly Tibbett's tits would be feeding her baby.

    Or, even more radically, we can admit that perhaps nature’s way is right and that cow’s milk is intended for calves. Ah but then we’d have all these dairy cattle rotting in the fields. Plus we do need some low-fat frozen yoghurt now and then. And coffee creamer.

  147. @Logan
    All true.

    However, a good many Americans, especially many conservatives, have a visceral objection to being routinely asked for their papers.

    A system that will effectively identify illegal aliens will require legal aliens and citizens to also carry papers to prove their status. No way around it.

    The opposition to a Nstional ID card has always been strong in this country. It’s been considered the hasllmark of a totalitarian government. At the inception of the Social Security system, it was stated that it would not be a National ID. But it has become one, especially in the financial arena.

    I give up. I’ve been flipped out of the comments window three times with this posting.

  148. @Jack D
    Even HIAS (the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society) who sponsored my parents is in on this racket now. You have to understand that all "non-profits" eventually devolve into businesses/rackets because the people working their don't want to lose their nice cushy jobs. So when polio was cured, the "March of Dimes" didn't go out of business, they just found some other disease to profit from.

    Even HIAS (the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society) who sponsored my parents is in on this racket now. You have to understand that all “non-profits” eventually devolve into businesses/rackets because the people working their don’t want to lose their nice cushy jobs. So when polio was cured, the “March of Dimes” didn’t go out of business, they just found some other disease to profit from.

    Exactly. As Lot points out in the upper-Midwest, Catholic Charities and Lutheran Social Services are the slimy refugee racketeers.

    But that’s the key point–it’s a racket. And more government created soft jobs for girls-with-BAs. The job being to dump racially, ethnically and culturally incompatible people onto the taxpayers … while of course patting themselves on the back about “helping people”.

    Misplaced/misdirected female nurturing is a huge component of our present crisis. Women naturally have these strong nurturing feelings to take good care of their own children!.

    “Progressives” have managed to not only crush white educated female fertility, but also to turn their still extant nurturing instinct back against their own people. Literally turn them into weapons of mass destruction.

    The level of sheer evil here is beyond belief.

  149. @AnotherDad

    ... so that we can have cheap milk and rich Republican dairy farm owners.
     
    Actually we don't need this garbage to have cheap milk.

    We have this thing called "technology"--i.e. white guys figuring out how to produce stuff faster, easier or better.

    Waiting around for some good harvesting weather last October, my Uncle took me out farm touring. One guy--not even a big operator, he had <100 cows--had put in these automatic milkers.
    http://umash.umn.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/LelyRobot.jpg

    The cows amble in when they are ready. The milker uses lasers to locate the tits, sprays a sanitizer and has brushes to get everything clean, then attaches the milkers, milks until the flow is over, detaches and cuts the cow loose. I saw a bit of cow contention for the next stop in line, but overall it's pretty basically a zero grunt-labor operation. (The feed and manure operation in the barn is automated in the usual fashion.) There simply is no need to have some guys in boots and bibs staring at the ass end of cows all day.

    In a sane America, these machines would be handling cow tits and Molly Tibbett's tits would be feeding her baby.

    No matter how much you automate, you are still going to need at least a few guys. I think the articles mentioned that 10 people worked on this farm including “John Budd” (I wonder who the others are – “George Washington”, “Abraham Lincoln” , “Suka Maidik”, etc.?) – I don’t know how many cows but the impression was that it was a big operation. I’m sure that if they had switched the leather sofas from real leather to faux leather at the Vail condo, they could have afforded to get real Americans instead of faux ones working in the barn but how can we ask the rent seeking capitalists of America to sit on sticky Naugahyde? That would violate international law or something.

  150. Lori Chesser, an immigration employment lawyer advising the farm, said that companies cannot discriminate against workers based on how they look or how their names sound.

    “Death to the infidel!” signed, Bob Smith

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    As a lawyer on retainer for Mr. Haven Monahan, I respectfully request you CEASE AND DESIST your libel against my client. Please take his picture down off the internet - he was having a bad hair beard day.
  151. @Lot
    Lots of words have specific meanings in legal, medical, academic etc jargon, but are used different outside this.

    Pence used lodestar a lot in ways that have nothing to do with legal bills, and he did it expecting generally educated audiences to understand him. It is a word whose context usually gives you a good general idea of its meaning, if not its specific original meaning of "star that doesn't move so is useful in navigation."

    Lots of words have specific meanings in legal, medical, academic etc jargon, but are used different outside this.

    Of course they do, and “lodestar” was a word in English use before it became a term of legal art. But it has since fallen out of common use in the English language, while it continued in common use in the practice of law.

    My point isn’t that someone can’t have a linguistic quirk or fondness for a certain anachronistic word – my point is that it is more likely that someone who uses a word that is in common use in a certain walk of like but not commonly used elsewhere is of that stated walk of life.

  152. @Logan
    All true.

    However, a good many Americans, especially many conservatives, have a visceral objection to being routinely asked for their papers.

    A system that will effectively identify illegal aliens will require legal aliens and citizens to also carry papers to prove their status. No way around it.

    Resident Aliens in the US have been required to carry their Green Cards with them since the 1940s.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Resident Aliens in the US have been required to carry their Green Cards with them since the 1940s.

     

    Those must be crumbling by now. My draft card is from the mid-'70s, and I had to laminate with tape a long time ago.
  153. @Jack D
    So to question whether a man who speaks little or no English and who has a Facebook page under the name of Cristhian Bahena Rivera is really named "John Budd" is racist and illegal. Not only is it OK to look the other way but the law COMMANDS us to be stupid and ignore all common sense (at least according to the dairy farmer's lawyer). But if he told you that his name was Juan and you insisted on calling him John, that would be racist and illegal too.

    This is how the enforcement provisions of the 1986 were so quickly gutted. They argued that requiring businesses to check documents was discriminatory against Hispanic job applicants, so they removed them or even banned them. Even now businesses face almost no threat of fees for failing to validate the legal status of their employees, vs. a the very real threat of an EEOC or ACLU or private lawsuit for doing so PLUS the fact that it it raises the cost of hiring.

    Leftists have made it illegal to use common sense to enforce the law. It doesn’t matter that the odds that a Hispanic person who spokes little or no English is living here illegally is like 1 in 3, 2hile for whites (or for people with good English skills in general) the odds of being here illegally are vanishingly small. The Left is doing everything it can to make enforcement of the law (see also: the TSA) impossible, exorbitantly costly and/or as inconvenient as possible to as many people as possible. The biggest threat to our freedom as Americans is the banning of common sense.

    • Agree: Dtbb
    • Replies: @anon
    One thing about the deep state ... I've come to believe that most operatives don't consider themselves members. It's like calling yourself rich - if you can wring a comfortable out of them, thats a victory.

    No one considers themselves an elite or a bureaucrat either. They are dedicated civil servants don't you know.
  154. @Lot
    I think I have a 70% chance of being right. Surprised nobody else is pushing this theory. Everyone else is obsessed with "lodestar." By itself, sure it points to Pence who used the term a lot.

    Every other clue says general and the phrase analysis says Mattis. Would Pence make a big point point out of praising McCain? No way, Pence is a hard core Tea Party faction guy, who largely hated McCain. The Pence-ists are clearly wrong.

    Among all the theories covered in this piece, this clever theory has also occurred to me:

    http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2018/09/theories-who-wrote-trump-op-ed.html

    The author is a MAGA true believer attempting to frame White House foes.

    Back in May, one of the Trump administration’s many anonymous leakers told Axios, “To cover my tracks, I usually pay attention to other staffers’ idioms and use that in my background quotes. That throws the scent off me.”

    Making no mention of immigration, using stodgy turns of phrase, and praising McCain is exactly what someone like Stephen Miller might do if he wanted to frame certain colleagues, prompting his “erratic” boss to carry out a purge.

    Although why would the New York Times knowingly cooperate with that?

  155. @moshe
    The fact that there is a single person on the planet who watched that and believed it was real has me on my knees praying that God Almighty in his infinite wisdom and mercy sends a flood to destroy mankind once and for all.

    The fact that there is a single person on the planet who watched that and believed it was real has me on my knees praying that God Almighty in his infinite wisdom and mercy sends a flood to destroy mankind once and for all.

    Whether or not it’s real is irrelevant. It was fun, and can give us ideas.

  156. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/JohnWSmith/status/1037437719369183232

    I doubt it’s anyone so high ranking, but if it were, I wouldn’t be the least bit surprised to learn the weasel is one of “our” stuffed uniforms.

  157. @flyingtiger
    Any relation to Billy Budd, the sailor?

    Or to Catherine Zeta Jones?

  158. @densa
    In 1858 Kansas the best thing that would have happened to him is he would have been lynched. Most legal lynchings were carried out on Whites, not Blacks or Amerindians.

    Course, then there was vigilante justice that didn't wait on formalities. Most of these were for claim jumping or horse thieving. In 1858 there was a moratorium on political murder in an effort to end the tit for tat of the Border Wars. They were keen to adopt a legal system, which is now being retrograded to a selective justice based again on politics.

    I think this murder would have been big news in 1978. Lots of shock. In 2018 we resign ourselves to the erosion of all that was once achieved.

    I think this murder would have been big news in 1978

    It was big news here in 2018, as well, because Iowa has so few murders.

    Iowa was consistently among the bottom-five murder rates in the USA in the 1990s and 2000s, but ticked up by the mid-2010s. I don’t know the origin of this but it could be Diversity and a small-scale version of the Ferguson Effect, and/or Drugs (which is, anyway, fueled by Diverse drug cartels and dealers).

    Murder Rate in Iowa
    2010: 1.2
    2014: 1.9
    2016: 2,3

    If 1.2/100,000 is supposed to be Iowa’s baseline murder rate in the 2010s without Diversity or drugs, how many marginal murders were there in 2016?

    - 38: Hypothetical murders at the 1.2/100,000 rate in 2016
    - 72: Observed murders in Iowa, 2016 [at 2.3/100,000 rate]

    = 35 marginal murders in 2016 alone. Who were these people? How many are out-and-out Mollie Tibbets-style Diversity Victims?

    _______________

    (Note: Trump won Iowa 52-42, the best R result in Iowa of the post-1990 era. Before Trump, the best R showing was the 50-49 Bush-Kerry ’04 squeak Bush victory with a Whiter electorate.)

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    Trump was the first Republican to carry Dubuque County since Eisenhower. If Democrats can't carry the Driftless, they have really blown it with average white folk. Their last white redoubts would be New England and Silicon Valley, both of which have suffered severe academic pollution in recent decades.
  159. @Milo Minderbinder
    Resident Aliens in the US have been required to carry their Green Cards with them since the 1940s.

    Resident Aliens in the US have been required to carry their Green Cards with them since the 1940s.

    Those must be crumbling by now. My draft card is from the mid-’70s, and I had to laminate with tape a long time ago.

  160. @Neuday
    tldr: Boomer Prajeet fully assimilated, enjoying the degeneracy of the 60's and 70's, then writes meandering narcissistic Boomerpoast.

    The post was copied from what somebody wrote on Quora, possibly by a bot, or if not by some kind of human troll spammer.

    One clue suggesting a bot is that the original on Quora had paragraphs.

  161. @Trevor H.
    There needs to be a message length limit around here, that much is certain.

    There needs to be a message length limit

    I thought Ron had put in something whereby a message over a certain length automatically got a “More” tag after x words, to prevent this possible-bot’s 2,200-word textvalanche from becoming a scroll-nuisance.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    I bet the lack of paragraph breaks broke it.
  162. @Hail

    I think this murder would have been big news in 1978
     
    It was big news here in 2018, as well, because Iowa has so few murders.

    Iowa was consistently among the bottom-five murder rates in the USA in the 1990s and 2000s, but ticked up by the mid-2010s. I don't know the origin of this but it could be Diversity and a small-scale version of the Ferguson Effect, and/or Drugs (which is, anyway, fueled by Diverse drug cartels and dealers).

    Murder Rate in Iowa
    2010: 1.2
    2014: 1.9
    2016: 2,3

    If 1.2/100,000 is supposed to be Iowa's baseline murder rate in the 2010s without Diversity or drugs, how many marginal murders were there in 2016?

    - 38: Hypothetical murders at the 1.2/100,000 rate in 2016
    - 72: Observed murders in Iowa, 2016 [at 2.3/100,000 rate]

    = 35 marginal murders in 2016 alone. Who were these people? How many are out-and-out Mollie Tibbets-style Diversity Victims?

    _______________

    (Note: Trump won Iowa 52-42, the best R result in Iowa of the post-1990 era. Before Trump, the best R showing was the 50-49 Bush-Kerry '04 squeak Bush victory with a Whiter electorate.)

    Trump was the first Republican to carry Dubuque County since Eisenhower. If Democrats can’t carry the Driftless, they have really blown it with average white folk. Their last white redoubts would be New England and Silicon Valley, both of which have suffered severe academic pollution in recent decades.

    • Replies: @Hail

    Trump was the first Republican to carry Dubuque County since Eisenhower.
     
    Interesting.

    Somebody on Wiki suggests that Dubuque City's majority-Catholic status is key to its politics. It has long had a German-Catholic character, and a Catholic majority, quite unusual for Iowa, and something that didn't "play well in Peoria," so to speak. Its Catholicism led to the development of a kind of ethnic-Catholic politics similar in general terms to what the Rhineland Catholics were doing in the same era back in Germany (the Zentrum Party as a malcontented Catholic party in a Protestant state); by the late 1920s, Dubuque was a lock for the Democrats and remained so for generations.

    A glance at its Wiki shows that Dubuque's Democratic-"lock" status began with the Al Smith campaign in 1928 (66-33 for Smith [D] over Hoover [R], despite Hoover himself being of eastern Iowa and German origin, just Protestant). Before that, it jumped around, going for La Follette in '24 and other back-and-forth results.

    Interestingly, Dubuque Co. narrowly went for Willkie in 1940, perhaps a case of Germanism briefly supserseding Catholicism, as by Nov. 1940 it was clear that FDR wanted "in" on the war against Germany. Then the war came. Then Dubuque Co. went narrowly (250-vote margin) for FDR in 1944. Not counting the two Eisenhower wins in the 1950s Era of Good Feelings, Dubuque Co. has voted D, usually by comfortable margins (only Nixon '72 and Reagan '80 came close)...until the Donald (but even this was only a +1 win).

    __________________

    The real story here in the 21st century, though, is not political-Catholicism but the story told in the following (per CNN exit poll):

    Iowa, Exit Poll 2016

    White college-grad. men (18% of voters)
    60 Trump
    33 Hillary

    White non-college-grad. men (24% of voters)
    67 Trump
    29 Hillary

    White college-grad. women (22% of voters)
    41 Trump
    52 Hillary

    White non-college-grad. women (26% of voters)
    49 Trump
    47 Hillary

    Nonwhites (10% of voters)
    25 Trump
    63 Hillary
  163. @Hail
    I don't know what kind of trolling and/or bot activity this is, but this post is copied (with possible slight additions or alterations) from here:

    https://www.quora.com/What-was-life-like-in-the-60s

    The original has plenty of mistakes, too. Elvis was never off the charts. The Colonel had anticipated the draft, and had records ready to release throughout the King’s stint in the Army.

    And quoting Bloodrock’s D.O.A. is just plain weird.

  164. Anon[349] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rajkumar Rao
    I was born in the late 1940s to an immigrant family from India and turned 12 in 1960. First, there were two 1960s; 1960 thru 1963/64 and then beyond. The first three years were a continuation of the 1950s, no real difference. I don’t recall ‘Duck and Cover’ in the 60s, that may have been a 50s thing. Rock and Roll was in a tailspin, all we were getting was Frankie Avalon, Fabian and such. Some of the ‘doo-wop’ groups were still there but the hard rockers weren’t around. Plastic was the thing, everything was covered in plastic. The new space age material. I asked my Mom once why she covered everything in vinyl. She laffed and said, it was the thing everyone was doing. There was no AC. The only place you could find AC was in a movie theatre. JFK was President and the press loved him in the way that they loved Barack Obama. For most of the press he could do no wrong, nor could Jackie or any of the Kennedys. The press had endless stories of touch football at the Kennedy compound, The Kennedy children and the Kennedy brothers. So everybody played touch football too. Viet Nam was still a distant police action; it did get press coverage but it was mostly of the Viet-Namese. American cars ruled. Automotive engineering was a different world from today. The things were fucking hugh and ran like Giant sloths. Bench seats front and rear that could fit a family of nine w/o a hitch. Gee, I loved those seats. Plus I was small enuff to ride in the shelf under the rear window. The National Highway system was copied from the Nazis and had just got under way under Eisenhower. So when you drove inter-city or inter-state it was on two lane blacktops for much or all of the way. Air travel was just beginning and people still traveled by train. Imagine telling your friends today that you’re taking a train to California or New York. Air travel was a different world from today. Every passenger was treated like a prince or princess. And the staff all had Hollywood good looks. BTW, no searching or security at all. I remember (latter 60s) buying a ticket at the airport and walking on to the flight. Often we got to walk onto the tarmac to board. All the staff smiling and greeting us like we were royalty. Smoking was allowed everywhere and the booze flowed on the flights. Folks dressed to fly. It was an occasion. The only foreign cars I recall from the early 60s was the occasional VW beetle or Mercede Benz. Japanese cars are still in the future- at least on the east coast. Back on the ground, there were supermarkets (remember I’m a city kid) but not as large as today. I remember we did much of our food shopping at neighborhood stores. A loaf of bread was 15 Cents, a hamburger at a local restaurant was 25 cents. A pack of cigarettes was 21 cents. And a newspaper was 4 cents. I remember some of these prices because as a kid I was often sent to a store to buy these items. My Mom would go to the A&P and buy a week or two of groceries for about $20. The groceries would be loaded into one or two big, paper bags which it was my job to carry. The big grocery chains in NY then were A&P and Bohacks. Latter there was a cute girl teenager cashier at the Bohacks who would let me buy any amount of stuff for the price of one item. How did I ever fuck that up. A pair of Clarks Desert Boots was about $5. In NYC, nobody wore blue jeans; That was farmers’ clothes; That’s gonna change soon. A 45 RPM record (top 10) was about 50 cents. Elvis was no longer on the charts as he had been drafted. Many young men went into the army or other military as there was still a draft of two years active duty. Fellows would volunteer for the draft to get it out of the way. But you could only volunteer for the draft in the army. There was no draft for other branches of the military. Racism was alive and very healthy. God save the poor black man that ventured into a white neighborhood. I have spoken to many black men, my age, that told me they would turn down jobs or other opportunities rather then venture into some white or ethnic areas. And the reverse was true. I remember being told not to go into certain black neighborhoods and recall being stopped once by a group of young blacks about something but nothing came of it, I was about 11 or 12. In NYC, at least, suburban flight was beginning, and every once in a while a friend or relative would move to the suburbs- never to be seen again. It was also the beginning of traffic jams. We played in the streets and parks all day and well into the night. Me? As long as I was home for dinner I was cool. It was not unusual to be out with your friends all day. Seeing your parents for the evening meal and then out again. Also, this was when extended families lived nearby so you had cousins and friends all around. Then JFK was shot and a month latter came The Beatles. LBJ was President and Viet Nam loomed ahead. Everything Changed. When JFK was shot it was a week of national mourning. Think 9/11. Everything closed, except churches. All schools, businesses, gov’t offices, etc. TV was Black and white and it was 15 hours or so of news coverage of the assassination, funeral, transfer of power. BTW there was no 24 hour TV back then. Everyone was solemn, no joking around and everyone in the country assumed that everyone in Dallas was guilty to some degree. Premarital sex was still a big no man’s land. As a teenager, we would dream about making-out or coping a feel. Holding a breast while while making out was heaven and you had to work for it. Weeks and months of being the BF. Finger-fucking was always beyond me. If your girl got pregnant, you got married that week. Dropped out of high school and got a job. Every year there was a couple that disappeared and folks would whisper that some girl was in ‘trouble’. Then came the Beatles and everything changed. Then Civil rights protest, and Viet Nam. Now begins the 60s people talk about. 77.8k Views · What did it feel like to live in the '60s? What was it like to grow up in the 1960s? How was life in the 60s in the USA? How well has Mad Men depicted the life of Americans in the 60s? What was life like in the Netherlands during the 60s? In the early sixties I lived in Virginia at Ft. Meyer. Andy Griffith show and lots of westerns. Everything was still very clean and family orientated in a weird way. If you didn’t want there to be S E X in the show you had widowers. Bonanza, My Three Sons, Mayberry. Then we moved to Hawaii. Skateboards and surfing songs. The Beatles were just becoming big. Viet Nam was stirring. JFK got killed and they had his funeral for days on every channel. Interstates were just being built. We drove across country on highways including route 66, Medgar Evers was murdered. A Black sgt in my neighbor hood threatened the people who owned the car from Mississippi. My mother told me to never tell anyone I was from Miss. We moved to Louisiana and the Viet Nam war started appearing on the six o’clock news. People trusted Walter Cronkite, Chet Huntley and David Brinkley. The music was still friendly…Jimmy Mack, Paul Revere and the Raiders, the Rollingstones. There were riots on TV, cities burning, and Dr, King was murdered. Then Bobby Kennedy. The music changed. If you’re going to San Francisco, be sure to wear some flowers in your hair….until Altamont. Then all those hippies started getting hooked on heroin and free love became less free. My Dad went to Viet Nam and we moved to Miss. I was so ought of place, but I loved my grandparents and could have lived on their farm. Woodstock and Alice’s Restaurant. Jimmy Hendrix opened for the Monkees…..Dark Shadows was what all the young folks watched. Where the Action Is! Soul Train! Hullabaloo, Laugh In. They Call Me Mellow Yellow. We All Live in a Yellow Submarine! Strawberry Fields Forever. Then one night I was listening to the radio while in bed. I heard Jimmy Mack and then Knight in Rusted Armor and I knew something just died. An era, an innocence that was never coming back. From now on it was We were flying low, hit something in the air! InnaGodadavida. Gonna be a hooker on Bleaker Street. I was eighteen when the sixties ended. 1.4k Views · Originally Answered: What was life like in the 1960s? I was born in 1965; so my experience was limited. I also can only answer about the USA but here goes. Median household income: lower than today, but growing. Fruits and vegetables were still largely seasonal. Portions in restaurants were smaller. People did not mind as long as raises came through every year. Less privacy. Houses were smaller measured by square footage. Moreover, the privacy was mostly for parents. I can remember growing up in a three-bedroom house. My parents had the brilliant idea of putting my brother and I in the same bedroom but then setting aside the spare bedroom for toys. Not surprisingly, my brother and I often fought like cats and dogs. Technology. Our house had two phones. Neither cordless. No computers. Really rich business people had phones in their cars; these were radios. I ran into one guy who hated having to add a car phone in the mid 1980s when cell phones came out; he missed the quiet when he drove. Cars were big and heavy. I think fifteen miles per gallon was good. Gas was cheap — I remember when people howled because gas hit $0.50 per gallon. I remember my folks getting a new car roughly every five years usually because they did not engage in regular maintenance. I take much better care of a car today and my 2005 Ford Taurus with 147,000 miles runs better than my old man’s cars with fewer than 50,000 miles. It helps that I check my Grease Monkey Sticker and know when to bring the car in for regular service. Retail was more expensive with higher margins. Kmart was the only big discounter and it was almost as bad then as it is today. Department stores had 100% margins. Skipping around, I remember spending more on a suit in 1985 (okay my grandparents bought it for my debating tournaments) than I pay today; of course the material and fit were both a little better then. Television. Three big networks. Local television added PBS and a few local independent stations showing reruns. Cartoons were a few hours in the afternoon and Sunday mornings. With one color television in the house (if you were lucky) you watched what dad or grandpop picked. Travel. I did not leave the USA at this time. Every year, however, we picked up my successful grandparents at the airport. Every year, they took a tour-group vacation. Since my grandfather had been working since he was 10 years old, it is hard to be jealous. Americans abroad were treated like gods — provided they stick to the safe tours in friendly countries. Less precision. I remember as a kid Burger King’s “Have it Your Way“ slogan. In those pre-computer days, forget it. My brother was a picky eater, and the fast-food restaurant inevitably got his order wrong. A scene inevitably ensued. Thanks for the A2A, Jai 12k Views · · Answer requested by Light, refreshing, idealistic, hopeful, and fun. In 1966 I hitch hiked to LA and hung out with the other hippies on the strip, indulging in the hedonism of sex, drugs, and rock and roll. It was a wonderful life for an 18-year old. I went to college and got a little more serious without losing those previous activities. The civil rights movement, supporting women’s liberation, and anti-war demonstrations were hopeful struggles to make the country and the world a better place. Although we failed to completely change the world in that decade we at least established efforts that are still on-going to improve the world we live in. Having aged considerably since then has moderated my raw hedonism and recklessness, but not changed my desire for and participation in the same efforts. And I may be old now, at least I got to see all the best bands live.

    I remember when people howled because gas hit $0.50 per gallon. I remember my folks getting a new car roughly every five years usually because they did not engage in regular maintenance. I take much better care of a car today and my 2005 Ford Taurus with 147,000 miles runs better than my old man’s cars with fewer than 50,000 miles.

    In 1979 during the (second) “oil shock”, I was 14 y/o and working as a gas jockey at suburban Mobile gas station right off a heavily traveled northeast interstate. The price of a gallon of gas cracked $1. One Saturday, I worked a 12-hour day, non-stop pumping gas one car after the other w/o a break. The line snaked for 3 miles down the road.

    I’m still driving a ’00 Ford Taurus w/ 125K miles, as the second owner. Bought it from National Car Rental in ’01 w/ 20K miles for $11K in mint condition. It’s been a cream-puff.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    When you adjust for inflation, I think gas at $3/gallon now is cheaper than 50 cents "back then" (depending on when back then was). Actually I remember gas as low as 30 cents.

    The reason cars last longer now is not because people take better care of them (actually back in the day you'd change the oil every 3,000 miles - if you are still doing this you are wasting your money because oils today are much better) but because cars are made much better now - better rust proofing, more reliable systems, etc.
    At 50,000 miles, your old car's points were worn and the carb out of adjustment, but the electronic ignition and fuel injection just keep working and working. When American industry is not faced with competition, they are content to turn out the same crap year after year (I just found out this week that GE has been using the same design pump in its dishwashers since 1970 - i.e. for the last 48 years) but the resurgent Japanese and Germans really forced the American car makers to up their games starting in the late '70s.

  165. @Rajkumar Rao
    I was born in the late 1940s to an immigrant family from India and turned 12 in 1960. First, there were two 1960s; 1960 thru 1963/64 and then beyond. The first three years were a continuation of the 1950s, no real difference. I don’t recall ‘Duck and Cover’ in the 60s, that may have been a 50s thing. Rock and Roll was in a tailspin, all we were getting was Frankie Avalon, Fabian and such. Some of the ‘doo-wop’ groups were still there but the hard rockers weren’t around. Plastic was the thing, everything was covered in plastic. The new space age material. I asked my Mom once why she covered everything in vinyl. She laffed and said, it was the thing everyone was doing. There was no AC. The only place you could find AC was in a movie theatre. JFK was President and the press loved him in the way that they loved Barack Obama. For most of the press he could do no wrong, nor could Jackie or any of the Kennedys. The press had endless stories of touch football at the Kennedy compound, The Kennedy children and the Kennedy brothers. So everybody played touch football too. Viet Nam was still a distant police action; it did get press coverage but it was mostly of the Viet-Namese. American cars ruled. Automotive engineering was a different world from today. The things were fucking hugh and ran like Giant sloths. Bench seats front and rear that could fit a family of nine w/o a hitch. Gee, I loved those seats. Plus I was small enuff to ride in the shelf under the rear window. The National Highway system was copied from the Nazis and had just got under way under Eisenhower. So when you drove inter-city or inter-state it was on two lane blacktops for much or all of the way. Air travel was just beginning and people still traveled by train. Imagine telling your friends today that you’re taking a train to California or New York. Air travel was a different world from today. Every passenger was treated like a prince or princess. And the staff all had Hollywood good looks. BTW, no searching or security at all. I remember (latter 60s) buying a ticket at the airport and walking on to the flight. Often we got to walk onto the tarmac to board. All the staff smiling and greeting us like we were royalty. Smoking was allowed everywhere and the booze flowed on the flights. Folks dressed to fly. It was an occasion. The only foreign cars I recall from the early 60s was the occasional VW beetle or Mercede Benz. Japanese cars are still in the future- at least on the east coast. Back on the ground, there were supermarkets (remember I’m a city kid) but not as large as today. I remember we did much of our food shopping at neighborhood stores. A loaf of bread was 15 Cents, a hamburger at a local restaurant was 25 cents. A pack of cigarettes was 21 cents. And a newspaper was 4 cents. I remember some of these prices because as a kid I was often sent to a store to buy these items. My Mom would go to the A&P and buy a week or two of groceries for about $20. The groceries would be loaded into one or two big, paper bags which it was my job to carry. The big grocery chains in NY then were A&P and Bohacks. Latter there was a cute girl teenager cashier at the Bohacks who would let me buy any amount of stuff for the price of one item. How did I ever fuck that up. A pair of Clarks Desert Boots was about $5. In NYC, nobody wore blue jeans; That was farmers’ clothes; That’s gonna change soon. A 45 RPM record (top 10) was about 50 cents. Elvis was no longer on the charts as he had been drafted. Many young men went into the army or other military as there was still a draft of two years active duty. Fellows would volunteer for the draft to get it out of the way. But you could only volunteer for the draft in the army. There was no draft for other branches of the military. Racism was alive and very healthy. God save the poor black man that ventured into a white neighborhood. I have spoken to many black men, my age, that told me they would turn down jobs or other opportunities rather then venture into some white or ethnic areas. And the reverse was true. I remember being told not to go into certain black neighborhoods and recall being stopped once by a group of young blacks about something but nothing came of it, I was about 11 or 12. In NYC, at least, suburban flight was beginning, and every once in a while a friend or relative would move to the suburbs- never to be seen again. It was also the beginning of traffic jams. We played in the streets and parks all day and well into the night. Me? As long as I was home for dinner I was cool. It was not unusual to be out with your friends all day. Seeing your parents for the evening meal and then out again. Also, this was when extended families lived nearby so you had cousins and friends all around. Then JFK was shot and a month latter came The Beatles. LBJ was President and Viet Nam loomed ahead. Everything Changed. When JFK was shot it was a week of national mourning. Think 9/11. Everything closed, except churches. All schools, businesses, gov’t offices, etc. TV was Black and white and it was 15 hours or so of news coverage of the assassination, funeral, transfer of power. BTW there was no 24 hour TV back then. Everyone was solemn, no joking around and everyone in the country assumed that everyone in Dallas was guilty to some degree. Premarital sex was still a big no man’s land. As a teenager, we would dream about making-out or coping a feel. Holding a breast while while making out was heaven and you had to work for it. Weeks and months of being the BF. Finger-fucking was always beyond me. If your girl got pregnant, you got married that week. Dropped out of high school and got a job. Every year there was a couple that disappeared and folks would whisper that some girl was in ‘trouble’. Then came the Beatles and everything changed. Then Civil rights protest, and Viet Nam. Now begins the 60s people talk about. 77.8k Views · What did it feel like to live in the '60s? What was it like to grow up in the 1960s? How was life in the 60s in the USA? How well has Mad Men depicted the life of Americans in the 60s? What was life like in the Netherlands during the 60s? In the early sixties I lived in Virginia at Ft. Meyer. Andy Griffith show and lots of westerns. Everything was still very clean and family orientated in a weird way. If you didn’t want there to be S E X in the show you had widowers. Bonanza, My Three Sons, Mayberry. Then we moved to Hawaii. Skateboards and surfing songs. The Beatles were just becoming big. Viet Nam was stirring. JFK got killed and they had his funeral for days on every channel. Interstates were just being built. We drove across country on highways including route 66, Medgar Evers was murdered. A Black sgt in my neighbor hood threatened the people who owned the car from Mississippi. My mother told me to never tell anyone I was from Miss. We moved to Louisiana and the Viet Nam war started appearing on the six o’clock news. People trusted Walter Cronkite, Chet Huntley and David Brinkley. The music was still friendly…Jimmy Mack, Paul Revere and the Raiders, the Rollingstones. There were riots on TV, cities burning, and Dr, King was murdered. Then Bobby Kennedy. The music changed. If you’re going to San Francisco, be sure to wear some flowers in your hair….until Altamont. Then all those hippies started getting hooked on heroin and free love became less free. My Dad went to Viet Nam and we moved to Miss. I was so ought of place, but I loved my grandparents and could have lived on their farm. Woodstock and Alice’s Restaurant. Jimmy Hendrix opened for the Monkees…..Dark Shadows was what all the young folks watched. Where the Action Is! Soul Train! Hullabaloo, Laugh In. They Call Me Mellow Yellow. We All Live in a Yellow Submarine! Strawberry Fields Forever. Then one night I was listening to the radio while in bed. I heard Jimmy Mack and then Knight in Rusted Armor and I knew something just died. An era, an innocence that was never coming back. From now on it was We were flying low, hit something in the air! InnaGodadavida. Gonna be a hooker on Bleaker Street. I was eighteen when the sixties ended. 1.4k Views · Originally Answered: What was life like in the 1960s? I was born in 1965; so my experience was limited. I also can only answer about the USA but here goes. Median household income: lower than today, but growing. Fruits and vegetables were still largely seasonal. Portions in restaurants were smaller. People did not mind as long as raises came through every year. Less privacy. Houses were smaller measured by square footage. Moreover, the privacy was mostly for parents. I can remember growing up in a three-bedroom house. My parents had the brilliant idea of putting my brother and I in the same bedroom but then setting aside the spare bedroom for toys. Not surprisingly, my brother and I often fought like cats and dogs. Technology. Our house had two phones. Neither cordless. No computers. Really rich business people had phones in their cars; these were radios. I ran into one guy who hated having to add a car phone in the mid 1980s when cell phones came out; he missed the quiet when he drove. Cars were big and heavy. I think fifteen miles per gallon was good. Gas was cheap — I remember when people howled because gas hit $0.50 per gallon. I remember my folks getting a new car roughly every five years usually because they did not engage in regular maintenance. I take much better care of a car today and my 2005 Ford Taurus with 147,000 miles runs better than my old man’s cars with fewer than 50,000 miles. It helps that I check my Grease Monkey Sticker and know when to bring the car in for regular service. Retail was more expensive with higher margins. Kmart was the only big discounter and it was almost as bad then as it is today. Department stores had 100% margins. Skipping around, I remember spending more on a suit in 1985 (okay my grandparents bought it for my debating tournaments) than I pay today; of course the material and fit were both a little better then. Television. Three big networks. Local television added PBS and a few local independent stations showing reruns. Cartoons were a few hours in the afternoon and Sunday mornings. With one color television in the house (if you were lucky) you watched what dad or grandpop picked. Travel. I did not leave the USA at this time. Every year, however, we picked up my successful grandparents at the airport. Every year, they took a tour-group vacation. Since my grandfather had been working since he was 10 years old, it is hard to be jealous. Americans abroad were treated like gods — provided they stick to the safe tours in friendly countries. Less precision. I remember as a kid Burger King’s “Have it Your Way“ slogan. In those pre-computer days, forget it. My brother was a picky eater, and the fast-food restaurant inevitably got his order wrong. A scene inevitably ensued. Thanks for the A2A, Jai 12k Views · · Answer requested by Light, refreshing, idealistic, hopeful, and fun. In 1966 I hitch hiked to LA and hung out with the other hippies on the strip, indulging in the hedonism of sex, drugs, and rock and roll. It was a wonderful life for an 18-year old. I went to college and got a little more serious without losing those previous activities. The civil rights movement, supporting women’s liberation, and anti-war demonstrations were hopeful struggles to make the country and the world a better place. Although we failed to completely change the world in that decade we at least established efforts that are still on-going to improve the world we live in. Having aged considerably since then has moderated my raw hedonism and recklessness, but not changed my desire for and participation in the same efforts. And I may be old now, at least I got to see all the best bands live.

    Plagiarized or not, this is unreadable with paragraphs. Paragraphs are handy–break your thoughts up into separate bite sized bits and they are much more easily digestible.

  166. He has a girlfriend and a young daughter, his former attorney has said.

    I read somewhere that the girlfriend is a former high school classmate of Mollie Tibbetts, the deceased.

  167. @AnotherDad

    ... so that we can have cheap milk and rich Republican dairy farm owners.
     
    Actually we don't need this garbage to have cheap milk.

    We have this thing called "technology"--i.e. white guys figuring out how to produce stuff faster, easier or better.

    Waiting around for some good harvesting weather last October, my Uncle took me out farm touring. One guy--not even a big operator, he had <100 cows--had put in these automatic milkers.
    http://umash.umn.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/LelyRobot.jpg

    The cows amble in when they are ready. The milker uses lasers to locate the tits, sprays a sanitizer and has brushes to get everything clean, then attaches the milkers, milks until the flow is over, detaches and cuts the cow loose. I saw a bit of cow contention for the next stop in line, but overall it's pretty basically a zero grunt-labor operation. (The feed and manure operation in the barn is automated in the usual fashion.) There simply is no need to have some guys in boots and bibs staring at the ass end of cows all day.

    In a sane America, these machines would be handling cow tits and Molly Tibbett's tits would be feeding her baby.

    Thank you, love the mental image of Elsie, Bessie and their sisters jostling to be next up for the robo-laser-milker.

  168. @Dtbb
    Just a theory I came up with years ago. Could all these illegal workers with fake names and social security numbers be propping up that system. They work for years with no chance of collecting that money taken out of their checks automatically and the government not only knows it but encourages it on the sly.

    It’s not just what JMcG wrote in reply, Dtbb. (I don’t know all that he does about it.) When these illegal aliens get into the system with their fake identities, do you think they come out owing money to the IRS, or getting refunds? My friend worked at one of the quick-refund tax place for a few seasons. He told me that they come in giving names of all sorts of made-up dependents. Some may not be made up, but they live in Mexico. The government just buys all that stuff because Anarcho-tyranny. What’s to stop these people from getting NOT ONLY their refunds, but their Earned Income Credit for making such low money.

    How can they live on such low money, you ask? Let me tell you, Dtbb: The American welfare state provides free WIC (food for kids, supposedly), cheap housing, and hospital care at the emergency room. That’s being paid by working Americans’ income, property, and sales taxes, oh and on their medical bills, per “muh Socialist healthcare, excuse me ‘single payer’”.

    I hope you don’t feel any anger from me on this. I just got mad thinking about it all. I know about this stuff, Dtbb, from personal experience and from reading VDare.com for 15 years or so.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    He told me that they come in giving names of all sorts of made-up dependents. Some may not be made up, but they live in Mexico. The government just buys all that stuff because Anarcho-tyranny. What’s to stop these people from getting NOT ONLY their refunds, but their Earned Income Credit for making such low money.
     
    No doubt he told you that, but all the tax returns filed by these commercial tax-preparers have to be filed electronically and not rejected before any "refund anticipation loan" is issued. This means that the social security number given must electronically match the first four letters of the first and second (can be middle name) names as per social security records, or the tax return will not be accepted as having been filed.

    So for a child overseas to be accepted as a dependent, that child would have to be a US citizen born overseas to get a SS#, or must have previously been accepted for immigration to the US and traveled to the US and entered on a legitimate visa to obtain the SS#, and then traveled back overseas again (which is possible).

    I suppose it is also possible that the claimant could use a false SS# that matches a name of someone else, but this will soon come unstuck when the same SS# is claimed on another tax return.

    There are also quite a few restrictions in place regarding issuance of ITIN numbers. For example an ITIN number WILL be issued to an overseas wife so that a joint tax return can be filed, but not to overseas step-children (unless they have physically lived with you for more than half the year) or any other financial dependent who does not have a US SS# or ITIN.

    So to say that "the government just buys all that stuff" is an exaggeration. No doubt frauds do occur, but to succeed they have to be much more sophisticated than the person with no experience of these things would assume.

    https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/3058377-my-friend-wife-and-child-lives-in-another-country-but-he-support-both-of-them-neither-one-of-them-have-a-ss-can-he-file-them-as-dependents-since-he-supports-them
    , @Dtbb
    Preaching to the choir. Never said I had one scintilla of sympathy for them. They should be made so paranoid and in fear of being caught that they self deport. Hell put a bounty on all illegals and let the marketplace solve the problem.
  169. @J1234

    Lori Chesser, an immigration employment lawyer advising the farm, said that companies cannot discriminate against workers based on how they look or how their names sound.
     
    https://phalsephillysports.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/crazed-muslim.jpg

    "Death to the infidel!" signed, Bob Smith

    As a lawyer on retainer for Mr. Haven Monahan, I respectfully request you CEASE AND DESIST your libel against my client. Please take his picture down off the internet – he was having a bad hair beard day.

  170. @Logan
    Is it rage at being part of a helot class that white women don’t acknowledge as potential mates?

    I have a theory along these lines that is wildly unpopular.

    In the old days, a young woman propositioned by a man could tell him, "I'm not that kind of girl." This "let him down easy," as she was, or claimed to be, rejecting all illicit sexual activity, not the man himself as being unworthy of being considered a potential mate.

    This still works, to some extent, for a married woman. But media universally portrays single young women as being eager to immediately jump into bed with any sexually attractive man they meet.

    So, any refusal by a young woman to do so immediately becomes an intensely personal rejection of the man as a person. Such rejection often, not unreasonably, is responded to with anger. I would assume the anger is intensified when he assumes the rejection is based on his race or ethnicity.

    BTW, what a loser this guy is! I frequently approach random young women while they're jogging, and they almost always disappear into the weeds with me for a little afternoon delight. /s

    “BTW, what a loser this guy is! I frequently approach random young women while they’re jogging, and they almost always disappear into the weeds with me for a little afternoon delight.”

    So…Logan’s Run meets Starland Vocal Band.
    Nice.

  171. @Reg Cæsar
    Trump was the first Republican to carry Dubuque County since Eisenhower. If Democrats can't carry the Driftless, they have really blown it with average white folk. Their last white redoubts would be New England and Silicon Valley, both of which have suffered severe academic pollution in recent decades.

    Trump was the first Republican to carry Dubuque County since Eisenhower.

    Interesting.

    Somebody on Wiki suggests that Dubuque City’s majority-Catholic status is key to its politics. It has long had a German-Catholic character, and a Catholic majority, quite unusual for Iowa, and something that didn’t “play well in Peoria,” so to speak. Its Catholicism led to the development of a kind of ethnic-Catholic politics similar in general terms to what the Rhineland Catholics were doing in the same era back in Germany (the Zentrum Party as a malcontented Catholic party in a Protestant state); by the late 1920s, Dubuque was a lock for the Democrats and remained so for generations.

    A glance at its Wiki shows that Dubuque’s Democratic-”lock” status began with the Al Smith campaign in 1928 (66-33 for Smith [D] over Hoover [R], despite Hoover himself being of eastern Iowa and German origin, just Protestant). Before that, it jumped around, going for La Follette in ’24 and other back-and-forth results.

    Interestingly, Dubuque Co. narrowly went for Willkie in 1940, perhaps a case of Germanism briefly supserseding Catholicism, as by Nov. 1940 it was clear that FDR wanted “in” on the war against Germany. Then the war came. Then Dubuque Co. went narrowly (250-vote margin) for FDR in 1944. Not counting the two Eisenhower wins in the 1950s Era of Good Feelings, Dubuque Co. has voted D, usually by comfortable margins (only Nixon ’72 and Reagan ’80 came close)…until the Donald (but even this was only a +1 win).

    __________________

    The real story here in the 21st century, though, is not political-Catholicism but the story told in the following (per CNN exit poll):

    Iowa, Exit Poll 2016

    White college-grad. men (18% of voters)
    60 Trump
    33 Hillary

    White non-college-grad. men (24% of voters)
    67 Trump
    29 Hillary

    White college-grad. women (22% of voters)
    41 Trump
    52 Hillary

    White non-college-grad. women (26% of voters)
    49 Trump
    47 Hillary

    Nonwhites (10% of voters)
    25 Trump
    63 Hillary

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson II
    Conclusion: Immigration moratorium.
  172. @Anon
    I remember when people howled because gas hit $0.50 per gallon. I remember my folks getting a new car roughly every five years usually because they did not engage in regular maintenance. I take much better care of a car today and my 2005 Ford Taurus with 147,000 miles runs better than my old man’s cars with fewer than 50,000 miles.

    In 1979 during the (second) "oil shock", I was 14 y/o and working as a gas jockey at suburban Mobile gas station right off a heavily traveled northeast interstate. The price of a gallon of gas cracked $1. One Saturday, I worked a 12-hour day, non-stop pumping gas one car after the other w/o a break. The line snaked for 3 miles down the road.

    I'm still driving a '00 Ford Taurus w/ 125K miles, as the second owner. Bought it from National Car Rental in '01 w/ 20K miles for $11K in mint condition. It's been a cream-puff.

    When you adjust for inflation, I think gas at $3/gallon now is cheaper than 50 cents “back then” (depending on when back then was). Actually I remember gas as low as 30 cents.

    The reason cars last longer now is not because people take better care of them (actually back in the day you’d change the oil every 3,000 miles – if you are still doing this you are wasting your money because oils today are much better) but because cars are made much better now – better rust proofing, more reliable systems, etc.
    At 50,000 miles, your old car’s points were worn and the carb out of adjustment, but the electronic ignition and fuel injection just keep working and working. When American industry is not faced with competition, they are content to turn out the same crap year after year (I just found out this week that GE has been using the same design pump in its dishwashers since 1970 – i.e. for the last 48 years) but the resurgent Japanese and Germans really forced the American car makers to up their games starting in the late ’70s.

    • Replies: @unpc downunder
    Yes, one of the few things I like about the current age is reliable and economical motor cars. The only only bad buy car I've had in recent times was a second hand manual Nissan I bought off an East Asian female (the gearbox and engine valves proved to be in shocking condition).

    As a student of HBD I should have known better.
  173. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/JohnWSmith/status/1037437719369183232

    Yes, almost all unique phrases match up with Mattis. No sign of Kelly’s work using “first principles.”

    Mattis also seems to enjoy writing. Probably not true of most suspects.

    I do not think it is a prank or false flag.

    Could be a lower level guy despite what the NYT says. But again, the overall tone is brainy military guy, not upper-middle GOP DC bureaucrat.

  174. @Alec Leamas

    So to question whether a man who speaks little or no English and who has a Facebook page under the name of Cristhian Bahena Rivera is really named “John Budd” is racist and illegal. Not only is it OK to look the other way but the law COMMANDS us to be stupid and ignore all common sense (at least according to the dairy farmer’s lawyer). But if he told you that his name was Juan and you insisted on calling him John, that would be racist and illegal too.
     
    This sort of humiliation in getting you to assiduously ignore the obvious is as the kids say "a feature, not a bug." They want you dispirited.

    We get in a back and forth with the left over immigration generally and their false statistics about illegal crime. But the higher rate of crime by illegals is almost besides the point - it's the anarcho-tyranny of the the law touching every aspect of the average American's life contrasted with the open lawlessness of the illegal immigration racket that drives normal people red with rage.

    AGREED with all the other folks agreeing, Mr. Leamas. I want to add something though. Because of that very anarcho-tyranny, the numbers on illegal alien crime are very inaccurate. I had Ron Unz himself graciously write me back under one of the articles telling me that his 100,000 words on the subject of hispanic crime rates beat anything VDare has to say about it.

    Hey, Mr. Unz is a very bright guy, and he can deal with numbers. However, you can do all the calculations you want, and write 100,000 words, but it’s only as good as some basic inputs that common sense may tell you are bogus. Conviction rates of illegal aliens – how does that work? Jose gets busted, high-tails it to Mexico, and comes back next year as a guy named Hose-B. All the stolen identities gum up all the numbers.

  175. When they make the Cristhian Bahena Rivera movie, I think Oscar Isaac would be good casting.

  176. @L Woods

    Most of the white knighting old codgers on this site think most young women aren't depraved sluts owning to having no personal knowledge of young women
     
    FIFY betaboi

    AGREED, Mr. Woods, but #257 is a girl, maybe a gammagirl.

  177. @Johann Ricke

    There’s a new thing now in PA (don’t know whether they do it in other states) where, when you want to buy beer or wine, they ask you for ID (which they then scan and which must go into a database somewhere – someday it will leak out that Republican candidate X has a frequent fondness for Chardonnay) even if you are (like me) pretty obviously well north of your 21st birthday. I don’t like it but I do it because I guess this way they don’t have to embarrass 30 year old Asian men who look like they are 16 – same logic as feeling the crotch of 90 year old white women so as not to “profile” young Muslim men.
     
    That may be so that straw buyers for underage drinkers are easily detected.

    That may be so that straw buyers for underage drinkers are easily detected.

    That doesn’t make me feel any better about that kind of thing, Johann. Does anyone remember (a Mr. Vin Suprynowitz does.*) when Americans used to laugh at the whole “papers, please!” business in the movies because we were Americans and lived free? Not anymore.

    * More in Part 2 and Part 3.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    Aaah, the old "That 'papers please' stuff is NaziCommie... it won't happen here" is a trap for young players who fail to take the big, broad flexible outlook.

    Firstly... in the US ICE can search anybody within a 100 mile radius (an areea of ~31,416-ish square miles) of any entry point: almost 75% of the US population lives within 100 miles of an entry point, because that includes every international airport, many of which are more than 100 miles inland (e.g., Denver, Salt Lake etc).

    I used to believe that "Papers please" was just not done in civilised societies; it no longer applies, or we no longer qualify as civilised here in Australia (actually pronounced "Straya" in Bogan[1]).

    Having been subject to that level of silly ignorance is actually quite embarrassing, because there have been times when I publicly sang the praises of the lack of "Papers please" in Straya, full of the type of idiotic pride that people display when their overlords are a teensy bit less obviously-tyrannical than someone else's overlords. Not full-retard "stand for the anthem/jet flyover/flag" pride of the genre displayed by IQ-90 Americans, but still: goeth before a fall, bitch.

    And it's odd, really, since if anything I am actually more Kiwi than Strayan - I was born in Ao Tea Roa; I'm part-Maori (Kiwi-chocolate); I support the All Blacks and love it when perform the haka and beat the Wobblies (Wallabies)... and since the events outlined below, I travel on a gorgeous black uruwhenua rather than an Australian passport (NZ passports are written in Maori and English, not French and English).

    The story is a fun one (but sadly not as embellished or interesting as most survivor testimony from concentration camps).

    Let's fucking do this... read it or don't: je n'en ai rien à foutre... I had a blast writing it, coz I started drinking at midday at it's 3:30pm.

    Our story starts in 2006, when The Lovely was seconded by her firm to a law firm in Paris (on Avenue Kléber, literally around the corner from Trocadero).

    As part of The Lovely's secondment, her firm had paid tens of thousands of euro to an agent to sort out cartes de séjour for the both of us. From time to time we would get an email telling us to go somewhere and sign something, and we would do that.

    We figured it was all being handled, although I wasn't helpful - I was hostile to the whole thing, on the basis that the French relied on people from my country any time Germany decided they wanted Alsace back. I would say so often.

    You see, Strayans and Kiwis are almost considered human by the Frogs: along with a few others, we get to stay in Frogland for 3 months without a visa - that being a paltry recognition of tens of thousands of our forebears dying in the mud to help save France from the shame of having capitulated twice in a generation.

    When the Krauts cross the border, we're allowed to flood in en masse for as long as we like, so long as we're armed and prepared to help reverse yet another French military humiliation. But if Jerry is behaving himself, we're restricted to 3 months and then it's "M'sieur, you must, 'ow you say, sling your fucking 'ook".

    Anyhow... The Lovely's secondment was 7 months, and we had had no papers-related drama in Paris, or in the country house 55km south of Paris where we spent weekends. Plus, work took us to London and Oslo a few times during those 7 months - so we'd been 'out and back' and re-set the clock.

    After the secondment, we took a summer house in Deepest Darkest Auvergne (the best bit of France: mountainous and full of short, tough, gritty blokes whose French is almost as bad as mine).

    We were having a lovely time in the French countryside, until about a year later when I was 'controlé' (checked) by a sanglier ('boar'; French slang for a gendarme) in a car park.

    I didn't have my passport (or anything else) on me - in Straya it's just not part of the things people do: we might carry our driver's licence (and credit cards), but even that's not universal. I explained this to the sanglier .

    Actually I was far less diplomatic: I explained that I come from a free country where citizens aren't inveighed upon in car parks by les forces de l'ordre; where 'liberté' is not just a slogan; and that besides, French soil contains thousands of ANZAC skeletons who fought to prevent people in uniform saying "Papers please" to citizens.

    He took my name and went and used his radio.

    He came back and said "M'sieur, vous êtes en situation irrégulière!", and carted me off.

    Five hours later I was in the Centre de Détention Administrative at Lyon - an immigration detention centre, or as I prefer to call it, a concentration camp. (Warning: what follows may contain concentration camp-memoir type embellishments).

    The camp had the whole nine yards:
    • razor wire;
    • bars on the windows;
    • doors locked at night;
    • an electric conveyor belt that vaporised thousands of detainees at once;
    • a mad doctor who made theatrical costumes (mainly hats) out of tortured detainees' skins; and
    • guards playing ping-pong with the testicles of babies that they had recently sacrificed in satanic rituals.

    (We all know the memoir dictum: some things are true although they never actually happened. The razor wire, window bars and locked doors violate this, in that they are true even though they did actually happen).

    After two weeks in the camp, I was escorted all the way back to Straya by 4 cops (2 armed): they were good guys - especially Gildas, whose ambition was to live in Straya.

    We drank heaps, and chatted at length: I gave them a detailed analysis centred on how it made no sense for the French state to spend an entire year's worth of their pensions sending me (and them) halfway round the world, when I was absolutely free to return the same day if I wanted.

    Coz here's the weird thing: at the hearing, the judge pointed out that I was not being 'deported' (which carries a mandatory ban on return). I was only required to be 'réconduite à la frontière' (taken back to the border). All I had to do was cross the Schengen border, and I was free to return for the 'standard' 90 days. I pointed out that this border crossing could be achieved if I was to go to London for a day - at my own expense - since I had the right to go there. She said it was not how the process is routinely done, and anyhow it's "all organised now, and oh, by the way, the centre says it has misplaced your passport so you can't go to the UK anyway. We need to get you a laissez-passer - temporary travel document" (she said it in French, though: "laissez-passer" is the same in both, weirdly).

    I also pointed out that I had actually, provably 'franchi' the frontière less than two weeks before I was picked up: I had gone to Geneva for a weekend (and had proof of it), so the clock should have restarted. Her view was that unless my passport was stamped as having exited (that's not done at the Swiss border), there was no new clock. That has no basis in actual, y'know, law, but she wasn't taking discussion on finer points from someone in handcuffs. BOO.

    So back to the camp.

    In the camp I was something of a curiosity. The 'détenus' - overwhelmingly from the Maghreb and other African former-colonies - thought it spoke volumes about France's lurch to the Right, that they had detained a wealthy, white, educated chappie from a first-world country.

    Plus, they had heard great things about Straya - the people, the weather, the system. I showed them some photos I had in my luggage, and they were rapt.

    At the prompting of some activist friends, a TV crew came (not just for me, but I was the 'hook') and they were getting in everyone's ear about the potential for an international incident. They needn't have worried - as Assange's plight shows, 'our' diplomats are the sort of preening fuckwits who have no interest in how other governments treat Strayan serfs... in other words, our diplomats are "Australian", not Strayan.

    A few of the Muslims thought I was a DGSE infiltrator: partly because it appeared that I was capable of summoning TV crews out of thin air, but also because I knew one of the senior guards who would come and chatted with me in the dining hall at the evening meal of the day I arrived (he and I had common interests in the mid-80s, in Castelnaudaray).

    When they heard me speak French, and it was clear I wasn't a Frog, they were curious rather than suspicious.

    Within a day or so, they had worked out that I was kind of interesting, spoke fluent-if-phonetically-awful French, and had spent the second half of my second day in the camp day helping a Bangladeshi woman explain her quest for asylum to the NGO (her name was Momtaj Alo: she was a women's rights campaigner who had run afoul of the Bangladeshi regime after a military coup; she spoke limited English, and zero French, and had lit out from Italy when she learned that the Bangladeshi junta had sent a team to apprehend her[*]) .

    So they figured I was an OK egg: seems personable; talks funny; helps ladies in distress; apparently comes from a wondrous country on the other side of the planet.

    The fact that I was 'kosher' to the Muzzies had a side benefit: understand that the French system specifically refused to declare whether the meat being served was halal (supposedly because "laïcité, but actually because racisme)".

    Anyhow - the fact that the meat was not verified as halal meant that the Muslims wouldn't eat it, and since I was earmarked as a goodish egg, they would get their serves, and offer me the meat portion of their meals.

    This was no small thing: the food in the camp was excellent. On Tuesdays and Saturdays, dinner was confit de canard. I had 6 cuisses each time: in fact I put on almost 10lb in the two weeks I was detained. (Note: I know outrageous embellishments are expected in every concentration-camp-memoir, and I've inserted a few and made them just as obvious as they are in other harrowing first-person accounts of camp life... but the food story is not one of them.)

    So anyhow... I was constantly asked to tell folks about Straya. I made some genuine friends - folks from Senegal, Côte d'Ivoire, Cap Verde, Cameroon, Morocco, Algeria... even a couple of Poles, a Turkish guy (called Ayhan Turk!) and an Afghani.

    In telling these folks all about Straya, I made it absolutely clear that although it wasn't completely the ארץ זבת חלב ודבש (lol), one thing you could count on was a fair shake.


    The moment you get your feet on Strayan soil, nobody will ask you for your papers. It just isn't a part of the normal role of police. Straya is a free country: we didn't do "Papers, please".

     

    ...I thundered (in French) to the rapt attention of the Assembled Various (some of them may have been Huddled Masses Yearning to Breathe Free; I never checked).

    Straya is a free country: we didn't do "Papers, please"... how those words sting now.

    In 2015, Straya legislated to give extra powers to the obese retards who comprise the corrupt "Border Farce". Because terrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrism, or some other shibboleth.

    So now, a bunch of people so retarded that the only job they could get was as a TSA-like apparatchik, were now permitted to ask to see people's papers, at any time, in the street.

    It's still not normal practice for Strayans to carry proof of citizenship on their person, and they're under no legal obligation to do so. In other words these powers are meant to be focused on anyone who looks 'foreign'.

    As part of the PR for these new powers, they planned to have their 85-IQ high-school dropouts conduct a 'sweep' in central Melbourne, and check hundreds (if not, thousands) of people's immigration status.

    The plan was leaked a few days before it was due to happen, and was such a public outcry from individuals across the political spectrum that they cancelled the whole thing: the Little Eichmanns and Amateur Berias had to go back to pilfering things from travellers' luggage.

    In 2016 their boss was fired for using his position to get his girlfriend a job for which she was not qualified... karma, bitch.
    .
    .
    The 'sting in the tail' (all stories have to have this)[*]...

    When I was in the camp. the people from CIMADE (a detainee-rights/admin group) were able to check the French system. They were able to verify that my carte de séjour had been approved more than a year ago, and I had been sent a letter telling me to go to the Préfecture to collect it... but the letter went to an old address despite them having been keep fully updated as to our address changes.

    Despite the carte de séjour being valid for 5 years, the Interior Ministry refused to let me out of detention, or to permit me to take possession of the carte de séjour: they told me to re-apply when I returned from Straya.

    Notes.

    [1] "Bogan" is Strayan for "white trash", and also as a descriptor for anything to do with white trash, e.g., their argot and idioms.

    [*] Not an embellishment.

  178. @Mr. Anon
    I have nothing but contempt for the poor girl's father, who felt the need to virtue signal after his daughter was raped and murdered. The proper response would be outrage at whatever circumstances permitted this crime to happen. In my view, he has earned the cruel memes that have been generated about him.

    Agreed. Molly Tibbetts was young and stupid–in part no doubt from being raised by this creep.

    Pa Tibbets is a full grown man, needs social approval like a 14-year old girl and refuses to do the basic job of a man–protect his family, his nation. His is not a man. And does not deserve to live in America, does not deserve to have his line continue, because he is unwilling to take on the single responsible for that–defense.

    • Agree: Kylie
    • Replies: @Kylie
    Exactly. You could say the tragedy occurred before her murder when her father failed to explain to her the facts of life she needed to know for survival. Her murder was the result of his failure as a father, as a man and as a responsible member of society. After her murder, her family bleating the party line about not demonizing a group because of one member's actions was a travesty.

    Frankly, I'm relieved she did not live long enough to reproduce. It's bad enough her killer did. We don't need either kind in our country.
  179. @Jack D
    There's a new thing now in PA (don't know whether they do it in other states) where, when you want to buy beer or wine, they ask you for ID (which they then scan and which must go into a database somewhere - someday it will leak out that Republican candidate X has a frequent fondness for Chardonnay) even if you are (like me) pretty obviously well north of your 21st birthday. I don't like it but I do it because I guess this way they don't have to embarrass 30 year old Asian men who look like they are 16 - same logic as feeling the crotch of 90 year old white women so as not to "profile" young Muslim men.

    Likewise, if I want to buy some Sudafed - same drill - they record your name and address so that meth heads can't buy enough Sudafed to convert to meth.

    And getting on an airplane - fuggedaboutit without ID. And you can't even go to Canada any more without a passport.

    So, you don't need "papers" as long as you never leave your home, but otherwise, that ship has sailed.

    This is all of a piece with how the leftist state works - if it is something that they really care about, they have no problem burdening the hell out of you and business - no burden is too great to save the whales from plastic bags or whatever. But if it is in their interest NOT to care (like voter ID or checking whether this little brown man is really named John Budd) then suddenly whatever it is "burdensome" and impossible to comply with and blah, blah, blah.

    I got into that very thing with a young guy (not in Pennsylvania) at the grocery over a 6-pack, who told me “you need to know how to pick your battles.” I left the beer and chips on the check-out counter.

  180. @densa
    In 1858 Kansas the best thing that would have happened to him is he would have been lynched. Most legal lynchings were carried out on Whites, not Blacks or Amerindians.

    Course, then there was vigilante justice that didn't wait on formalities. Most of these were for claim jumping or horse thieving. In 1858 there was a moratorium on political murder in an effort to end the tit for tat of the Border Wars. They were keen to adopt a legal system, which is now being retrograded to a selective justice based again on politics.

    I think this murder would have been big news in 1978. Lots of shock. In 2018 we resign ourselves to the erosion of all that was once achieved.

    In the early 1980s my Upper Midwest town and county had its first ever murder. A shopkeeper murdered his assistant/mistress in a fit of passion. It was certainly big news in the local media but I don’t know if it made it out into the wider world.

    Following the Reagan/Republicans amnesty the area began getting squatamalans and by the end of the 1990s and continuing until today, the county has just under a murder a year. The perps are all squatamalans and the victims are mostly other squatamalans but some are white girls. None of these stories make it out into the wider world and most of them barely register locally. The locals just believe it’s part of God’s plan and there’s nothing you can do about it and even if you could do something about it it would be racist and you’re not a racist commie pinko are you?

    It is interesting to think about why Mollie Tibbetts became a story and so many others don’t. She’s probably better looking than most and was college student at University of Iowa which makes her more compelling than most on both counts. The wealthy PR/CoC father from CA Bay Area who is likely gay seems to have been the catalyst who turned this from a local to national even international story. He and the rest of the family clearly did not expect or want the perp to be anything other than a white guy and it would be interesting to find out who it was they thought it really was and/or who they wanted it to be. They seemed genuinely surprised/shocked it was one of the squats and wouldn’t have made it a story if they’d even suspected it would be a squat. The family turned a sad story even sadder with their post-suspect-apprehension behavior and made themselves and their kind look awful to the rest of the country.

  181. @Logan
    Is it rage at being part of a helot class that white women don’t acknowledge as potential mates?

    I have a theory along these lines that is wildly unpopular.

    In the old days, a young woman propositioned by a man could tell him, "I'm not that kind of girl." This "let him down easy," as she was, or claimed to be, rejecting all illicit sexual activity, not the man himself as being unworthy of being considered a potential mate.

    This still works, to some extent, for a married woman. But media universally portrays single young women as being eager to immediately jump into bed with any sexually attractive man they meet.

    So, any refusal by a young woman to do so immediately becomes an intensely personal rejection of the man as a person. Such rejection often, not unreasonably, is responded to with anger. I would assume the anger is intensified when he assumes the rejection is based on his race or ethnicity.

    BTW, what a loser this guy is! I frequently approach random young women while they're jogging, and they almost always disappear into the weeds with me for a little afternoon delight. /s

    How is the anger reasonable or sane? Rejection is part of life and should be an opportunity for self improvement.

    Lots of women get dumped after only a couple of dates or get outright rejected by attractive high status guys. Is it reasonable if they poison the guy or slash his tires or get their brothers to beat the crap out of him?

    Besides, plenty of sex crimes happened in the 70s when many young girls did use the “I’m not that kind of girl” let down.

  182. @Lot
    I think I have a 70% chance of being right. Surprised nobody else is pushing this theory. Everyone else is obsessed with "lodestar." By itself, sure it points to Pence who used the term a lot.

    Every other clue says general and the phrase analysis says Mattis. Would Pence make a big point point out of praising McCain? No way, Pence is a hard core Tea Party faction guy, who largely hated McCain. The Pence-ists are clearly wrong.

    Just because Pence hates McCain doesn’t mean he isn’t willing to use his ghost to help accomplish one of his goals. Pence was quoted at one point as saying “god wants me to be President.”

    I think it was probably a no-name lower-level staffer who wrote the article BUT if it was someone truly close to Trump there’s a good chance it was Pence. Maybe Pence thinks he’s on a sinking ship for real this time and wants to justify staying in power if something happens to Trump.

    • Replies: @kihowi
    He certainly didn't look very happy at the victory speech. His wife did.
  183. @Johann Ricke

    There’s a new thing now in PA (don’t know whether they do it in other states) where, when you want to buy beer or wine, they ask you for ID (which they then scan and which must go into a database somewhere – someday it will leak out that Republican candidate X has a frequent fondness for Chardonnay) even if you are (like me) pretty obviously well north of your 21st birthday. I don’t like it but I do it because I guess this way they don’t have to embarrass 30 year old Asian men who look like they are 16 – same logic as feeling the crotch of 90 year old white women so as not to “profile” young Muslim men.
     
    That may be so that straw buyers for underage drinkers are easily detected.

    Straw buyers for the youth-surely one of the most pressing issues in 2018 America!

    Anyone who never got someone to buy drinks for them while they were under 21 is either from a wacky religion or a socially inept loser.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Sure having a government database where all of your alcohol purchases are logged is a small price to pay for ridding our society of this scourge. And think of how many H1-B's gained work writing the software for this, all the condos in Vail purchased by the brother in law of the head of the liquor commission who got the contract to connect all the retailers with the state and supply the scanner hardware at a high markup, etc. And it only added a few pennies to the price of each beer. If you are against this you must be one of those nutty libertarians who wants our society to descend into utter chaos in the absence of reasonable government regulations.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Anyone who never got someone to buy drinks for them while they were under 21 is either from a wacky religion or a socially inept loser.

     

    Or grew up in a state where the drinking age was 18,

    Q Why did the Coulters move to Connecticut?
    A No income tax.

    Q Why did Ann choose to go to Cornell rather than Yale?
    A Lower drinking age.
    , @anonymous
    Agreed. I started at 15 and never looked back!

    Never drove after drinking though. I'm white.
  184. @Bard of Bumperstickers
    Gezombieapocalyptunggessellschaft.

    “Gezombieapocalyptunggessellschaft.”

    Freudenweisentoten.

    (Joy in white death)

    • Replies: @Anon87
    Now that's a good one. Seems to be the feeling of the left for sure.
  185. anon[607] • Disclaimer says:
    @Wilkey
    This is how the enforcement provisions of the 1986 were so quickly gutted. They argued that requiring businesses to check documents was discriminatory against Hispanic job applicants, so they removed them or even banned them. Even now businesses face almost no threat of fees for failing to validate the legal status of their employees, vs. a the very real threat of an EEOC or ACLU or private lawsuit for doing so PLUS the fact that it it raises the cost of hiring.

    Leftists have made it illegal to use common sense to enforce the law. It doesn't matter that the odds that a Hispanic person who spokes little or no English is living here illegally is like 1 in 3, 2hile for whites (or for people with good English skills in general) the odds of being here illegally are vanishingly small. The Left is doing everything it can to make enforcement of the law (see also: the TSA) impossible, exorbitantly costly and/or as inconvenient as possible to as many people as possible. The biggest threat to our freedom as Americans is the banning of common sense.

    One thing about the deep state … I’ve come to believe that most operatives don’t consider themselves members. It’s like calling yourself rich – if you can wring a comfortable out of them, thats a victory.

    No one considers themselves an elite or a bureaucrat either. They are dedicated civil servants don’t you know.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  186. anon[288] • Disclaimer says:

    Farming is such a bad business that it relies on cheating to subsist. It is only a couple percent of GDP. They produce commodities. Supply is partially out of their control. Demand is inelastic.

    As far as agribusiness, they are mostly involved with processing of some sort. The typical reaction to low prices is to increase yield. It is like a checklist of what to avoid in a business.

    Capital intensive – check.
    Commodity – check.
    Weather dependent – check.

    Government subsidies are just high enough to keep supply high. Problem is, these are our red states.

    The television show, Real Mccoys, had a Mexican laborer:

    The McCoys’ farm had previously been owned by an uncle, Ben McCoy, who died. The former West Virginians join the Grange farm association and hire Pepino as a farm hand after he informs them that he had worked for Ben, serving as his “foreman” on the property. In the episode that aired on January 8, 1962, Pepino becomes an American citizen and takes the surname “McCoy”.

    • Replies: @anon
    Instead of calling out farmers, Id like to peel them off somehow. MS-13 and Muslims aren't working on the Farm. They are a huge impediment to solving this and are natural populists.
    , @Jack D
    The US government has 1.4 BILLION pounds of surplus cheese in storage, people are drinking less (cow) milk, but we need more "John Budds" from south of the border to help us produce even more useless milk.


    https://www.investors.com/politics/editorials/dairy-subsidies-government-farm-programs-surplus-cheese/
  187. @Achmed E. Newman
    It's not just what JMcG wrote in reply, Dtbb. (I don't know all that he does about it.) When these illegal aliens get into the system with their fake identities, do you think they come out owing money to the IRS, or getting refunds? My friend worked at one of the quick-refund tax place for a few seasons. He told me that they come in giving names of all sorts of made-up dependents. Some may not be made up, but they live in Mexico. The government just buys all that stuff because Anarcho-tyranny. What's to stop these people from getting NOT ONLY their refunds, but their Earned Income Credit for making such low money.

    How can they live on such low money, you ask? Let me tell you, Dtbb: The American welfare state provides free WIC (food for kids, supposedly), cheap housing, and hospital care at the emergency room. That's being paid by working Americans' income, property, and sales taxes, oh and on their medical bills, per "muh Socialist healthcare, excuse me 'single payer'".

    I hope you don't feel any anger from me on this. I just got mad thinking about it all. I know about this stuff, Dtbb, from personal experience and from reading VDare.com for 15 years or so.

    He told me that they come in giving names of all sorts of made-up dependents. Some may not be made up, but they live in Mexico. The government just buys all that stuff because Anarcho-tyranny. What’s to stop these people from getting NOT ONLY their refunds, but their Earned Income Credit for making such low money.

    No doubt he told you that, but all the tax returns filed by these commercial tax-preparers have to be filed electronically and not rejected before any “refund anticipation loan” is issued. This means that the social security number given must electronically match the first four letters of the first and second (can be middle name) names as per social security records, or the tax return will not be accepted as having been filed.

    So for a child overseas to be accepted as a dependent, that child would have to be a US citizen born overseas to get a SS#, or must have previously been accepted for immigration to the US and traveled to the US and entered on a legitimate visa to obtain the SS#, and then traveled back overseas again (which is possible).

    I suppose it is also possible that the claimant could use a false SS# that matches a name of someone else, but this will soon come unstuck when the same SS# is claimed on another tax return.

    There are also quite a few restrictions in place regarding issuance of ITIN numbers. For example an ITIN number WILL be issued to an overseas wife so that a joint tax return can be filed, but not to overseas step-children (unless they have physically lived with you for more than half the year) or any other financial dependent who does not have a US SS# or ITIN.

    So to say that “the government just buys all that stuff” is an exaggeration. No doubt frauds do occur, but to succeed they have to be much more sophisticated than the person with no experience of these things would assume.

    https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/3058377-my-friend-wife-and-child-lives-in-another-country-but-he-support-both-of-them-neither-one-of-them-have-a-ss-can-he-file-them-as-dependents-since-he-supports-them

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Thanks, Jonathan.

    (I feel richer already :-))
  188. @anon
    Farming is such a bad business that it relies on cheating to subsist. It is only a couple percent of GDP. They produce commodities. Supply is partially out of their control. Demand is inelastic.

    As far as agribusiness, they are mostly involved with processing of some sort. The typical reaction to low prices is to increase yield. It is like a checklist of what to avoid in a business.

    Capital intensive - check.
    Commodity - check.
    Weather dependent - check.

    Government subsidies are just high enough to keep supply high. Problem is, these are our red states.

    The television show, Real Mccoys, had a Mexican laborer:

    The McCoys' farm had previously been owned by an uncle, Ben McCoy, who died. The former West Virginians join the Grange farm association and hire Pepino as a farm hand after he informs them that he had worked for Ben, serving as his "foreman" on the property. In the episode that aired on January 8, 1962, Pepino becomes an American citizen and takes the surname "McCoy".

    Instead of calling out farmers, Id like to peel them off somehow. MS-13 and Muslims aren’t working on the Farm. They are a huge impediment to solving this and are natural populists.

  189. @Another Canadian
    Leervernichtungsgefuehl?

    Google Translate struggled with that, but “empty extermination feeling” seems close? Not bad.

  190. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    "Gezombieapocalyptunggessellschaft."

    Freudenweisentoten.

    (Joy in white death)

    Now that’s a good one. Seems to be the feeling of the left for sure.

  191. @anon
    Farming is such a bad business that it relies on cheating to subsist. It is only a couple percent of GDP. They produce commodities. Supply is partially out of their control. Demand is inelastic.

    As far as agribusiness, they are mostly involved with processing of some sort. The typical reaction to low prices is to increase yield. It is like a checklist of what to avoid in a business.

    Capital intensive - check.
    Commodity - check.
    Weather dependent - check.

    Government subsidies are just high enough to keep supply high. Problem is, these are our red states.

    The television show, Real Mccoys, had a Mexican laborer:

    The McCoys' farm had previously been owned by an uncle, Ben McCoy, who died. The former West Virginians join the Grange farm association and hire Pepino as a farm hand after he informs them that he had worked for Ben, serving as his "foreman" on the property. In the episode that aired on January 8, 1962, Pepino becomes an American citizen and takes the surname "McCoy".

    The US government has 1.4 BILLION pounds of surplus cheese in storage, people are drinking less (cow) milk, but we need more “John Budds” from south of the border to help us produce even more useless milk.

    https://www.investors.com/politics/editorials/dairy-subsidies-government-farm-programs-surplus-cheese/

    • Replies: @anon
    They need to find another job, but try telling them that. Maybe get rid of 1/3. Not that the invisible hand won't grind them down, subsidies or not. The ROIC on farming is abysmal.
  192. @S. Anonyia
    Straw buyers for the youth-surely one of the most pressing issues in 2018 America!

    Anyone who never got someone to buy drinks for them while they were under 21 is either from a wacky religion or a socially inept loser.

    Sure having a government database where all of your alcohol purchases are logged is a small price to pay for ridding our society of this scourge. And think of how many H1-B’s gained work writing the software for this, all the condos in Vail purchased by the brother in law of the head of the liquor commission who got the contract to connect all the retailers with the state and supply the scanner hardware at a high markup, etc. And it only added a few pennies to the price of each beer. If you are against this you must be one of those nutty libertarians who wants our society to descend into utter chaos in the absence of reasonable government regulations.

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    If you are against this you must be one of those nutty libertarians who wants our society to descend into utter chaos in the absence of reasonable government regulations.
     
    Hasn't that already happened? We do not have 'reasonable government regulations.' But of course you know that, don't you?
  193. Isn’t “John Budd” a Keanu Reeves movie in which the bad guys kill his beloved potted dope plant by overwatering it, so he takes bloody vengeance?

    That was worthy of beer-spewing.

  194. @Hail

    Trump was the first Republican to carry Dubuque County since Eisenhower.
     
    Interesting.

    Somebody on Wiki suggests that Dubuque City's majority-Catholic status is key to its politics. It has long had a German-Catholic character, and a Catholic majority, quite unusual for Iowa, and something that didn't "play well in Peoria," so to speak. Its Catholicism led to the development of a kind of ethnic-Catholic politics similar in general terms to what the Rhineland Catholics were doing in the same era back in Germany (the Zentrum Party as a malcontented Catholic party in a Protestant state); by the late 1920s, Dubuque was a lock for the Democrats and remained so for generations.

    A glance at its Wiki shows that Dubuque's Democratic-"lock" status began with the Al Smith campaign in 1928 (66-33 for Smith [D] over Hoover [R], despite Hoover himself being of eastern Iowa and German origin, just Protestant). Before that, it jumped around, going for La Follette in '24 and other back-and-forth results.

    Interestingly, Dubuque Co. narrowly went for Willkie in 1940, perhaps a case of Germanism briefly supserseding Catholicism, as by Nov. 1940 it was clear that FDR wanted "in" on the war against Germany. Then the war came. Then Dubuque Co. went narrowly (250-vote margin) for FDR in 1944. Not counting the two Eisenhower wins in the 1950s Era of Good Feelings, Dubuque Co. has voted D, usually by comfortable margins (only Nixon '72 and Reagan '80 came close)...until the Donald (but even this was only a +1 win).

    __________________

    The real story here in the 21st century, though, is not political-Catholicism but the story told in the following (per CNN exit poll):

    Iowa, Exit Poll 2016

    White college-grad. men (18% of voters)
    60 Trump
    33 Hillary

    White non-college-grad. men (24% of voters)
    67 Trump
    29 Hillary

    White college-grad. women (22% of voters)
    41 Trump
    52 Hillary

    White non-college-grad. women (26% of voters)
    49 Trump
    47 Hillary

    Nonwhites (10% of voters)
    25 Trump
    63 Hillary

    Conclusion: Immigration moratorium.

  195. That first ‘real’ John Budd (the Sonic Burger dude) appears to have some weird animal sitting on top of his otherwise-shiny pate.

    I mean honestly – there’s a need to get priorities straight.

    Kidnap and murder under an alias is one thing; we can all agree it’s bad, yadda yadda… but I can’t unsee that haircrime (assuming it’s a combover, and not a piece of actual carpet).

    The worst thing is he’s got such a young face: if he got rid of the carpet/combover he would look vastly better, and he wouldn’t be self-conscious any time anyone laughed within earshot.

  196. @Jack D
    Sure having a government database where all of your alcohol purchases are logged is a small price to pay for ridding our society of this scourge. And think of how many H1-B's gained work writing the software for this, all the condos in Vail purchased by the brother in law of the head of the liquor commission who got the contract to connect all the retailers with the state and supply the scanner hardware at a high markup, etc. And it only added a few pennies to the price of each beer. If you are against this you must be one of those nutty libertarians who wants our society to descend into utter chaos in the absence of reasonable government regulations.

    If you are against this you must be one of those nutty libertarians who wants our society to descend into utter chaos in the absence of reasonable government regulations.

    Hasn’t that already happened? We do not have ‘reasonable government regulations.’ But of course you know that, don’t you?

  197. @Logan
    Is it rage at being part of a helot class that white women don’t acknowledge as potential mates?

    I have a theory along these lines that is wildly unpopular.

    In the old days, a young woman propositioned by a man could tell him, "I'm not that kind of girl." This "let him down easy," as she was, or claimed to be, rejecting all illicit sexual activity, not the man himself as being unworthy of being considered a potential mate.

    This still works, to some extent, for a married woman. But media universally portrays single young women as being eager to immediately jump into bed with any sexually attractive man they meet.

    So, any refusal by a young woman to do so immediately becomes an intensely personal rejection of the man as a person. Such rejection often, not unreasonably, is responded to with anger. I would assume the anger is intensified when he assumes the rejection is based on his race or ethnicity.

    BTW, what a loser this guy is! I frequently approach random young women while they're jogging, and they almost always disappear into the weeds with me for a little afternoon delight. /s

    I would assume the anger is intensified when he assumes the rejection is based on his race or ethnicity.

    Yet another reason for the 2nd Amendment.

  198. @Jack D
    The US government has 1.4 BILLION pounds of surplus cheese in storage, people are drinking less (cow) milk, but we need more "John Budds" from south of the border to help us produce even more useless milk.


    https://www.investors.com/politics/editorials/dairy-subsidies-government-farm-programs-surplus-cheese/

    They need to find another job, but try telling them that. Maybe get rid of 1/3. Not that the invisible hand won’t grind them down, subsidies or not. The ROIC on farming is abysmal.

  199. @Rajkumar Rao
    I was born in the late 1940s to an immigrant family from India and turned 12 in 1960. First, there were two 1960s; 1960 thru 1963/64 and then beyond. The first three years were a continuation of the 1950s, no real difference. I don’t recall ‘Duck and Cover’ in the 60s, that may have been a 50s thing. Rock and Roll was in a tailspin, all we were getting was Frankie Avalon, Fabian and such. Some of the ‘doo-wop’ groups were still there but the hard rockers weren’t around. Plastic was the thing, everything was covered in plastic. The new space age material. I asked my Mom once why she covered everything in vinyl. She laffed and said, it was the thing everyone was doing. There was no AC. The only place you could find AC was in a movie theatre. JFK was President and the press loved him in the way that they loved Barack Obama. For most of the press he could do no wrong, nor could Jackie or any of the Kennedys. The press had endless stories of touch football at the Kennedy compound, The Kennedy children and the Kennedy brothers. So everybody played touch football too. Viet Nam was still a distant police action; it did get press coverage but it was mostly of the Viet-Namese. American cars ruled. Automotive engineering was a different world from today. The things were fucking hugh and ran like Giant sloths. Bench seats front and rear that could fit a family of nine w/o a hitch. Gee, I loved those seats. Plus I was small enuff to ride in the shelf under the rear window. The National Highway system was copied from the Nazis and had just got under way under Eisenhower. So when you drove inter-city or inter-state it was on two lane blacktops for much or all of the way. Air travel was just beginning and people still traveled by train. Imagine telling your friends today that you’re taking a train to California or New York. Air travel was a different world from today. Every passenger was treated like a prince or princess. And the staff all had Hollywood good looks. BTW, no searching or security at all. I remember (latter 60s) buying a ticket at the airport and walking on to the flight. Often we got to walk onto the tarmac to board. All the staff smiling and greeting us like we were royalty. Smoking was allowed everywhere and the booze flowed on the flights. Folks dressed to fly. It was an occasion. The only foreign cars I recall from the early 60s was the occasional VW beetle or Mercede Benz. Japanese cars are still in the future- at least on the east coast. Back on the ground, there were supermarkets (remember I’m a city kid) but not as large as today. I remember we did much of our food shopping at neighborhood stores. A loaf of bread was 15 Cents, a hamburger at a local restaurant was 25 cents. A pack of cigarettes was 21 cents. And a newspaper was 4 cents. I remember some of these prices because as a kid I was often sent to a store to buy these items. My Mom would go to the A&P and buy a week or two of groceries for about $20. The groceries would be loaded into one or two big, paper bags which it was my job to carry. The big grocery chains in NY then were A&P and Bohacks. Latter there was a cute girl teenager cashier at the Bohacks who would let me buy any amount of stuff for the price of one item. How did I ever fuck that up. A pair of Clarks Desert Boots was about $5. In NYC, nobody wore blue jeans; That was farmers’ clothes; That’s gonna change soon. A 45 RPM record (top 10) was about 50 cents. Elvis was no longer on the charts as he had been drafted. Many young men went into the army or other military as there was still a draft of two years active duty. Fellows would volunteer for the draft to get it out of the way. But you could only volunteer for the draft in the army. There was no draft for other branches of the military. Racism was alive and very healthy. God save the poor black man that ventured into a white neighborhood. I have spoken to many black men, my age, that told me they would turn down jobs or other opportunities rather then venture into some white or ethnic areas. And the reverse was true. I remember being told not to go into certain black neighborhoods and recall being stopped once by a group of young blacks about something but nothing came of it, I was about 11 or 12. In NYC, at least, suburban flight was beginning, and every once in a while a friend or relative would move to the suburbs- never to be seen again. It was also the beginning of traffic jams. We played in the streets and parks all day and well into the night. Me? As long as I was home for dinner I was cool. It was not unusual to be out with your friends all day. Seeing your parents for the evening meal and then out again. Also, this was when extended families lived nearby so you had cousins and friends all around. Then JFK was shot and a month latter came The Beatles. LBJ was President and Viet Nam loomed ahead. Everything Changed. When JFK was shot it was a week of national mourning. Think 9/11. Everything closed, except churches. All schools, businesses, gov’t offices, etc. TV was Black and white and it was 15 hours or so of news coverage of the assassination, funeral, transfer of power. BTW there was no 24 hour TV back then. Everyone was solemn, no joking around and everyone in the country assumed that everyone in Dallas was guilty to some degree. Premarital sex was still a big no man’s land. As a teenager, we would dream about making-out or coping a feel. Holding a breast while while making out was heaven and you had to work for it. Weeks and months of being the BF. Finger-fucking was always beyond me. If your girl got pregnant, you got married that week. Dropped out of high school and got a job. Every year there was a couple that disappeared and folks would whisper that some girl was in ‘trouble’. Then came the Beatles and everything changed. Then Civil rights protest, and Viet Nam. Now begins the 60s people talk about. 77.8k Views · What did it feel like to live in the '60s? What was it like to grow up in the 1960s? How was life in the 60s in the USA? How well has Mad Men depicted the life of Americans in the 60s? What was life like in the Netherlands during the 60s? In the early sixties I lived in Virginia at Ft. Meyer. Andy Griffith show and lots of westerns. Everything was still very clean and family orientated in a weird way. If you didn’t want there to be S E X in the show you had widowers. Bonanza, My Three Sons, Mayberry. Then we moved to Hawaii. Skateboards and surfing songs. The Beatles were just becoming big. Viet Nam was stirring. JFK got killed and they had his funeral for days on every channel. Interstates were just being built. We drove across country on highways including route 66, Medgar Evers was murdered. A Black sgt in my neighbor hood threatened the people who owned the car from Mississippi. My mother told me to never tell anyone I was from Miss. We moved to Louisiana and the Viet Nam war started appearing on the six o’clock news. People trusted Walter Cronkite, Chet Huntley and David Brinkley. The music was still friendly…Jimmy Mack, Paul Revere and the Raiders, the Rollingstones. There were riots on TV, cities burning, and Dr, King was murdered. Then Bobby Kennedy. The music changed. If you’re going to San Francisco, be sure to wear some flowers in your hair….until Altamont. Then all those hippies started getting hooked on heroin and free love became less free. My Dad went to Viet Nam and we moved to Miss. I was so ought of place, but I loved my grandparents and could have lived on their farm. Woodstock and Alice’s Restaurant. Jimmy Hendrix opened for the Monkees…..Dark Shadows was what all the young folks watched. Where the Action Is! Soul Train! Hullabaloo, Laugh In. They Call Me Mellow Yellow. We All Live in a Yellow Submarine! Strawberry Fields Forever. Then one night I was listening to the radio while in bed. I heard Jimmy Mack and then Knight in Rusted Armor and I knew something just died. An era, an innocence that was never coming back. From now on it was We were flying low, hit something in the air! InnaGodadavida. Gonna be a hooker on Bleaker Street. I was eighteen when the sixties ended. 1.4k Views · Originally Answered: What was life like in the 1960s? I was born in 1965; so my experience was limited. I also can only answer about the USA but here goes. Median household income: lower than today, but growing. Fruits and vegetables were still largely seasonal. Portions in restaurants were smaller. People did not mind as long as raises came through every year. Less privacy. Houses were smaller measured by square footage. Moreover, the privacy was mostly for parents. I can remember growing up in a three-bedroom house. My parents had the brilliant idea of putting my brother and I in the same bedroom but then setting aside the spare bedroom for toys. Not surprisingly, my brother and I often fought like cats and dogs. Technology. Our house had two phones. Neither cordless. No computers. Really rich business people had phones in their cars; these were radios. I ran into one guy who hated having to add a car phone in the mid 1980s when cell phones came out; he missed the quiet when he drove. Cars were big and heavy. I think fifteen miles per gallon was good. Gas was cheap — I remember when people howled because gas hit $0.50 per gallon. I remember my folks getting a new car roughly every five years usually because they did not engage in regular maintenance. I take much better care of a car today and my 2005 Ford Taurus with 147,000 miles runs better than my old man’s cars with fewer than 50,000 miles. It helps that I check my Grease Monkey Sticker and know when to bring the car in for regular service. Retail was more expensive with higher margins. Kmart was the only big discounter and it was almost as bad then as it is today. Department stores had 100% margins. Skipping around, I remember spending more on a suit in 1985 (okay my grandparents bought it for my debating tournaments) than I pay today; of course the material and fit were both a little better then. Television. Three big networks. Local television added PBS and a few local independent stations showing reruns. Cartoons were a few hours in the afternoon and Sunday mornings. With one color television in the house (if you were lucky) you watched what dad or grandpop picked. Travel. I did not leave the USA at this time. Every year, however, we picked up my successful grandparents at the airport. Every year, they took a tour-group vacation. Since my grandfather had been working since he was 10 years old, it is hard to be jealous. Americans abroad were treated like gods — provided they stick to the safe tours in friendly countries. Less precision. I remember as a kid Burger King’s “Have it Your Way“ slogan. In those pre-computer days, forget it. My brother was a picky eater, and the fast-food restaurant inevitably got his order wrong. A scene inevitably ensued. Thanks for the A2A, Jai 12k Views · · Answer requested by Light, refreshing, idealistic, hopeful, and fun. In 1966 I hitch hiked to LA and hung out with the other hippies on the strip, indulging in the hedonism of sex, drugs, and rock and roll. It was a wonderful life for an 18-year old. I went to college and got a little more serious without losing those previous activities. The civil rights movement, supporting women’s liberation, and anti-war demonstrations were hopeful struggles to make the country and the world a better place. Although we failed to completely change the world in that decade we at least established efforts that are still on-going to improve the world we live in. Having aged considerably since then has moderated my raw hedonism and recklessness, but not changed my desire for and participation in the same efforts. And I may be old now, at least I got to see all the best bands live.

    So you hitchhiked to LA as an infant?

  200. @Hail

    There needs to be a message length limit
     
    I thought Ron had put in something whereby a message over a certain length automatically got a "More" tag after x words, to prevent this possible-bot's 2,200-word textvalanche from becoming a scroll-nuisance.

    I bet the lack of paragraph breaks broke it.

  201. @Jonathan Mason

    He told me that they come in giving names of all sorts of made-up dependents. Some may not be made up, but they live in Mexico. The government just buys all that stuff because Anarcho-tyranny. What’s to stop these people from getting NOT ONLY their refunds, but their Earned Income Credit for making such low money.
     
    No doubt he told you that, but all the tax returns filed by these commercial tax-preparers have to be filed electronically and not rejected before any "refund anticipation loan" is issued. This means that the social security number given must electronically match the first four letters of the first and second (can be middle name) names as per social security records, or the tax return will not be accepted as having been filed.

    So for a child overseas to be accepted as a dependent, that child would have to be a US citizen born overseas to get a SS#, or must have previously been accepted for immigration to the US and traveled to the US and entered on a legitimate visa to obtain the SS#, and then traveled back overseas again (which is possible).

    I suppose it is also possible that the claimant could use a false SS# that matches a name of someone else, but this will soon come unstuck when the same SS# is claimed on another tax return.

    There are also quite a few restrictions in place regarding issuance of ITIN numbers. For example an ITIN number WILL be issued to an overseas wife so that a joint tax return can be filed, but not to overseas step-children (unless they have physically lived with you for more than half the year) or any other financial dependent who does not have a US SS# or ITIN.

    So to say that "the government just buys all that stuff" is an exaggeration. No doubt frauds do occur, but to succeed they have to be much more sophisticated than the person with no experience of these things would assume.

    https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/3058377-my-friend-wife-and-child-lives-in-another-country-but-he-support-both-of-them-neither-one-of-them-have-a-ss-can-he-file-them-as-dependents-since-he-supports-them

    Thanks, Jonathan.

    (I feel richer already :-))

  202. @S. Anonyia
    Straw buyers for the youth-surely one of the most pressing issues in 2018 America!

    Anyone who never got someone to buy drinks for them while they were under 21 is either from a wacky religion or a socially inept loser.

    Anyone who never got someone to buy drinks for them while they were under 21 is either from a wacky religion or a socially inept loser.

    Or grew up in a state where the drinking age was 18,

    Q Why did the Coulters move to Connecticut?
    A No income tax.

    Q Why did Ann choose to go to Cornell rather than Yale?
    A Lower drinking age.

  203. @S. Anonyia
    Straw buyers for the youth-surely one of the most pressing issues in 2018 America!

    Anyone who never got someone to buy drinks for them while they were under 21 is either from a wacky religion or a socially inept loser.

    Agreed. I started at 15 and never looked back!

    Never drove after drinking though. I’m white.

  204. @Achmed E. Newman

    That may be so that straw buyers for underage drinkers are easily detected.
     
    That doesn't make me feel any better about that kind of thing, Johann. Does anyone remember (a Mr. Vin Suprynowitz does.*) when Americans used to laugh at the whole "papers, please!" business in the movies because we were Americans and lived free? Not anymore.

    * More in Part 2 and Part 3.

    Aaah, the old “That ‘papers please’ stuff is NaziCommie… it won’t happen here” is a trap for young players who fail to take the big, broad flexible outlook.

    Firstly… in the US ICE can search anybody within a 100 mile radius (an areea of ~31,416-ish square miles) of any entry point: almost 75% of the US population lives within 100 miles of an entry point, because that includes every international airport, many of which are more than 100 miles inland (e.g., Denver, Salt Lake etc).

    I used to believe that “Papers please” was just not done in civilised societies; it no longer applies, or we no longer qualify as civilised here in Australia (actually pronounced “Straya” in Bogan[1]).

    Having been subject to that level of silly ignorance is actually quite embarrassing, because there have been times when I publicly sang the praises of the lack of “Papers please” in Straya, full of the type of idiotic pride that people display when their overlords are a teensy bit less obviously-tyrannical than someone else’s overlords. Not full-retard “stand for the anthem/jet flyover/flag” pride of the genre displayed by IQ-90 Americans, but still: goeth before a fall, bitch.

    And it’s odd, really, since if anything I am actually more Kiwi than Strayan – I was born in Ao Tea Roa; I’m part-Maori (Kiwi-chocolate); I support the All Blacks and love it when perform the haka and beat the Wobblies (Wallabies)… and since the events outlined below, I travel on a gorgeous black uruwhenua rather than an Australian passport (NZ passports are written in Maori and English, not French and English).

    The story is a fun one (but sadly not as embellished or interesting as most survivor testimony from concentration camps).

    Let’s fucking do this… read it or don’t: je n’en ai rien à foutre… I had a blast writing it, coz I started drinking at midday at it’s 3:30pm.

    Our story starts in 2006, when The Lovely was seconded by her firm to a law firm in Paris (on Avenue Kléber, literally around the corner from Trocadero).

    As part of The Lovely‘s secondment, her firm had paid tens of thousands of euro to an agent to sort out cartes de séjour for the both of us. From time to time we would get an email telling us to go somewhere and sign something, and we would do that.

    We figured it was all being handled, although I wasn’t helpful – I was hostile to the whole thing, on the basis that the French relied on people from my country any time Germany decided they wanted Alsace back. I would say so often.

    You see, Strayans and Kiwis are almost considered human by the Frogs: along with a few others, we get to stay in Frogland for 3 months without a visa – that being a paltry recognition of tens of thousands of our forebears dying in the mud to help save France from the shame of having capitulated twice in a generation.

    When the Krauts cross the border, we’re allowed to flood in en masse for as long as we like, so long as we’re armed and prepared to help reverse yet another French military humiliation. But if Jerry is behaving himself, we’re restricted to 3 months and then it’s “M’sieur, you must, ‘ow you say, sling your fucking ‘ook“.

    Anyhow… The Lovely‘s secondment was 7 months, and we had had no papers-related drama in Paris, or in the country house 55km south of Paris where we spent weekends. Plus, work took us to London and Oslo a few times during those 7 months – so we’d been ‘out and back’ and re-set the clock.

    After the secondment, we took a summer house in Deepest Darkest Auvergne (the best bit of France: mountainous and full of short, tough, gritty blokes whose French is almost as bad as mine).

    We were having a lovely time in the French countryside, until about a year later when I was ‘controlé‘ (checked) by a sanglier (‘boar’; French slang for a gendarme) in a car park.

    I didn’t have my passport (or anything else) on me – in Straya it’s just not part of the things people do: we might carry our driver’s licence (and credit cards), but even that’s not universal. I explained this to the sanglier .

    Actually I was far less diplomatic: I explained that I come from a free country where citizens aren’t inveighed upon in car parks by les forces de l’ordre; where ‘liberté‘ is not just a slogan; and that besides, French soil contains thousands of ANZAC skeletons who fought to prevent people in uniform saying “Papers please” to citizens.

    He took my name and went and used his radio.

    He came back and said “M’sieur, vous êtes en situation irrégulière!”, and carted me off.

    Five hours later I was in the Centre de Détention Administrative at Lyon – an immigration detention centre, or as I prefer to call it, a concentration camp. (Warning: what follows may contain concentration camp-memoir type embellishments).

    The camp had the whole nine yards:
    • razor wire;
    • bars on the windows;
    • doors locked at night;
    • an electric conveyor belt that vaporised thousands of detainees at once;
    • a mad doctor who made theatrical costumes (mainly hats) out of tortured detainees’ skins; and
    • guards playing ping-pong with the testicles of babies that they had recently sacrificed in satanic rituals.

    (We all know the memoir dictum: some things are true although they never actually happened. The razor wire, window bars and locked doors violate this, in that they are true even though they did actually happen).

    After two weeks in the camp, I was escorted all the way back to Straya by 4 cops (2 armed): they were good guys – especially Gildas, whose ambition was to live in Straya.

    We drank heaps, and chatted at length: I gave them a detailed analysis centred on how it made no sense for the French state to spend an entire year’s worth of their pensions sending me (and them) halfway round the world, when I was absolutely free to return the same day if I wanted.

    Coz here’s the weird thing: at the hearing, the judge pointed out that I was not being ‘deported’ (which carries a mandatory ban on return). I was only required to be ‘réconduite à la frontière‘ (taken back to the border). All I had to do was cross the Schengen border, and I was free to return for the ‘standard’ 90 days. I pointed out that this border crossing could be achieved if I was to go to London for a day – at my own expense – since I had the right to go there. She said it was not how the process is routinely done, and anyhow it’s “all organised now, and oh, by the way, the centre says it has misplaced your passport so you can’t go to the UK anyway. We need to get you a laissez-passer – temporary travel document” (she said it in French, though: “laissez-passer” is the same in both, weirdly).

    I also pointed out that I had actually, provably ‘franchi‘ the frontière less than two weeks before I was picked up: I had gone to Geneva for a weekend (and had proof of it), so the clock should have restarted. Her view was that unless my passport was stamped as having exited (that’s not done at the Swiss border), there was no new clock. That has no basis in actual, y’know, law, but she wasn’t taking discussion on finer points from someone in handcuffs. BOO.

    So back to the camp.

    In the camp I was something of a curiosity. The ‘détenus‘ – overwhelmingly from the Maghreb and other African former-colonies – thought it spoke volumes about France’s lurch to the Right, that they had detained a wealthy, white, educated chappie from a first-world country.

    Plus, they had heard great things about Straya - the people, the weather, the system. I showed them some photos I had in my luggage, and they were rapt.

    At the prompting of some activist friends, a TV crew came (not just for me, but I was the ‘hook’) and they were getting in everyone’s ear about the potential for an international incident. They needn’t have worried – as Assange’s plight shows, ‘our’ diplomats are the sort of preening fuckwits who have no interest in how other governments treat Strayan serfs… in other words, our diplomats are “Australian”, not Strayan.

    A few of the Muslims thought I was a DGSE infiltrator: partly because it appeared that I was capable of summoning TV crews out of thin air, but also because I knew one of the senior guards who would come and chatted with me in the dining hall at the evening meal of the day I arrived (he and I had common interests in the mid-80s, in Castelnaudaray).

    When they heard me speak French, and it was clear I wasn’t a Frog, they were curious rather than suspicious.

    Within a day or so, they had worked out that I was kind of interesting, spoke fluent-if-phonetically-awful French, and had spent the second half of my second day in the camp day helping a Bangladeshi woman explain her quest for asylum to the NGO (her name was Momtaj Alo: she was a women’s rights campaigner who had run afoul of the Bangladeshi regime after a military coup; she spoke limited English, and zero French, and had lit out from Italy when she learned that the Bangladeshi junta had sent a team to apprehend her[*]) .

    So they figured I was an OK egg: seems personable; talks funny; helps ladies in distress; apparently comes from a wondrous country on the other side of the planet.

    The fact that I was ‘kosher’ to the Muzzies had a side benefit: understand that the French system specifically refused to declare whether the meat being served was halal (supposedly because “laïcité, but actually because racisme)”.

    Anyhow – the fact that the meat was not verified as halal meant that the Muslims wouldn’t eat it, and since I was earmarked as a goodish egg, they would get their serves, and offer me the meat portion of their meals.

    This was no small thing: the food in the camp was excellent. On Tuesdays and Saturdays, dinner was confit de canard. I had 6 cuisses each time: in fact I put on almost 10lb in the two weeks I was detained. (Note: I know outrageous embellishments are expected in every concentration-camp-memoir, and I’ve inserted a few and made them just as obvious as they are in other harrowing first-person accounts of camp life… but the food story is not one of them.)

    So anyhow… I was constantly asked to tell folks about Straya. I made some genuine friends – folks from Senegal, Côte d’Ivoire, Cap Verde, Cameroon, Morocco, Algeria… even a couple of Poles, a Turkish guy (called Ayhan Turk!) and an Afghani.

    In telling these folks all about Straya, I made it absolutely clear that although it wasn’t completely the ארץ זבת חלב ודבש (lol), one thing you could count on was a fair shake.

    The moment you get your feet on Strayan soil, nobody will ask you for your papers. It just isn’t a part of the normal role of police. Straya is a free country: we didn’t do “Papers, please.

    …I thundered (in French) to the rapt attention of the Assembled Various (some of them may have been Huddled Masses Yearning to Breathe Free; I never checked).

    Straya is a free country: we didn’t do “Papers, please… how those words sting now.

    In 2015, Straya legislated to give extra powers to the obese retards who comprise the corrupt “Border Farce”. Because terrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrism, or some other shibboleth.

    So now, a bunch of people so retarded that the only job they could get was as a TSA-like apparatchik, were now permitted to ask to see people’s papers, at any time, in the street.

    It’s still not normal practice for Strayans to carry proof of citizenship on their person, and they’re under no legal obligation to do so. In other words these powers are meant to be focused on anyone who looks ‘foreign’.

    As part of the PR for these new powers, they planned to have their 85-IQ high-school dropouts conduct a ‘sweep’ in central Melbourne, and check hundreds (if not, thousands) of people’s immigration status.

    The plan was leaked a few days before it was due to happen, and was such a public outcry from individuals across the political spectrum that they cancelled the whole thing: the Little Eichmanns and Amateur Berias had to go back to pilfering things from travellers’ luggage.

    In 2016 their boss was fired for using his position to get his girlfriend a job for which she was not qualified… karma, bitch.
    .
    .
    The ‘sting in the tail’ (all stories have to have this)[*]…

    When I was in the camp. the people from CIMADE (a detainee-rights/admin group) were able to check the French system. They were able to verify that my carte de séjour had been approved more than a year ago, and I had been sent a letter telling me to go to the Préfecture to collect it… but the letter went to an old address despite them having been keep fully updated as to our address changes.

    Despite the carte de séjour being valid for 5 years, the Interior Ministry refused to let me out of detention, or to permit me to take possession of the carte de séjour: they told me to re-apply when I returned from Straya.

    Notes.

    [1] “Bogan” is Strayan for “white trash”, and also as a descriptor for anything to do with white trash, e.g., their argot and idioms.

    [*] Not an embellishment.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    RON ... WHAT ABOUT A POST-LENGTH MAXIMUM ???
    , @JMcG
    Great story! Beer is on me if our paths should ever cross.
    , @Prof. Woland

    “That ‘papers please’ stuff is NaziCommie… it won’t happen here”
     
    One of the ironies about not requiring secure bio-metric ID is that it is far more problematic to release people back into the public while they await a court date or have a voluntary deportation order so the only thing you can do is lock them up. If we used it, in effect, illegal aliens without papers would be in their own form of house arrest. If they cannot work, travel, or buy or sell anything they are basically little more than tourists without money. Most of them would have to feed off of relatives or other benefactors thereby using up their good will. Before long, not only would the illegals find it pointless to be here but so would their support network that was trying to help them get a foothold into the country.
  205. @Jack D
    When you adjust for inflation, I think gas at $3/gallon now is cheaper than 50 cents "back then" (depending on when back then was). Actually I remember gas as low as 30 cents.

    The reason cars last longer now is not because people take better care of them (actually back in the day you'd change the oil every 3,000 miles - if you are still doing this you are wasting your money because oils today are much better) but because cars are made much better now - better rust proofing, more reliable systems, etc.
    At 50,000 miles, your old car's points were worn and the carb out of adjustment, but the electronic ignition and fuel injection just keep working and working. When American industry is not faced with competition, they are content to turn out the same crap year after year (I just found out this week that GE has been using the same design pump in its dishwashers since 1970 - i.e. for the last 48 years) but the resurgent Japanese and Germans really forced the American car makers to up their games starting in the late '70s.

    Yes, one of the few things I like about the current age is reliable and economical motor cars. The only only bad buy car I’ve had in recent times was a second hand manual Nissan I bought off an East Asian female (the gearbox and engine valves proved to be in shocking condition).

    As a student of HBD I should have known better.

  206. @res

    Some kind soul, please post the YouTube video.
     
    Here you go. Thanks for the background.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhisIT_CuQ8

    Thanks.

  207. @Kratoklastes
    Aaah, the old "That 'papers please' stuff is NaziCommie... it won't happen here" is a trap for young players who fail to take the big, broad flexible outlook.

    Firstly... in the US ICE can search anybody within a 100 mile radius (an areea of ~31,416-ish square miles) of any entry point: almost 75% of the US population lives within 100 miles of an entry point, because that includes every international airport, many of which are more than 100 miles inland (e.g., Denver, Salt Lake etc).

    I used to believe that "Papers please" was just not done in civilised societies; it no longer applies, or we no longer qualify as civilised here in Australia (actually pronounced "Straya" in Bogan[1]).

    Having been subject to that level of silly ignorance is actually quite embarrassing, because there have been times when I publicly sang the praises of the lack of "Papers please" in Straya, full of the type of idiotic pride that people display when their overlords are a teensy bit less obviously-tyrannical than someone else's overlords. Not full-retard "stand for the anthem/jet flyover/flag" pride of the genre displayed by IQ-90 Americans, but still: goeth before a fall, bitch.

    And it's odd, really, since if anything I am actually more Kiwi than Strayan - I was born in Ao Tea Roa; I'm part-Maori (Kiwi-chocolate); I support the All Blacks and love it when perform the haka and beat the Wobblies (Wallabies)... and since the events outlined below, I travel on a gorgeous black uruwhenua rather than an Australian passport (NZ passports are written in Maori and English, not French and English).

    The story is a fun one (but sadly not as embellished or interesting as most survivor testimony from concentration camps).

    Let's fucking do this... read it or don't: je n'en ai rien à foutre... I had a blast writing it, coz I started drinking at midday at it's 3:30pm.

    Our story starts in 2006, when The Lovely was seconded by her firm to a law firm in Paris (on Avenue Kléber, literally around the corner from Trocadero).

    As part of The Lovely's secondment, her firm had paid tens of thousands of euro to an agent to sort out cartes de séjour for the both of us. From time to time we would get an email telling us to go somewhere and sign something, and we would do that.

    We figured it was all being handled, although I wasn't helpful - I was hostile to the whole thing, on the basis that the French relied on people from my country any time Germany decided they wanted Alsace back. I would say so often.

    You see, Strayans and Kiwis are almost considered human by the Frogs: along with a few others, we get to stay in Frogland for 3 months without a visa - that being a paltry recognition of tens of thousands of our forebears dying in the mud to help save France from the shame of having capitulated twice in a generation.

    When the Krauts cross the border, we're allowed to flood in en masse for as long as we like, so long as we're armed and prepared to help reverse yet another French military humiliation. But if Jerry is behaving himself, we're restricted to 3 months and then it's "M'sieur, you must, 'ow you say, sling your fucking 'ook".

    Anyhow... The Lovely's secondment was 7 months, and we had had no papers-related drama in Paris, or in the country house 55km south of Paris where we spent weekends. Plus, work took us to London and Oslo a few times during those 7 months - so we'd been 'out and back' and re-set the clock.

    After the secondment, we took a summer house in Deepest Darkest Auvergne (the best bit of France: mountainous and full of short, tough, gritty blokes whose French is almost as bad as mine).

    We were having a lovely time in the French countryside, until about a year later when I was 'controlé' (checked) by a sanglier ('boar'; French slang for a gendarme) in a car park.

    I didn't have my passport (or anything else) on me - in Straya it's just not part of the things people do: we might carry our driver's licence (and credit cards), but even that's not universal. I explained this to the sanglier .

    Actually I was far less diplomatic: I explained that I come from a free country where citizens aren't inveighed upon in car parks by les forces de l'ordre; where 'liberté' is not just a slogan; and that besides, French soil contains thousands of ANZAC skeletons who fought to prevent people in uniform saying "Papers please" to citizens.

    He took my name and went and used his radio.

    He came back and said "M'sieur, vous êtes en situation irrégulière!", and carted me off.

    Five hours later I was in the Centre de Détention Administrative at Lyon - an immigration detention centre, or as I prefer to call it, a concentration camp. (Warning: what follows may contain concentration camp-memoir type embellishments).

    The camp had the whole nine yards:
    • razor wire;
    • bars on the windows;
    • doors locked at night;
    • an electric conveyor belt that vaporised thousands of detainees at once;
    • a mad doctor who made theatrical costumes (mainly hats) out of tortured detainees' skins; and
    • guards playing ping-pong with the testicles of babies that they had recently sacrificed in satanic rituals.

    (We all know the memoir dictum: some things are true although they never actually happened. The razor wire, window bars and locked doors violate this, in that they are true even though they did actually happen).

    After two weeks in the camp, I was escorted all the way back to Straya by 4 cops (2 armed): they were good guys - especially Gildas, whose ambition was to live in Straya.

    We drank heaps, and chatted at length: I gave them a detailed analysis centred on how it made no sense for the French state to spend an entire year's worth of their pensions sending me (and them) halfway round the world, when I was absolutely free to return the same day if I wanted.

    Coz here's the weird thing: at the hearing, the judge pointed out that I was not being 'deported' (which carries a mandatory ban on return). I was only required to be 'réconduite à la frontière' (taken back to the border). All I had to do was cross the Schengen border, and I was free to return for the 'standard' 90 days. I pointed out that this border crossing could be achieved if I was to go to London for a day - at my own expense - since I had the right to go there. She said it was not how the process is routinely done, and anyhow it's "all organised now, and oh, by the way, the centre says it has misplaced your passport so you can't go to the UK anyway. We need to get you a laissez-passer - temporary travel document" (she said it in French, though: "laissez-passer" is the same in both, weirdly).

    I also pointed out that I had actually, provably 'franchi' the frontière less than two weeks before I was picked up: I had gone to Geneva for a weekend (and had proof of it), so the clock should have restarted. Her view was that unless my passport was stamped as having exited (that's not done at the Swiss border), there was no new clock. That has no basis in actual, y'know, law, but she wasn't taking discussion on finer points from someone in handcuffs. BOO.

    So back to the camp.

    In the camp I was something of a curiosity. The 'détenus' - overwhelmingly from the Maghreb and other African former-colonies - thought it spoke volumes about France's lurch to the Right, that they had detained a wealthy, white, educated chappie from a first-world country.

    Plus, they had heard great things about Straya - the people, the weather, the system. I showed them some photos I had in my luggage, and they were rapt.

    At the prompting of some activist friends, a TV crew came (not just for me, but I was the 'hook') and they were getting in everyone's ear about the potential for an international incident. They needn't have worried - as Assange's plight shows, 'our' diplomats are the sort of preening fuckwits who have no interest in how other governments treat Strayan serfs... in other words, our diplomats are "Australian", not Strayan.

    A few of the Muslims thought I was a DGSE infiltrator: partly because it appeared that I was capable of summoning TV crews out of thin air, but also because I knew one of the senior guards who would come and chatted with me in the dining hall at the evening meal of the day I arrived (he and I had common interests in the mid-80s, in Castelnaudaray).

    When they heard me speak French, and it was clear I wasn't a Frog, they were curious rather than suspicious.

    Within a day or so, they had worked out that I was kind of interesting, spoke fluent-if-phonetically-awful French, and had spent the second half of my second day in the camp day helping a Bangladeshi woman explain her quest for asylum to the NGO (her name was Momtaj Alo: she was a women's rights campaigner who had run afoul of the Bangladeshi regime after a military coup; she spoke limited English, and zero French, and had lit out from Italy when she learned that the Bangladeshi junta had sent a team to apprehend her[*]) .

    So they figured I was an OK egg: seems personable; talks funny; helps ladies in distress; apparently comes from a wondrous country on the other side of the planet.

    The fact that I was 'kosher' to the Muzzies had a side benefit: understand that the French system specifically refused to declare whether the meat being served was halal (supposedly because "laïcité, but actually because racisme)".

    Anyhow - the fact that the meat was not verified as halal meant that the Muslims wouldn't eat it, and since I was earmarked as a goodish egg, they would get their serves, and offer me the meat portion of their meals.

    This was no small thing: the food in the camp was excellent. On Tuesdays and Saturdays, dinner was confit de canard. I had 6 cuisses each time: in fact I put on almost 10lb in the two weeks I was detained. (Note: I know outrageous embellishments are expected in every concentration-camp-memoir, and I've inserted a few and made them just as obvious as they are in other harrowing first-person accounts of camp life... but the food story is not one of them.)

    So anyhow... I was constantly asked to tell folks about Straya. I made some genuine friends - folks from Senegal, Côte d'Ivoire, Cap Verde, Cameroon, Morocco, Algeria... even a couple of Poles, a Turkish guy (called Ayhan Turk!) and an Afghani.

    In telling these folks all about Straya, I made it absolutely clear that although it wasn't completely the ארץ זבת חלב ודבש (lol), one thing you could count on was a fair shake.


    The moment you get your feet on Strayan soil, nobody will ask you for your papers. It just isn't a part of the normal role of police. Straya is a free country: we didn't do "Papers, please".

     

    ...I thundered (in French) to the rapt attention of the Assembled Various (some of them may have been Huddled Masses Yearning to Breathe Free; I never checked).

    Straya is a free country: we didn't do "Papers, please"... how those words sting now.

    In 2015, Straya legislated to give extra powers to the obese retards who comprise the corrupt "Border Farce". Because terrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrism, or some other shibboleth.

    So now, a bunch of people so retarded that the only job they could get was as a TSA-like apparatchik, were now permitted to ask to see people's papers, at any time, in the street.

    It's still not normal practice for Strayans to carry proof of citizenship on their person, and they're under no legal obligation to do so. In other words these powers are meant to be focused on anyone who looks 'foreign'.

    As part of the PR for these new powers, they planned to have their 85-IQ high-school dropouts conduct a 'sweep' in central Melbourne, and check hundreds (if not, thousands) of people's immigration status.

    The plan was leaked a few days before it was due to happen, and was such a public outcry from individuals across the political spectrum that they cancelled the whole thing: the Little Eichmanns and Amateur Berias had to go back to pilfering things from travellers' luggage.

    In 2016 their boss was fired for using his position to get his girlfriend a job for which she was not qualified... karma, bitch.
    .
    .
    The 'sting in the tail' (all stories have to have this)[*]...

    When I was in the camp. the people from CIMADE (a detainee-rights/admin group) were able to check the French system. They were able to verify that my carte de séjour had been approved more than a year ago, and I had been sent a letter telling me to go to the Préfecture to collect it... but the letter went to an old address despite them having been keep fully updated as to our address changes.

    Despite the carte de séjour being valid for 5 years, the Interior Ministry refused to let me out of detention, or to permit me to take possession of the carte de séjour: they told me to re-apply when I returned from Straya.

    Notes.

    [1] "Bogan" is Strayan for "white trash", and also as a descriptor for anything to do with white trash, e.g., their argot and idioms.

    [*] Not an embellishment.

    RON … WHAT ABOUT A POST-LENGTH MAXIMUM ???

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Is your "Page Down" key broken? Did Kratoklastes prop open your eyes with toothpicks and force you to read this?

    I rather enjoyed Kratoklastes's tale of woe - these adventures are always more fun in retrospect than they are at the time. Some of what he wrote may even be true - probably a higher % than in the average NY Times article.

    God help any of us who get their cuffs ensnared in the bureaucratic woodchipper, whether it is la migra or the po-po or just the code enforcement officer. Once you are caught in its teeth, even by accident, there is rarely any easy way to loosen its grip and you may be quite chewed up by the time you get free of it.
  208. @Achmed E. Newman
    It's not just what JMcG wrote in reply, Dtbb. (I don't know all that he does about it.) When these illegal aliens get into the system with their fake identities, do you think they come out owing money to the IRS, or getting refunds? My friend worked at one of the quick-refund tax place for a few seasons. He told me that they come in giving names of all sorts of made-up dependents. Some may not be made up, but they live in Mexico. The government just buys all that stuff because Anarcho-tyranny. What's to stop these people from getting NOT ONLY their refunds, but their Earned Income Credit for making such low money.

    How can they live on such low money, you ask? Let me tell you, Dtbb: The American welfare state provides free WIC (food for kids, supposedly), cheap housing, and hospital care at the emergency room. That's being paid by working Americans' income, property, and sales taxes, oh and on their medical bills, per "muh Socialist healthcare, excuse me 'single payer'".

    I hope you don't feel any anger from me on this. I just got mad thinking about it all. I know about this stuff, Dtbb, from personal experience and from reading VDare.com for 15 years or so.

    Preaching to the choir. Never said I had one scintilla of sympathy for them. They should be made so paranoid and in fear of being caught that they self deport. Hell put a bounty on all illegals and let the marketplace solve the problem.

  209. If I took my white hide down to Mexico and used the name Juan Rivera on stolen or forged documents, could I feign outrage an claim discrimination if the locals there questioned my identity and right to reside and work in their country? That’s the story Libtards expect you to swallow!

  210. @Jack D
    No of course he doesn't believe it. No one is that stupid, let alone a Federal prosecutor. Rather, this is what we call "a legal fiction" - a lie that the legal system consents to in order to grease the wheels of society. Obviously, EVERYONE involved understood instantly that John Budd was not his real name but the law has given them permission (in fact DEMANDED) that they ignore the obvious so that we can have cheap milk and rich Republican dairy farm owners. A dead white girl or two is a small price to pay for cheap milk and the Vail condo of the farm family. Modern corporato-leftism is all about ignoring the obvious.

    Obviously, EVERYONE involved understood instantly that John Budd was not his real name but the law has given them permission (in fact DEMANDED) that they ignore the obvious so that we can have cheap milk and rich Republican dairy farm owners. A dead white girl or two is a small price to pay for cheap milk and the Vail condo of the farm family. Modern corporato-leftism is all about ignoring the obvious.

    We could double farm workers’ wages, and the cost of the products they bring to market would only go up a few points because labor’s only a small fraction of retail price.

    It’s just to make their employers a lil’ richer; wages are a bigger share of their costs.

  211. Did the person whose ssn was used get a notice from the IRS?

    Did the employer get an inquiry about the ssn after a problem was discovered?

  212. @anonymous
    RON ... WHAT ABOUT A POST-LENGTH MAXIMUM ???

    Is your “Page Down” key broken? Did Kratoklastes prop open your eyes with toothpicks and force you to read this?

    I rather enjoyed Kratoklastes’s tale of woe – these adventures are always more fun in retrospect than they are at the time. Some of what he wrote may even be true – probably a higher % than in the average NY Times article.

    God help any of us who get their cuffs ensnared in the bureaucratic woodchipper, whether it is la migra or the po-po or just the code enforcement officer. Once you are caught in its teeth, even by accident, there is rarely any easy way to loosen its grip and you may be quite chewed up by the time you get free of it.

  213. @S. Anonyia
    Just because Pence hates McCain doesn't mean he isn't willing to use his ghost to help accomplish one of his goals. Pence was quoted at one point as saying "god wants me to be President."

    I think it was probably a no-name lower-level staffer who wrote the article BUT if it was someone truly close to Trump there's a good chance it was Pence. Maybe Pence thinks he's on a sinking ship for real this time and wants to justify staying in power if something happens to Trump.

    He certainly didn’t look very happy at the victory speech. His wife did.

  214. @AnotherDad
    Agreed. Molly Tibbetts was young and stupid--in part no doubt from being raised by this creep.

    Pa Tibbets is a full grown man, needs social approval like a 14-year old girl and refuses to do the basic job of a man--protect his family, his nation. His is not a man. And does not deserve to live in America, does not deserve to have his line continue, because he is unwilling to take on the single responsible for that--defense.

    Exactly. You could say the tragedy occurred before her murder when her father failed to explain to her the facts of life she needed to know for survival. Her murder was the result of his failure as a father, as a man and as a responsible member of society. After her murder, her family bleating the party line about not demonizing a group because of one member’s actions was a travesty.

    Frankly, I’m relieved she did not live long enough to reproduce. It’s bad enough her killer did. We don’t need either kind in our country.

  215. @Jack D
    No of course he doesn't believe it. No one is that stupid, let alone a Federal prosecutor. Rather, this is what we call "a legal fiction" - a lie that the legal system consents to in order to grease the wheels of society. Obviously, EVERYONE involved understood instantly that John Budd was not his real name but the law has given them permission (in fact DEMANDED) that they ignore the obvious so that we can have cheap milk and rich Republican dairy farm owners. A dead white girl or two is a small price to pay for cheap milk and the Vail condo of the farm family. Modern corporato-leftism is all about ignoring the obvious.

    Obviously, EVERYONE involved understood instantly that John Budd was not his real name but the law has given them permission (in fact DEMANDED) that they ignore the obvious so that we can have cheap milk and rich Republican dairy farm owners.

    As you say, obviously.

    But one of the important aspects of applying for a legitimate visa is that there have to be criminal background checks, police reports, and so on. It is entirely unclear to me whether Billy Budd, or Pablo Escobar, or whatever his real name is, had some overseas criminal record or should have been on a sex offender registry–or whether this monstrous crime was just something that occurred to him on the spur of the moment, and he thought it seemed like a good idea at the time. (Possibly she had threatened to report him to ICE and then, like Billy Budd, he was rendered inchoate and struck her down, or like Zola Budd he tripped up an attractive American female runner by mistake and then panicked.)

  216. @Kratoklastes
    Aaah, the old "That 'papers please' stuff is NaziCommie... it won't happen here" is a trap for young players who fail to take the big, broad flexible outlook.

    Firstly... in the US ICE can search anybody within a 100 mile radius (an areea of ~31,416-ish square miles) of any entry point: almost 75% of the US population lives within 100 miles of an entry point, because that includes every international airport, many of which are more than 100 miles inland (e.g., Denver, Salt Lake etc).

    I used to believe that "Papers please" was just not done in civilised societies; it no longer applies, or we no longer qualify as civilised here in Australia (actually pronounced "Straya" in Bogan[1]).

    Having been subject to that level of silly ignorance is actually quite embarrassing, because there have been times when I publicly sang the praises of the lack of "Papers please" in Straya, full of the type of idiotic pride that people display when their overlords are a teensy bit less obviously-tyrannical than someone else's overlords. Not full-retard "stand for the anthem/jet flyover/flag" pride of the genre displayed by IQ-90 Americans, but still: goeth before a fall, bitch.

    And it's odd, really, since if anything I am actually more Kiwi than Strayan - I was born in Ao Tea Roa; I'm part-Maori (Kiwi-chocolate); I support the All Blacks and love it when perform the haka and beat the Wobblies (Wallabies)... and since the events outlined below, I travel on a gorgeous black uruwhenua rather than an Australian passport (NZ passports are written in Maori and English, not French and English).

    The story is a fun one (but sadly not as embellished or interesting as most survivor testimony from concentration camps).

    Let's fucking do this... read it or don't: je n'en ai rien à foutre... I had a blast writing it, coz I started drinking at midday at it's 3:30pm.

    Our story starts in 2006, when The Lovely was seconded by her firm to a law firm in Paris (on Avenue Kléber, literally around the corner from Trocadero).

    As part of The Lovely's secondment, her firm had paid tens of thousands of euro to an agent to sort out cartes de séjour for the both of us. From time to time we would get an email telling us to go somewhere and sign something, and we would do that.

    We figured it was all being handled, although I wasn't helpful - I was hostile to the whole thing, on the basis that the French relied on people from my country any time Germany decided they wanted Alsace back. I would say so often.

    You see, Strayans and Kiwis are almost considered human by the Frogs: along with a few others, we get to stay in Frogland for 3 months without a visa - that being a paltry recognition of tens of thousands of our forebears dying in the mud to help save France from the shame of having capitulated twice in a generation.

    When the Krauts cross the border, we're allowed to flood in en masse for as long as we like, so long as we're armed and prepared to help reverse yet another French military humiliation. But if Jerry is behaving himself, we're restricted to 3 months and then it's "M'sieur, you must, 'ow you say, sling your fucking 'ook".

    Anyhow... The Lovely's secondment was 7 months, and we had had no papers-related drama in Paris, or in the country house 55km south of Paris where we spent weekends. Plus, work took us to London and Oslo a few times during those 7 months - so we'd been 'out and back' and re-set the clock.

    After the secondment, we took a summer house in Deepest Darkest Auvergne (the best bit of France: mountainous and full of short, tough, gritty blokes whose French is almost as bad as mine).

    We were having a lovely time in the French countryside, until about a year later when I was 'controlé' (checked) by a sanglier ('boar'; French slang for a gendarme) in a car park.

    I didn't have my passport (or anything else) on me - in Straya it's just not part of the things people do: we might carry our driver's licence (and credit cards), but even that's not universal. I explained this to the sanglier .

    Actually I was far less diplomatic: I explained that I come from a free country where citizens aren't inveighed upon in car parks by les forces de l'ordre; where 'liberté' is not just a slogan; and that besides, French soil contains thousands of ANZAC skeletons who fought to prevent people in uniform saying "Papers please" to citizens.

    He took my name and went and used his radio.

    He came back and said "M'sieur, vous êtes en situation irrégulière!", and carted me off.

    Five hours later I was in the Centre de Détention Administrative at Lyon - an immigration detention centre, or as I prefer to call it, a concentration camp. (Warning: what follows may contain concentration camp-memoir type embellishments).

    The camp had the whole nine yards:
    • razor wire;
    • bars on the windows;
    • doors locked at night;
    • an electric conveyor belt that vaporised thousands of detainees at once;
    • a mad doctor who made theatrical costumes (mainly hats) out of tortured detainees' skins; and
    • guards playing ping-pong with the testicles of babies that they had recently sacrificed in satanic rituals.

    (We all know the memoir dictum: some things are true although they never actually happened. The razor wire, window bars and locked doors violate this, in that they are true even though they did actually happen).

    After two weeks in the camp, I was escorted all the way back to Straya by 4 cops (2 armed): they were good guys - especially Gildas, whose ambition was to live in Straya.

    We drank heaps, and chatted at length: I gave them a detailed analysis centred on how it made no sense for the French state to spend an entire year's worth of their pensions sending me (and them) halfway round the world, when I was absolutely free to return the same day if I wanted.

    Coz here's the weird thing: at the hearing, the judge pointed out that I was not being 'deported' (which carries a mandatory ban on return). I was only required to be 'réconduite à la frontière' (taken back to the border). All I had to do was cross the Schengen border, and I was free to return for the 'standard' 90 days. I pointed out that this border crossing could be achieved if I was to go to London for a day - at my own expense - since I had the right to go there. She said it was not how the process is routinely done, and anyhow it's "all organised now, and oh, by the way, the centre says it has misplaced your passport so you can't go to the UK anyway. We need to get you a laissez-passer - temporary travel document" (she said it in French, though: "laissez-passer" is the same in both, weirdly).

    I also pointed out that I had actually, provably 'franchi' the frontière less than two weeks before I was picked up: I had gone to Geneva for a weekend (and had proof of it), so the clock should have restarted. Her view was that unless my passport was stamped as having exited (that's not done at the Swiss border), there was no new clock. That has no basis in actual, y'know, law, but she wasn't taking discussion on finer points from someone in handcuffs. BOO.

    So back to the camp.

    In the camp I was something of a curiosity. The 'détenus' - overwhelmingly from the Maghreb and other African former-colonies - thought it spoke volumes about France's lurch to the Right, that they had detained a wealthy, white, educated chappie from a first-world country.

    Plus, they had heard great things about Straya - the people, the weather, the system. I showed them some photos I had in my luggage, and they were rapt.

    At the prompting of some activist friends, a TV crew came (not just for me, but I was the 'hook') and they were getting in everyone's ear about the potential for an international incident. They needn't have worried - as Assange's plight shows, 'our' diplomats are the sort of preening fuckwits who have no interest in how other governments treat Strayan serfs... in other words, our diplomats are "Australian", not Strayan.

    A few of the Muslims thought I was a DGSE infiltrator: partly because it appeared that I was capable of summoning TV crews out of thin air, but also because I knew one of the senior guards who would come and chatted with me in the dining hall at the evening meal of the day I arrived (he and I had common interests in the mid-80s, in Castelnaudaray).

    When they heard me speak French, and it was clear I wasn't a Frog, they were curious rather than suspicious.

    Within a day or so, they had worked out that I was kind of interesting, spoke fluent-if-phonetically-awful French, and had spent the second half of my second day in the camp day helping a Bangladeshi woman explain her quest for asylum to the NGO (her name was Momtaj Alo: she was a women's rights campaigner who had run afoul of the Bangladeshi regime after a military coup; she spoke limited English, and zero French, and had lit out from Italy when she learned that the Bangladeshi junta had sent a team to apprehend her[*]) .

    So they figured I was an OK egg: seems personable; talks funny; helps ladies in distress; apparently comes from a wondrous country on the other side of the planet.

    The fact that I was 'kosher' to the Muzzies had a side benefit: understand that the French system specifically refused to declare whether the meat being served was halal (supposedly because "laïcité, but actually because racisme)".

    Anyhow - the fact that the meat was not verified as halal meant that the Muslims wouldn't eat it, and since I was earmarked as a goodish egg, they would get their serves, and offer me the meat portion of their meals.

    This was no small thing: the food in the camp was excellent. On Tuesdays and Saturdays, dinner was confit de canard. I had 6 cuisses each time: in fact I put on almost 10lb in the two weeks I was detained. (Note: I know outrageous embellishments are expected in every concentration-camp-memoir, and I've inserted a few and made them just as obvious as they are in other harrowing first-person accounts of camp life... but the food story is not one of them.)

    So anyhow... I was constantly asked to tell folks about Straya. I made some genuine friends - folks from Senegal, Côte d'Ivoire, Cap Verde, Cameroon, Morocco, Algeria... even a couple of Poles, a Turkish guy (called Ayhan Turk!) and an Afghani.

    In telling these folks all about Straya, I made it absolutely clear that although it wasn't completely the ארץ זבת חלב ודבש (lol), one thing you could count on was a fair shake.


    The moment you get your feet on Strayan soil, nobody will ask you for your papers. It just isn't a part of the normal role of police. Straya is a free country: we didn't do "Papers, please".

     

    ...I thundered (in French) to the rapt attention of the Assembled Various (some of them may have been Huddled Masses Yearning to Breathe Free; I never checked).

    Straya is a free country: we didn't do "Papers, please"... how those words sting now.

    In 2015, Straya legislated to give extra powers to the obese retards who comprise the corrupt "Border Farce". Because terrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrism, or some other shibboleth.

    So now, a bunch of people so retarded that the only job they could get was as a TSA-like apparatchik, were now permitted to ask to see people's papers, at any time, in the street.

    It's still not normal practice for Strayans to carry proof of citizenship on their person, and they're under no legal obligation to do so. In other words these powers are meant to be focused on anyone who looks 'foreign'.

    As part of the PR for these new powers, they planned to have their 85-IQ high-school dropouts conduct a 'sweep' in central Melbourne, and check hundreds (if not, thousands) of people's immigration status.

    The plan was leaked a few days before it was due to happen, and was such a public outcry from individuals across the political spectrum that they cancelled the whole thing: the Little Eichmanns and Amateur Berias had to go back to pilfering things from travellers' luggage.

    In 2016 their boss was fired for using his position to get his girlfriend a job for which she was not qualified... karma, bitch.
    .
    .
    The 'sting in the tail' (all stories have to have this)[*]...

    When I was in the camp. the people from CIMADE (a detainee-rights/admin group) were able to check the French system. They were able to verify that my carte de séjour had been approved more than a year ago, and I had been sent a letter telling me to go to the Préfecture to collect it... but the letter went to an old address despite them having been keep fully updated as to our address changes.

    Despite the carte de séjour being valid for 5 years, the Interior Ministry refused to let me out of detention, or to permit me to take possession of the carte de séjour: they told me to re-apply when I returned from Straya.

    Notes.

    [1] "Bogan" is Strayan for "white trash", and also as a descriptor for anything to do with white trash, e.g., their argot and idioms.

    [*] Not an embellishment.

    Great story! Beer is on me if our paths should ever cross.

  217. @Kratoklastes
    Aaah, the old "That 'papers please' stuff is NaziCommie... it won't happen here" is a trap for young players who fail to take the big, broad flexible outlook.

    Firstly... in the US ICE can search anybody within a 100 mile radius (an areea of ~31,416-ish square miles) of any entry point: almost 75% of the US population lives within 100 miles of an entry point, because that includes every international airport, many of which are more than 100 miles inland (e.g., Denver, Salt Lake etc).

    I used to believe that "Papers please" was just not done in civilised societies; it no longer applies, or we no longer qualify as civilised here in Australia (actually pronounced "Straya" in Bogan[1]).

    Having been subject to that level of silly ignorance is actually quite embarrassing, because there have been times when I publicly sang the praises of the lack of "Papers please" in Straya, full of the type of idiotic pride that people display when their overlords are a teensy bit less obviously-tyrannical than someone else's overlords. Not full-retard "stand for the anthem/jet flyover/flag" pride of the genre displayed by IQ-90 Americans, but still: goeth before a fall, bitch.

    And it's odd, really, since if anything I am actually more Kiwi than Strayan - I was born in Ao Tea Roa; I'm part-Maori (Kiwi-chocolate); I support the All Blacks and love it when perform the haka and beat the Wobblies (Wallabies)... and since the events outlined below, I travel on a gorgeous black uruwhenua rather than an Australian passport (NZ passports are written in Maori and English, not French and English).

    The story is a fun one (but sadly not as embellished or interesting as most survivor testimony from concentration camps).

    Let's fucking do this... read it or don't: je n'en ai rien à foutre... I had a blast writing it, coz I started drinking at midday at it's 3:30pm.

    Our story starts in 2006, when The Lovely was seconded by her firm to a law firm in Paris (on Avenue Kléber, literally around the corner from Trocadero).

    As part of The Lovely's secondment, her firm had paid tens of thousands of euro to an agent to sort out cartes de séjour for the both of us. From time to time we would get an email telling us to go somewhere and sign something, and we would do that.

    We figured it was all being handled, although I wasn't helpful - I was hostile to the whole thing, on the basis that the French relied on people from my country any time Germany decided they wanted Alsace back. I would say so often.

    You see, Strayans and Kiwis are almost considered human by the Frogs: along with a few others, we get to stay in Frogland for 3 months without a visa - that being a paltry recognition of tens of thousands of our forebears dying in the mud to help save France from the shame of having capitulated twice in a generation.

    When the Krauts cross the border, we're allowed to flood in en masse for as long as we like, so long as we're armed and prepared to help reverse yet another French military humiliation. But if Jerry is behaving himself, we're restricted to 3 months and then it's "M'sieur, you must, 'ow you say, sling your fucking 'ook".

    Anyhow... The Lovely's secondment was 7 months, and we had had no papers-related drama in Paris, or in the country house 55km south of Paris where we spent weekends. Plus, work took us to London and Oslo a few times during those 7 months - so we'd been 'out and back' and re-set the clock.

    After the secondment, we took a summer house in Deepest Darkest Auvergne (the best bit of France: mountainous and full of short, tough, gritty blokes whose French is almost as bad as mine).

    We were having a lovely time in the French countryside, until about a year later when I was 'controlé' (checked) by a sanglier ('boar'; French slang for a gendarme) in a car park.

    I didn't have my passport (or anything else) on me - in Straya it's just not part of the things people do: we might carry our driver's licence (and credit cards), but even that's not universal. I explained this to the sanglier .

    Actually I was far less diplomatic: I explained that I come from a free country where citizens aren't inveighed upon in car parks by les forces de l'ordre; where 'liberté' is not just a slogan; and that besides, French soil contains thousands of ANZAC skeletons who fought to prevent people in uniform saying "Papers please" to citizens.

    He took my name and went and used his radio.

    He came back and said "M'sieur, vous êtes en situation irrégulière!", and carted me off.

    Five hours later I was in the Centre de Détention Administrative at Lyon - an immigration detention centre, or as I prefer to call it, a concentration camp. (Warning: what follows may contain concentration camp-memoir type embellishments).

    The camp had the whole nine yards:
    • razor wire;
    • bars on the windows;
    • doors locked at night;
    • an electric conveyor belt that vaporised thousands of detainees at once;
    • a mad doctor who made theatrical costumes (mainly hats) out of tortured detainees' skins; and
    • guards playing ping-pong with the testicles of babies that they had recently sacrificed in satanic rituals.

    (We all know the memoir dictum: some things are true although they never actually happened. The razor wire, window bars and locked doors violate this, in that they are true even though they did actually happen).

    After two weeks in the camp, I was escorted all the way back to Straya by 4 cops (2 armed): they were good guys - especially Gildas, whose ambition was to live in Straya.

    We drank heaps, and chatted at length: I gave them a detailed analysis centred on how it made no sense for the French state to spend an entire year's worth of their pensions sending me (and them) halfway round the world, when I was absolutely free to return the same day if I wanted.

    Coz here's the weird thing: at the hearing, the judge pointed out that I was not being 'deported' (which carries a mandatory ban on return). I was only required to be 'réconduite à la frontière' (taken back to the border). All I had to do was cross the Schengen border, and I was free to return for the 'standard' 90 days. I pointed out that this border crossing could be achieved if I was to go to London for a day - at my own expense - since I had the right to go there. She said it was not how the process is routinely done, and anyhow it's "all organised now, and oh, by the way, the centre says it has misplaced your passport so you can't go to the UK anyway. We need to get you a laissez-passer - temporary travel document" (she said it in French, though: "laissez-passer" is the same in both, weirdly).

    I also pointed out that I had actually, provably 'franchi' the frontière less than two weeks before I was picked up: I had gone to Geneva for a weekend (and had proof of it), so the clock should have restarted. Her view was that unless my passport was stamped as having exited (that's not done at the Swiss border), there was no new clock. That has no basis in actual, y'know, law, but she wasn't taking discussion on finer points from someone in handcuffs. BOO.

    So back to the camp.

    In the camp I was something of a curiosity. The 'détenus' - overwhelmingly from the Maghreb and other African former-colonies - thought it spoke volumes about France's lurch to the Right, that they had detained a wealthy, white, educated chappie from a first-world country.

    Plus, they had heard great things about Straya - the people, the weather, the system. I showed them some photos I had in my luggage, and they were rapt.

    At the prompting of some activist friends, a TV crew came (not just for me, but I was the 'hook') and they were getting in everyone's ear about the potential for an international incident. They needn't have worried - as Assange's plight shows, 'our' diplomats are the sort of preening fuckwits who have no interest in how other governments treat Strayan serfs... in other words, our diplomats are "Australian", not Strayan.

    A few of the Muslims thought I was a DGSE infiltrator: partly because it appeared that I was capable of summoning TV crews out of thin air, but also because I knew one of the senior guards who would come and chatted with me in the dining hall at the evening meal of the day I arrived (he and I had common interests in the mid-80s, in Castelnaudaray).

    When they heard me speak French, and it was clear I wasn't a Frog, they were curious rather than suspicious.

    Within a day or so, they had worked out that I was kind of interesting, spoke fluent-if-phonetically-awful French, and had spent the second half of my second day in the camp day helping a Bangladeshi woman explain her quest for asylum to the NGO (her name was Momtaj Alo: she was a women's rights campaigner who had run afoul of the Bangladeshi regime after a military coup; she spoke limited English, and zero French, and had lit out from Italy when she learned that the Bangladeshi junta had sent a team to apprehend her[*]) .

    So they figured I was an OK egg: seems personable; talks funny; helps ladies in distress; apparently comes from a wondrous country on the other side of the planet.

    The fact that I was 'kosher' to the Muzzies had a side benefit: understand that the French system specifically refused to declare whether the meat being served was halal (supposedly because "laïcité, but actually because racisme)".

    Anyhow - the fact that the meat was not verified as halal meant that the Muslims wouldn't eat it, and since I was earmarked as a goodish egg, they would get their serves, and offer me the meat portion of their meals.

    This was no small thing: the food in the camp was excellent. On Tuesdays and Saturdays, dinner was confit de canard. I had 6 cuisses each time: in fact I put on almost 10lb in the two weeks I was detained. (Note: I know outrageous embellishments are expected in every concentration-camp-memoir, and I've inserted a few and made them just as obvious as they are in other harrowing first-person accounts of camp life... but the food story is not one of them.)

    So anyhow... I was constantly asked to tell folks about Straya. I made some genuine friends - folks from Senegal, Côte d'Ivoire, Cap Verde, Cameroon, Morocco, Algeria... even a couple of Poles, a Turkish guy (called Ayhan Turk!) and an Afghani.

    In telling these folks all about Straya, I made it absolutely clear that although it wasn't completely the ארץ זבת חלב ודבש (lol), one thing you could count on was a fair shake.


    The moment you get your feet on Strayan soil, nobody will ask you for your papers. It just isn't a part of the normal role of police. Straya is a free country: we didn't do "Papers, please".

     

    ...I thundered (in French) to the rapt attention of the Assembled Various (some of them may have been Huddled Masses Yearning to Breathe Free; I never checked).

    Straya is a free country: we didn't do "Papers, please"... how those words sting now.

    In 2015, Straya legislated to give extra powers to the obese retards who comprise the corrupt "Border Farce". Because terrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrism, or some other shibboleth.

    So now, a bunch of people so retarded that the only job they could get was as a TSA-like apparatchik, were now permitted to ask to see people's papers, at any time, in the street.

    It's still not normal practice for Strayans to carry proof of citizenship on their person, and they're under no legal obligation to do so. In other words these powers are meant to be focused on anyone who looks 'foreign'.

    As part of the PR for these new powers, they planned to have their 85-IQ high-school dropouts conduct a 'sweep' in central Melbourne, and check hundreds (if not, thousands) of people's immigration status.

    The plan was leaked a few days before it was due to happen, and was such a public outcry from individuals across the political spectrum that they cancelled the whole thing: the Little Eichmanns and Amateur Berias had to go back to pilfering things from travellers' luggage.

    In 2016 their boss was fired for using his position to get his girlfriend a job for which she was not qualified... karma, bitch.
    .
    .
    The 'sting in the tail' (all stories have to have this)[*]...

    When I was in the camp. the people from CIMADE (a detainee-rights/admin group) were able to check the French system. They were able to verify that my carte de séjour had been approved more than a year ago, and I had been sent a letter telling me to go to the Préfecture to collect it... but the letter went to an old address despite them having been keep fully updated as to our address changes.

    Despite the carte de séjour being valid for 5 years, the Interior Ministry refused to let me out of detention, or to permit me to take possession of the carte de séjour: they told me to re-apply when I returned from Straya.

    Notes.

    [1] "Bogan" is Strayan for "white trash", and also as a descriptor for anything to do with white trash, e.g., their argot and idioms.

    [*] Not an embellishment.

    “That ‘papers please’ stuff is NaziCommie… it won’t happen here”

    One of the ironies about not requiring secure bio-metric ID is that it is far more problematic to release people back into the public while they await a court date or have a voluntary deportation order so the only thing you can do is lock them up. If we used it, in effect, illegal aliens without papers would be in their own form of house arrest. If they cannot work, travel, or buy or sell anything they are basically little more than tourists without money. Most of them would have to feed off of relatives or other benefactors thereby using up their good will. Before long, not only would the illegals find it pointless to be here but so would their support network that was trying to help them get a foothold into the country.

  218. @Anon
    You’re right, but it was long before the Obama administration . It was a court finding that the civil rights division of the department of justice decided to make into administrative law.

    I dug into the DOJ website. The fines for document abuse can be up to $375,000. Document abuse is noticing that the false ID is false.
    I’m sure that it was a coalition of farmers food processors and restaurants that funded the lawsuit that resulted in a finding that demanding authentic ID was national origin discrimination

    And being SJWs and White hating Democrats, I doubt that the Tibbetts family will sue Yarrabee farms for wrongful death.

    Their case against Potter Concrete is very telling. They claim that the company discriminated because they used E-Verify to check the work eligibility of foreign nationals only. You know, the thing E-Verify was created for. Have a gander:

    “Employers cannot create discriminatory hurdles for work-authorized non-U.S. citizens or naturalized citizens in the employment eligibility verification process, which includes the E-Verify program,” said Acting Assistant Attorney General Jocelyn Samuels for the Civil Rights Division.

    How are you supposed to check that they’re authorized to work when it’s discrimination to do so? That’s right, you can’t, unless you want to pay a hefty fine.

    • Replies: @Prof. Woland
    Computers that use social security and tax id numbers to hunt down tax money from white people are not discriminatory. But when you take the same computer to see if they are entitled to work in the first place, they are. see what I am saying?
  219. @Daisy Hogg
    Their case against Potter Concrete is very telling. They claim that the company discriminated because they used E-Verify to check the work eligibility of foreign nationals only. You know, the thing E-Verify was created for. Have a gander:

    “Employers cannot create discriminatory hurdles for work-authorized non-U.S. citizens or naturalized citizens in the employment eligibility verification process, which includes the E-Verify program,” said Acting Assistant Attorney General Jocelyn Samuels for the Civil Rights Division.
     
    How are you supposed to check that they're authorized to work when it's discrimination to do so? That's right, you can't, unless you want to pay a hefty fine.

    Computers that use social security and tax id numbers to hunt down tax money from white people are not discriminatory. But when you take the same computer to see if they are entitled to work in the first place, they are. see what I am saying?

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