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From the New York Times:

To Understand Rising Inequality, Consider the Janitors at Two Top Companies, Then and Now
Neil Irwin @Neil_Irwin SEPT. 3, 2017

ROCHESTER — Gail Evans and Marta Ramos have one thing in common: They have each cleaned offices for one of the most innovative, profitable and all-around successful companies in the United States.

For Ms. Evans, that meant being a janitor in Building 326 at Eastman Kodak’s campus in Rochester in the early 1980s. For Ms. Ramos, that means cleaning at Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., in the present day.

Ms. Evans is African-American, Ms. Ramos Latino.

In the 35 years between their jobs as janitors, corporations across America have flocked to a new management theory: Focus on core competence and outsource the rest. The approach has made companies more nimble and more productive, and delivered huge profits for shareholders. It has also fueled inequality and helps explain why many working-class Americans are struggling even in an ostensibly healthy economy.

The $16.60 per hour Ms. Ramos earns as a janitor at Apple works out to about the same in inflation-adjusted terms as what Ms. Evans earned 35 years ago. But that’s where the similarities end.

Ms. Evans was a full-time employee of Kodak. She received more than four weeks of paid vacation per year, reimbursement of some tuition costs to go to college part time, and a bonus payment every March. When the facility she cleaned was shut down, the company found another job for her: cutting film.

Ms. Ramos is an employee of a contractor that Apple uses to keep its facilities clean. She hasn’t taken a vacation in years, because she can’t afford the lost wages. Going back to school is similarly out of reach. There are certainly no bonuses, nor even a remote possibility of being transferred to some other role at Apple.

Yet the biggest difference between their two experiences is in the opportunities they created. A manager learned that Ms. Evans was taking computer classes while she was working as a janitor and asked her to teach some other employees how to use spreadsheet software to track inventory. When she eventually finished her college degree in 1987, she was promoted to a professional-track job in information technology.

Less than a decade later, Ms. Evans was chief technology officer of the whole company, and she has had a long career since as a senior executive at other top companies. Ms. Ramos sees the only advancement possibility as becoming a team leader keeping tabs on a few other janitors, which pays an extra 50 cents an hour.

They both spent a lot of time cleaning floors. The difference is, for Ms. Ramos, that work is also a ceiling.

Uh, there is also the difference that Ms. Evans started in a blue collar workforce, 20th Century upstate New York, dominated by native-born Americans, while Ms. Ramos started in a blue collar workforce, turn of the century California, dominated by immigrants.

Of course, as in virtually all articles about one of the two key I-Words — inequality — there is no mention of the other key I-World — immigration.

 
175 Comments to "A Tale of Two Janitors"
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  1. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Evans got benefits in addition to a paycheck. Ramos just gets the paycheck. And therein lies the difference. The companies would rather pay bennies to one exec or Stanford Ph.D techie than to 10 broom pushers. After all, who’s worth more? Anyway, this will all probably be moot because before long robots will be pushing the brooms–and for nothing more than the cost of recharging the batteries.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    https://www.bestbuy.com/site/husqvarna-automower-430x-granite-gray/5833600.p?skuId=5833600

    Robotic lawn mowers.

    Just in time. In case my Mexican lawn care professional retires.
    , @Colleen Pater
    Its quite a bit more complicated than that. Sailor is pointing out that we once had a system that was ethnically more homogeneous and took better care of all levels of its society which system benefited the few minorities within it as well.
    We now have 40% non whites and do not take care of anyone very well except the investor class. Benefits are rare theses days as is job security. This could well be a side effect of ethnic disintegration. But we also no it was to some extent a reaction to the old system becoming bloated and inefficient. And we know the interests of commies and capitalists came together and here we are.
    Its in the interest not only to peoples whose interest are ethnically or nationally oriented, but to the ruling class as well to not have the gap widen to the point the "people" have to demonstrate once again they are always sovereign.This would be particularly true if the people and the rulers were different ethnicities. Unfortunately the same ethnic differences makes stewardship of the underclasses a futile project they are simply too stupid to ever do much with. So that become a separate problem with an eventually ugly answer.

    were it not for that problem had we say not taken that fork in 1964 or 1890 even, then we could more sanely discuss how one best keeps the genetic and therefore economic left tale from getting too stretched out. Ironically about the time this fork was taken we hit on the correct solution, eugenics.To day our only competitor east asians are quietly demonstrating the verity of this. Short of this we could have argued about how best to apply socialist approaches. The USA back then instead of going as far socialist govt administered outsourced the paternalism to the corporate world, this certainly was not without problems but it did allow a certain discretion as employers that governments as employees can not politically wield. Allowing civil service unions was a huge mistake. It gave private unions more lout than they should have deserved.Its tempting to go the galts gulch route but I think you find that a nation is a organism and letting your left foot wither away is a bad idea, you may not want to think with your left foot but you cant really live without it.You cant even have it dragging behind you. Of course you dont want it growing weak from favoring it but it must be kept in balance with the rest of the body. Today we have tried to strangle our left leg and graft a third world leg retarded, robots may clean trash cans without heal insurance or wages or pay income taxes or buying things, but it wont solve the two major cases of gangreene we have inflicted on ourselves.
    , @The Alarmist
    Let the bathrooms go uncleaned a few days and you quickly have a problem with your professional and executive staff. Another big difference between then and now would be Industrial Actions, which occurred with significant effect back then due to a tighter, limited workforce; it doesn't happen so much now because the New American Worker has no power to organise and can be quickly replaced if they do.
    , @Olorin

    Anyway, this will all probably be moot because before long robots will be pushing the brooms–and for nothing more than the cost of recharging the batteries.
     
    Every bit of automation of any task, process, or industry has a massive phalanx of essential automation-overseers, all meatbags.

    None of these machines "run on their own" at any level and never will except in the fantasies of libertarian autists or people not familiar with building/facilities/infrastructure management.

    Every industry or sector I ever worked in in the 20th century got massively automated. Never did it rule out the need for people to design, build, adapt, program, maintain, monitor, and upgrade the automation. I'm talking about the actual material machines, in every field.

    So while, say, publishing automated the jobs of 30 or 50 people into the desktop of one, there were new jobs created in supporting that desktop. It was a shift of labor that intensified the impacts of cognitive stratification. The guy who was still setting hot type in my first newspaper job in the mid-'70s was a mechanical whiz who went into servicing Xerox photocopying machines. His typesetter became a proofreader. One of my graphic artists got some loans, bought a phototypositor (ITC IIRC), and built a much better career path for herself.

    Add code-programmed silicon to automation, and you also need meatbags to upgrade the code, patch it, recognize/diagnose/research/repair potential exploits or known security problems, learn new code/languages, learn where the devices are new and are veneers on older stuff that has legacy bugs....

    Then there's systems integration at the machine, code, and institutional level.

    "Janitors" no longer "push brooms" all day. These companies' employees are not Roger Miller king-of-the-roading.

    That's the point.

    They either have to operate at higher levels of cognitive and behavioral functioning or will have to settle for doing carefully spelled out, routine work subject to intensive quality control oversight. They do more than "push brooms" because most workplaces don't need much of that, while needing entire new realms of facilities support.

    Facility maintenance companies have to operate within areas of certification or standards by OSHA, ISSA, IICRC, RBSM, CIMS, LEED, IFMA, Green Building Council, and more. They have to be familiar with health and environmental standards that incorporate all that was learned in the 1970s to 2000s out of dozens of scientific fields that rapidly grew in knowledge thanks to the explosion of research instrumentation. Their employees have to fit into that work ecosystem.

    Benefits are not the nexus of the issue. The capacity to operate at high--often accredited--professional standards is.

    These two workers typify the externalized costs of US immigration policy in the Uniparty's rush to import voting ringers on both sides.

    I'm guessing that Ramos arrived not even being able to speak English, whereas Evans had X hundred years of American background including English and some long family history of living in/assimilating to upper NY state civilization. Maybe in ten years Ramos can learn English and learn to read LEED standards--whether they're in English or Spanish, they require a higher level of understanding than she's likely to have, coming new to First World civilization.

    We're not living in idiocracy, we're living in Bellcurvia as predicted by Herrnstein and Murray. Cognitive stratification matters. More and more so each passing year.

    , @Former navy swabby
    Hi tech always costs more and fails miserably with the hard parts. I will give a case in point. The US Navy many years ago decided to do away with all of the expensive and hard to retain, avionics techs who kept the black boxes and instruments in their aircraft working, so they paid a bunch of EEs and other engineers to design a computer to troubleshoot black box problems. I asked two brothers, one who was part of the engineering firm and another who was a career avionics tech how well it worked and they told me. The computer found all of the easy fixes, like blown fuse or burnt out light bulb, but when the repair could not be found on the flow chart, the computer sent you on a wild goose chase. And about 5% of the time, the tough dog problems, it was worse than useless. To save the navy's bacon, the best techs would congregate at a pizza place with the schematics and programming code and brainstorm the solutions for repairs that worked. Of course, as the navy gets rid of more and more techs, this becomes impossible, and remember, THIS IS THE PEACE TIME NAVY. When the SHTF catastrophic failures will not be part of the database or anywhere on the flowcharts. This is a system designed to fail when times get hard. It shows up first in the military because combat with death and destruction can not be faked, but in the civilian world such weaknesses are ignored until the stink is so bad even vultures gag. Robots used for cleaning will have a tremendous logistical tail and fail to find the most hard to reach cleaning problems, until they fail, catastrophically. Enjoy.
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  2. utu says:

    Uh, there is also the difference that Ms. Evans started in a blue collar workforce, 20th Century upstate New York, dominated by native-born Americans, while Ms. Ramos started in a blue collar workforce, turn of the century California, dominated by immigrants.

    It is true. But immigration is not the original cause here. Immigration is juts a tool. When under Reagan they started busting unions and moving jobs from rust belt to right-to-work states it was not about immigration. But certainly for neoliberals immigration helps them accomplish their goals. And they can get once the pro union left to help them in keeping the immigration flowing.

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    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Democrats of the '80's didn't do much to stop union busting and sold them down the river with President Clinton signing NAFTA in '93. Dems controlled Congress all during this time.
  3. Back in the 20th also there was a commitment to community – and country – much more than there is now. In between we were taught that all of that was silly, old-fashioned, patriotic nonsense; the very term patriotic was degraded and reimaged as synonym for racism and right-wing extremism. Today, all a CEO must do is conform to some throwaway HR rules and mouth a few platitudes about diversity and equality. …And to hell with the peasants.

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  4. In the 1980s, companies still appreciated loyalty and good work and it was possible to go up through the ranks on talent ambition rather than a four year degree. Not anymore.

    The American standard of living peaked in the late 60s, early 70s, and we’ve going backwards since then. Things have improved, though, for the top 1%.

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  5. Tiny Duck says:

    This is yet another reason why diversity is paramount in the leadership in large corporations. Ass long as white men continue to run things the workplace by class will continue to get crapoed on from tremendous heights

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  6. Damn that’s a long story. Does it ever come to any sort of conclusion other than “things are different now, and we should fix them! Somehow.”? Maybe $150/hr for everyone and “let the Fed fix the inflation problem”?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clark Westwood

    Damn that’s a long story. Does it ever come to any sort of conclusion other than “things are different now, and we should fix them! Somehow.”? Maybe $150/hr for everyone and “let the Fed fix the inflation problem”?
     
    One could say this about every story in the print MSM other than the pure "three people died in a fire last night" kind. Wherever you dig, you hit "feelz."
  7. DFH says:

    Why aren’t there more black immigration restrictionists?
    Is it just that what small proportion would be smart enough to work out that immigration is bad for blacks are bought off by the left/cuck right?

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    • Replies: @jack ryan
    Yes, this has been a huge disappointment. The Black Congressional Caucus just hates White America, so anything that White Americans oppose, the Black Congressional Caucus supports. So far, mass Hispanic immigration hasn't really effected Black political jobs, the powers that be gerrymander and protect Black congressional seats, that's reality in Chicago.

    Also, the seemingly insane reality that the Jewish American political/financial/academic/media elite is overwhelmingly in support of open borders mass immigration, including mass Arab/Muslim immigration - anyone who disagrees is smeared and marginalized as a terrible RACIST Nazi.

    Jewish American Liberal Leftist Marxists are accepted as born again Conservatives, Neo Conservatives, market libertarians and get high paying jobs at the Wall Street Journal, National Review and Conservative Inc and these born again Jewish Neo Conservatives maintain their insane, treasonous immigration views.

    Look at the example of the creature Tamar Jacoby! One day she's at the Lib Leftist marxist New School of Social Research, the next day she's working for the Wall Street Journal - and her insane, treason immigration views remain the same.

    Just look at this creature Tamar Jacoby!

    http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/tamarjacoby.jpg
  8. AM says:

    Ms. Ramos is an employee of a contractor that Apple uses to keep its facilities clean. She hasn’t taken a vacation in years, because she can’t afford the lost wages.

    Apple is the best. iPhones for everyone and maybe they can afford to give Ms. Ramos a three day vacation and Tim Cook a $3 billion dollar bonus so he can give it to the SPLC to fight inequality.

    Also, a little surprised that that editors of NYT allowed a piece showing Apple in a negative light to be published. Maybe it’s a “New York is the best” sort of article.

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  9. Daniel H says:

    >>The $16.60 per hour Ms. Ramos earns as a janitor at Apple works out to about the same in inflation-adjusted terms as what Ms. Evans earned 35 years ago.

    I call bullshit on that. The difference in the cost of living between Rochester, NY circa 1982 and Cupertino, CA 2017 is vast. Florida’s article of the other day noted that in the Bay area hosing prices are approximately 10x the typical bay area worker’s annual salary, and by “typical bay area worker” I’m sure the article was referring to a computer programmer or some other professional, not a janitor. $16.60 / hour in Cupertino is not a “living wage”. Not for a single person just out of school, and certainly not for a middle age woman who is likely supporting a family. These “tech” firms are incredibly callous and greedy. How much longer will the people give them a pass just on account of their conspicuous virtue signaling over the sex and race issues?

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  10. Dan Hayes says:

    Steve,

    Creative Destruction of the American working class but with all downside and no upside.

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  11. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    People who do not live and work in silicon valley probably have no idea how fast it has essentially become a very non-traditional American company town for the cheapest labor in the world who can at least pretend to do the job.

    It’s not just the companies fault, if they don’t play this game they face the prospect of private equity funds (essentially multi-national VCs playing with money coming in from many nation-state banking sectors) finding an angle to take over.

    These guys know about as much about high-tech as Wall Street did about the housing market, but they are convinced that they have more money than god, so there must always be someone in their rolodex they can find who will do better. So simple!

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    • Replies: @Autochthon
    You made perfect sense explaining the company town business, then you list the plot: no venture capitalist has a chance in Hell of a hostile takeover of Apple, Inc. or Alphabet, Inc. (or even Microsoft Corp., Intel Corp., etc.); your point is relevant to the many smaller companies, which are actually less culpable for the cited problems.
  12. It’s “custodian”, not “janitor”.

    I was corrected thusly four decades ago on my summer job at a Y camp.

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    • Replies: @carol
    Maintenance engineer, currently.
    , @Dave from Oz
    @1 "It’s “custodian”, not “janitor”. "

    The problem with words is that they come to mean what they do, and a new word has to be found.
    , @JackOH
    Could be a different usages for different situations deal. The custodian at my school was a state-licensed boiler operator with supervisory responsibility for about a dozen part-timers and four full-timers. The four full-timers were janitors, who did a mess of light maintenance, window cleaning, floor scrubbing, and what-not. There were a half-dozen part-time student workers and a half-dozen part-time cleaning ladies doing classroom dust mopping, furniture dusting, chalkboard cleaning, wastebasket-emptying, and so on.
  13. epebble says:

    I have difficulty seeing a direct line from one I to the other. The new management theory of “core competency” seems to be a factor. It is also interesting that Kodak (and its friends in upstate NY) are no more while Apple (and its friends in CA) are ruling the world. Example: a Kodak style company IBM, from NY, went through a meltdown and was reborn as an Apple style company at the pain of becoming a Burroughs/Univac/CDC (i.e. death).

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    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    The management style of the company had little to do with their success or failure. Apple is in newer industries and IBM and other mainframe makers were not. Don't forget Apple would have gone bankrupt without Bill Gates 150 million and Intel would have gone bankrupt without IBM choosing the 8088 for the PC.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    Kodak is still around, and still traded on the NYSE, though it's a small cap now, with a ~$300 million market cap. Xerox is still around too, with a more respectable market cap of $8 billion.
    , @EdwardM
    I agree that it may not be mostly about immigration, but surely differences in the supply-and-demand outcome for labor between upstate N.Y. in the early 1980s and California today partially explain the different experiences of these two workers. And immigration has a lot to do with that.

    And it's a good point that Kodak is essentially dead while Apple has among the highest profit margins of any manufacturing company.

  14. bomag says:

    Less than a decade later, Ms. Evans was chief technology officer of the whole company, and she has had a long career since as a senior executive at other top companies.

    Remarkable. I imagine such stories will be scarcer in the future as we pile more people on a planet facing resource constraints, and more jobs mechanized out of existence.

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  15. Someone at the NYT should consider doing a historical piece on how Mexican immigration wiped out the Negro-owned, Negro run, and Negro manned small businesses that dominated the janitorial services sector back in the good old days in LA. White entrepreneurs figured out that they could sweep away the competition by hiring cheap Mexican labor to do the work. Here is a pretty grim depiction of what happened: http://www.usillegalaliens.com/impacts_of_illegal_immigration_jobs.html and here is the sugar-coated feminist academic version: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12147-998-0009-x

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  16. Wilkey says:

    And Tim Cook, humanitarian extraordinaire, just gave himself a $90 million bonus, while Laurene Powell Jobs, one of the richest women in the world, presses to let the rest of the world in, even as Apple conveniently manages to avoid paying taxes to the United States.

    Once upon a time we had a press and a Democratic Party that called these greedy shits out for exactly what they are.

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    • Agree: Jim Don Bob, AndrewR
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    Jobs just bought the Atlantic

    Bezos owns the Washington Post

    Gates owns the education system, via Common Core

    Zuckerberg has more control over the information read, than any man in recorded history

    Google has the literal power to unperson
    , @AndrewR
    But Cook gave two million dollars of Apple's money to the SPLC, so you're literally a Nazi if you criticize Apple.
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    When was that? A generation and a half ago maybe.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Once upon a time we had a press and a Democratic Party that called these greedy shits out for exactly what they are.
     
    When did the Democratic Party ever call out Democratic benefactors?
    , @Rod1963



    Once upon a time we had a press and a Democratic Party that called these greedy shits out for exactly what they are.
     
    Yeah they did, I still remember those times. But you have go 25 plus years well before the Clinton's arrived on the scene and changed the party from class based issues to racial ones. Then it all went silent on both sides. Even today it's barely covered by the alt-right.

    What is described in the article, even if you replace the Babus of Apple with white guys the results would be the same. The out-sourcing frenzy is pure murder on upward mobility, it kills it. If you don't land a gig in a company where upward mobility is possible, you're screwed. Any firm that provides services for other larger firms is going to be a bare bones sweat shop operation with no bennies.

    It's a race to the bottom for most workers.

    I looked up the average wage at Google - about $130k for the peons. In Silicon Valley it means you live a crappy apartment 50 miles away and commute to a job that you'll quit in little over a year. In short it's a rotten gig. All because Google and all the other firms have hired Babus and Chinese grinders to replace American labor to destroy their wages. By all rights those jobs should be paying $180-$250k because of how selective they are.But they don't.

    Business has created a environment that floods the market with excess workers which has driven down wages and benefits across the board.

    We either get that the wealthy whites have declared war on us or it will get worse. Immigration and immigrants are just a function of the wealthy whites industrial policy in this country. It's the symptom not the disease.
  17. Forbes says:

    It might also be pointed out that Eastman Kodak is no more. Bankrupt, liquidated, defunct. However modest, generous or reasonable their compensation policy was, it didn’t serve the corporate entity to survive.

    One also imagines that the number of ‘custodians’ that become ‘senior executives’ can be counted up without taking off your shoes and socks. Ordinarily, that would be called the exception that proves the rule. For the NYT, it means every ‘janitor’ is capable of being a senior executive, and that invidious discrimination is the cause of income inequality.

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    • Replies: @Forbes
    Sorry. Kodak emerged from bankruptcy in 2013 after selling off its digital imaging patents. The company lives on in a much shrunken state.
  18. jim jones says:

    Britain has the best janitors:

    View post on imgur.com

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    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Britannia_Coco-nut_Dancers
    , @Catholic Philly Prole
    Looks like the Philly Mummers when they used to wear blackface
  19. Hubbub says:

    When the Goodpeople talk about ‘equality’ in all things, they do not take into consideration such things as time period, years of service, education, part of the country, type of industry, etc. – all those things by nature are equal and need not be factored in.

    Equality means equality: Evans – a maid; Ramos – a maid and, as such, deserve the same wages and benefits.

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  20. carol says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    It's "custodian", not "janitor".

    I was corrected thusly four decades ago on my summer job at a Y camp.

    Maintenance engineer, currently.

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    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Also known as Facilities Services.
    , @Pericles
    Engineer: the most debased profession. First every third worlder and their uncle is a software engineer. Now the cleaning staff are not "Facilities Attorneys at Law" or "Medical Doctors of Maintenance" but "maintenance engineers". Sic transit whatever.
  21. OT…

    Hilarious headline is Steve bait:

    “Parents Travel From India to Help Son Beat Wife”

    http://www.tampabay.com/news/publicsafety/crime/parents-travel-from-india-to-help-son-beat-wife-say-deputies/2336101

    Read More
    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    “Parents Travel From India to Help Son Beat Wife”

    http://www.tampabay.com/news/publicsafety/crime/parents-travel-from-india-to-help-son-beat-wife-say-deputies/2336101

     

    Sikh last names.

    Assuming the photo editor used the right mugshots, I must say the three of them look a lot like Latin American types.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Hilarious headline is Steve bait:

    “Parents Travel From India to Help Son Beat Wife”
     

    That happened in Hillsborough County, where, 56 years ago, Gwendolyn Hoyt was convicted by an all-male jury of beating her husband to death with a baseball bat.

    Mrs Hoyt took it to the Supreme Court, where her lawyers argued that it was unfair to her that her fellow women, unlike men, were not forced to sit on juries. She lost, but a similar case in 1975 mostly agreed with her point, and the notorious RBG's last case in 1979 tossed out all sex differences in juror selection.

    So poor Gwendolyn was a premature anti-sexist, it seems.

    Something like one percent of the jurors in Hillsborough County (Tampa) that year (1961) were female, as opposed to nearby Pinellas County (St Pete and Clearwater), where a strong local effort was made to get women to volunteer, which raised their number all the way to four percent.

  22. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    I think another difference is the rise of “meritocratic” personnel-filling asset-stripping techniques — the SAT/ACT being simply the corrupt amateur version of this, as NCAA football is to NFL — so that someone who can function about janitorial level is less likely even to start there nowadays. No offense to Mrs. Ramos. But I tend to believe corporate moneyballers have left no NAM stone unturned by this point.

    The old fable of someone being groomed for C-suite starting at the ticket counter, deep fryer, or shop floor was, if unscientific and hokey, not without its merits. Witness our present elites.

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  23. An interesting SoCal post-punk artifact:

    Some YouTube comments:

    i like this garbage

    Nihilist new wave brilliance.

    god bless white America.
    reply> Finally, someone understands.

    Now THAT’S counter culture.

    This sounds like something you’d read about in Less Than Zero.

    I have no idea if this is genius or just fucking stupid.

    good luck ever being this cool

    When there were white people in Los Angeles!
    reply> LOL, yeah, it’s over.

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    • Replies: @jamie b.
    The guy that did the intro- wasn't he stabbed to death or something?
    , @Pat Boyle
    This garbage can't possibly be real music. This must be a parody.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    Su Tissue is kinda cute in a catatonic sort of way. But, like Monday Night Football, this is best viewed with the sound down. All the way down.
    , @fredyetagain aka superhonky
    As a kid listening to this on KROQ in the early 80s, I thought she was talking about her genitals.
  24. Supreme Court is no friend of workers

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielfisher/2014/12/09/amazon-workers-lose-at-supreme-court-on-security-screen-time/#796129c34e06

    “The court, in Integrity Staffing Solutions vs. Busk, rejected the reasoning of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, which had allowed the workers to sue under the theory that since their screening time was required by the employer, it should be compensated.”

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  25. Joe69 says:

    I was a contract engineer at Fiat-Chrysler up until last December. I was contract for 3 years, I was never offered a direct role or a pay raise even though my senior manager went to bat for me to get one. It was almost as if Fiat-Chrysler and the contracting house had no idea how to go about giving me a raise, it was pretty funny, seeing them give my boss the run around… Chrysler telling the contracting house they have to give the raise and the contract house then saying it has to be approved by Chrysler, with neither side, conveniently, making any traction…. pretty rediculous. But good news, since December (Trump’s America), I’ve had a 100% pay increase, and I give all the credit to Trump finally putting a halt to all the Syrian refugee engineers he stopped from coming in!

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  26. Making e-verify mandatory would do a lot for lower paid legal labor. Instead, what we get from congressional Republicans are expanded H-2A and H-2B visa programs.

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  27. The $16.60 per hour Ms. Ramos earns as a janitor at Apple works out to about the same in inflation-adjusted terms as what Ms. Evans earned 35 years ago. But that’s where the similarities end.

    You can’t adjust wages for inflation.

    Here’s why.

    The inflation rate is massively underestimated. So if our government were calculating a REALISTIC inflation rate, we’d see that there has been a massive fall in wages since the early 1980s.

    Here’s an example of what I’m talking about.

    The median home value in Orange County (California) is $677,400.
    The median Orange County family income is $75,422. So it costs 8.98x the median family income to buy a median home.

    In 1993, the median home price in Orange County was $214,000. The median Orange County income was $45,116. So it used to costs 4.74x the median family income to buy a median home.

    In practical terms, the average Orange County resident’s standard of living has fallen 50% (from 4.7 x income to 8.98 x income) between 1993 and now.

    However, according to the US govt inflation-adjusted statistics, Orange County median income has (from 1993 through today) increased from $74,141 (in present-day dollars) to $75,4322. This means that according to US govt statistics, the average Orange County residents is 1.7% wealthier today than back in 1993.

    The above represents a real-life example of how the government-calculated inflation rate is totally bogus.

    Read More
    • Agree: Daniel H, Autochthon
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong

    In practical terms, the average Orange County resident’s standard of living has fallen 50% (from 4.7 x income to 8.98 x income) between 1993 and now.
     
    In political terms, Orange County used to be Republican, now it votes for ZANU-PF. And that is the only metric that counts in our society.
    , @Anonymous
    The REAL inflation rate is pretty close to the increase in prices for a P&W PT-6 aircraft engine.


    Much as Jeff Cooper observed that in 1900, a Double Eagle gold piece would buy a well made fitted man's suit or a Colt Single Action Army new, and in 1990 it still would.
    , @JohnnyWalker123
    Median male earnings (which includes non-workers and is adjusted for unemployment) peaked back in the 1970s and have been decling from 80s through today. It’s amazing that with our GDP having expanded so much since the 70s, median wages have fallen so much. See page 12 of this report. The report also shows that 80% of prime-age American men used to have a full-time job back in the 70s. By the late 2000s, it was only 66%. See below link.

    http://www.hamiltonproject.org/assets/files/milken_reduced_earnings_for_men_america

    Bankruptcy filings skyrocketed from the 80s onward.

    http://www.mondaq.com/unitedstates/x/464136/Insolvency+Bankruptcy/BAPCPA+10+Years+Later+The+Effectiveness+And+Necessity+Of+Bankruptcy+Reforms+Remain+In+Question

    Overdoses rose slightly in the mid 80s and early 90s. Then skyrocketed from the mid 90s onward.
    Overdoses deaths (per-capita) are now 6x more common than in the 70s and early 80s. Per capita, overdoses are also about 4x more common than in the early 90s.

    https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6101a3.htm

    The incarceration rate (for all races) is also much higher today than in the 70s.

    https://www.nap.edu/read/18613/chapter/4

    Consumer debt increased substantially in the 80s, then skyrocketed in from the 90s through today.

    http://www.money-zine.com/financial-planning/debt-consolidation/consumer-debt-statistics/

    Student loan debt has exploded too since the early 90s. This is more significant than it seems. Back in the 70s&80s, a college degree wasn't a prerequisite to entering the middle-class. Now it is. So this increase in student loan debt is even worse than it seems.

    http://www.doctorhousingbubble.com/education-of-the-housing-market-student-loan-debt-and-falling-birth-rates-slow-demand-for-the-first-time-buyer-market-sallie-mae-debt/
    , @Wilkey
    Yeah, $16.60/hour in Cupertino in 2017 doesn't go nearly as far as it goes in Rochester, today or 35 years ago.

    I didn't read the full article (yet) but...where the hell does Ms. Ramos live? How many people have to live with her just to pay the bills? How many jobs does she have? How many hours does she spend commuting?

    This system is effed up, and the supposed party of the poor is defending it. It's encouraging that it seems like large numbers of people in both parties (the voters if not the politicians) are catching on. Whether our elected leaders will ever do anything about it is another matter entirely.
  28. jamie b. says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican
    An interesting SoCal post-punk artifact:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7RBRJVUsI48

    Some YouTube comments:

    i like this garbage

    Nihilist new wave brilliance.

    god bless white America.
    reply> Finally, someone understands.

    Now THAT'S counter culture.

    This sounds like something you'd read about in Less Than Zero.

    I have no idea if this is genius or just fucking stupid.

    good luck ever being this cool

    When there were white people in Los Angeles!
    reply> LOL, yeah, it's over.
     

    The guy that did the intro- wasn’t he stabbed to death or something?

    Read More
  29. anon says: • Disclaimer

    Before the mid 90′s or so, it wasn’t difficult for a corporation to hire low level service personnel directly. There is a lot more overhead when hiring now. A major HR role is to keep the firm from getting sued. Plus, there is an obsession with headcount. Investors look at metrics like revenue per FTE (full time equivalent).

    Anyway — maybe Ms Ramos should be looking for work in an Apple Store. It pays around the same. I think a year at Starbucks or an Apple Store is good experience. A year as a janitor wouldn’t be a waste either. I put in a year working construction. I learned a lot about people and picked up a few skills. My first corporate job — I couldn’t believe that they paid you to sit for an hour in a meeting.

    For the second straight year, CollegeGrad.com has ranked Enterprise Rent-A-Car the No. 1 Entry-Level Employer of college graduates for 2016.

    I actually talked to an Enterprise Employee who was finishing a PhD in Physics and wanted to improve his ‘people skills’. None of these are great jobs. But all of them are pretty good places for someone without a better idea. The one piece of advice would be to make sure you don’t have the same year of experience five times. They are places to find your next job.

    Read More
  30. jwm says:

    Here’s a real, true janitor story from a real janitor. We could sub-title this, “White Privilege in the workplace”

    Eleven years ago I got out of the cardiac ward with a stent in my heart, and no bank account left. Insurance was a gyp. So as soon as I was back on my feet, I hired on as a substitute custodian for the local school district. I had 15 years of experience when they hired me. I worked hard, applied for the first full-time job that came open. Passed up for some Latino dude cold off the street. Next I was passed up for the 20yo Latino kid who bailed within the the first year- couldn’t handle the workload. Next I got passed up for the Black dude, who was shit-canned within six weeks. Then I got passed up for the second Black dude who also bailed because of the workload. It took damn near five years to get a full time job. They just fired the first Latino dude who was hired before me. I outlasted them all. And they just promoted a nice lesbian with a boy’s haircut to take the lead custodial spot on my campus. She can’t get a file cabinet up on a hand truck, or manage to get the flags right side up, and doesn’t know enough to not store the gasoline in the same closet as the water heater. I can retire this year, so I’m just standing back and watching the circus. (I moved the gasoline)

    JWM

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hubbub
    Maybe you should move the gasoline closer to the water heater as you leave.
    , @Tiny Duck
    Why are altrighters so freaking old? Shouldn't you guys be spending time with your grandkids and wives


    Oh wait
    , @Bard of Bumperstickers
    Guy oughta claim to self-identify as black, like Rachel Dolezal . Who, in this age of enlightenment, would dare argue? Also, heavy filing cabinets are misogynist manifestations of toxic masculinity.
    , @JackOH
    jwm, thanks. The hiring practices at my local state university are the most corrupt I've ever seen in my life, or will ever see. Affirmative action boogie-woogie, plus crony 'n' patronage, which may as well be called White dude welfare for selected Whites, mean that no incompetent lay-about is left behind.

    Too bad you had to pay a pretty hefty "White dude tax" before getting a full-time job. There ought to be a way of toting up the cost of "deferred re-employment", wages and salaries lost by competent workers because our masters were running their game.
    , @JeremiahJohnbalaya
    Worth being moved into the head post, and retitled "A Tale of Three Janitors"
    , @Truth
    Just a thought, Sport; maybe your job performance wasn't quite what you thought it was?
  31. Maj. Kong says:
    @Wilkey
    And Tim Cook, humanitarian extraordinaire, just gave himself a $90 million bonus, while Laurene Powell Jobs, one of the richest women in the world, presses to let the rest of the world in, even as Apple conveniently manages to avoid paying taxes to the United States.

    Once upon a time we had a press and a Democratic Party that called these greedy shits out for exactly what they are.

    Jobs just bought the Atlantic

    Bezos owns the Washington Post

    Gates owns the education system, via Common Core

    Zuckerberg has more control over the information read, than any man in recorded history

    Google has the literal power to unperson

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Its a cyberpunk world, only much queerer than we ever dared to imagine. The eternal boot stomping on our faces will have rainbow smileys.
  32. Maj. Kong says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The $16.60 per hour Ms. Ramos earns as a janitor at Apple works out to about the same in inflation-adjusted terms as what Ms. Evans earned 35 years ago. But that’s where the similarities end.
     
    You can't adjust wages for inflation.

    Here's why.

    The inflation rate is massively underestimated. So if our government were calculating a REALISTIC inflation rate, we'd see that there has been a massive fall in wages since the early 1980s.

    Here’s an example of what I’m talking about.

    The median home value in Orange County (California) is $677,400.
    The median Orange County family income is $75,422. So it costs 8.98x the median family income to buy a median home.

    In 1993, the median home price in Orange County was $214,000. The median Orange County income was $45,116. So it used to costs 4.74x the median family income to buy a median home.

    In practical terms, the average Orange County resident's standard of living has fallen 50% (from 4.7 x income to 8.98 x income) between 1993 and now.

    However, according to the US govt inflation-adjusted statistics, Orange County median income has (from 1993 through today) increased from $74,141 (in present-day dollars) to $75,4322. This means that according to US govt statistics, the average Orange County residents is 1.7% wealthier today than back in 1993.

    The above represents a real-life example of how the government-calculated inflation rate is totally bogus.

    In practical terms, the average Orange County resident’s standard of living has fallen 50% (from 4.7 x income to 8.98 x income) between 1993 and now.

    In political terms, Orange County used to be Republican, now it votes for ZANU-PF. And that is the only metric that counts in our society.

    Read More
  33. Er,

    What happened to Eastman Kodak?

    What happened to Apple?

    This may be a bad example.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    What happened to Eastman Kodak
     
    Alinsky
    , @fnn

    Er, What happened to Eastman Kodak?

    What happened to Apple?

    This may be a bad example.
     
    Companies come and go, that 's part of capitalism, eh? Surprise that Kodak still around, albeit hanging on by a thread. The point that is that one the premier companies of the white supreemist, male chauvinist Madmen era had a more egalitarian, objectively anti-racist personnel policy than the the ridiculously giant mega-corporation now at the tip of the spear of murica's current reenactment of Mao's Cultural Revolution.
    , @Laugh Track

    Er,

    What happened to Eastman Kodak?

    What happened to Apple?

    This may be a bad example.
     
    Yeah, I was wondering whether Ms Evans was the Chief Technology Officer for Kodak during the era that they got broadsided by the digital revolution. Didn't work out so well for Kodak.
    , @MarkinLA
    What happened to Eastman Kodak?

    Kodak only made junk cameras in the film days and film and photo-paper were it's big money makers. When it was gone, it was hard for any company to downsize enough to stay solvent. They were into other businesses like copiers but there were also many established competitors in those businesses. They tried to get into the digital camera market by partnering with some noted lens makers but compared to real camera makers, it was too little too late.
    , @ScarletNumber
    They took our Kodachrome away.
  34. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The $16.60 per hour Ms. Ramos earns as a janitor at Apple works out to about the same in inflation-adjusted terms as what Ms. Evans earned 35 years ago. But that’s where the similarities end.
     
    You can't adjust wages for inflation.

    Here's why.

    The inflation rate is massively underestimated. So if our government were calculating a REALISTIC inflation rate, we'd see that there has been a massive fall in wages since the early 1980s.

    Here’s an example of what I’m talking about.

    The median home value in Orange County (California) is $677,400.
    The median Orange County family income is $75,422. So it costs 8.98x the median family income to buy a median home.

    In 1993, the median home price in Orange County was $214,000. The median Orange County income was $45,116. So it used to costs 4.74x the median family income to buy a median home.

    In practical terms, the average Orange County resident's standard of living has fallen 50% (from 4.7 x income to 8.98 x income) between 1993 and now.

    However, according to the US govt inflation-adjusted statistics, Orange County median income has (from 1993 through today) increased from $74,141 (in present-day dollars) to $75,4322. This means that according to US govt statistics, the average Orange County residents is 1.7% wealthier today than back in 1993.

    The above represents a real-life example of how the government-calculated inflation rate is totally bogus.

    The REAL inflation rate is pretty close to the increase in prices for a P&W PT-6 aircraft engine.

    Much as Jeff Cooper observed that in 1900, a Double Eagle gold piece would buy a well made fitted man’s suit or a Colt Single Action Army new, and in 1990 it still would.

    Read More
  35. @JohnnyWalker123

    The $16.60 per hour Ms. Ramos earns as a janitor at Apple works out to about the same in inflation-adjusted terms as what Ms. Evans earned 35 years ago. But that’s where the similarities end.
     
    You can't adjust wages for inflation.

    Here's why.

    The inflation rate is massively underestimated. So if our government were calculating a REALISTIC inflation rate, we'd see that there has been a massive fall in wages since the early 1980s.

    Here’s an example of what I’m talking about.

    The median home value in Orange County (California) is $677,400.
    The median Orange County family income is $75,422. So it costs 8.98x the median family income to buy a median home.

    In 1993, the median home price in Orange County was $214,000. The median Orange County income was $45,116. So it used to costs 4.74x the median family income to buy a median home.

    In practical terms, the average Orange County resident's standard of living has fallen 50% (from 4.7 x income to 8.98 x income) between 1993 and now.

    However, according to the US govt inflation-adjusted statistics, Orange County median income has (from 1993 through today) increased from $74,141 (in present-day dollars) to $75,4322. This means that according to US govt statistics, the average Orange County residents is 1.7% wealthier today than back in 1993.

    The above represents a real-life example of how the government-calculated inflation rate is totally bogus.

    Median male earnings (which includes non-workers and is adjusted for unemployment) peaked back in the 1970s and have been decling from 80s through today. It’s amazing that with our GDP having expanded so much since the 70s, median wages have fallen so much. See page 12 of this report. The report also shows that 80% of prime-age American men used to have a full-time job back in the 70s. By the late 2000s, it was only 66%. See below link.

    http://www.hamiltonproject.org/assets/files/milken_reduced_earnings_for_men_america

    Bankruptcy filings skyrocketed from the 80s onward.

    http://www.mondaq.com/unitedstates/x/464136/Insolvency+Bankruptcy/BAPCPA+10+Years+Later+The+Effectiveness+And+Necessity+Of+Bankruptcy+Reforms+Remain+In+Question

    Overdoses rose slightly in the mid 80s and early 90s. Then skyrocketed from the mid 90s onward.
    Overdoses deaths (per-capita) are now 6x more common than in the 70s and early 80s. Per capita, overdoses are also about 4x more common than in the early 90s.

    https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6101a3.htm

    The incarceration rate (for all races) is also much higher today than in the 70s.

    https://www.nap.edu/read/18613/chapter/4

    Consumer debt increased substantially in the 80s, then skyrocketed in from the 90s through today.

    http://www.money-zine.com/financial-planning/debt-consolidation/consumer-debt-statistics/

    Student loan debt has exploded too since the early 90s. This is more significant than it seems. Back in the 70s&80s, a college degree wasn’t a prerequisite to entering the middle-class. Now it is. So this increase in student loan debt is even worse than it seems.

    http://www.doctorhousingbubble.com/education-of-the-housing-market-student-loan-debt-and-falling-birth-rates-slow-demand-for-the-first-time-buyer-market-sallie-mae-debt/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pat Boyle
    These figures do not make me happy.
    , @anon
    The Hamilton Project seems to think that immigration increases wages for American Citizens.

    Although many are concerned that immigrants compete against Americans for jobs, the most recent economic evidence suggests that, on average, immigrant workers increase the opportunities and incomes of Americans.
     
    Shockingly, the US Civil Rights Commission isn't so sure

    Illegal immigration to the United States in recent decades has tended to depress both wages and employment rates for low-skilled American citizens, a disproportionate number of whom are black men. Expert economic opinions concerning the negative effects range from modest to significant. Those panelists that found modest effects overall nonetheless found significant effects in industry sectors such as meatpacking and construction.
     
    http://www.usccr.gov/pubs/IllegImmig_10-14-10_430pm.pdf

    30 years ago, construction work paid roughly 2x minimum wage. It's physically challenging work and the working conditions are often difficult. It is possible that unions contributed to higher wages, even in non union work sites. But now roofing, drywall, cement work, etc is done by crews of illegals.
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "Median male earnings (which includes non-workers and is adjusted for unemployment) peaked back in the 1970s and have been declining from 80s through today. It’s amazing that with our GDP having expanded so much since the 70s, median wages have fallen so much. See page 12 of this report."

    So much for he Democratic Party being for the common man and his interests. They signed on with the GOP for such deals as NAFTA, etc. which have helped depress wages and benefits. And they didn't care about protecting US jobs from being outsourced.

    "The incarceration rate (for all races) is also much higher today than in the 70s."

    Not all races are at the same rate. It's still about 10-15x higher among a certain group when compared to whites.
    , @Autochthon

    It’s amazing that with our GDP having expanded so much since the 70s, median wages have fallen so much.
     
    This phenomenon is neither amazing nor even remarkable, since all the increased GDP has been achieved by overpopulation; GDPPP – not GDP – is the measure of productivity and its increase (or decrease).
  36. @anony-mouse
    Er,

    What happened to Eastman Kodak?

    What happened to Apple?

    This may be a bad example.

    What happened to Eastman Kodak

    Alinsky

    Read More
  37. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Ms. Evans’ career path is not at all typical. Is it really even fair to compare what is likely a typical janitorial worker with someone who was a apparently very unusual one?

    A highly ranked university where I live only started giving tuition reimbursement to current employees about 15 years ago. Prior to that time, only the children of university employees who had worked there for at least five years were eligible for tuition assistance. That same university never never gave bonuses to all employees until also around 15 years ago, but those bonuses were only a couple of hundred dollars, or so.

    I would also guess that Ms. Evans did not have four weeks vacation until she had worked there for quite awhile. I’m just guessing, but I would imagine that turnover among janitorial staff is pretty high, although maybe at companies with superb benefits it is less so.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TWS
    You're living in the wrong century. Worse you're living in the wrong country because the past is a different country. Things were so much better you can't even imagine what it was really like.
    , @joefour
    Eastman Kodak back in 70s and 80s was known as "Mother Yellow" to its employees ... they knew they had a sweet deal!
  38. Pat Boyle says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican
    An interesting SoCal post-punk artifact:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7RBRJVUsI48

    Some YouTube comments:

    i like this garbage

    Nihilist new wave brilliance.

    god bless white America.
    reply> Finally, someone understands.

    Now THAT'S counter culture.

    This sounds like something you'd read about in Less Than Zero.

    I have no idea if this is genius or just fucking stupid.

    good luck ever being this cool

    When there were white people in Los Angeles!
    reply> LOL, yeah, it's over.
     

    This garbage can’t possibly be real music. This must be a parody.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    My sentiments exactly. And I thought pop music collapsed in the 1970s (and I stopped listening).

    Seems I missed nothing.
    , @jamie b.
    Wait until somebody introduces you to something called "rap."
  39. Pat Boyle says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Median male earnings (which includes non-workers and is adjusted for unemployment) peaked back in the 1970s and have been decling from 80s through today. It’s amazing that with our GDP having expanded so much since the 70s, median wages have fallen so much. See page 12 of this report. The report also shows that 80% of prime-age American men used to have a full-time job back in the 70s. By the late 2000s, it was only 66%. See below link.

    http://www.hamiltonproject.org/assets/files/milken_reduced_earnings_for_men_america

    Bankruptcy filings skyrocketed from the 80s onward.

    http://www.mondaq.com/unitedstates/x/464136/Insolvency+Bankruptcy/BAPCPA+10+Years+Later+The+Effectiveness+And+Necessity+Of+Bankruptcy+Reforms+Remain+In+Question

    Overdoses rose slightly in the mid 80s and early 90s. Then skyrocketed from the mid 90s onward.
    Overdoses deaths (per-capita) are now 6x more common than in the 70s and early 80s. Per capita, overdoses are also about 4x more common than in the early 90s.

    https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6101a3.htm

    The incarceration rate (for all races) is also much higher today than in the 70s.

    https://www.nap.edu/read/18613/chapter/4

    Consumer debt increased substantially in the 80s, then skyrocketed in from the 90s through today.

    http://www.money-zine.com/financial-planning/debt-consolidation/consumer-debt-statistics/

    Student loan debt has exploded too since the early 90s. This is more significant than it seems. Back in the 70s&80s, a college degree wasn't a prerequisite to entering the middle-class. Now it is. So this increase in student loan debt is even worse than it seems.

    http://www.doctorhousingbubble.com/education-of-the-housing-market-student-loan-debt-and-falling-birth-rates-slow-demand-for-the-first-time-buyer-market-sallie-mae-debt/

    These figures do not make me happy.

    Read More
  40. @Pat Boyle
    This garbage can't possibly be real music. This must be a parody.

    My sentiments exactly. And I thought pop music collapsed in the 1970s (and I stopped listening).

    Seems I missed nothing.

    Read More
  41. Apple and the rest of the “modern” corporations are aggravated that there are still jobs that require humans at all. Basic Income is probably not a viable option, but healthcare and free education would make mcjobs workable. I don’t know how much longer the current inequality imbalance can last.

    Read More
  42. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Median male earnings (which includes non-workers and is adjusted for unemployment) peaked back in the 1970s and have been decling from 80s through today. It’s amazing that with our GDP having expanded so much since the 70s, median wages have fallen so much. See page 12 of this report. The report also shows that 80% of prime-age American men used to have a full-time job back in the 70s. By the late 2000s, it was only 66%. See below link.

    http://www.hamiltonproject.org/assets/files/milken_reduced_earnings_for_men_america

    Bankruptcy filings skyrocketed from the 80s onward.

    http://www.mondaq.com/unitedstates/x/464136/Insolvency+Bankruptcy/BAPCPA+10+Years+Later+The+Effectiveness+And+Necessity+Of+Bankruptcy+Reforms+Remain+In+Question

    Overdoses rose slightly in the mid 80s and early 90s. Then skyrocketed from the mid 90s onward.
    Overdoses deaths (per-capita) are now 6x more common than in the 70s and early 80s. Per capita, overdoses are also about 4x more common than in the early 90s.

    https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6101a3.htm

    The incarceration rate (for all races) is also much higher today than in the 70s.

    https://www.nap.edu/read/18613/chapter/4

    Consumer debt increased substantially in the 80s, then skyrocketed in from the 90s through today.

    http://www.money-zine.com/financial-planning/debt-consolidation/consumer-debt-statistics/

    Student loan debt has exploded too since the early 90s. This is more significant than it seems. Back in the 70s&80s, a college degree wasn't a prerequisite to entering the middle-class. Now it is. So this increase in student loan debt is even worse than it seems.

    http://www.doctorhousingbubble.com/education-of-the-housing-market-student-loan-debt-and-falling-birth-rates-slow-demand-for-the-first-time-buyer-market-sallie-mae-debt/

    The Hamilton Project seems to think that immigration increases wages for American Citizens.

    Although many are concerned that immigrants compete against Americans for jobs, the most recent economic evidence suggests that, on average, immigrant workers increase the opportunities and incomes of Americans.

    Shockingly, the US Civil Rights Commission isn’t so sure

    Illegal immigration to the United States in recent decades has tended to depress both wages and employment rates for low-skilled American citizens, a disproportionate number of whom are black men. Expert economic opinions concerning the negative effects range from modest to significant. Those panelists that found modest effects overall nonetheless found significant effects in industry sectors such as meatpacking and construction.

    http://www.usccr.gov/pubs/IllegImmig_10-14-10_430pm.pdf

    30 years ago, construction work paid roughly 2x minimum wage. It’s physically challenging work and the working conditions are often difficult. It is possible that unions contributed to higher wages, even in non union work sites. But now roofing, drywall, cement work, etc is done by crews of illegals.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    Using illegal labor also means dodging income and payroll taxes. The border wall should be paid for by a tax on remittances to Mexico. It has been suggested that such a tax would cause an increase in cryptocurrency usage, so I am not sure how that could be dealt with.
  43. I earned $10 an hour as a cleaner at NYC public schools during my summer breaks from college 1984-85.

    Read More
    • Replies: @StillCARealist
    that was 3x the minimum wage at the time. No wonder the schools were/are so expensive for the taxpayer.

    For comparison, I do payroll for a carpet cleaning company.... hard work for sure... and they make from $11-13 an hour. 2017.
  44. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Which of course, begs the question, if American corporations and evil white men are so exploitative of immigrants, especially illegal ones, why push so hard to bring the poor immigrants here to suffer under the evil white man? And for that matter, why would the poor immigrant want to come, if things are so terrible for them? Certainly if they are talking up a storm to their relatives back home (and certainly Carlos Slim’s billions are a testament to that), then surely news by now of how awful America is to Hispanics would have gotten around.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dmitry134564
    Well you already know the answer to the question of course. The hardworking Latinos cleaning toilets, are not the ones complaining about the 'evil white man'.
    , @Frau Katze
    The eternal mystery! The West is considered horrible: full of racism, Islamophobia, misogynists, swarms of neo-Nazis... And that's just a partial list. Get an SJW started and you hear a very long list.

    But strangely enough, the rest of the world seems desperate to live here.

    Someone is wrong...
  45. TWS says:
    @Anonymous
    Ms. Evans' career path is not at all typical. Is it really even fair to compare what is likely a typical janitorial worker with someone who was a apparently very unusual one?

    A highly ranked university where I live only started giving tuition reimbursement to current employees about 15 years ago. Prior to that time, only the children of university employees who had worked there for at least five years were eligible for tuition assistance. That same university never never gave bonuses to all employees until also around 15 years ago, but those bonuses were only a couple of hundred dollars, or so.

    I would also guess that Ms. Evans did not have four weeks vacation until she had worked there for quite awhile. I'm just guessing, but I would imagine that turnover among janitorial staff is pretty high, although maybe at companies with superb benefits it is less so.

    You’re living in the wrong century. Worse you’re living in the wrong country because the past is a different country. Things were so much better you can’t even imagine what it was really like.

    Read More
  46. @Jewish Conservative Race Realist
    OT...

    Hilarious headline is Steve bait:

    "Parents Travel From India to Help Son Beat Wife"

    http://www.tampabay.com/news/publicsafety/crime/parents-travel-from-india-to-help-son-beat-wife-say-deputies/2336101

    “Parents Travel From India to Help Son Beat Wife”

    http://www.tampabay.com/news/publicsafety/crime/parents-travel-from-india-to-help-son-beat-wife-say-deputies/2336101

    Sikh last names.

    Assuming the photo editor used the right mugshots, I must say the three of them look a lot like Latin American types.

    Read More
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    The first guy (the son?) looks Indian/Paki, but could pass as Middle Eastern. The other two look like Mexicans. Not a good looking family.
  47. @Anonymous
    Which of course, begs the question, if American corporations and evil white men are so exploitative of immigrants, especially illegal ones, why push so hard to bring the poor immigrants here to suffer under the evil white man? And for that matter, why would the poor immigrant want to come, if things are so terrible for them? Certainly if they are talking up a storm to their relatives back home (and certainly Carlos Slim's billions are a testament to that), then surely news by now of how awful America is to Hispanics would have gotten around.

    Well you already know the answer to the question of course. The hardworking Latinos cleaning toilets, are not the ones complaining about the ‘evil white man’.

    Read More
  48. Trelane says:

    Eastman Kodask went bankrupt in part because of its toxic corporate culture of non-meritocratic hiring and promotion. Ms. Brown, the janitor, or whatever her name is would be an example of this.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Wilkey
    Eastman Kodak went bankrupt in part because of its toxic corporate culture of non-meritocratic hiring and promotion. Ms. Brown, the janitor, or whatever her name is would be an example of this.

    In part there's a strong possibility that's true, but it's also true that the biggest single reason they went bankrupt is that they're making effectively making buggy whips in an era when every single human being has a car. There was no chance ever, in a million years, that they were ever going to keep up with the technological changes that eviscerated what was probably their biggest source of revenue.

    My older brother went to college with a kid whose dad was CEO of Kodak. When he told my father I remember my dad commenting (and this was like 25 years ago - pre-internet, pre-Windows 95) that Kodak was pretty much doomed because of computers. Even my old man, a Korean War vet, 44 years older than me and 60 y.o. at the time, saw the writing on the wall.

    The hiring policy that got Ms. Evans to the position of CTO were frankly just batshit crazy. But is it too much to expect that Apple (or its contractors) hire legal employees and pay them a decent wage, rather than combing for the world for the dirt cheapest labor and bringing them to America to undermine the working class already here?

    , @Anonymous
    I think the main reason they went bankrupt was that they were making film cameras and accessories in the age of the digital camera.

    But probably as you say, promoting janitors to company officers probably helped to seal their fate. Unless they were promoting Will Hunting, they're probably not going to get too many intelligent suggestions about transitioning to the 21st Century. And even Will would have to do quite a bit of growing up before I'd sign off on giving him a promotion.
    , @Truth
    No, it went bankrupt because it invented the digital camera and did nothing with the patent.

    Full. Stop.
  49. fnn says:
    @anony-mouse
    Er,

    What happened to Eastman Kodak?

    What happened to Apple?

    This may be a bad example.

    Er, What happened to Eastman Kodak?

    What happened to Apple?

    This may be a bad example.

    Companies come and go, that ‘s part of capitalism, eh? Surprise that Kodak still around, albeit hanging on by a thread. The point that is that one the premier companies of the white supreemist, male chauvinist Madmen era had a more egalitarian, objectively anti-racist personnel policy than the the ridiculously giant mega-corporation now at the tip of the spear of murica’s current reenactment of Mao’s Cultural Revolution.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    more egalitarian, objectively anti-racist personnel policy

    Astute observation; those who ignore The Bell Curve and HBD are compelled to die by it. Kodaks are fated to die, Apples are fated to prosper. That is the golden rule of 21st century.
  50. AndrewR says:
    @Wilkey
    And Tim Cook, humanitarian extraordinaire, just gave himself a $90 million bonus, while Laurene Powell Jobs, one of the richest women in the world, presses to let the rest of the world in, even as Apple conveniently manages to avoid paying taxes to the United States.

    Once upon a time we had a press and a Democratic Party that called these greedy shits out for exactly what they are.

    But Cook gave two million dollars of Apple’s money to the SPLC, so you’re literally a Nazi if you criticize Apple.

    Read More
  51. anon says: • Disclaimer

    Best comments on NYTs:

    As for Ms. Ramos, learning English would probably help if she was interested in following the footsteps of Ms. Evans. And family planning.

    or the full version:

    “There is little chance for building connections at Apple. “Everyone is doing their own thing and has their own assignment, and we don’t see each other outside of work,” said Ms. Ramos in Spanish.”

    Talk about burying the lede. She lives in the U.S., has 4 children and doesn’t speak enough English to answer a few basic questions about her work situation? This to me raises a whole other set of questions. How is she going to get ahead if she doesn’t bother to learn English (and why doesn’t she speak it)? Is she a legal resident of the U.S.? Are her children? Where are their fathers? It seems to me there are some issues of personal responsibility that may explain low wages, let’s not lay the blame at the feet of her employer.

    Read More
  52. @JohnnyWalker123
    Median male earnings (which includes non-workers and is adjusted for unemployment) peaked back in the 1970s and have been decling from 80s through today. It’s amazing that with our GDP having expanded so much since the 70s, median wages have fallen so much. See page 12 of this report. The report also shows that 80% of prime-age American men used to have a full-time job back in the 70s. By the late 2000s, it was only 66%. See below link.

    http://www.hamiltonproject.org/assets/files/milken_reduced_earnings_for_men_america

    Bankruptcy filings skyrocketed from the 80s onward.

    http://www.mondaq.com/unitedstates/x/464136/Insolvency+Bankruptcy/BAPCPA+10+Years+Later+The+Effectiveness+And+Necessity+Of+Bankruptcy+Reforms+Remain+In+Question

    Overdoses rose slightly in the mid 80s and early 90s. Then skyrocketed from the mid 90s onward.
    Overdoses deaths (per-capita) are now 6x more common than in the 70s and early 80s. Per capita, overdoses are also about 4x more common than in the early 90s.

    https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6101a3.htm

    The incarceration rate (for all races) is also much higher today than in the 70s.

    https://www.nap.edu/read/18613/chapter/4

    Consumer debt increased substantially in the 80s, then skyrocketed in from the 90s through today.

    http://www.money-zine.com/financial-planning/debt-consolidation/consumer-debt-statistics/

    Student loan debt has exploded too since the early 90s. This is more significant than it seems. Back in the 70s&80s, a college degree wasn't a prerequisite to entering the middle-class. Now it is. So this increase in student loan debt is even worse than it seems.

    http://www.doctorhousingbubble.com/education-of-the-housing-market-student-loan-debt-and-falling-birth-rates-slow-demand-for-the-first-time-buyer-market-sallie-mae-debt/

    “Median male earnings (which includes non-workers and is adjusted for unemployment) peaked back in the 1970s and have been declining from 80s through today. It’s amazing that with our GDP having expanded so much since the 70s, median wages have fallen so much. See page 12 of this report.”

    So much for he Democratic Party being for the common man and his interests. They signed on with the GOP for such deals as NAFTA, etc. which have helped depress wages and benefits. And they didn’t care about protecting US jobs from being outsourced.

    “The incarceration rate (for all races) is also much higher today than in the 70s.”

    Not all races are at the same rate. It’s still about 10-15x higher among a certain group when compared to whites.

    Read More
  53. Maj. Kong says:
    @anon
    The Hamilton Project seems to think that immigration increases wages for American Citizens.

    Although many are concerned that immigrants compete against Americans for jobs, the most recent economic evidence suggests that, on average, immigrant workers increase the opportunities and incomes of Americans.
     
    Shockingly, the US Civil Rights Commission isn't so sure

    Illegal immigration to the United States in recent decades has tended to depress both wages and employment rates for low-skilled American citizens, a disproportionate number of whom are black men. Expert economic opinions concerning the negative effects range from modest to significant. Those panelists that found modest effects overall nonetheless found significant effects in industry sectors such as meatpacking and construction.
     
    http://www.usccr.gov/pubs/IllegImmig_10-14-10_430pm.pdf

    30 years ago, construction work paid roughly 2x minimum wage. It's physically challenging work and the working conditions are often difficult. It is possible that unions contributed to higher wages, even in non union work sites. But now roofing, drywall, cement work, etc is done by crews of illegals.

    Using illegal labor also means dodging income and payroll taxes. The border wall should be paid for by a tax on remittances to Mexico. It has been suggested that such a tax would cause an increase in cryptocurrency usage, so I am not sure how that could be dealt with.

    Read More
  54. @Wilkey
    And Tim Cook, humanitarian extraordinaire, just gave himself a $90 million bonus, while Laurene Powell Jobs, one of the richest women in the world, presses to let the rest of the world in, even as Apple conveniently manages to avoid paying taxes to the United States.

    Once upon a time we had a press and a Democratic Party that called these greedy shits out for exactly what they are.

    When was that? A generation and a half ago maybe.

    Read More
  55. Hubbub says:
    @jwm
    Here's a real, true janitor story from a real janitor. We could sub-title this, "White Privilege in the workplace"

    Eleven years ago I got out of the cardiac ward with a stent in my heart, and no bank account left. Insurance was a gyp. So as soon as I was back on my feet, I hired on as a substitute custodian for the local school district. I had 15 years of experience when they hired me. I worked hard, applied for the first full-time job that came open. Passed up for some Latino dude cold off the street. Next I was passed up for the 20yo Latino kid who bailed within the the first year- couldn't handle the workload. Next I got passed up for the Black dude, who was shit-canned within six weeks. Then I got passed up for the second Black dude who also bailed because of the workload. It took damn near five years to get a full time job. They just fired the first Latino dude who was hired before me. I outlasted them all. And they just promoted a nice lesbian with a boy's haircut to take the lead custodial spot on my campus. She can't get a file cabinet up on a hand truck, or manage to get the flags right side up, and doesn't know enough to not store the gasoline in the same closet as the water heater. I can retire this year, so I'm just standing back and watching the circus. (I moved the gasoline)

    JWM

    Maybe you should move the gasoline closer to the water heater as you leave.

    Read More
  56. @Wilkey
    And Tim Cook, humanitarian extraordinaire, just gave himself a $90 million bonus, while Laurene Powell Jobs, one of the richest women in the world, presses to let the rest of the world in, even as Apple conveniently manages to avoid paying taxes to the United States.

    Once upon a time we had a press and a Democratic Party that called these greedy shits out for exactly what they are.

    Once upon a time we had a press and a Democratic Party that called these greedy shits out for exactly what they are.

    When did the Democratic Party ever call out Democratic benefactors?

    Read More
  57. cthulhu says:

    I found it interesting that the NYT strongly implied that Ms. Ramos does not speak English, but drew no conclusions from it. This would prevent her from, as another comment suggested, seeking work in an Apple Store as anything but…a janitor.

    Read More
  58. Rod1963 says:
    @Wilkey
    And Tim Cook, humanitarian extraordinaire, just gave himself a $90 million bonus, while Laurene Powell Jobs, one of the richest women in the world, presses to let the rest of the world in, even as Apple conveniently manages to avoid paying taxes to the United States.

    Once upon a time we had a press and a Democratic Party that called these greedy shits out for exactly what they are.

    Once upon a time we had a press and a Democratic Party that called these greedy shits out for exactly what they are.

    Yeah they did, I still remember those times. But you have go 25 plus years well before the Clinton’s arrived on the scene and changed the party from class based issues to racial ones. Then it all went silent on both sides. Even today it’s barely covered by the alt-right.

    What is described in the article, even if you replace the Babus of Apple with white guys the results would be the same. The out-sourcing frenzy is pure murder on upward mobility, it kills it. If you don’t land a gig in a company where upward mobility is possible, you’re screwed. Any firm that provides services for other larger firms is going to be a bare bones sweat shop operation with no bennies.

    It’s a race to the bottom for most workers.

    I looked up the average wage at Google – about $130k for the peons. In Silicon Valley it means you live a crappy apartment 50 miles away and commute to a job that you’ll quit in little over a year. In short it’s a rotten gig. All because Google and all the other firms have hired Babus and Chinese grinders to replace American labor to destroy their wages. By all rights those jobs should be paying $180-$250k because of how selective they are.But they don’t.

    Business has created a environment that floods the market with excess workers which has driven down wages and benefits across the board.

    We either get that the wealthy whites have declared war on us or it will get worse. Immigration and immigrants are just a function of the wealthy whites industrial policy in this country. It’s the symptom not the disease.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Exactly so. San José and its environs are nothing more than a factory (in the anyient sense of that term – not a manufactory...) for interaction with China, India, et al. in-sourced to what used to be the U.S.A. for the convenience of its masters: they maintain the one locale for interaction with all others, rather than establishing separate factories in each of several nations as empires of old did – all possible because of modern aircraft, telecommunications, and the demise of popular sovereignty in favor of corporatocary without boundaries.
  59. @anony-mouse
    Er,

    What happened to Eastman Kodak?

    What happened to Apple?

    This may be a bad example.

    Er,

    What happened to Eastman Kodak?

    What happened to Apple?

    This may be a bad example.

    Yeah, I was wondering whether Ms Evans was the Chief Technology Officer for Kodak during the era that they got broadsided by the digital revolution. Didn’t work out so well for Kodak.

    Read More
    • Replies: @res

    Yeah, I was wondering whether Ms Evans was the Chief Technology Officer for Kodak during the era that they got broadsided by the digital revolution. Didn’t work out so well for Kodak.
     
    An interesting hypothesis. Let's check it out.

    From a very friendly profile we find she was promoted to Kodak CTO in 1999: https://anitaborg.org/profiles/gail-evans-spotlight/

    In 1980, Gail Evans was a student at Nazareth College in Rochester, New York, putting herself through school as a custodian at Eastman Kodak, the iconic and photographic film and imaging company. Almost two decades later, in 1999, Gail was still at Eastman Kodak, but in a very different role — she had just been named Chief Technology Officer.
     
    Let's look at Kodak. From this 2012 Economist article: http://www.economist.com/node/21542796
    We see that Kodak's profit peak was in (wait for it) 1999. The post 1999 collapse is epic:

    http://cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/290-width/images/print-edition/20120114_WBC381.gif

    The rest of the article is an account of Kodak's woes and an unfavorable comparison with Fujifilm's success.

    So it looks like your guess was on target. Now compare the "putting herself through school" narrative with the NYT "costs to go to college part time." Interesting, how old was she at the time (see below)?

    And we continue with a chronicle of her continuing success in high level positions since then: https://www.mercer.com/about-mercer/gail-evans.html

    Gail Evans is Mercer’s Global Chief Information Officer.

    Prior to joining Mercer, Gail was the Group Partner Program Manager for Microsoft, where she worked across Microsoft Business Groups, Product Engineering and IT teams to launch the next-generation customer knowledge platform for Microsoft’s Mobile First, Cloud First services. In her previous role, she was General Manager of Microsoft Studios, Services & Operations.

    Gail also served as Vice President and General Manager for Hewlett-Packard, responsible for worldwide country engagement and web capabilities as well as execution, search, personalization and digital marketing for HP’s web presence. She previously served as Technology Senior Vice President for Bank of America.

     

    Interesting that Kodak has fallen off of her list of accomplishments there.

    There is more on Gail Evans (and many others) at http://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/29/business/yourmoney/affirmative-action-a-corporate-diary.html

    There we find out she was 44 in 2003 so 21 in 1980 when the NYT story started. Looks like putting herself through school would be a more accurate characterization. It would be an interesting exercise to go through all the people profiled there and see how their groups/companies did during their tenure.

    On another note, how many 40 year olds were in the Kodak C-Suite in 1999? From their 1999 10k: http://getfilings.com/o0000031235-00-000004.html
    we see that CTO does not make it to the list of executives, but the youngest there (the controller) is 41. She must have been amazing to rise so quickly from such a low starting point!
  60. Wilkey says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The $16.60 per hour Ms. Ramos earns as a janitor at Apple works out to about the same in inflation-adjusted terms as what Ms. Evans earned 35 years ago. But that’s where the similarities end.
     
    You can't adjust wages for inflation.

    Here's why.

    The inflation rate is massively underestimated. So if our government were calculating a REALISTIC inflation rate, we'd see that there has been a massive fall in wages since the early 1980s.

    Here’s an example of what I’m talking about.

    The median home value in Orange County (California) is $677,400.
    The median Orange County family income is $75,422. So it costs 8.98x the median family income to buy a median home.

    In 1993, the median home price in Orange County was $214,000. The median Orange County income was $45,116. So it used to costs 4.74x the median family income to buy a median home.

    In practical terms, the average Orange County resident's standard of living has fallen 50% (from 4.7 x income to 8.98 x income) between 1993 and now.

    However, according to the US govt inflation-adjusted statistics, Orange County median income has (from 1993 through today) increased from $74,141 (in present-day dollars) to $75,4322. This means that according to US govt statistics, the average Orange County residents is 1.7% wealthier today than back in 1993.

    The above represents a real-life example of how the government-calculated inflation rate is totally bogus.

    Yeah, $16.60/hour in Cupertino in 2017 doesn’t go nearly as far as it goes in Rochester, today or 35 years ago.

    I didn’t read the full article (yet) but…where the hell does Ms. Ramos live? How many people have to live with her just to pay the bills? How many jobs does she have? How many hours does she spend commuting?

    This system is effed up, and the supposed party of the poor is defending it. It’s encouraging that it seems like large numbers of people in both parties (the voters if not the politicians) are catching on. Whether our elected leaders will ever do anything about it is another matter entirely.

    Read More
  61. anon says: • Disclaimer

    Maybe, if they had hired a Stamford or MIT wiz kid to be CIO instead of promoting the janitor to that position, they would not have descended into the bankrupt irrelevance of today. Maybe Rochester would not be the crime infested decaying city it is today either.

    [regarding] the **early** employees spoke lovingly of Kodak’s culture. Now go talk to the 55,000 Kodak employees who lost their jobs precisely because of that “culture”.

    The point is that Kodak and many other companies had this in-bred “culture” of promoting mediocrity from within. Pretty much managers and senior managers got promoted up based on time and loyalty. Not because they were the superstars that companies now need to thrive. And with no one coming from the outside, there was no challenge to the “culture” that seemed content with splitting the market with Fuji for middling returns.

    An external CIO would be perfectly positioned to challenging the status quo. Instead, Kodak promotes the janitor to CIO, and brings in a failed airline executive as CEO when it was already too late.

    Read More
  62. anon says: • Disclaimer

    More Comments in NYT:

    Maybe, if they had hired a Stamford or MIT wiz kid to be CIO instead of promoting the janitor to that position, they would not have descended into the bankrupt irrelevance of today. Maybe Rochester would not be the crime infested decaying city it is today either.

    [regarding] the **early** employees spoke lovingly of Kodak’s culture. Now go talk to the 55,000 Kodak employees who lost their jobs precisely because of that “culture”.

    The point is that Kodak and many other companies had this in-bred “culture” of promoting mediocrity from within. Pretty much managers and senior managers got promoted up based on time and loyalty. Not because they were the superstars that companies now need to thrive. And with no one coming from the outside, there was no challenge to the “culture” that seemed content with splitting the market with Fuji for middling returns.

    An external CIO would be perfectly positioned to challenging the status quo. Instead, Kodak promotes the janitor to CIO, and brings in a failed airline executive as CEO when it was already too late.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Maybe Rochester would not be the crime infested decaying city it is today either.
     
    That Xerox was totally clueless about what they had out in Palo Alto didn't help matters on the Genesee, either.

    Thanks to Mayo Clinic, the other Rochester is still doing quite well. I believe it is still the whitest city (real city, not suburb) in America of its size.
  63. Wilkey says:
    @Trelane
    Eastman Kodask went bankrupt in part because of its toxic corporate culture of non-meritocratic hiring and promotion. Ms. Brown, the janitor, or whatever her name is would be an example of this.

    Eastman Kodak went bankrupt in part because of its toxic corporate culture of non-meritocratic hiring and promotion. Ms. Brown, the janitor, or whatever her name is would be an example of this.

    In part there’s a strong possibility that’s true, but it’s also true that the biggest single reason they went bankrupt is that they’re making effectively making buggy whips in an era when every single human being has a car. There was no chance ever, in a million years, that they were ever going to keep up with the technological changes that eviscerated what was probably their biggest source of revenue.

    My older brother went to college with a kid whose dad was CEO of Kodak. When he told my father I remember my dad commenting (and this was like 25 years ago – pre-internet, pre-Windows 95) that Kodak was pretty much doomed because of computers. Even my old man, a Korean War vet, 44 years older than me and 60 y.o. at the time, saw the writing on the wall.

    The hiring policy that got Ms. Evans to the position of CTO were frankly just batshit crazy. But is it too much to expect that Apple (or its contractors) hire legal employees and pay them a decent wage, rather than combing for the world for the dirt cheapest labor and bringing them to America to undermine the working class already here?

    Read More
  64. @Jewish Conservative Race Realist
    OT...

    Hilarious headline is Steve bait:

    "Parents Travel From India to Help Son Beat Wife"

    http://www.tampabay.com/news/publicsafety/crime/parents-travel-from-india-to-help-son-beat-wife-say-deputies/2336101

    Hilarious headline is Steve bait:

    “Parents Travel From India to Help Son Beat Wife”

    That happened in Hillsborough County, where, 56 years ago, Gwendolyn Hoyt was convicted by an all-male jury of beating her husband to death with a baseball bat.

    Mrs Hoyt took it to the Supreme Court, where her lawyers argued that it was unfair to her that her fellow women, unlike men, were not forced to sit on juries. She lost, but a similar case in 1975 mostly agreed with her point, and the notorious RBG’s last case in 1979 tossed out all sex differences in juror selection.

    So poor Gwendolyn was a premature anti-sexist, it seems.

    Something like one percent of the jurors in Hillsborough County (Tampa) that year (1961) were female, as opposed to nearby Pinellas County (St Pete and Clearwater), where a strong local effort was made to get women to volunteer, which raised their number all the way to four percent.

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  65. Tiny Duck says:
    @jwm
    Here's a real, true janitor story from a real janitor. We could sub-title this, "White Privilege in the workplace"

    Eleven years ago I got out of the cardiac ward with a stent in my heart, and no bank account left. Insurance was a gyp. So as soon as I was back on my feet, I hired on as a substitute custodian for the local school district. I had 15 years of experience when they hired me. I worked hard, applied for the first full-time job that came open. Passed up for some Latino dude cold off the street. Next I was passed up for the 20yo Latino kid who bailed within the the first year- couldn't handle the workload. Next I got passed up for the Black dude, who was shit-canned within six weeks. Then I got passed up for the second Black dude who also bailed because of the workload. It took damn near five years to get a full time job. They just fired the first Latino dude who was hired before me. I outlasted them all. And they just promoted a nice lesbian with a boy's haircut to take the lead custodial spot on my campus. She can't get a file cabinet up on a hand truck, or manage to get the flags right side up, and doesn't know enough to not store the gasoline in the same closet as the water heater. I can retire this year, so I'm just standing back and watching the circus. (I moved the gasoline)

    JWM

    Why are altrighters so freaking old? Shouldn’t you guys be spending time with your grandkids and wives

    Oh wait

    Read More
    • LOL: Truth
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    "Why are altrighters so freaking old? Shouldn’t you guys be spending time with your grandkids and wives

    Oh wait"

    You've got us mixed up with your freak circus on the left. We've got the families and family traditions, you guys are the party of LGBTQRSTUVWXYZs who scream their demands that their genders be named after ferns or that 50yr old men have the right to go to the toilet next to 5 yr old girls. Not to mention the party of effeminate men and women who boast about killing all their babies, and minorities who celebrate 'de-policing' their communities and letting the murder rates spike to astronomical levels in those communities.
    , @Truth
    I wanted to put "LOL" twice, that was your funniest comment yet.
  66. @Reg Cæsar
    It's "custodian", not "janitor".

    I was corrected thusly four decades ago on my summer job at a Y camp.

    @1 “It’s “custodian”, not “janitor”. ”

    The problem with words is that they come to mean what they do, and a new word has to be found.

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  67. @jwm
    Here's a real, true janitor story from a real janitor. We could sub-title this, "White Privilege in the workplace"

    Eleven years ago I got out of the cardiac ward with a stent in my heart, and no bank account left. Insurance was a gyp. So as soon as I was back on my feet, I hired on as a substitute custodian for the local school district. I had 15 years of experience when they hired me. I worked hard, applied for the first full-time job that came open. Passed up for some Latino dude cold off the street. Next I was passed up for the 20yo Latino kid who bailed within the the first year- couldn't handle the workload. Next I got passed up for the Black dude, who was shit-canned within six weeks. Then I got passed up for the second Black dude who also bailed because of the workload. It took damn near five years to get a full time job. They just fired the first Latino dude who was hired before me. I outlasted them all. And they just promoted a nice lesbian with a boy's haircut to take the lead custodial spot on my campus. She can't get a file cabinet up on a hand truck, or manage to get the flags right side up, and doesn't know enough to not store the gasoline in the same closet as the water heater. I can retire this year, so I'm just standing back and watching the circus. (I moved the gasoline)

    JWM

    Guy oughta claim to self-identify as black, like Rachel Dolezal . Who, in this age of enlightenment, would dare argue? Also, heavy filing cabinets are misogynist manifestations of toxic masculinity.

    Read More
  68. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    OT – Some bar owner just got doxed and ruined for contributing to David Duke: https://www.deathandtaxesmag.com/343927/minneapolis-bar-shuts-down-after-owner-is-revealed-to-be-david-duke-donor/

    Hey Steve – You have systems in place to protect the anonymity of your donors, right?

    Read More
    • Replies: @jim jones
    I recommend Visa Gift cards if you want to remain anonymous, you buy then for cash.
  69. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    An interesting SoCal post-punk artifact:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7RBRJVUsI48

    Some YouTube comments:

    i like this garbage

    Nihilist new wave brilliance.

    god bless white America.
    reply> Finally, someone understands.

    Now THAT'S counter culture.

    This sounds like something you'd read about in Less Than Zero.

    I have no idea if this is genius or just fucking stupid.

    good luck ever being this cool

    When there were white people in Los Angeles!
    reply> LOL, yeah, it's over.
     

    Su Tissue is kinda cute in a catatonic sort of way. But, like Monday Night Football, this is best viewed with the sound down. All the way down.

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  70. AB- says:

    Left coast company I worked at would promote POC’s and womyn with essentially none of the qualifications the passed over white guys had. White guy with their resume would never, ever, be considered for those jobs.

    They promoted a 50 something old negro womyn to be a district manager; she had spent the previous 15 years as a clerk typist….but DIVERSITY! They did this in the entire company, then about 18 months into it, they fired everybody and had them reapply for any job they wanted. She, along with a whole bunch of other AA promotions got canned.

    But when new management came in, they started the AA nonsense again.

    I lost my job when the CEO listened to the management consultants and dumped all the non-core jobs.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Peripatetic commenter
    Don't be so coy. Tell us the name of the company.
    , @Off The Street
    Imagine a company going through industry consolidation, then hiring many more-qualified execs. Some of those execs see the low native skill sets and performance, and have employees reapply for their jobs to see who might qualify in the real world. Then the SVP head of internal audit decides to follow suit. The CEO fires her, pointing out that she hired most of the staff that she wants to rehire. That event was not imaginary.
  71. @anon
    More Comments in NYT:

    Maybe, if they had hired a Stamford or MIT wiz kid to be CIO instead of promoting the janitor to that position, they would not have descended into the bankrupt irrelevance of today. Maybe Rochester would not be the crime infested decaying city it is today either.

     


    [regarding] the **early** employees spoke lovingly of Kodak's culture. Now go talk to the 55,000 Kodak employees who lost their jobs precisely because of that "culture".


    The point is that Kodak and many other companies had this in-bred "culture" of promoting mediocrity from within. Pretty much managers and senior managers got promoted up based on time and loyalty. Not because they were the superstars that companies now need to thrive. And with no one coming from the outside, there was no challenge to the "culture" that seemed content with splitting the market with Fuji for middling returns.

    An external CIO would be perfectly positioned to challenging the status quo. Instead, Kodak promotes the janitor to CIO, and brings in a failed airline executive as CEO when it was already too late.

     

    Maybe Rochester would not be the crime infested decaying city it is today either.

    That Xerox was totally clueless about what they had out in Palo Alto didn’t help matters on the Genesee, either.

    Thanks to Mayo Clinic, the other Rochester is still doing quite well. I believe it is still the whitest city (real city, not suburb) in America of its size.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AnotherDad

    That Xerox was totally clueless about what they had out in Palo Alto didn’t help matters on the Genesee, either.
     
    Definite missed opportunity, that's for sure.

    Upstate NY should be doing better than it is. Beautiful area. Not quite a "whitetopia" because of the cities, but now quite a bit whiter than the national average. Lake effect snow obviously an issue. Buffalo not so interesting--more lake plain, a bit further from the more scenic bits. Rochester still too much lake effect but a bit closer to the finger lake scenery seems like it would be nice. White folks can handle some cold and snow if the payoff in outdoor amenities is nice.

    My guess is the problems are too many blacks in what are the available cities. And a relatively high tax regime.

    Whitetopias will be in demand in the coming diversity years. Upstate should secede from New York. Then the city fathers of Rochester/Syracuse/Buffalo should be finding ways to encourage blacks to move to Atlanta. (Maybe give them free travel vouchers to go to Atlanta in January. A whole bunch of them might not come back.)
  72. MarkinLA says:

    The $16.60 per hour Ms. Ramos earns as a janitor at Apple works out to about the same in inflation-adjusted terms as what Ms. Evans earned 35 years ago.

    Is this 16.60 what she is actually paid or is this 16.60 what the contracting office cleaning company is getting paid by Apple? Big difference since we all know the office cleaning company is probably keeping half.

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  73. MarkinLA says:
    @epebble
    I have difficulty seeing a direct line from one I to the other. The new management theory of "core competency" seems to be a factor. It is also interesting that Kodak (and its friends in upstate NY) are no more while Apple (and its friends in CA) are ruling the world. Example: a Kodak style company IBM, from NY, went through a meltdown and was reborn as an Apple style company at the pain of becoming a Burroughs/Univac/CDC (i.e. death).

    The management style of the company had little to do with their success or failure. Apple is in newer industries and IBM and other mainframe makers were not. Don’t forget Apple would have gone bankrupt without Bill Gates 150 million and Intel would have gone bankrupt without IBM choosing the 8088 for the PC.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Management decisions have something do with getting into "new industries". Mainframes were, at one time, a new industry for IBM, whose history goes back to 1911. IBM is still a pretty big company today ($135 billion market cap).
  74. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @anonymous
    Evans got benefits in addition to a paycheck. Ramos just gets the paycheck. And therein lies the difference. The companies would rather pay bennies to one exec or Stanford Ph.D techie than to 10 broom pushers. After all, who's worth more? Anyway, this will all probably be moot because before long robots will be pushing the brooms--and for nothing more than the cost of recharging the batteries.

    https://www.bestbuy.com/site/husqvarna-automower-430x-granite-gray/5833600.p?skuId=5833600

    Robotic lawn mowers.

    Just in time. In case my Mexican lawn care professional retires.

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  75. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @fnn

    Er, What happened to Eastman Kodak?

    What happened to Apple?

    This may be a bad example.
     
    Companies come and go, that 's part of capitalism, eh? Surprise that Kodak still around, albeit hanging on by a thread. The point that is that one the premier companies of the white supreemist, male chauvinist Madmen era had a more egalitarian, objectively anti-racist personnel policy than the the ridiculously giant mega-corporation now at the tip of the spear of murica's current reenactment of Mao's Cultural Revolution.

    more egalitarian, objectively anti-racist personnel policy

    Astute observation; those who ignore The Bell Curve and HBD are compelled to die by it. Kodaks are fated to die, Apples are fated to prosper. That is the golden rule of 21st century.

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  76. @Anonymous
    Which of course, begs the question, if American corporations and evil white men are so exploitative of immigrants, especially illegal ones, why push so hard to bring the poor immigrants here to suffer under the evil white man? And for that matter, why would the poor immigrant want to come, if things are so terrible for them? Certainly if they are talking up a storm to their relatives back home (and certainly Carlos Slim's billions are a testament to that), then surely news by now of how awful America is to Hispanics would have gotten around.

    The eternal mystery! The West is considered horrible: full of racism, Islamophobia, misogynists, swarms of neo-Nazis… And that’s just a partial list. Get an SJW started and you hear a very long list.

    But strangely enough, the rest of the world seems desperate to live here.

    Someone is wrong…

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  77. MarkinLA says:
    @anony-mouse
    Er,

    What happened to Eastman Kodak?

    What happened to Apple?

    This may be a bad example.

    What happened to Eastman Kodak?

    Kodak only made junk cameras in the film days and film and photo-paper were it’s big money makers. When it was gone, it was hard for any company to downsize enough to stay solvent. They were into other businesses like copiers but there were also many established competitors in those businesses. They tried to get into the digital camera market by partnering with some noted lens makers but compared to real camera makers, it was too little too late.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel H
    >>What happened to Eastman Kodak?

    Kodak only made junk cameras in the film days and film and photo-paper were it’s big money makers. When it was gone, it was hard for any company to downsize enough to stay solvent.<<

    Yup. It seemed, at one time, that Kodak (and Fuji) had the perfect franchise. A business in which they were top dogs (film) and the market would only demand more and more, year after year, a business like tobacco, disposable diapers, razor blades, underwear etc. It never occurred to me that photography would be digitized, even after the first appearances of CDs for music.

    Stick around long enough and IBM, Apple, Microsoft, Facebook, Google, all will someday slip under the waves.
    , @Anon87
    It didn't help that they spun off any new business that leveraged their core competencies. They just kept hold of the film business and had nothing left to grow.
  78. Some NYT readers are coming to “interesting” conclusions:

    To understand rising inequality, look at the unimpeded mass immigration of the last 50 years.

    An endless supply of workers, limited supply of jobs. Result? Destruction of conditions for entry-level workers.

    More, in this case, given Ms Ramos apparently does not speak English, it is clear that she is unsuited for the rapid advancement accorded the older worker, Ms Evans.

    Why are we adding hundreds upon hundreds of thousands of unskilled workers, unfit for the New Economy, each year to the United States?

    Does Ms Ramos’s wage support four children, or are some of those costs socialized to the taxpayer in the form of EBT, school lunches and other subsidies?

    Read More
  79. Daniel H says:
    @MarkinLA
    What happened to Eastman Kodak?

    Kodak only made junk cameras in the film days and film and photo-paper were it's big money makers. When it was gone, it was hard for any company to downsize enough to stay solvent. They were into other businesses like copiers but there were also many established competitors in those businesses. They tried to get into the digital camera market by partnering with some noted lens makers but compared to real camera makers, it was too little too late.

    >>What happened to Eastman Kodak?

    Kodak only made junk cameras in the film days and film and photo-paper were it’s big money makers. When it was gone, it was hard for any company to downsize enough to stay solvent.<<

    Yup. It seemed, at one time, that Kodak (and Fuji) had the perfect franchise. A business in which they were top dogs (film) and the market would only demand more and more, year after year, a business like tobacco, disposable diapers, razor blades, underwear etc. It never occurred to me that photography would be digitized, even after the first appearances of CDs for music.

    Stick around long enough and IBM, Apple, Microsoft, Facebook, Google, all will someday slip under the waves.

    Read More
  80. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    MADA.

    Make America Dream Again. I’m an American Dreamer, and I dream that illegals will be deported and Rule of Law will be restored.

    In a diverse nation, the ONLY thing that can hold all people together is respect for rule of law. If the law begins to favor certain people, especially law-breakers, it’s a path to a nightmare.

    End the Nightmare so that we dream again. Not dream of parasitism but of patriotism.

    Parasitic Nightmare or Patriotic Dream.

    The choice is obvious.

    Read More
    • Replies: @DFH

    Parasitic Nightmare or Patriotic Dream.
     
    Or white people could have their own, un-diverse country free from either immigrant or native black diversity
  81. Ms. Evans the Kodak janitor-turned-CIO did plenty of jg-hopping after Kodak. That seems to be the career strategy of CIOs.

    I’m estimating that Ms. Ramos $16.60 per hour is supplemented w/ about $8000 EITC, $5000 EBT, and Medicaid for her and her four children. Her fully-funded Medicaid insurance is better than most any corporate-subsidized health insurance plan.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Flip
    Excellent point. A good reporter should have talked about any government assistance that she may be receiving.

    Despite my libertarian beliefs, I am actually warming to the minimum wage as otherwise corporations gets subsidized by the government to underpay their low skill workers.

    I am also fine with forcing people to buy insurance as with Obamacare and as in Switzerland as otherwise we just have to pay for them anyway since we don't let people die on the streets in this country.
  82. @YetAnotherAnon
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Britannia_Coco-nut_Dancers

    Did Roald Dahl ever see the Bacup Coco-Nut Dancers?

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  83. @PiltdownMan

    “Parents Travel From India to Help Son Beat Wife”

    http://www.tampabay.com/news/publicsafety/crime/parents-travel-from-india-to-help-son-beat-wife-say-deputies/2336101

     

    Sikh last names.

    Assuming the photo editor used the right mugshots, I must say the three of them look a lot like Latin American types.

    The first guy (the son?) looks Indian/Paki, but could pass as Middle Eastern. The other two look like Mexicans. Not a good looking family.

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  84. Altai says:

    The cleaning company where I work used to be staffed by Poles/Africans now for some reason it is staffed entirely by Brazilians. (It’s great because they can talk to each other in their own language all day! Ethnic networking in job seeking often goes unnoticed) I once encountered the man who checks the sign in sheets to see if cleaners had been to the bathrooms that day, I’m glad I didn’t have a manager like him… Mass migration has really brought back the open contempt and hatred for ones employees that people wasted so much time and blood destroying.

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  85. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @epebble
    I have difficulty seeing a direct line from one I to the other. The new management theory of "core competency" seems to be a factor. It is also interesting that Kodak (and its friends in upstate NY) are no more while Apple (and its friends in CA) are ruling the world. Example: a Kodak style company IBM, from NY, went through a meltdown and was reborn as an Apple style company at the pain of becoming a Burroughs/Univac/CDC (i.e. death).

    Kodak is still around, and still traded on the NYSE, though it’s a small cap now, with a ~$300 million market cap. Xerox is still around too, with a more respectable market cap of $8 billion.

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  86. jim jones says:
    @Anonymous
    OT - Some bar owner just got doxed and ruined for contributing to David Duke: https://www.deathandtaxesmag.com/343927/minneapolis-bar-shuts-down-after-owner-is-revealed-to-be-david-duke-donor/

    Hey Steve - You have systems in place to protect the anonymity of your donors, right?

    I recommend Visa Gift cards if you want to remain anonymous, you buy then for cash.

    Read More
  87. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @MarkinLA
    The management style of the company had little to do with their success or failure. Apple is in newer industries and IBM and other mainframe makers were not. Don't forget Apple would have gone bankrupt without Bill Gates 150 million and Intel would have gone bankrupt without IBM choosing the 8088 for the PC.

    Management decisions have something do with getting into “new industries”. Mainframes were, at one time, a new industry for IBM, whose history goes back to 1911. IBM is still a pretty big company today ($135 billion market cap).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Peripatetic commenter
    Moreover, IBM invented many of the ideas that have made it big today.

    Virtual Machines. Yup, an IBM invention that IBM didn't manage to turn into a product.

    There are others too ...

    , @epebble
    IBM, has also changed their business radically since the nineties. Now, they no longer own Fabs (Chip manufacturing), having sold it to GlobalFoundries, owned by the Emir of Abu Dhabi. They sold off PC business to Lenovo, a Chinese company; printer business to Lexmark, another Chinese company; Hard drive business to Hitachi (later sold to Western Digital, now owned by Toshiba). They are mostly into design, technology development, software and service.
    , @MarkinLA
    Yes they do, but to expect a company making most of it's revenue on film and photo paper to shift gears and get into businesses that already have major competitors like copiers is not the same thing as a PC company deciding to make Ipods.

    IBM was making tabulating machines for businesses, making computers was just a natural continuation of that trend. Film photography and digital imaging are two completely different areas. If Kodak had been making SLRs competitive with Nikon and Canon they probably would have done a better job of making the transition.

    For every CEO that bets the company on a new direction and wins there are many more times as many when the bet is lost. You just don't hear about the losers because they have a shelf life of a week in the business press and nobody wants to read the CEOs book about how great he was.
  88. Pericles says:
    @carol
    Maintenance engineer, currently.

    Engineer: the most debased profession. First every third worlder and their uncle is a software engineer. Now the cleaning staff are not “Facilities Attorneys at Law” or “Medical Doctors of Maintenance” but “maintenance engineers“. Sic transit whatever.

    Read More
    • Replies: @JackOH
    The building maintenance guys at our local university are, I think, called boiler operators and building maintenance supervisors. They're state-licensed boiler operators, need a working knowledge of HVAC, plumbing, electrical wiring, blueprint-reading, floor maintenance, carpentry, painting, and specific minor repairs and maintenance procedures of all sorts, and have full charge of buildings with a new or replacement cost of $35 million or more. They can call on skilled tradesmen, such as electricians and plumbers, if they have to. Actual floor-sweeping is done by an outsource company that hires mentally handicapped folks who do a good job.
    , @cthulhu
    I think this "xxx engineer" renaming practice is more comedy routine than real world. But there's a small kernel of truth in there: most people who get engineering degrees do not go on to get a Professional Engineer certification (aka the P.E. "stamp"), so in most states there is no law about who can append "engineer" to their job title. (You still have to have the P.E. stamp to call yourself a professional engineer though.) Certain jobs require the PE stamp - civil engineers who design buildings, bridges, roads, etc., have to be PEs, as do the electrical engineers who sign off on building electrical system designs (which can be pretty lucrative; there aren't a lot of EEs with stamps), but most other engineering jobs don't require the stamp. I've been at it for more than two decades (aircraft design) and my lack of the stamp is meaningless; none of my co-workers are PEs either.
  89. DFH says:
    @Anon
    MADA.

    Make America Dream Again. I'm an American Dreamer, and I dream that illegals will be deported and Rule of Law will be restored.

    In a diverse nation, the ONLY thing that can hold all people together is respect for rule of law. If the law begins to favor certain people, especially law-breakers, it's a path to a nightmare.

    End the Nightmare so that we dream again. Not dream of parasitism but of patriotism.

    Parasitic Nightmare or Patriotic Dream.

    The choice is obvious.

    Parasitic Nightmare or Patriotic Dream.

    Or white people could have their own, un-diverse country free from either immigrant or native black diversity

    Read More
  90. JackOH says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    It's "custodian", not "janitor".

    I was corrected thusly four decades ago on my summer job at a Y camp.

    Could be a different usages for different situations deal. The custodian at my school was a state-licensed boiler operator with supervisory responsibility for about a dozen part-timers and four full-timers. The four full-timers were janitors, who did a mess of light maintenance, window cleaning, floor scrubbing, and what-not. There were a half-dozen part-time student workers and a half-dozen part-time cleaning ladies doing classroom dust mopping, furniture dusting, chalkboard cleaning, wastebasket-emptying, and so on.

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  91. JackOH says:
    @Pericles
    Engineer: the most debased profession. First every third worlder and their uncle is a software engineer. Now the cleaning staff are not "Facilities Attorneys at Law" or "Medical Doctors of Maintenance" but "maintenance engineers". Sic transit whatever.

    The building maintenance guys at our local university are, I think, called boiler operators and building maintenance supervisors. They’re state-licensed boiler operators, need a working knowledge of HVAC, plumbing, electrical wiring, blueprint-reading, floor maintenance, carpentry, painting, and specific minor repairs and maintenance procedures of all sorts, and have full charge of buildings with a new or replacement cost of $35 million or more. They can call on skilled tradesmen, such as electricians and plumbers, if they have to. Actual floor-sweeping is done by an outsource company that hires mentally handicapped folks who do a good job.

    Read More
  92. JackOH says:
    @jwm
    Here's a real, true janitor story from a real janitor. We could sub-title this, "White Privilege in the workplace"

    Eleven years ago I got out of the cardiac ward with a stent in my heart, and no bank account left. Insurance was a gyp. So as soon as I was back on my feet, I hired on as a substitute custodian for the local school district. I had 15 years of experience when they hired me. I worked hard, applied for the first full-time job that came open. Passed up for some Latino dude cold off the street. Next I was passed up for the 20yo Latino kid who bailed within the the first year- couldn't handle the workload. Next I got passed up for the Black dude, who was shit-canned within six weeks. Then I got passed up for the second Black dude who also bailed because of the workload. It took damn near five years to get a full time job. They just fired the first Latino dude who was hired before me. I outlasted them all. And they just promoted a nice lesbian with a boy's haircut to take the lead custodial spot on my campus. She can't get a file cabinet up on a hand truck, or manage to get the flags right side up, and doesn't know enough to not store the gasoline in the same closet as the water heater. I can retire this year, so I'm just standing back and watching the circus. (I moved the gasoline)

    JWM

    jwm, thanks. The hiring practices at my local state university are the most corrupt I’ve ever seen in my life, or will ever see. Affirmative action boogie-woogie, plus crony ‘n’ patronage, which may as well be called White dude welfare for selected Whites, mean that no incompetent lay-about is left behind.

    Too bad you had to pay a pretty hefty “White dude tax” before getting a full-time job. There ought to be a way of toting up the cost of “deferred re-employment”, wages and salaries lost by competent workers because our masters were running their game.

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  93. Ron Unz says:

    Lots of excellent points made in this comment thread…

    Obviously, the current employment practices in Silicon Valley have all sorts of problems. But I’d agree with the argument that some others have raised, namely that there might be a direct connection between a leading technology company such as Kodak having (presumably for Affirmative Action reasons) promoted a former black janitor to Chief Technology Officer and said technology company not long afterward going bankrupt. At least Silicon Valley companies typically haven’t (yet) behaved in this insane manner.

    I seem to recall that ultra-successful tech company Xerox, also based near Kodak, was endlessly hailed in the media for its tremendous support for Affirmative Action, eventually going so far as to appoint some black woman as CEO. Perhaps coincidentally, although Xerox’s Palo Alto PARC unit created many of Silicon Valley’s most important technologies, its the corporate parent was too preoccupied with “diversity” to ever make proper use of them, and instead they generated many hundreds of billions of dollars of market value for other companies that did.

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    • Agree: Frau Katze
    • Replies: @JackOH
    " . . . [T]he corporate parent was too preoccupied with 'diversity' . . .".

    One of the most cogent criticisms of "diversity", in my opinion, was a brief few sentences in a NYT book review maybe twenty years ago. Something like: if White Western guys are presumed to be racist, patriarchal screw-ups, what makes the diversitarians believe that Black folks and women, with far less leadership and vocational experience, will do a better job? I don't think I've ever seen the idea fleshed out.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    You're thinking of Ursula Burns. I'm no fan of affirmative action or diversification for its own sake, but I'm not sure we can blame her for Xerox's failure to successfully commercialize PARC's innovations. She didn't become president of the company until 10 years ago.
    , @MarkinLA
    The problem with blaming affirmative action is that there aren't that many important positions affected by it and supporting it is a condition of getting contracts with the federal government. So while a few useless employees do get promoted (usually to lower level management positions), the company gets contracts worth many times what they are paying the do-nothings.

    I doubt the useless affirmative action employee is ever in a position significant enough to have any real effect on what direction the company takes.
    , @TelfoedJohn
    If you get to be a leader like these people:
    http://www.businessinsider.com/most-influential-blacks-in-technology-2013-4

    ... then it's usually on merit, especially when they are founders. Capitalism is automatically a competence hierarchy. The affirmative action hires are usually a little lower in the totem pole, and have jobs which are not critical. Occasionally, you will get an AA hire near the top, acting as a 'face' for the company, but having no real power.
  94. Man this is depressing, hopefully @Art Deco can get in this thread and tell us how a couple of isolated data points show that it’s really pretty great.

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  95. @anony-mouse
    Er,

    What happened to Eastman Kodak?

    What happened to Apple?

    This may be a bad example.

    They took our Kodachrome away.

    Read More
  96. Flip says:
    @E. Rekshun
    Ms. Evans the Kodak janitor-turned-CIO did plenty of jg-hopping after Kodak. That seems to be the career strategy of CIOs.

    I'm estimating that Ms. Ramos $16.60 per hour is supplemented w/ about $8000 EITC, $5000 EBT, and Medicaid for her and her four children. Her fully-funded Medicaid insurance is better than most any corporate-subsidized health insurance plan.

    Excellent point. A good reporter should have talked about any government assistance that she may be receiving.

    Despite my libertarian beliefs, I am actually warming to the minimum wage as otherwise corporations gets subsidized by the government to underpay their low skill workers.

    I am also fine with forcing people to buy insurance as with Obamacare and as in Switzerland as otherwise we just have to pay for them anyway since we don’t let people die on the streets in this country.

    Read More
  97. @Tiny Duck
    This is yet another reason why diversity is paramount in the leadership in large corporations. Ass long as white men continue to run things the workplace by class will continue to get crapoed on from tremendous heights

    Mr. Cook is gay and very diverse.

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  98. @jim jones
    Britain has the best janitors:

    https://imgur.com/a/XBmms

    Looks like the Philly Mummers when they used to wear blackface

    Read More
  99. @anonymous
    Evans got benefits in addition to a paycheck. Ramos just gets the paycheck. And therein lies the difference. The companies would rather pay bennies to one exec or Stanford Ph.D techie than to 10 broom pushers. After all, who's worth more? Anyway, this will all probably be moot because before long robots will be pushing the brooms--and for nothing more than the cost of recharging the batteries.

    Its quite a bit more complicated than that. Sailor is pointing out that we once had a system that was ethnically more homogeneous and took better care of all levels of its society which system benefited the few minorities within it as well.
    We now have 40% non whites and do not take care of anyone very well except the investor class. Benefits are rare theses days as is job security. This could well be a side effect of ethnic disintegration. But we also no it was to some extent a reaction to the old system becoming bloated and inefficient. And we know the interests of commies and capitalists came together and here we are.
    Its in the interest not only to peoples whose interest are ethnically or nationally oriented, but to the ruling class as well to not have the gap widen to the point the “people” have to demonstrate once again they are always sovereign.This would be particularly true if the people and the rulers were different ethnicities. Unfortunately the same ethnic differences makes stewardship of the underclasses a futile project they are simply too stupid to ever do much with. So that become a separate problem with an eventually ugly answer.

    were it not for that problem had we say not taken that fork in 1964 or 1890 even, then we could more sanely discuss how one best keeps the genetic and therefore economic left tale from getting too stretched out. Ironically about the time this fork was taken we hit on the correct solution, eugenics.To day our only competitor east asians are quietly demonstrating the verity of this. Short of this we could have argued about how best to apply socialist approaches. The USA back then instead of going as far socialist govt administered outsourced the paternalism to the corporate world, this certainly was not without problems but it did allow a certain discretion as employers that governments as employees can not politically wield. Allowing civil service unions was a huge mistake. It gave private unions more lout than they should have deserved.Its tempting to go the galts gulch route but I think you find that a nation is a organism and letting your left foot wither away is a bad idea, you may not want to think with your left foot but you cant really live without it.You cant even have it dragging behind you. Of course you dont want it growing weak from favoring it but it must be kept in balance with the rest of the body. Today we have tried to strangle our left leg and graft a third world leg retarded, robots may clean trash cans without heal insurance or wages or pay income taxes or buying things, but it wont solve the two major cases of gangreene we have inflicted on ourselves.

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  100. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Trelane
    Eastman Kodask went bankrupt in part because of its toxic corporate culture of non-meritocratic hiring and promotion. Ms. Brown, the janitor, or whatever her name is would be an example of this.

    I think the main reason they went bankrupt was that they were making film cameras and accessories in the age of the digital camera.

    But probably as you say, promoting janitors to company officers probably helped to seal their fate. Unless they were promoting Will Hunting, they’re probably not going to get too many intelligent suggestions about transitioning to the 21st Century. And even Will would have to do quite a bit of growing up before I’d sign off on giving him a promotion.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Kodak only built low end, poorly built "snapshot" cameras-Instamatics, Pocket Instamatics and the Disk camera, and then the godawful APS system-after the early sixties. The cameras were sold on the theory that people who bought them would buy more Kodak film and were sold at low margins.

    Digital photography and the ubiquity of the cellphone camera meant the end of the low end film camera, but it was a long time before digital really competed with film for top quality results. Even today, the best film has advantages over digital in several ways (but the gap has narrowed a lot).

    Archivally processed monochrome film, and the now discontinued Kodachrome color film, were archival: in other words they would last a very long time. We do not have an archival method of digital storage at any level of density usable for modern file sizes available to consumer or small and medium business users. Data preservation is based on the concept of "spit swapping"-actively copying all your data over to the new and improved medium with each release. This depends on anyone 1) bothering to do it and 2) not actively wanting to suppress, delete or destroy it. Two unacceptable assumptions.

    Film still has a niche market, no thanks to Kodak and their lame marketing.
    , @Truth

    But probably as you say, promoting janitors to company officers probably helped to seal their fate.
     
    You'd rather have this pricks in there with $50 million dollar packages, and golden parachutes, who still loose money?
    , @poor irish
    When an Irishman applied at that famous college in Pasadena, Calif., for a job as a janitor; a black woman told him he had to take a test to qualify for the job of janitor. The test, he later found out, was the Cal-Tech Jr. College Transfer Test, and he passed with flying colors. Of course he did not get the job and the jew professor who graded it told him, "You are too smart to be a goy and live."; laughed in his face saying, "No Irish need apply.", as security roughly pushed him out of the door. But we all know the MSM will never do a sob story or any story about such behavior in an 'american' university.
  101. @Maj. Kong
    Jobs just bought the Atlantic

    Bezos owns the Washington Post

    Gates owns the education system, via Common Core

    Zuckerberg has more control over the information read, than any man in recorded history

    Google has the literal power to unperson

    Its a cyberpunk world, only much queerer than we ever dared to imagine. The eternal boot stomping on our faces will have rainbow smileys.

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  102. Forbes says:
    @Forbes
    It might also be pointed out that Eastman Kodak is no more. Bankrupt, liquidated, defunct. However modest, generous or reasonable their compensation policy was, it didn't serve the corporate entity to survive.

    One also imagines that the number of 'custodians' that become 'senior executives' can be counted up without taking off your shoes and socks. Ordinarily, that would be called the exception that proves the rule. For the NYT, it means every 'janitor' is capable of being a senior executive, and that invidious discrimination is the cause of income inequality.

    Sorry. Kodak emerged from bankruptcy in 2013 after selling off its digital imaging patents. The company lives on in a much shrunken state.

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  103. Patriot says:

    In 1950, California’s population was close to 10 million people. Then a man without a highschool education could support a family of 6 in a new 4 bedroom, 2 car garage, 2 cars and wife stayed t home.

    Today that opportunity is long gone due to massive immigration of cheap labor. During the interving 67 years, California’s population rocketed to 40 million, causing house prices to increase by around 100 times. Meanwhile, wages grew by only by around 8 times, due to cheap Mexican labor. This disparity between salries and house costs, destroyed California’s middle class.

    This happened in my lifetime. I saw it with my own eyes – The willful destruction of The American Dream, and hence America, itself. Today, my college-educated chidren struggle. Both parents must work, they can only afford a small condo 1-hr drive from the city, and can’t afford kids. Meanwhile the Mexican immigrants breed like rabbits, supported by welfare paid by the taxes levied on my struggling childless kids.

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    • Replies: @Daniel H
    >>This happened in my lifetime. I saw it with my own eyes – The willful destruction of The American Dream, and hence America, itself. Today, my college-educated chidren struggle. Both parents must work, they can only afford a small condo 1-hr drive from the city, and can’t afford kids. Meanwhile the Mexican immigrants breed like rabbits, supported by welfare paid by the taxes levied on my struggling childless kids.<<

    I feel for you, I really do. The fact that young heritage Americans can't even contemplate a family, that their parents won't see any grandchildren is a punch in the gut.

    As a civilizational survival strategy I would urge all young heritage Americans, unless they have landed a high paying job that can support a wife an family, to leave these coastal moral cesspools and start a life in a small city/town. Even if the only jobs available are crummy and don't pay well, it will still be easier to afford a house and provide for a family.

    One would not be paranoid to think that all this was planned.
  104. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Tiny Duck
    Why are altrighters so freaking old? Shouldn't you guys be spending time with your grandkids and wives


    Oh wait

    “Why are altrighters so freaking old? Shouldn’t you guys be spending time with your grandkids and wives

    Oh wait”

    You’ve got us mixed up with your freak circus on the left. We’ve got the families and family traditions, you guys are the party of LGBTQRSTUVWXYZs who scream their demands that their genders be named after ferns or that 50yr old men have the right to go to the toilet next to 5 yr old girls. Not to mention the party of effeminate men and women who boast about killing all their babies, and minorities who celebrate ‘de-policing’ their communities and letting the murder rates spike to astronomical levels in those communities.

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    • Replies: @Truth
    Typical right-wingers, yes, "alt-righters", absolutely not. He nailed it dead center.
  105. JackOH says:
    @Ron Unz
    Lots of excellent points made in this comment thread...

    Obviously, the current employment practices in Silicon Valley have all sorts of problems. But I'd agree with the argument that some others have raised, namely that there might be a direct connection between a leading technology company such as Kodak having (presumably for Affirmative Action reasons) promoted a former black janitor to Chief Technology Officer and said technology company not long afterward going bankrupt. At least Silicon Valley companies typically haven't (yet) behaved in this insane manner.

    I seem to recall that ultra-successful tech company Xerox, also based near Kodak, was endlessly hailed in the media for its tremendous support for Affirmative Action, eventually going so far as to appoint some black woman as CEO. Perhaps coincidentally, although Xerox's Palo Alto PARC unit created many of Silicon Valley's most important technologies, its the corporate parent was too preoccupied with "diversity" to ever make proper use of them, and instead they generated many hundreds of billions of dollars of market value for other companies that did.

    ” . . . [T]he corporate parent was too preoccupied with ‘diversity’ . . .”.

    One of the most cogent criticisms of “diversity”, in my opinion, was a brief few sentences in a NYT book review maybe twenty years ago. Something like: if White Western guys are presumed to be racist, patriarchal screw-ups, what makes the diversitarians believe that Black folks and women, with far less leadership and vocational experience, will do a better job? I don’t think I’ve ever seen the idea fleshed out.

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  106. @anonymous
    People who do not live and work in silicon valley probably have no idea how fast it has essentially become a very non-traditional American company town for the cheapest labor in the world who can at least pretend to do the job.

    It's not just the companies fault, if they don't play this game they face the prospect of private equity funds (essentially multi-national VCs playing with money coming in from many nation-state banking sectors) finding an angle to take over.

    These guys know about as much about high-tech as Wall Street did about the housing market, but they are convinced that they have more money than god, so there must always be someone in their rolodex they can find who will do better. So simple!

    You made perfect sense explaining the company town business, then you list the plot: no venture capitalist has a chance in Hell of a hostile takeover of Apple, Inc. or Alphabet, Inc. (or even Microsoft Corp., Intel Corp., etc.); your point is relevant to the many smaller companies, which are actually less culpable for the cited problems.

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  107. @JohnnyWalker123
    Median male earnings (which includes non-workers and is adjusted for unemployment) peaked back in the 1970s and have been decling from 80s through today. It’s amazing that with our GDP having expanded so much since the 70s, median wages have fallen so much. See page 12 of this report. The report also shows that 80% of prime-age American men used to have a full-time job back in the 70s. By the late 2000s, it was only 66%. See below link.

    http://www.hamiltonproject.org/assets/files/milken_reduced_earnings_for_men_america

    Bankruptcy filings skyrocketed from the 80s onward.

    http://www.mondaq.com/unitedstates/x/464136/Insolvency+Bankruptcy/BAPCPA+10+Years+Later+The+Effectiveness+And+Necessity+Of+Bankruptcy+Reforms+Remain+In+Question

    Overdoses rose slightly in the mid 80s and early 90s. Then skyrocketed from the mid 90s onward.
    Overdoses deaths (per-capita) are now 6x more common than in the 70s and early 80s. Per capita, overdoses are also about 4x more common than in the early 90s.

    https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6101a3.htm

    The incarceration rate (for all races) is also much higher today than in the 70s.

    https://www.nap.edu/read/18613/chapter/4

    Consumer debt increased substantially in the 80s, then skyrocketed in from the 90s through today.

    http://www.money-zine.com/financial-planning/debt-consolidation/consumer-debt-statistics/

    Student loan debt has exploded too since the early 90s. This is more significant than it seems. Back in the 70s&80s, a college degree wasn't a prerequisite to entering the middle-class. Now it is. So this increase in student loan debt is even worse than it seems.

    http://www.doctorhousingbubble.com/education-of-the-housing-market-student-loan-debt-and-falling-birth-rates-slow-demand-for-the-first-time-buyer-market-sallie-mae-debt/

    It’s amazing that with our GDP having expanded so much since the 70s, median wages have fallen so much.

    This phenomenon is neither amazing nor even remarkable, since all the increased GDP has been achieved by overpopulation; GDPPP – not GDP – is the measure of productivity and its increase (or decrease).

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  108. @AB-
    Left coast company I worked at would promote POC's and womyn with essentially none of the qualifications the passed over white guys had. White guy with their resume would never, ever, be considered for those jobs.

    They promoted a 50 something old negro womyn to be a district manager; she had spent the previous 15 years as a clerk typist....but DIVERSITY! They did this in the entire company, then about 18 months into it, they fired everybody and had them reapply for any job they wanted. She, along with a whole bunch of other AA promotions got canned.

    But when new management came in, they started the AA nonsense again.

    I lost my job when the CEO listened to the management consultants and dumped all the non-core jobs.

    Don’t be so coy. Tell us the name of the company.

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  109. @Dave Pinsen
    Management decisions have something do with getting into "new industries". Mainframes were, at one time, a new industry for IBM, whose history goes back to 1911. IBM is still a pretty big company today ($135 billion market cap).

    Moreover, IBM invented many of the ideas that have made it big today.

    Virtual Machines. Yup, an IBM invention that IBM didn’t manage to turn into a product.

    There are others too …

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    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    Burroughs invented the first operating system called the Master Control Program that was much easier to use than IBMs and it's Job Control Language. However, everybody uses IBM's term Operating System for the program controlling the resources of the computer.
  110. @Name Withheld
    I earned $10 an hour as a cleaner at NYC public schools during my summer breaks from college 1984-85.

    that was 3x the minimum wage at the time. No wonder the schools were/are so expensive for the taxpayer.

    For comparison, I do payroll for a carpet cleaning company…. hard work for sure… and they make from $11-13 an hour. 2017.

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  111. @Rod1963



    Once upon a time we had a press and a Democratic Party that called these greedy shits out for exactly what they are.
     
    Yeah they did, I still remember those times. But you have go 25 plus years well before the Clinton's arrived on the scene and changed the party from class based issues to racial ones. Then it all went silent on both sides. Even today it's barely covered by the alt-right.

    What is described in the article, even if you replace the Babus of Apple with white guys the results would be the same. The out-sourcing frenzy is pure murder on upward mobility, it kills it. If you don't land a gig in a company where upward mobility is possible, you're screwed. Any firm that provides services for other larger firms is going to be a bare bones sweat shop operation with no bennies.

    It's a race to the bottom for most workers.

    I looked up the average wage at Google - about $130k for the peons. In Silicon Valley it means you live a crappy apartment 50 miles away and commute to a job that you'll quit in little over a year. In short it's a rotten gig. All because Google and all the other firms have hired Babus and Chinese grinders to replace American labor to destroy their wages. By all rights those jobs should be paying $180-$250k because of how selective they are.But they don't.

    Business has created a environment that floods the market with excess workers which has driven down wages and benefits across the board.

    We either get that the wealthy whites have declared war on us or it will get worse. Immigration and immigrants are just a function of the wealthy whites industrial policy in this country. It's the symptom not the disease.

    Exactly so. San José and its environs are nothing more than a factory (in the anyient sense of that term – not a manufactory…) for interaction with China, India, et al. in-sourced to what used to be the U.S.A. for the convenience of its masters: they maintain the one locale for interaction with all others, rather than establishing separate factories in each of several nations as empires of old did – all possible because of modern aircraft, telecommunications, and the demise of popular sovereignty in favor of corporatocary without boundaries.

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  112. res says:
    @Laugh Track

    Er,

    What happened to Eastman Kodak?

    What happened to Apple?

    This may be a bad example.
     
    Yeah, I was wondering whether Ms Evans was the Chief Technology Officer for Kodak during the era that they got broadsided by the digital revolution. Didn't work out so well for Kodak.

    Yeah, I was wondering whether Ms Evans was the Chief Technology Officer for Kodak during the era that they got broadsided by the digital revolution. Didn’t work out so well for Kodak.

    An interesting hypothesis. Let’s check it out.

    From a very friendly profile we find she was promoted to Kodak CTO in 1999: https://anitaborg.org/profiles/gail-evans-spotlight/

    In 1980, Gail Evans was a student at Nazareth College in Rochester, New York, putting herself through school as a custodian at Eastman Kodak, the iconic and photographic film and imaging company. Almost two decades later, in 1999, Gail was still at Eastman Kodak, but in a very different role — she had just been named Chief Technology Officer.

    Let’s look at Kodak. From this 2012 Economist article: http://www.economist.com/node/21542796
    We see that Kodak’s profit peak was in (wait for it) 1999. The post 1999 collapse is epic:

    The rest of the article is an account of Kodak’s woes and an unfavorable comparison with Fujifilm’s success.

    So it looks like your guess was on target. Now compare the “putting herself through school” narrative with the NYT “costs to go to college part time.” Interesting, how old was she at the time (see below)?

    And we continue with a chronicle of her continuing success in high level positions since then: https://www.mercer.com/about-mercer/gail-evans.html

    Gail Evans is Mercer’s Global Chief Information Officer.

    Prior to joining Mercer, Gail was the Group Partner Program Manager for Microsoft, where she worked across Microsoft Business Groups, Product Engineering and IT teams to launch the next-generation customer knowledge platform for Microsoft’s Mobile First, Cloud First services. In her previous role, she was General Manager of Microsoft Studios, Services & Operations.

    Gail also served as Vice President and General Manager for Hewlett-Packard, responsible for worldwide country engagement and web capabilities as well as execution, search, personalization and digital marketing for HP’s web presence. She previously served as Technology Senior Vice President for Bank of America.

    Interesting that Kodak has fallen off of her list of accomplishments there.

    There is more on Gail Evans (and many others) at http://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/29/business/yourmoney/affirmative-action-a-corporate-diary.html

    There we find out she was 44 in 2003 so 21 in 1980 when the NYT story started. Looks like putting herself through school would be a more accurate characterization. It would be an interesting exercise to go through all the people profiled there and see how their groups/companies did during their tenure.

    On another note, how many 40 year olds were in the Kodak C-Suite in 1999? From their 1999 10k: http://getfilings.com/o0000031235-00-000004.html
    we see that CTO does not make it to the list of executives, but the youngest there (the controller) is 41. She must have been amazing to rise so quickly from such a low starting point!

    Read More
    • Replies: @E. Rekshun
    After leaving Kodak Eastman as the company’s chief information officer of consumer products, Gail served executive stints at Bank of America, HP and Microsoft. In January 2016, she was named Chief Information Officer at Mercer

    Ms. Evans was promoted to CIO at Kodak in 1999 and presumably held that job for at least a couple of years. So, including Kodak, five employers in less than sixteen years. As an IT executive, she never accomplished anything at any employer, and left before the fires. She started each new job with rave reviews from the CEO, updated her resume, went to blackety-black IT executive conferences "networked," and three years later was on to her next company at 25% higher salary. She is clever. Good work if you can get it.

  113. res says:

    Here is a CEPR piece taking Irwin and the NYT to task for his outsourcing comments: http://cepr.net/blogs/beat-the-press/more-profitable-is-not-the-same-as-more-productive

    Irwin notes the growing practice of outsourcing many tasks and in the third paragraph writes:

    “The approach has made companies more nimble and more productive, and delivered huge profits for shareholders.”

    As the piece subsequently explains, it is not at all clear that this outsourcing of jobs had made companies more productive. It has almost certainly made them more profitable, since there is considerable evidence that workers employed by contractors are paid less than they would be if employed by the parent organization. But this is just shifting the location of a relatively low productivity job from the company to the contractor, it does nothing to increase economy wide productivity.

    In fact, from an economy wide perspective it may well do the opposite. As the piece points out, Kodak employees enjoyed considerable job security. If there was no need for their work in one part of the company, it would look to transfer them to another part where they could be used. This meant that the company was effectively preventing workers from suffering unemployment and turning to government services during a downturn or shift in demand.

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  114. @AB-
    Left coast company I worked at would promote POC's and womyn with essentially none of the qualifications the passed over white guys had. White guy with their resume would never, ever, be considered for those jobs.

    They promoted a 50 something old negro womyn to be a district manager; she had spent the previous 15 years as a clerk typist....but DIVERSITY! They did this in the entire company, then about 18 months into it, they fired everybody and had them reapply for any job they wanted. She, along with a whole bunch of other AA promotions got canned.

    But when new management came in, they started the AA nonsense again.

    I lost my job when the CEO listened to the management consultants and dumped all the non-core jobs.

    Imagine a company going through industry consolidation, then hiring many more-qualified execs. Some of those execs see the low native skill sets and performance, and have employees reapply for their jobs to see who might qualify in the real world. Then the SVP head of internal audit decides to follow suit. The CEO fires her, pointing out that she hired most of the staff that she wants to rehire. That event was not imaginary.

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    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    Served her right: Having people re-apply for their jobs is a chicken-sh!t and unimaginative move from someone who should show a bit of leadership and development talent. Fire them if they are not capable or willing or redeploy them, but don't make people beg to keep that which you previously signalled they had earned.
  115. @anonymous
    Evans got benefits in addition to a paycheck. Ramos just gets the paycheck. And therein lies the difference. The companies would rather pay bennies to one exec or Stanford Ph.D techie than to 10 broom pushers. After all, who's worth more? Anyway, this will all probably be moot because before long robots will be pushing the brooms--and for nothing more than the cost of recharging the batteries.

    Let the bathrooms go uncleaned a few days and you quickly have a problem with your professional and executive staff. Another big difference between then and now would be Industrial Actions, which occurred with significant effect back then due to a tighter, limited workforce; it doesn’t happen so much now because the New American Worker has no power to organise and can be quickly replaced if they do.

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  116. @Off The Street
    Imagine a company going through industry consolidation, then hiring many more-qualified execs. Some of those execs see the low native skill sets and performance, and have employees reapply for their jobs to see who might qualify in the real world. Then the SVP head of internal audit decides to follow suit. The CEO fires her, pointing out that she hired most of the staff that she wants to rehire. That event was not imaginary.

    Served her right: Having people re-apply for their jobs is a chicken-sh!t and unimaginative move from someone who should show a bit of leadership and development talent. Fire them if they are not capable or willing or redeploy them, but don’t make people beg to keep that which you previously signalled they had earned.

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  117. @utu
    Uh, there is also the difference that Ms. Evans started in a blue collar workforce, 20th Century upstate New York, dominated by native-born Americans, while Ms. Ramos started in a blue collar workforce, turn of the century California, dominated by immigrants.

    It is true. But immigration is not the original cause here. Immigration is juts a tool. When under Reagan they started busting unions and moving jobs from rust belt to right-to-work states it was not about immigration. But certainly for neoliberals immigration helps them accomplish their goals. And they can get once the pro union left to help them in keeping the immigration flowing.

    Democrats of the ’80′s didn’t do much to stop union busting and sold them down the river with President Clinton signing NAFTA in ’93. Dems controlled Congress all during this time.

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    • Replies: @utu
    Democrats and Republicans are on the same team. You haven't noticed it yet? The transformation to neoliberal paradigm stared in late Crater with getting Volcker in FED. Then with Reagan union busting and then with Clinton NAFTA. Are you still about party politics that Reps this and Dems that?
  118. epebble says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    Management decisions have something do with getting into "new industries". Mainframes were, at one time, a new industry for IBM, whose history goes back to 1911. IBM is still a pretty big company today ($135 billion market cap).

    IBM, has also changed their business radically since the nineties. Now, they no longer own Fabs (Chip manufacturing), having sold it to GlobalFoundries, owned by the Emir of Abu Dhabi. They sold off PC business to Lenovo, a Chinese company; printer business to Lexmark, another Chinese company; Hard drive business to Hitachi (later sold to Western Digital, now owned by Toshiba). They are mostly into design, technology development, software and service.

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  119. @jwm
    Here's a real, true janitor story from a real janitor. We could sub-title this, "White Privilege in the workplace"

    Eleven years ago I got out of the cardiac ward with a stent in my heart, and no bank account left. Insurance was a gyp. So as soon as I was back on my feet, I hired on as a substitute custodian for the local school district. I had 15 years of experience when they hired me. I worked hard, applied for the first full-time job that came open. Passed up for some Latino dude cold off the street. Next I was passed up for the 20yo Latino kid who bailed within the the first year- couldn't handle the workload. Next I got passed up for the Black dude, who was shit-canned within six weeks. Then I got passed up for the second Black dude who also bailed because of the workload. It took damn near five years to get a full time job. They just fired the first Latino dude who was hired before me. I outlasted them all. And they just promoted a nice lesbian with a boy's haircut to take the lead custodial spot on my campus. She can't get a file cabinet up on a hand truck, or manage to get the flags right side up, and doesn't know enough to not store the gasoline in the same closet as the water heater. I can retire this year, so I'm just standing back and watching the circus. (I moved the gasoline)

    JWM

    Worth being moved into the head post, and retitled “A Tale of Three Janitors”

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    • Replies: @JackOH
    Agree.

    We sometimes mention Orwell's future, a "boot stamping on a human face---forever." How about a version for America's near future: able, English-speaking White guys herded to the back of the bus for a long time.
  120. Art says:

    Allen Greenspan accelerated the decline of corporate responsibility. The Federal Reserve under him, fueled the junk bond debt takeover of American corporations. Corporate earnings went to paying back debt – not looking after employees and customers. Corporations primarily became a source of cash for Wall Street – not people orientated productive organizations of goods and services. Pensions, fully funded health care, and the idea of loyalty to older employees went by the wayside.

    p.s. Search on Google is now a monopoly – it has become a utility – it needs to be put in a status like Ma Bell was in the 50’s.

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  121. @res

    Yeah, I was wondering whether Ms Evans was the Chief Technology Officer for Kodak during the era that they got broadsided by the digital revolution. Didn’t work out so well for Kodak.
     
    An interesting hypothesis. Let's check it out.

    From a very friendly profile we find she was promoted to Kodak CTO in 1999: https://anitaborg.org/profiles/gail-evans-spotlight/

    In 1980, Gail Evans was a student at Nazareth College in Rochester, New York, putting herself through school as a custodian at Eastman Kodak, the iconic and photographic film and imaging company. Almost two decades later, in 1999, Gail was still at Eastman Kodak, but in a very different role — she had just been named Chief Technology Officer.
     
    Let's look at Kodak. From this 2012 Economist article: http://www.economist.com/node/21542796
    We see that Kodak's profit peak was in (wait for it) 1999. The post 1999 collapse is epic:

    http://cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/290-width/images/print-edition/20120114_WBC381.gif

    The rest of the article is an account of Kodak's woes and an unfavorable comparison with Fujifilm's success.

    So it looks like your guess was on target. Now compare the "putting herself through school" narrative with the NYT "costs to go to college part time." Interesting, how old was she at the time (see below)?

    And we continue with a chronicle of her continuing success in high level positions since then: https://www.mercer.com/about-mercer/gail-evans.html

    Gail Evans is Mercer’s Global Chief Information Officer.

    Prior to joining Mercer, Gail was the Group Partner Program Manager for Microsoft, where she worked across Microsoft Business Groups, Product Engineering and IT teams to launch the next-generation customer knowledge platform for Microsoft’s Mobile First, Cloud First services. In her previous role, she was General Manager of Microsoft Studios, Services & Operations.

    Gail also served as Vice President and General Manager for Hewlett-Packard, responsible for worldwide country engagement and web capabilities as well as execution, search, personalization and digital marketing for HP’s web presence. She previously served as Technology Senior Vice President for Bank of America.

     

    Interesting that Kodak has fallen off of her list of accomplishments there.

    There is more on Gail Evans (and many others) at http://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/29/business/yourmoney/affirmative-action-a-corporate-diary.html

    There we find out she was 44 in 2003 so 21 in 1980 when the NYT story started. Looks like putting herself through school would be a more accurate characterization. It would be an interesting exercise to go through all the people profiled there and see how their groups/companies did during their tenure.

    On another note, how many 40 year olds were in the Kodak C-Suite in 1999? From their 1999 10k: http://getfilings.com/o0000031235-00-000004.html
    we see that CTO does not make it to the list of executives, but the youngest there (the controller) is 41. She must have been amazing to rise so quickly from such a low starting point!

    After leaving Kodak Eastman as the company’s chief information officer of consumer products, Gail served executive stints at Bank of America, HP and Microsoft. In January 2016, she was named Chief Information Officer at Mercer

    Ms. Evans was promoted to CIO at Kodak in 1999 and presumably held that job for at least a couple of years. So, including Kodak, five employers in less than sixteen years. As an IT executive, she never accomplished anything at any employer, and left before the fires. She started each new job with rave reviews from the CEO, updated her resume, went to blackety-black IT executive conferences “networked,” and three years later was on to her next company at 25% higher salary. She is clever. Good work if you can get it.

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  122. @Reg Cæsar

    Maybe Rochester would not be the crime infested decaying city it is today either.
     
    That Xerox was totally clueless about what they had out in Palo Alto didn't help matters on the Genesee, either.

    Thanks to Mayo Clinic, the other Rochester is still doing quite well. I believe it is still the whitest city (real city, not suburb) in America of its size.

    That Xerox was totally clueless about what they had out in Palo Alto didn’t help matters on the Genesee, either.

    Definite missed opportunity, that’s for sure.

    Upstate NY should be doing better than it is. Beautiful area. Not quite a “whitetopia” because of the cities, but now quite a bit whiter than the national average. Lake effect snow obviously an issue. Buffalo not so interesting–more lake plain, a bit further from the more scenic bits. Rochester still too much lake effect but a bit closer to the finger lake scenery seems like it would be nice. White folks can handle some cold and snow if the payoff in outdoor amenities is nice.

    My guess is the problems are too many blacks in what are the available cities. And a relatively high tax regime.

    Whitetopias will be in demand in the coming diversity years. Upstate should secede from New York. Then the city fathers of Rochester/Syracuse/Buffalo should be finding ways to encourage blacks to move to Atlanta. (Maybe give them free travel vouchers to go to Atlanta in January. A whole bunch of them might not come back.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Truth

    Whitetopias will be in demand in the coming diversity years. Upstate should secede from New York. Then the city fathers of Rochester/Syracuse/Buffalo should be finding ways to encourage blacks to move to Atlanta. (Maybe give them free travel vouchers to go to Atlanta in January. A whole bunch of them might not come back.)
     
    And who, exactly is going to replace the population to keep the schools, stores, and restaurants open, Richard Florida?
  123. cthulhu says:
    @Pericles
    Engineer: the most debased profession. First every third worlder and their uncle is a software engineer. Now the cleaning staff are not "Facilities Attorneys at Law" or "Medical Doctors of Maintenance" but "maintenance engineers". Sic transit whatever.

    I think this “xxx engineer” renaming practice is more comedy routine than real world. But there’s a small kernel of truth in there: most people who get engineering degrees do not go on to get a Professional Engineer certification (aka the P.E. “stamp”), so in most states there is no law about who can append “engineer” to their job title. (You still have to have the P.E. stamp to call yourself a professional engineer though.) Certain jobs require the PE stamp – civil engineers who design buildings, bridges, roads, etc., have to be PEs, as do the electrical engineers who sign off on building electrical system designs (which can be pretty lucrative; there aren’t a lot of EEs with stamps), but most other engineering jobs don’t require the stamp. I’ve been at it for more than two decades (aircraft design) and my lack of the stamp is meaningless; none of my co-workers are PEs either.

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  124. Sean says:

    Business created the conditions for the cost of labour to be stable or even falling (including increasing the supply of labour by immigration) because business make more money that way. Robots will be progressively cheaper and more able to do any task. . There will be a last surge of cheap labour as business tries to stick with humans and then they will re-tool for total automation. Almost all of the present workers are going to have nothing remunerative to do. And there will be an awful lot of them.

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  125. Daniel H says:
    @Patriot
    In 1950, California's population was close to 10 million people. Then a man without a highschool education could support a family of 6 in a new 4 bedroom, 2 car garage, 2 cars and wife stayed t home.

    Today that opportunity is long gone due to massive immigration of cheap labor. During the interving 67 years, California's population rocketed to 40 million, causing house prices to increase by around 100 times. Meanwhile, wages grew by only by around 8 times, due to cheap Mexican labor. This disparity between salries and house costs, destroyed California's middle class.

    This happened in my lifetime. I saw it with my own eyes - The willful destruction of The American Dream, and hence America, itself. Today, my college-educated chidren struggle. Both parents must work, they can only afford a small condo 1-hr drive from the city, and can't afford kids. Meanwhile the Mexican immigrants breed like rabbits, supported by welfare paid by the taxes levied on my struggling childless kids.

    >>This happened in my lifetime. I saw it with my own eyes – The willful destruction of The American Dream, and hence America, itself. Today, my college-educated chidren struggle. Both parents must work, they can only afford a small condo 1-hr drive from the city, and can’t afford kids. Meanwhile the Mexican immigrants breed like rabbits, supported by welfare paid by the taxes levied on my struggling childless kids.<<

    I feel for you, I really do. The fact that young heritage Americans can't even contemplate a family, that their parents won't see any grandchildren is a punch in the gut.

    As a civilizational survival strategy I would urge all young heritage Americans, unless they have landed a high paying job that can support a wife an family, to leave these coastal moral cesspools and start a life in a small city/town. Even if the only jobs available are crummy and don't pay well, it will still be easier to afford a house and provide for a family.

    One would not be paranoid to think that all this was planned.

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  126. JackOH says:
    @JeremiahJohnbalaya
    Worth being moved into the head post, and retitled "A Tale of Three Janitors"

    Agree.

    We sometimes mention Orwell’s future, a “boot stamping on a human face—forever.” How about a version for America’s near future: able, English-speaking White guys herded to the back of the bus for a long time.

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  127. MarkinLA says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    Management decisions have something do with getting into "new industries". Mainframes were, at one time, a new industry for IBM, whose history goes back to 1911. IBM is still a pretty big company today ($135 billion market cap).

    Yes they do, but to expect a company making most of it’s revenue on film and photo paper to shift gears and get into businesses that already have major competitors like copiers is not the same thing as a PC company deciding to make Ipods.

    IBM was making tabulating machines for businesses, making computers was just a natural continuation of that trend. Film photography and digital imaging are two completely different areas. If Kodak had been making SLRs competitive with Nikon and Canon they probably would have done a better job of making the transition.

    For every CEO that bets the company on a new direction and wins there are many more times as many when the bet is lost. You just don’t hear about the losers because they have a shelf life of a week in the business press and nobody wants to read the CEOs book about how great he was.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    This is known as survivorship bias.
    , @PiltdownMan

    Film photography and digital imaging are two completely different areas. If Kodak had been making SLRs competitive with Nikon and Canon they probably would have done a better job of making the transition.
     
    Kodak completely flubbed the transition to digital photography having started it themselves. The first professional digital SLRs were Kodak products, using Nikon supplied bodies. But their management didn't fully realize how quick the technology transition would be. It's hard to see, though, what Kodak's niche in digital photography would be, since, as you point out, they had never been much of a force in the quality camera market.

    They were pioneers in developing and supplying camera digital sensors, but companies in Asia out-competed them with a greater investment in capital and R&D. But the digital image sensor market is a smaller market, in dollar volume, than the film market was.

    So, even had they become the dominant supplier of sensors, they would have had to shrink rapidly, and become a very different type of company.

    They couldn't have found a niche in helping people archive their images, either. Online archival image storage was a decade off in the future, and, in any case, it turned out that the culture of consumer photography became a culture of not permanent artifacts (framed photos or photos in albums) but transient items of personal communication (snaps sent out from smartphones or email).

    They were doomed, even if their management had been geniuses.

  128. MarkinLA says:
    @Peripatetic commenter
    Moreover, IBM invented many of the ideas that have made it big today.

    Virtual Machines. Yup, an IBM invention that IBM didn't manage to turn into a product.

    There are others too ...

    Burroughs invented the first operating system called the Master Control Program that was much easier to use than IBMs and it’s Job Control Language. However, everybody uses IBM’s term Operating System for the program controlling the resources of the computer.

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  129. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymous
    I think the main reason they went bankrupt was that they were making film cameras and accessories in the age of the digital camera.

    But probably as you say, promoting janitors to company officers probably helped to seal their fate. Unless they were promoting Will Hunting, they're probably not going to get too many intelligent suggestions about transitioning to the 21st Century. And even Will would have to do quite a bit of growing up before I'd sign off on giving him a promotion.

    Kodak only built low end, poorly built “snapshot” cameras-Instamatics, Pocket Instamatics and the Disk camera, and then the godawful APS system-after the early sixties. The cameras were sold on the theory that people who bought them would buy more Kodak film and were sold at low margins.

    Digital photography and the ubiquity of the cellphone camera meant the end of the low end film camera, but it was a long time before digital really competed with film for top quality results. Even today, the best film has advantages over digital in several ways (but the gap has narrowed a lot).

    Archivally processed monochrome film, and the now discontinued Kodachrome color film, were archival: in other words they would last a very long time. We do not have an archival method of digital storage at any level of density usable for modern file sizes available to consumer or small and medium business users. Data preservation is based on the concept of “spit swapping”-actively copying all your data over to the new and improved medium with each release. This depends on anyone 1) bothering to do it and 2) not actively wanting to suppress, delete or destroy it. Two unacceptable assumptions.

    Film still has a niche market, no thanks to Kodak and their lame marketing.

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  130. @MarkinLA
    Yes they do, but to expect a company making most of it's revenue on film and photo paper to shift gears and get into businesses that already have major competitors like copiers is not the same thing as a PC company deciding to make Ipods.

    IBM was making tabulating machines for businesses, making computers was just a natural continuation of that trend. Film photography and digital imaging are two completely different areas. If Kodak had been making SLRs competitive with Nikon and Canon they probably would have done a better job of making the transition.

    For every CEO that bets the company on a new direction and wins there are many more times as many when the bet is lost. You just don't hear about the losers because they have a shelf life of a week in the business press and nobody wants to read the CEOs book about how great he was.

    This is known as survivorship bias.

    Read More
  131. utu says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Democrats of the '80's didn't do much to stop union busting and sold them down the river with President Clinton signing NAFTA in '93. Dems controlled Congress all during this time.

    Democrats and Republicans are on the same team. You haven’t noticed it yet? The transformation to neoliberal paradigm stared in late Crater with getting Volcker in FED. Then with Reagan union busting and then with Clinton NAFTA. Are you still about party politics that Reps this and Dems that?

    Read More
  132. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Ron Unz
    Lots of excellent points made in this comment thread...

    Obviously, the current employment practices in Silicon Valley have all sorts of problems. But I'd agree with the argument that some others have raised, namely that there might be a direct connection between a leading technology company such as Kodak having (presumably for Affirmative Action reasons) promoted a former black janitor to Chief Technology Officer and said technology company not long afterward going bankrupt. At least Silicon Valley companies typically haven't (yet) behaved in this insane manner.

    I seem to recall that ultra-successful tech company Xerox, also based near Kodak, was endlessly hailed in the media for its tremendous support for Affirmative Action, eventually going so far as to appoint some black woman as CEO. Perhaps coincidentally, although Xerox's Palo Alto PARC unit created many of Silicon Valley's most important technologies, its the corporate parent was too preoccupied with "diversity" to ever make proper use of them, and instead they generated many hundreds of billions of dollars of market value for other companies that did.

    You’re thinking of Ursula Burns. I’m no fan of affirmative action or diversification for its own sake, but I’m not sure we can blame her for Xerox’s failure to successfully commercialize PARC’s innovations. She didn’t become president of the company until 10 years ago.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon87
    You CAN blame her for the 6 billion dollar mistake of purchasing ACS. She frankly was a giant failure.
  133. Truth says:
    @jwm
    Here's a real, true janitor story from a real janitor. We could sub-title this, "White Privilege in the workplace"

    Eleven years ago I got out of the cardiac ward with a stent in my heart, and no bank account left. Insurance was a gyp. So as soon as I was back on my feet, I hired on as a substitute custodian for the local school district. I had 15 years of experience when they hired me. I worked hard, applied for the first full-time job that came open. Passed up for some Latino dude cold off the street. Next I was passed up for the 20yo Latino kid who bailed within the the first year- couldn't handle the workload. Next I got passed up for the Black dude, who was shit-canned within six weeks. Then I got passed up for the second Black dude who also bailed because of the workload. It took damn near five years to get a full time job. They just fired the first Latino dude who was hired before me. I outlasted them all. And they just promoted a nice lesbian with a boy's haircut to take the lead custodial spot on my campus. She can't get a file cabinet up on a hand truck, or manage to get the flags right side up, and doesn't know enough to not store the gasoline in the same closet as the water heater. I can retire this year, so I'm just standing back and watching the circus. (I moved the gasoline)

    JWM

    Just a thought, Sport; maybe your job performance wasn’t quite what you thought it was?

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  134. Truth says:
    @Dmitry134564
    Well you already know the answer to the question of course. The hardworking Latinos cleaning toilets, are not the ones complaining about the 'evil white man'.

    Well not in the first generation, anyway.

    Read More
  135. Truth says:
    @Trelane
    Eastman Kodask went bankrupt in part because of its toxic corporate culture of non-meritocratic hiring and promotion. Ms. Brown, the janitor, or whatever her name is would be an example of this.

    No, it went bankrupt because it invented the digital camera and did nothing with the patent.

    Full. Stop.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave
    Exactly. I was born and raised in Rochester, and it's no secret what killed Kodak.
    There's a lot of projection going on in the comments here, none of it based on facts.
    I had family that worked in R&D for Kodak and Xerox.
    Kodak invented digital imaging, had contracts with the Federal government for use of said technology in satellites, but didn't have the foresight to see where the industry was headed.
    Post WWII, Rochester was a type of working class, industrial Silicon Valley. The entire city was built around both companies, and both companies came up with a lot of the tech that bright people in California later picked up on and ran with.
    Kodak, and to a lesser extent Xerox, killed itself.
    Unfortunately, they ended up killing Rochester as well. It's a shell of it's former self. The largest employers are now the University of Rochester and a local grocery store chain called Wegmans.
    , @Trelane
    Yeah, like I said, Kodak had a toxic corporate culture.
  136. Truth says:
    @Tiny Duck
    Why are altrighters so freaking old? Shouldn't you guys be spending time with your grandkids and wives


    Oh wait

    I wanted to put “LOL” twice, that was your funniest comment yet.

    Read More
  137. Truth says:
    @Anonymous
    I think the main reason they went bankrupt was that they were making film cameras and accessories in the age of the digital camera.

    But probably as you say, promoting janitors to company officers probably helped to seal their fate. Unless they were promoting Will Hunting, they're probably not going to get too many intelligent suggestions about transitioning to the 21st Century. And even Will would have to do quite a bit of growing up before I'd sign off on giving him a promotion.

    But probably as you say, promoting janitors to company officers probably helped to seal their fate.

    You’d rather have this pricks in there with $50 million dollar packages, and golden parachutes, who still loose money?

    Read More
  138. Truth says:
    @Anonymous
    "Why are altrighters so freaking old? Shouldn’t you guys be spending time with your grandkids and wives

    Oh wait"

    You've got us mixed up with your freak circus on the left. We've got the families and family traditions, you guys are the party of LGBTQRSTUVWXYZs who scream their demands that their genders be named after ferns or that 50yr old men have the right to go to the toilet next to 5 yr old girls. Not to mention the party of effeminate men and women who boast about killing all their babies, and minorities who celebrate 'de-policing' their communities and letting the murder rates spike to astronomical levels in those communities.

    Typical right-wingers, yes, “alt-righters”, absolutely not. He nailed it dead center.

    Read More
  139. Truth says:
    @AnotherDad

    That Xerox was totally clueless about what they had out in Palo Alto didn’t help matters on the Genesee, either.
     
    Definite missed opportunity, that's for sure.

    Upstate NY should be doing better than it is. Beautiful area. Not quite a "whitetopia" because of the cities, but now quite a bit whiter than the national average. Lake effect snow obviously an issue. Buffalo not so interesting--more lake plain, a bit further from the more scenic bits. Rochester still too much lake effect but a bit closer to the finger lake scenery seems like it would be nice. White folks can handle some cold and snow if the payoff in outdoor amenities is nice.

    My guess is the problems are too many blacks in what are the available cities. And a relatively high tax regime.

    Whitetopias will be in demand in the coming diversity years. Upstate should secede from New York. Then the city fathers of Rochester/Syracuse/Buffalo should be finding ways to encourage blacks to move to Atlanta. (Maybe give them free travel vouchers to go to Atlanta in January. A whole bunch of them might not come back.)

    Whitetopias will be in demand in the coming diversity years. Upstate should secede from New York. Then the city fathers of Rochester/Syracuse/Buffalo should be finding ways to encourage blacks to move to Atlanta. (Maybe give them free travel vouchers to go to Atlanta in January. A whole bunch of them might not come back.)

    And who, exactly is going to replace the population to keep the schools, stores, and restaurants open, Richard Florida?

    Read More
  140. Truth says:
    @JackOH
    Agree.

    We sometimes mention Orwell's future, a "boot stamping on a human face---forever." How about a version for America's near future: able, English-speaking White guys herded to the back of the bus for a long time.

    I nominate YOU to be Ross Parks.

    Read More
  141. @MarkinLA
    Yes they do, but to expect a company making most of it's revenue on film and photo paper to shift gears and get into businesses that already have major competitors like copiers is not the same thing as a PC company deciding to make Ipods.

    IBM was making tabulating machines for businesses, making computers was just a natural continuation of that trend. Film photography and digital imaging are two completely different areas. If Kodak had been making SLRs competitive with Nikon and Canon they probably would have done a better job of making the transition.

    For every CEO that bets the company on a new direction and wins there are many more times as many when the bet is lost. You just don't hear about the losers because they have a shelf life of a week in the business press and nobody wants to read the CEOs book about how great he was.

    Film photography and digital imaging are two completely different areas. If Kodak had been making SLRs competitive with Nikon and Canon they probably would have done a better job of making the transition.

    Kodak completely flubbed the transition to digital photography having started it themselves. The first professional digital SLRs were Kodak products, using Nikon supplied bodies. But their management didn’t fully realize how quick the technology transition would be. It’s hard to see, though, what Kodak’s niche in digital photography would be, since, as you point out, they had never been much of a force in the quality camera market.

    They were pioneers in developing and supplying camera digital sensors, but companies in Asia out-competed them with a greater investment in capital and R&D. But the digital image sensor market is a smaller market, in dollar volume, than the film market was.

    So, even had they become the dominant supplier of sensors, they would have had to shrink rapidly, and become a very different type of company.

    They couldn’t have found a niche in helping people archive their images, either. Online archival image storage was a decade off in the future, and, in any case, it turned out that the culture of consumer photography became a culture of not permanent artifacts (framed photos or photos in albums) but transient items of personal communication (snaps sent out from smartphones or email).

    They were doomed, even if their management had been geniuses.

    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    Your points seem compelling. Except Fujifilm survived: https://www.economist.com/blogs/schumpeter/2012/01/how-fujifilm-survived
  142. JackOH says:

    “They were doomed, even if their management had been geniuses.”

    Agree. I don’t know the details of Kodak’s decline as you do, but sometimes companies are vested in a path to nowhere, and no amount of technical or managerial talent can right things. Working for a company that’s on the skids can be pretty ugly, too, because, in my opinion, it induces inordinate gamesmanship among corporate insiders to make up for lost opportunities and declining revenues.

    Steel, ceramics, rail transport, auto assembly and auto parts manufacturing, and a handful of other companies once employed thousands or tens of thousands in my area. Talent won’t help. That’s a lesson that still needs to be learned by a lot of our well-educated managerial and technical people who’ve been given the bum’s rush by their latest employer.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Some obsolescent companies have managed to buy into new technologies, just as some outside investors manage to hit it rich in new technologies, but it seems pretty random.
  143. @JackOH
    "They were doomed, even if their management had been geniuses."

    Agree. I don't know the details of Kodak's decline as you do, but sometimes companies are vested in a path to nowhere, and no amount of technical or managerial talent can right things. Working for a company that's on the skids can be pretty ugly, too, because, in my opinion, it induces inordinate gamesmanship among corporate insiders to make up for lost opportunities and declining revenues.

    Steel, ceramics, rail transport, auto assembly and auto parts manufacturing, and a handful of other companies once employed thousands or tens of thousands in my area. Talent won't help. That's a lesson that still needs to be learned by a lot of our well-educated managerial and technical people who've been given the bum's rush by their latest employer.

    Some obsolescent companies have managed to buy into new technologies, just as some outside investors manage to hit it rich in new technologies, but it seems pretty random.

    Read More
    • Replies: @JackOH
    I was getting a little worked up, I suppose, thinking about the latest crop of non-traditional students (over 25) with bachelor's degrees entering our local state university for a second go 'round at getting a credential that may be worth a shit in the workplace.
    , @Anon87
    Either re-apply your skill set to new products/solutions as your traditional market goes away, or you end up like Kodak. Google invests in all sorts of new markets (living high off browser clicks) but can't maintain that forever. Someday they need to have another, novel, growth product. Facebook must be thinking about what comes next once people bail on their social network. Zuck is thinking politics (since he has never had an original idea) but that leaves a huge company to survive. Apple Watch was a dud, iPhones won't go on forever. What comes next?
  144. Dave says:
    @Truth
    No, it went bankrupt because it invented the digital camera and did nothing with the patent.

    Full. Stop.

    Exactly. I was born and raised in Rochester, and it’s no secret what killed Kodak.
    There’s a lot of projection going on in the comments here, none of it based on facts.
    I had family that worked in R&D for Kodak and Xerox.
    Kodak invented digital imaging, had contracts with the Federal government for use of said technology in satellites, but didn’t have the foresight to see where the industry was headed.
    Post WWII, Rochester was a type of working class, industrial Silicon Valley. The entire city was built around both companies, and both companies came up with a lot of the tech that bright people in California later picked up on and ran with.
    Kodak, and to a lesser extent Xerox, killed itself.
    Unfortunately, they ended up killing Rochester as well. It’s a shell of it’s former self. The largest employers are now the University of Rochester and a local grocery store chain called Wegmans.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Truth
    Yes.

    There's always somebody here who will attribute Sputnik getting to space first or the Great Chicago Fire to Affirmative Action.
    , @Desiderius
    No coincidence that Rochester was where Alinsky focused his efforts.
  145. jim jones says:

    I worked for a company once that everyone knew was going down the tubes, as far as I was concerned it just gave me more time to send out my CV.

    Read More
  146. jack ryan says: • Website
    @DFH
    Why aren't there more black immigration restrictionists?
    Is it just that what small proportion would be smart enough to work out that immigration is bad for blacks are bought off by the left/cuck right?

    Yes, this has been a huge disappointment. The Black Congressional Caucus just hates White America, so anything that White Americans oppose, the Black Congressional Caucus supports. So far, mass Hispanic immigration hasn’t really effected Black political jobs, the powers that be gerrymander and protect Black congressional seats, that’s reality in Chicago.

    Also, the seemingly insane reality that the Jewish American political/financial/academic/media elite is overwhelmingly in support of open borders mass immigration, including mass Arab/Muslim immigration – anyone who disagrees is smeared and marginalized as a terrible RACIST Nazi.

    Jewish American Liberal Leftist Marxists are accepted as born again Conservatives, Neo Conservatives, market libertarians and get high paying jobs at the Wall Street Journal, National Review and Conservative Inc and these born again Jewish Neo Conservatives maintain their insane, treasonous immigration views.

    Look at the example of the creature Tamar Jacoby! One day she’s at the Lib Leftist marxist New School of Social Research, the next day she’s working for the Wall Street Journal – and her insane, treason immigration views remain the same.

    Just look at this creature Tamar Jacoby!

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  147. Truth says:
    @Dave
    Exactly. I was born and raised in Rochester, and it's no secret what killed Kodak.
    There's a lot of projection going on in the comments here, none of it based on facts.
    I had family that worked in R&D for Kodak and Xerox.
    Kodak invented digital imaging, had contracts with the Federal government for use of said technology in satellites, but didn't have the foresight to see where the industry was headed.
    Post WWII, Rochester was a type of working class, industrial Silicon Valley. The entire city was built around both companies, and both companies came up with a lot of the tech that bright people in California later picked up on and ran with.
    Kodak, and to a lesser extent Xerox, killed itself.
    Unfortunately, they ended up killing Rochester as well. It's a shell of it's former self. The largest employers are now the University of Rochester and a local grocery store chain called Wegmans.

    Yes.

    There’s always somebody here who will attribute Sputnik getting to space first or the Great Chicago Fire to Affirmative Action.

    Read More
    • Replies: @JackOH
    Truth, many of us here have fairly nuanced views of affirmative action, and many of us likewise know that affirmative action has been gamed by our White overlords--your masters and mine--so that its best intentions are pretty much lost to memory. At its heart, affirmative action is a politically motivated rent-seeking scheme that unduly enriches some folks and unduly deprives other folks, and it's enforced by the police powers of the state, which can be as arbitrary as it wants to be in its enforcement. That's why affirmative action is just plain wrong.
  148. res says:
    @PiltdownMan

    Film photography and digital imaging are two completely different areas. If Kodak had been making SLRs competitive with Nikon and Canon they probably would have done a better job of making the transition.
     
    Kodak completely flubbed the transition to digital photography having started it themselves. The first professional digital SLRs were Kodak products, using Nikon supplied bodies. But their management didn't fully realize how quick the technology transition would be. It's hard to see, though, what Kodak's niche in digital photography would be, since, as you point out, they had never been much of a force in the quality camera market.

    They were pioneers in developing and supplying camera digital sensors, but companies in Asia out-competed them with a greater investment in capital and R&D. But the digital image sensor market is a smaller market, in dollar volume, than the film market was.

    So, even had they become the dominant supplier of sensors, they would have had to shrink rapidly, and become a very different type of company.

    They couldn't have found a niche in helping people archive their images, either. Online archival image storage was a decade off in the future, and, in any case, it turned out that the culture of consumer photography became a culture of not permanent artifacts (framed photos or photos in albums) but transient items of personal communication (snaps sent out from smartphones or email).

    They were doomed, even if their management had been geniuses.

    Your points seem compelling. Except Fujifilm survived: https://www.economist.com/blogs/schumpeter/2012/01/how-fujifilm-survived

    Read More
  149. joefour says:
    @Anonymous
    Ms. Evans' career path is not at all typical. Is it really even fair to compare what is likely a typical janitorial worker with someone who was a apparently very unusual one?

    A highly ranked university where I live only started giving tuition reimbursement to current employees about 15 years ago. Prior to that time, only the children of university employees who had worked there for at least five years were eligible for tuition assistance. That same university never never gave bonuses to all employees until also around 15 years ago, but those bonuses were only a couple of hundred dollars, or so.

    I would also guess that Ms. Evans did not have four weeks vacation until she had worked there for quite awhile. I'm just guessing, but I would imagine that turnover among janitorial staff is pretty high, although maybe at companies with superb benefits it is less so.

    Eastman Kodak back in 70s and 80s was known as “Mother Yellow” to its employees … they knew they had a sweet deal!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave
    As I stated above, I was born and raised in Rochester and had family that worked at both Kodak and Xerox.
    in the 70's and 80's Kodak gave out Christmas bonuses that were insanely generous. Many working class men could buy a new car outright or several major appliances and then some from the bonus alone.
    I knew guys who graduated high school and went straight to work changing lightbulbs, or some other mindless task, at Kodak Park with a starting wage of $15 an hour in the mid 80's. The minimum wage at the time was like $3 and change.
    Kodak and Xerox took care of the folks who worked there, and the city prospered as a result.
    Now that they're gone, the city is quickly deconstructing itself and going the way of the Rustbelt.
  150. @Oleaginous Outrager
    Damn that's a long story. Does it ever come to any sort of conclusion other than "things are different now, and we should fix them! Somehow."? Maybe $150/hr for everyone and "let the Fed fix the inflation problem"?

    Damn that’s a long story. Does it ever come to any sort of conclusion other than “things are different now, and we should fix them! Somehow.”? Maybe $150/hr for everyone and “let the Fed fix the inflation problem”?

    One could say this about every story in the print MSM other than the pure “three people died in a fire last night” kind. Wherever you dig, you hit “feelz.”

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  151. Olorin says:
    @anonymous
    Evans got benefits in addition to a paycheck. Ramos just gets the paycheck. And therein lies the difference. The companies would rather pay bennies to one exec or Stanford Ph.D techie than to 10 broom pushers. After all, who's worth more? Anyway, this will all probably be moot because before long robots will be pushing the brooms--and for nothing more than the cost of recharging the batteries.

    Anyway, this will all probably be moot because before long robots will be pushing the brooms–and for nothing more than the cost of recharging the batteries.

    Every bit of automation of any task, process, or industry has a massive phalanx of essential automation-overseers, all meatbags.

    None of these machines “run on their own” at any level and never will except in the fantasies of libertarian autists or people not familiar with building/facilities/infrastructure management.

    Every industry or sector I ever worked in in the 20th century got massively automated. Never did it rule out the need for people to design, build, adapt, program, maintain, monitor, and upgrade the automation. I’m talking about the actual material machines, in every field.

    So while, say, publishing automated the jobs of 30 or 50 people into the desktop of one, there were new jobs created in supporting that desktop. It was a shift of labor that intensified the impacts of cognitive stratification. The guy who was still setting hot type in my first newspaper job in the mid-’70s was a mechanical whiz who went into servicing Xerox photocopying machines. His typesetter became a proofreader. One of my graphic artists got some loans, bought a phototypositor (ITC IIRC), and built a much better career path for herself.

    Add code-programmed silicon to automation, and you also need meatbags to upgrade the code, patch it, recognize/diagnose/research/repair potential exploits or known security problems, learn new code/languages, learn where the devices are new and are veneers on older stuff that has legacy bugs….

    Then there’s systems integration at the machine, code, and institutional level.

    “Janitors” no longer “push brooms” all day. These companies’ employees are not Roger Miller king-of-the-roading.

    That’s the point.

    They either have to operate at higher levels of cognitive and behavioral functioning or will have to settle for doing carefully spelled out, routine work subject to intensive quality control oversight. They do more than “push brooms” because most workplaces don’t need much of that, while needing entire new realms of facilities support.

    Facility maintenance companies have to operate within areas of certification or standards by OSHA, ISSA, IICRC, RBSM, CIMS, LEED, IFMA, Green Building Council, and more. They have to be familiar with health and environmental standards that incorporate all that was learned in the 1970s to 2000s out of dozens of scientific fields that rapidly grew in knowledge thanks to the explosion of research instrumentation. Their employees have to fit into that work ecosystem.

    Benefits are not the nexus of the issue. The capacity to operate at high–often accredited–professional standards is.

    These two workers typify the externalized costs of US immigration policy in the Uniparty’s rush to import voting ringers on both sides.

    I’m guessing that Ramos arrived not even being able to speak English, whereas Evans had X hundred years of American background including English and some long family history of living in/assimilating to upper NY state civilization. Maybe in ten years Ramos can learn English and learn to read LEED standards–whether they’re in English or Spanish, they require a higher level of understanding than she’s likely to have, coming new to First World civilization.

    We’re not living in idiocracy, we’re living in Bellcurvia as predicted by Herrnstein and Murray. Cognitive stratification matters. More and more so each passing year.

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  152. MarkinLA says:
    @Ron Unz
    Lots of excellent points made in this comment thread...

    Obviously, the current employment practices in Silicon Valley have all sorts of problems. But I'd agree with the argument that some others have raised, namely that there might be a direct connection between a leading technology company such as Kodak having (presumably for Affirmative Action reasons) promoted a former black janitor to Chief Technology Officer and said technology company not long afterward going bankrupt. At least Silicon Valley companies typically haven't (yet) behaved in this insane manner.

    I seem to recall that ultra-successful tech company Xerox, also based near Kodak, was endlessly hailed in the media for its tremendous support for Affirmative Action, eventually going so far as to appoint some black woman as CEO. Perhaps coincidentally, although Xerox's Palo Alto PARC unit created many of Silicon Valley's most important technologies, its the corporate parent was too preoccupied with "diversity" to ever make proper use of them, and instead they generated many hundreds of billions of dollars of market value for other companies that did.

    The problem with blaming affirmative action is that there aren’t that many important positions affected by it and supporting it is a condition of getting contracts with the federal government. So while a few useless employees do get promoted (usually to lower level management positions), the company gets contracts worth many times what they are paying the do-nothings.

    I doubt the useless affirmative action employee is ever in a position significant enough to have any real effect on what direction the company takes.

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  153. @anonymous
    Evans got benefits in addition to a paycheck. Ramos just gets the paycheck. And therein lies the difference. The companies would rather pay bennies to one exec or Stanford Ph.D techie than to 10 broom pushers. After all, who's worth more? Anyway, this will all probably be moot because before long robots will be pushing the brooms--and for nothing more than the cost of recharging the batteries.

    Hi tech always costs more and fails miserably with the hard parts. I will give a case in point. The US Navy many years ago decided to do away with all of the expensive and hard to retain, avionics techs who kept the black boxes and instruments in their aircraft working, so they paid a bunch of EEs and other engineers to design a computer to troubleshoot black box problems. I asked two brothers, one who was part of the engineering firm and another who was a career avionics tech how well it worked and they told me. The computer found all of the easy fixes, like blown fuse or burnt out light bulb, but when the repair could not be found on the flow chart, the computer sent you on a wild goose chase. And about 5% of the time, the tough dog problems, it was worse than useless. To save the navy’s bacon, the best techs would congregate at a pizza place with the schematics and programming code and brainstorm the solutions for repairs that worked. Of course, as the navy gets rid of more and more techs, this becomes impossible, and remember, THIS IS THE PEACE TIME NAVY. When the SHTF catastrophic failures will not be part of the database or anywhere on the flowcharts. This is a system designed to fail when times get hard. It shows up first in the military because combat with death and destruction can not be faked, but in the civilian world such weaknesses are ignored until the stink is so bad even vultures gag. Robots used for cleaning will have a tremendous logistical tail and fail to find the most hard to reach cleaning problems, until they fail, catastrophically. Enjoy.

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  154. @Anonymous
    I think the main reason they went bankrupt was that they were making film cameras and accessories in the age of the digital camera.

    But probably as you say, promoting janitors to company officers probably helped to seal their fate. Unless they were promoting Will Hunting, they're probably not going to get too many intelligent suggestions about transitioning to the 21st Century. And even Will would have to do quite a bit of growing up before I'd sign off on giving him a promotion.

    When an Irishman applied at that famous college in Pasadena, Calif., for a job as a janitor; a black woman told him he had to take a test to qualify for the job of janitor. The test, he later found out, was the Cal-Tech Jr. College Transfer Test, and he passed with flying colors. Of course he did not get the job and the jew professor who graded it told him, “You are too smart to be a goy and live.”; laughed in his face saying, “No Irish need apply.”, as security roughly pushed him out of the door. But we all know the MSM will never do a sob story or any story about such behavior in an ‘american’ university.

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  155. JackOH says:
    @Truth
    Yes.

    There's always somebody here who will attribute Sputnik getting to space first or the Great Chicago Fire to Affirmative Action.

    Truth, many of us here have fairly nuanced views of affirmative action, and many of us likewise know that affirmative action has been gamed by our White overlords–your masters and mine–so that its best intentions are pretty much lost to memory. At its heart, affirmative action is a politically motivated rent-seeking scheme that unduly enriches some folks and unduly deprives other folks, and it’s enforced by the police powers of the state, which can be as arbitrary as it wants to be in its enforcement. That’s why affirmative action is just plain wrong.

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  156. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    An interesting SoCal post-punk artifact:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7RBRJVUsI48

    Some YouTube comments:

    i like this garbage

    Nihilist new wave brilliance.

    god bless white America.
    reply> Finally, someone understands.

    Now THAT'S counter culture.

    This sounds like something you'd read about in Less Than Zero.

    I have no idea if this is genius or just fucking stupid.

    good luck ever being this cool

    When there were white people in Los Angeles!
    reply> LOL, yeah, it's over.
     

    As a kid listening to this on KROQ in the early 80s, I thought she was talking about her genitals.

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  157. I believe I’ve posted this before. My Dad was a building mechanic for a large Gas & Electric Utility company from the 60′s to the mid 90′s. He was in the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) union. Before take your kid to work day became official my Dad took me to work on several occasions. I remember the Black janitors as they seemed to have good rapport joking around with my Dad. I’d see them again at Christmas time as the company had a choir, that’s right a choir that performed Holiday classics including the religiously themed ones. The choir was mixed race even in the 1960′s. Whaaaat, I thought we were all racists back then. We all went to the company picnic in the Summer. The janitors didn’t get paid as well as my Dad but they all had benefits, healthcare and yep a pension. Such progress we have made since then……….it’s no longer a wonderful life.

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  158. Dave says:
    @joefour
    Eastman Kodak back in 70s and 80s was known as "Mother Yellow" to its employees ... they knew they had a sweet deal!

    As I stated above, I was born and raised in Rochester and had family that worked at both Kodak and Xerox.
    in the 70′s and 80′s Kodak gave out Christmas bonuses that were insanely generous. Many working class men could buy a new car outright or several major appliances and then some from the bonus alone.
    I knew guys who graduated high school and went straight to work changing lightbulbs, or some other mindless task, at Kodak Park with a starting wage of $15 an hour in the mid 80′s. The minimum wage at the time was like $3 and change.
    Kodak and Xerox took care of the folks who worked there, and the city prospered as a result.
    Now that they’re gone, the city is quickly deconstructing itself and going the way of the Rustbelt.

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    • Replies: @JackOH
    "[I]n the 70′s and 80′s Kodak gave out Christmas bonuses that were insanely generous." [emphasis mine]

    Dave, you make a good, if stomach-churning point, about the extraordinary wages paid by some of America's great companies to unskilled and semi-skilled workers without supervisory responsibilities. Steelworkers in my area earned up to $25,000 a year in the late 1970s with some overtime, and it's commonly believed management caved in to organized labor's demands because management knew a shutdown was in the offing. Let 'em eat Harleys, I guess. Wages these days for the very few steelmaking jobs are, I think, about $40 to $50 thousand a year.

    FWIW-I visited Rochester in the 1990s, and the sight of the emptied Bausch and Lomb buildings (?) was pretty awful, yet another American scene looking like a smashed 1945 European city. I'd mentioned in a previous comment that deindustrialization, demoralization, and depopulation are pretty ugly business if you're living in a legacy city.

  159. JackOH says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Some obsolescent companies have managed to buy into new technologies, just as some outside investors manage to hit it rich in new technologies, but it seems pretty random.

    I was getting a little worked up, I suppose, thinking about the latest crop of non-traditional students (over 25) with bachelor’s degrees entering our local state university for a second go ’round at getting a credential that may be worth a shit in the workplace.

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  160. Trelane says:
    @Truth
    No, it went bankrupt because it invented the digital camera and did nothing with the patent.

    Full. Stop.

    Yeah, like I said, Kodak had a toxic corporate culture.

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  161. @Dave
    Exactly. I was born and raised in Rochester, and it's no secret what killed Kodak.
    There's a lot of projection going on in the comments here, none of it based on facts.
    I had family that worked in R&D for Kodak and Xerox.
    Kodak invented digital imaging, had contracts with the Federal government for use of said technology in satellites, but didn't have the foresight to see where the industry was headed.
    Post WWII, Rochester was a type of working class, industrial Silicon Valley. The entire city was built around both companies, and both companies came up with a lot of the tech that bright people in California later picked up on and ran with.
    Kodak, and to a lesser extent Xerox, killed itself.
    Unfortunately, they ended up killing Rochester as well. It's a shell of it's former self. The largest employers are now the University of Rochester and a local grocery store chain called Wegmans.

    No coincidence that Rochester was where Alinsky focused his efforts.

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  162. jamie b. says:
    @Pat Boyle
    This garbage can't possibly be real music. This must be a parody.

    Wait until somebody introduces you to something called “rap.”

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  163. JackOH says:
    @Dave
    As I stated above, I was born and raised in Rochester and had family that worked at both Kodak and Xerox.
    in the 70's and 80's Kodak gave out Christmas bonuses that were insanely generous. Many working class men could buy a new car outright or several major appliances and then some from the bonus alone.
    I knew guys who graduated high school and went straight to work changing lightbulbs, or some other mindless task, at Kodak Park with a starting wage of $15 an hour in the mid 80's. The minimum wage at the time was like $3 and change.
    Kodak and Xerox took care of the folks who worked there, and the city prospered as a result.
    Now that they're gone, the city is quickly deconstructing itself and going the way of the Rustbelt.

    “[I]n the 70′s and 80′s Kodak gave out Christmas bonuses that were insanely generous.” [emphasis mine]

    Dave, you make a good, if stomach-churning point, about the extraordinary wages paid by some of America’s great companies to unskilled and semi-skilled workers without supervisory responsibilities. Steelworkers in my area earned up to $25,000 a year in the late 1970s with some overtime, and it’s commonly believed management caved in to organized labor’s demands because management knew a shutdown was in the offing. Let ‘em eat Harleys, I guess. Wages these days for the very few steelmaking jobs are, I think, about $40 to $50 thousand a year.

    FWIW-I visited Rochester in the 1990s, and the sight of the emptied Bausch and Lomb buildings (?) was pretty awful, yet another American scene looking like a smashed 1945 European city. I’d mentioned in a previous comment that deindustrialization, demoralization, and depopulation are pretty ugly business if you’re living in a legacy city.

    Read More
  164. Anon87 says:
    @MarkinLA
    What happened to Eastman Kodak?

    Kodak only made junk cameras in the film days and film and photo-paper were it's big money makers. When it was gone, it was hard for any company to downsize enough to stay solvent. They were into other businesses like copiers but there were also many established competitors in those businesses. They tried to get into the digital camera market by partnering with some noted lens makers but compared to real camera makers, it was too little too late.

    It didn’t help that they spun off any new business that leveraged their core competencies. They just kept hold of the film business and had nothing left to grow.

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  165. Anon87 says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    You're thinking of Ursula Burns. I'm no fan of affirmative action or diversification for its own sake, but I'm not sure we can blame her for Xerox's failure to successfully commercialize PARC's innovations. She didn't become president of the company until 10 years ago.

    You CAN blame her for the 6 billion dollar mistake of purchasing ACS. She frankly was a giant failure.

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  166. Anon87 says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Some obsolescent companies have managed to buy into new technologies, just as some outside investors manage to hit it rich in new technologies, but it seems pretty random.

    Either re-apply your skill set to new products/solutions as your traditional market goes away, or you end up like Kodak. Google invests in all sorts of new markets (living high off browser clicks) but can’t maintain that forever. Someday they need to have another, novel, growth product. Facebook must be thinking about what comes next once people bail on their social network. Zuck is thinking politics (since he has never had an original idea) but that leaves a huge company to survive. Apple Watch was a dud, iPhones won’t go on forever. What comes next?

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  167. EdwardM says:
    @epebble
    I have difficulty seeing a direct line from one I to the other. The new management theory of "core competency" seems to be a factor. It is also interesting that Kodak (and its friends in upstate NY) are no more while Apple (and its friends in CA) are ruling the world. Example: a Kodak style company IBM, from NY, went through a meltdown and was reborn as an Apple style company at the pain of becoming a Burroughs/Univac/CDC (i.e. death).

    I agree that it may not be mostly about immigration, but surely differences in the supply-and-demand outcome for labor between upstate N.Y. in the early 1980s and California today partially explain the different experiences of these two workers. And immigration has a lot to do with that.

    And it’s a good point that Kodak is essentially dead while Apple has among the highest profit margins of any manufacturing company.

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  168. @Ron Unz
    Lots of excellent points made in this comment thread...

    Obviously, the current employment practices in Silicon Valley have all sorts of problems. But I'd agree with the argument that some others have raised, namely that there might be a direct connection between a leading technology company such as Kodak having (presumably for Affirmative Action reasons) promoted a former black janitor to Chief Technology Officer and said technology company not long afterward going bankrupt. At least Silicon Valley companies typically haven't (yet) behaved in this insane manner.

    I seem to recall that ultra-successful tech company Xerox, also based near Kodak, was endlessly hailed in the media for its tremendous support for Affirmative Action, eventually going so far as to appoint some black woman as CEO. Perhaps coincidentally, although Xerox's Palo Alto PARC unit created many of Silicon Valley's most important technologies, its the corporate parent was too preoccupied with "diversity" to ever make proper use of them, and instead they generated many hundreds of billions of dollars of market value for other companies that did.

    If you get to be a leader like these people:

    http://www.businessinsider.com/most-influential-blacks-in-technology-2013-4

    … then it’s usually on merit, especially when they are founders. Capitalism is automatically a competence hierarchy. The affirmative action hires are usually a little lower in the totem pole, and have jobs which are not critical. Occasionally, you will get an AA hire near the top, acting as a ‘face’ for the company, but having no real power.

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  169. EdwardM says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Did Roald Dahl ever see the Bacup Coco-Nut Dancers?

    Is this the title of Tom Wolfe’s next novel?

    Read More
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