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Commenter Wilkey points out:

… We keep hearing that Muslims must tolerate blasphemy because free speech. But Europe doesn’t have free speech. In most European countries, including France, there is a long list of blasphemous statements for which one can go to jail – from publicly denying facts, like the Holocaust, to denying opinions, like racial equality.

America has a lot of ways of enforcing blasphemy taboos as well, such as being forced out of your job (e.g., James D. Watson, Jason Richwine, Brandon Eich, etc.), public humiliations, leaking confidential conversations, and so forth.

The Left is an amorphous religion from which one cannot claim religious freedom, because the Religion of Political Correctness has never been formally declared. But it has its own dogma – racial and gender quality, etc. It has its own scriptures – poems like “The New Colossus,” and plays like The Crucible. It has its own hymns – “Imagine.” It has its own deities, including one – The Reverend Doctor Martin Luther King, Junior – with his own holiday. “Public schools” are now effectively parochial schools owned and run by the Religion of Political Correctness.

A belief in magic is almost mandatory these days.

It must seem to Muslims very hypocritical to claim they must accept blasphemy while banning blasphemy against the Left.

 
• Category: Ideology • Tags: Charlie Hebdo, France, Freedom of Speech 
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  1. My favorite version of Imagine is this one by A Perfect Circle. Maynard took a dippy utopian ballad and made it sound like a threat. A perfect anthem for our times.

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  2. Bless us, oh saint Trayvon, and this, the purple drank we are about to receive…

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dahlia
    Lolloololol!!!!
    , @Vendetta
    Ha! That's good!
    , @another fred
    "Bless us, oh saint Trayvon, and this, the purple drank we are about to receive…"

    I am so stealing that!
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  3. I’d call it censorship rather than blasphemy since the proper punishment for blasphemy should be death-as a way of propitiating the deity.

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  4. Perhaps we need to turn the tables and lobby for yet another protected class: People who express unpopular opinions. It shall be illegal to fire someone for expressing an unpopular opinion. Affirmative action programs will require that people who have taboo views must be promoted and raised up ahead of the mainstream. Hmm…where does this lead?

    Right now we have a “don’t ask; don’t tell” approach to forbidden opinions. We keep them secret. We share them here anonymously. We are the new queers, hiding out in our own little clubs, using fake names. It is time to legalize blasphemy so we can come out of the closet. Make it illegal to discriminate against us!

    I’m a blasphemer and I’m proud! Let’s have a parade!

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  5. This whole ridiculous situation reminds me of the old joke about someone boasting of the total freedom of political speech in Stalinist Russia: “If I were in Berlin and I shouted ‘Death to Hitler’ on the street, the Gestapo would surely drag me away. But here in Moscow, I can shout ‘Death to Hitler’ in perfect safety. Indeed, I can even shout ‘Death to Trotsky.’”

    Although France’s ruling elites seem utterly committed to freedom of speech, my strong impression is that if our webzine were based there, Steve and half our writers would have long since gone to prison, along with maybe 70% of our commenters. It’s also pretty obvious why no MSM journalists have pointed this out—they’re terrified of losing their jobs and being blacklisted!

    And this is exactly the sort of reason I launched this small webzine a year ago.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Benjamin I. Espen
    Thanks.
    , @Prof. Woland
    Mr. Unz,

    My hat is off to you.

    pw
    , @Dave Pinsen
    Different countries can have different Overton windows and different laws. That's why I don't get why our State department is giving the Saudis crap about flogging a Saudi blogger. Objecting to them financing the spread of Wahabiism in the US would make more sense.
    , @ben tillman

    Most of us subscribe to the idea of human biodiversity and its implication here, but we should not underrate how much culture matters too.
     
    We're glad you did. Thank you.
    , @EnderbyEnderb
    Ron (or Steve),
    Is it possible for you to be harassed or prosecuted if you travel to Europe or Canada, or is that too far-fetched? Are you wary of retroactive hate speech prosecution if (when?) the first amendment finally gets gutted by a future supreme court?
    , @Hacienda
    I'm biased to the left because it's naturally more willing to take a chance with the unknown. But some unknowns are clearly known at this point and need face time with the public.

    And usually conservative commentary is asinine. But Steve represents intelligent conservative commentary that's hard to find. Incredible that Bill O'Reilly, Glen Beck are standard-bearers for right commentary and Steve is toxic to bring up in conversation. It's the paralysis of the right white, or white right.

    Great site, Ron. Ingenious, too.

    , @anon
    Thank you for that.
    , @A man in full
    Ridiculous. Steve is an antisemite but not a holocaust denier. No country in Europe imprisons antisemites.
    , @Anonym
    Thank you Mr Unz for hosting this site. I hope within a decade or so it is no longer necessary (e.g. that Steve could be employed by a MSM outlet). Or that this becomes the new mainstream.
    , @Cagey Beast
    That's a smart joke; I'll remember it and use it.

    Thanks for giving us this venue swap ideas and to try to make sense of this crazy world of ours.
    , @Anonymous
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KZ_7br_3y54
    , @Anonymous
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KZ_7br_3y54
    , @reiner Tor
    It is very important what you are doing. Keep it going! The whole site is great.
    , @Hunsdon
    I'll join the other people here who are saying, "Thank you, sir."
    , @Jim
    As a practical matter in any society with a large Moslem population anything like the Hebdo cartoons is out. That in itself is not so bad. Hebdo's cartoons were puerile, gatuitously offensive and of no intellectual value. However increasingly in the West even the most dispassionate discussion of Islam will become dangerous.

    It's amusing of course that the politicians marching Paris in supposed support of free speech will immediately take steps to criminalize any expresson of thought or feeling that might be offensive to Moslems.

    , @RW
    From a legal perspective I'm not sure you're right Ron, after all this website is in English. But if one of your contributors who speaks French were to write something on this webzine in French and directed towards the French people and then travel to France and bring attention to that article in some public way then he might be arrested. It would certainly bring a lot of publicity. And no publicity is bad publicity...
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  6. @Sparkling Wiggle
    Bless us, oh saint Trayvon, and this, the purple drank we are about to receive...

    Lolloololol!!!!

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  7. I really think a growing number of Americans, or at least the influential ones, prefer the French Revolution to the American Revolution. And that is a shock to me.

    Read More
    • Replies: @advancedatheist
    At least the American Revolutionaries to their credit respected King George III's life, even if they rejected his authority. Of course, it helped the British monarch's personal security to have an ocean between him and the angry mobs.

    It kind of obscures the issue to consider the American Revolution the "good" one and the French Revolution the "bad" one, because they really belong on the same continuum. The Enlightenment worked as a common intellectual movement on both sides of the Atlantic, and the revolutionary colonials read the books coming out of the French philosophes' clandestine publishing operations. For example, Thomas Jefferson's library reportedly had more than one edition of the Baron d'Holbach's atheist treatise, Système de la Nature, a book which created enormous controversy in Europe and which the French authorities tried to suppress. Yet Jefferson over in Virginia knew about it, and he went out of his way to buy and presumably read it. His willingness to consider materialist philosophical arguments shows that he thought more like those "bad" French infidels than we want to admit. And this common turn of thinking in Atlantic white nations, which gave us the American Revolution first, just had to incubate a a few more years to make the more radical French Revolution imaginable.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  8. @Ron Unz
    This whole ridiculous situation reminds me of the old joke about someone boasting of the total freedom of political speech in Stalinist Russia: "If I were in Berlin and I shouted 'Death to Hitler' on the street, the Gestapo would surely drag me away. But here in Moscow, I can shout 'Death to Hitler' in perfect safety. Indeed, I can even shout 'Death to Trotsky.'"

    Although France's ruling elites seem utterly committed to freedom of speech, my strong impression is that if our webzine were based there, Steve and half our writers would have long since gone to prison, along with maybe 70% of our commenters. It's also pretty obvious why no MSM journalists have pointed this out---they're terrified of losing their jobs and being blacklisted!

    And this is exactly the sort of reason I launched this small webzine a year ago.

    Thanks.

    Read More
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  9. Steve, any thoughts on the Dershowitz sex scandal? Apparently Dersh and Bubba were tag-teaming girls down in the Virgin Islands.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Chuck Johnson (who was right and early on UVA and the Sony hack) says Dersh wasn't involved.
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  10. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Well we all are walking down the street watching for black cats and throwing salt over our shoulder. Magic must work because we seem to still be here. My only problem is that I don’t know all the secret incantations, spells, and phrases. “white privilege”, “running dog capitalist pig”, “microinvalidation”, it’s all so hard to memorize and keep straight.

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  11. @Wilkey

    It must seem to Muslims very hypocritical…

    Perhaps some muslims in France/Europe are sensitive enough to perceive this, but I doubt many are intelligent enough to formulate it as you have done.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AJ
    Not true - Muslims, both individually and in organisations in Europe make these comparisons frequently in Europe. I'll try to write more later.
    , @gzu
    I am one and I pointed that out immediately. Lol.
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  12. Wow, House Republicans are putting forth a real, stronger-than-expected bill to stop Obama’s executive amnesties. Both of them. Plus a few other items on the restrictionist wishlist.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/10/us/house-gop-proposes-sweeping-reversal-of-obama-immigration-steps.html

    We should always look for the cynical angle where this is really just rube bait, but it isn’t clear where. Perhaps by not tying DHS funding with a liberal funding bill (like HUD), they are setting themselves up to surrender later rather than have DHS not get funded at all.

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  13. I do not know if the “average Muslim” reacts as strongly as the “average Christian” when the revered person is mocked. I do know I am physically afraid of so-called Christian fundamentalists who are still angry that Jesus died. I know they become angry at me if I suggest that Jesus may have been a Buddhist or that the virgin birth myth was borrowed from Hercules. I know they become furious when I suggest the Jesus had no eschatological beliefs, was concerned with the Kingdom of Heaven as a state of mind here in this life, and that to believe on him really means to believe him when taught spirituality as an enlightened path.

    I wonder if the average Muslim has more reverence for the teachings of Mohamed and living them, rather than being overly concerned with believing on him.

    I wonder if the dedication to heritage and some fantastic stories that delineates some Jews, and the dedication to some fantastic stories and the promise of eternal redemption that delineates some Christians are not viewed by their adherents as being inferior to the dedication to a massive set of teachings that delineates most Muslims.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bobbala
    Isaiah 7:14 Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel.
    , @dumpstersquirrel
    Your Christophobia is duly noted.
    , @David
    Please tell us about the first time a fundamentalist Christian threatened you. I wouldn't ask you to go into every incident, the list must be so long!

    Your ideas are so radical. You must be deep.
    , @Jim
    What examples are there of actual religious violence committed by Christain fundamentalists in the US who as a group are among the strongest supporters of the state of Israel?
    , @marylou
    Good thing you know all about being a Christian, while the Christian does not.
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  14. From this weekend’s Radio Derb:

    Taboos are part of any society, and you can always find intense believers willing to defend the taboos with violence.

    In present-day America there are taboos against open discussion of race. In May of 2012 a group of white Americans calling themselves “the 5th Annual White Nationalist Economic Summit” met for lunch at a restaurant in Tinley Park, Illinois, having arranged the event over the internet. A group of twenty or so self-styled “anti-racists,” also all white, and armed with hammers, nunchucks, and baseball bats, stormed into the restaurant and attacked diners and staff. Two diners and a restaurant manager ended up in hospital. Five of the anti-racists were arrested, tried, convicted, and sent to jail for the attack. They were unrepentant. They had defended the taboos!

    Everywhere you have taboos, and people willing to defend them with violence. It’s not an especially Muslim thing; although again, adding one more group to your society with a whole new set of taboos is stupid.

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    • Replies: @Dai Alanye
    I keep looking for a comparison between Muslim terrorism and Jerry Falwell vs Hustler but can't find one. Derb seems to have overlooked that particular example of WASPish intolerance for free speech, possibly because Falwell failed to break out the nunchucks and AK47s.

    [This snark brought to you by the Dept of Fallacious Comparisons.]
    , @dearieme
    "adding one more group to your society with a whole new set of taboos is stupid." Spot on.
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  15. @Ron Unz
    This whole ridiculous situation reminds me of the old joke about someone boasting of the total freedom of political speech in Stalinist Russia: "If I were in Berlin and I shouted 'Death to Hitler' on the street, the Gestapo would surely drag me away. But here in Moscow, I can shout 'Death to Hitler' in perfect safety. Indeed, I can even shout 'Death to Trotsky.'"

    Although France's ruling elites seem utterly committed to freedom of speech, my strong impression is that if our webzine were based there, Steve and half our writers would have long since gone to prison, along with maybe 70% of our commenters. It's also pretty obvious why no MSM journalists have pointed this out---they're terrified of losing their jobs and being blacklisted!

    And this is exactly the sort of reason I launched this small webzine a year ago.

    Mr. Unz,

    My hat is off to you.

    pw

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    What a brown noser.
    , @silviosilver
    Yes, definitely. Unz doesn't get nearly enough credit for bringing together this ensemble of dissidents. I'm proud to say I stood up for him when he was weathering the storm of criticism at the old blogs.
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  16. advancedatheist [AKA "RedneckCryonicist"] says:
    @iSteveFan
    I really think a growing number of Americans, or at least the influential ones, prefer the French Revolution to the American Revolution. And that is a shock to me.

    At least the American Revolutionaries to their credit respected King George III’s life, even if they rejected his authority. Of course, it helped the British monarch’s personal security to have an ocean between him and the angry mobs.

    It kind of obscures the issue to consider the American Revolution the “good” one and the French Revolution the “bad” one, because they really belong on the same continuum. The Enlightenment worked as a common intellectual movement on both sides of the Atlantic, and the revolutionary colonials read the books coming out of the French philosophes‘ clandestine publishing operations. For example, Thomas Jefferson’s library reportedly had more than one edition of the Baron d’Holbach’s atheist treatise, Système de la Nature, a book which created enormous controversy in Europe and which the French authorities tried to suppress. Yet Jefferson over in Virginia knew about it, and he went out of his way to buy and presumably read it. His willingness to consider materialist philosophical arguments shows that he thought more like those “bad” French infidels than we want to admit. And this common turn of thinking in Atlantic white nations, which gave us the American Revolution first, just had to incubate a a few more years to make the more radical French Revolution imaginable.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Didn't Ben Franklin want to marry D'Holbach's rich widow? Or was that somebody else's widow?
    , @Big Bill

    Yet Jefferson over in Virginia knew about it, and he went out of his way to buy and presumably read it. His willingness to consider materialist philosophical arguments shows that he thought more like those “bad” French infidels than we want to admit.
     
    Holy smokes! If owning a book equals "thinking like" the author I am damn glad you can't see my library. I must "think like" Karl Marx, Adolf Hitler, Marcus Aurelius, Rosa Luxemburg, Hermann Goering, Augustine, Eusebius and R. Crumb ... all at the same time! Its a wonder my head doesn't explode!

    For an educated man, acquiring and reading books on philosophy, religion, history and politics is not "going out of one's way" -- it IS the Way.
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  17. Interestingly enough, the executive editor of Charlie Hebdo was recently involved in inflicting legal penalties on a blasphemer:

    Read More
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  18. Read More
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  19. France ought to think about a 3-strikes law

    From the article below, here’s my timeline

    Born in 1982, one of 10 children from a Senegalese woman.

    1995-2007 – Multiple arrests for robbery and drug offenses.

    Unknown date – diagnosed as a psychopath

    2009 – Released from prison, given a make-work government job, meets President Sarkozy

    2010 – his apartment is found to contain 240 rounds of ammo

    2011-2014 regularly associates with jailed, free, and house-arrested terrorists, posts pictures of his hijabed girlfriend aiming weapons at the camara to social media

    2015 – Goes into a kosher supermarket and kills four people with a machine gun, wires the place with explosives but fails to do so properly, shot by swat team

    He was born in 1982 in the Paris suburb of Juvisy-sur-Orge, Le Monde reports. He grew up in Grigny south of Paris, the only boy in a family of 10 children. Since his late teens, he has been convicted several times for robbery and at least one time for drug trafficking, according to Liberation, a French newspaper.

    According to Liberation, in a report prepared at one point for a Paris court, a psychiatric expert found Coulibaly had an “immature and psychopathic personality” and “poor powers of introspection.” His sense of morality was apparently “lacking,” and he had a wish to be “all powerful,” Liberation says the expert wrote.

    In a 2009 interview for French newspaper Le Parisien, shortly after being released from jail, Coulibaly spoke of being excited to meet former French President Nicolas Sarkozy. The president wanted to meet young people working in companies that make efforts to employ youth, Le Parisien reported, according to a reprint of the story published Friday in Le Monde. “I don’t know what I would say. So I would begin with hello,” Coulibaly, then 27, told Le Parisien. Coulibaly, whose contract was ending soon, said he would tell the president about his professional life and his job.

    Just 10 months afterwards, police searched Coulibaly’s apartment and found 240 rounds of ammunition that could be used in Kalashnikov assault weapons, according to the Washington Post.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/09/amedy-coulibaly-paris-kosher-market_n_6444418.html

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    One of Mark Steyn's "known wolves".
    , @Erik L
    The pyschopath diagnosis is interesting. One might speculate on how often religion provides the text for the violent behavior the person wants to do anyway. In a different time these people might have been anarchists.
    , @gzu
    This is the issue with these guys: they aren't merely fundamentalist Muslims. They are also dangerous psychopaths. Islam is another line of seperation between people they care about and people they don't care about.
    , @eisermann
    Looks like the Parish shooting - Bulgarian handler (AP report) followed the same FBI modus operandus in recruiting terror perps:

    FBI Celebrates Duping Another Mentally Ill Man Into Fake Terror Plot
    http://www.thenewamerican.com/usnews/crime/item/14528-fbi-celebrates-duping-another-mentally-ill-man-into-fake-terror-plot

    dramatized by Diane Keaton as a terrorist plant in Little Drummer Girl, J LeCarre. w/ Klaus Kinski as mos sad.
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  20. @Prof. Woland
    Mr. Unz,

    My hat is off to you.

    pw

    What a brown noser.

    Read More
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  21. @advancedatheist
    At least the American Revolutionaries to their credit respected King George III's life, even if they rejected his authority. Of course, it helped the British monarch's personal security to have an ocean between him and the angry mobs.

    It kind of obscures the issue to consider the American Revolution the "good" one and the French Revolution the "bad" one, because they really belong on the same continuum. The Enlightenment worked as a common intellectual movement on both sides of the Atlantic, and the revolutionary colonials read the books coming out of the French philosophes' clandestine publishing operations. For example, Thomas Jefferson's library reportedly had more than one edition of the Baron d'Holbach's atheist treatise, Système de la Nature, a book which created enormous controversy in Europe and which the French authorities tried to suppress. Yet Jefferson over in Virginia knew about it, and he went out of his way to buy and presumably read it. His willingness to consider materialist philosophical arguments shows that he thought more like those "bad" French infidels than we want to admit. And this common turn of thinking in Atlantic white nations, which gave us the American Revolution first, just had to incubate a a few more years to make the more radical French Revolution imaginable.

    Didn’t Ben Franklin want to marry D’Holbach’s rich widow? Or was that somebody else’s widow?

    Read More
    • Replies: @advancedatheist
    I hadn't heard the story about Franklin and d'Holbach's widow.

    I've wondered why the philosophes with money, like d'Holbach, Voltaire and Helvétius, didn't leave instructions for using their wealth to carry on the work of the Enlightenment after they died. Instead they just left the fate of the Enlightenment to the haphazard.

    These kinds of provisions might have proved difficult in the French monarchy, but those horrible aristocratic countries we hear so much demotic propaganda about these days didn't have the ability to control the movement of capital across borders. Seems like these guys blew an interesting opportunity.

    Meanwhile, in America, I know of only two plausible cases of such legacies to promote the Enlightenment to future generations, namely, Thomas Jefferson's founding of the University of Virginia, and the banker Stephen Girard's bequest of his fortune to fund a secular school for poor white orphans boys, which became Girard College. Girard's trust still exists, BTW, and it has a respectable balance sheet:

    http://citytrusts.com/Financial%20Reports/Girard%202013%20Financial%20Statements.pdf

    , @Crawfurdmuir
    Franklin carried on an affair with Mme. Helvétius, the widow of Claude-Adrien Helvétius. He had been one of the fermiers-général (the source of his fortune) and was an atheistic philosophe.
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  22. @Ron Unz
    This whole ridiculous situation reminds me of the old joke about someone boasting of the total freedom of political speech in Stalinist Russia: "If I were in Berlin and I shouted 'Death to Hitler' on the street, the Gestapo would surely drag me away. But here in Moscow, I can shout 'Death to Hitler' in perfect safety. Indeed, I can even shout 'Death to Trotsky.'"

    Although France's ruling elites seem utterly committed to freedom of speech, my strong impression is that if our webzine were based there, Steve and half our writers would have long since gone to prison, along with maybe 70% of our commenters. It's also pretty obvious why no MSM journalists have pointed this out---they're terrified of losing their jobs and being blacklisted!

    And this is exactly the sort of reason I launched this small webzine a year ago.

    Different countries can have different Overton windows and different laws. That’s why I don’t get why our State department is giving the Saudis crap about flogging a Saudi blogger. Objecting to them financing the spread of Wahabiism in the US would make more sense.

    Read More
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  23. @Anonymous
    Steve, any thoughts on the Dershowitz sex scandal? Apparently Dersh and Bubba were tag-teaming girls down in the Virgin Islands.

    Chuck Johnson (who was right and early on UVA and the Sony hack) says Dersh wasn’t involved.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Whiskey
    Dersh is counter suing and seeking disbarment of the attorneys who filed the suit, saying his travel records show he was elsewhere two of the dates in question.

    Seems an Obama playbook ala Ryan to dump Hillary! for Sharpton or whoever Obama wants to suceed him.
    , @Big Bill
    And how does Chuck know? Dersh told him? Frankly, I fail to see any logical connection between UVA and Epstein's island paradise.
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  24. @Lot
    France ought to think about a 3-strikes law

    From the article below, here's my timeline

    Born in 1982, one of 10 children from a Senegalese woman.

    1995-2007 - Multiple arrests for robbery and drug offenses.

    Unknown date - diagnosed as a psychopath

    2009 - Released from prison, given a make-work government job, meets President Sarkozy

    2010 - his apartment is found to contain 240 rounds of ammo

    2011-2014 regularly associates with jailed, free, and house-arrested terrorists, posts pictures of his hijabed girlfriend aiming weapons at the camara to social media

    2015 - Goes into a kosher supermarket and kills four people with a machine gun, wires the place with explosives but fails to do so properly, shot by swat team

    He was born in 1982 in the Paris suburb of Juvisy-sur-Orge, Le Monde reports. He grew up in Grigny south of Paris, the only boy in a family of 10 children. Since his late teens, he has been convicted several times for robbery and at least one time for drug trafficking, according to Liberation, a French newspaper.

    According to Liberation, in a report prepared at one point for a Paris court, a psychiatric expert found Coulibaly had an “immature and psychopathic personality” and “poor powers of introspection.” His sense of morality was apparently “lacking,” and he had a wish to be “all powerful,” Liberation says the expert wrote.

    In a 2009 interview for French newspaper Le Parisien, shortly after being released from jail, Coulibaly spoke of being excited to meet former French President Nicolas Sarkozy. The president wanted to meet young people working in companies that make efforts to employ youth, Le Parisien reported, according to a reprint of the story published Friday in Le Monde. “I don't know what I would say. So I would begin with hello,” Coulibaly, then 27, told Le Parisien. Coulibaly, whose contract was ending soon, said he would tell the president about his professional life and his job.

    Just 10 months afterwards, police searched Coulibaly's apartment and found 240 rounds of ammunition that could be used in Kalashnikov assault weapons, according to the Washington Post.
     
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/09/amedy-coulibaly-paris-kosher-market_n_6444418.html

    One of Mark Steyn’s “known wolves”.

    Read More
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  25. @Ron Unz
    This whole ridiculous situation reminds me of the old joke about someone boasting of the total freedom of political speech in Stalinist Russia: "If I were in Berlin and I shouted 'Death to Hitler' on the street, the Gestapo would surely drag me away. But here in Moscow, I can shout 'Death to Hitler' in perfect safety. Indeed, I can even shout 'Death to Trotsky.'"

    Although France's ruling elites seem utterly committed to freedom of speech, my strong impression is that if our webzine were based there, Steve and half our writers would have long since gone to prison, along with maybe 70% of our commenters. It's also pretty obvious why no MSM journalists have pointed this out---they're terrified of losing their jobs and being blacklisted!

    And this is exactly the sort of reason I launched this small webzine a year ago.

    Most of us subscribe to the idea of human biodiversity and its implication here, but we should not underrate how much culture matters too.

    We’re glad you did. Thank you.

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  26. advancedatheist [AKA "RedneckCryonicist"] says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Didn't Ben Franklin want to marry D'Holbach's rich widow? Or was that somebody else's widow?

    I hadn’t heard the story about Franklin and d’Holbach’s widow.

    I’ve wondered why the philosophes with money, like d’Holbach, Voltaire and Helvétius, didn’t leave instructions for using their wealth to carry on the work of the Enlightenment after they died. Instead they just left the fate of the Enlightenment to the haphazard.

    These kinds of provisions might have proved difficult in the French monarchy, but those horrible aristocratic countries we hear so much demotic propaganda about these days didn’t have the ability to control the movement of capital across borders. Seems like these guys blew an interesting opportunity.

    Meanwhile, in America, I know of only two plausible cases of such legacies to promote the Enlightenment to future generations, namely, Thomas Jefferson’s founding of the University of Virginia, and the banker Stephen Girard’s bequest of his fortune to fund a secular school for poor white orphans boys, which became Girard College. Girard’s trust still exists, BTW, and it has a respectable balance sheet:

    http://citytrusts.com/Financial%20Reports/Girard%202013%20Financial%20Statements.pdf

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Franklin set aside a modest amount of money for 200 years to demonstrate the power of compound interest. The fund was finally distributed to beneficiaries not too many years ago.
    , @p s c
    Stephen Girard's will was broken in the late 1960's and black boys (and eventually girls) were admitted to his school. Recently, the school requested that they no longer board students as the trust fund is almost depleted.

    This is amazing. Girard College's endowment was enormous up until the late 60's. Somehow, the new guardians of the trust have blown hundreds of millions of dollars over a very short time period.

    A book should be written.
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  27. @Ron Unz
    This whole ridiculous situation reminds me of the old joke about someone boasting of the total freedom of political speech in Stalinist Russia: "If I were in Berlin and I shouted 'Death to Hitler' on the street, the Gestapo would surely drag me away. But here in Moscow, I can shout 'Death to Hitler' in perfect safety. Indeed, I can even shout 'Death to Trotsky.'"

    Although France's ruling elites seem utterly committed to freedom of speech, my strong impression is that if our webzine were based there, Steve and half our writers would have long since gone to prison, along with maybe 70% of our commenters. It's also pretty obvious why no MSM journalists have pointed this out---they're terrified of losing their jobs and being blacklisted!

    And this is exactly the sort of reason I launched this small webzine a year ago.

    Ron (or Steve),
    Is it possible for you to be harassed or prosecuted if you travel to Europe or Canada, or is that too far-fetched? Are you wary of retroactive hate speech prosecution if (when?) the first amendment finally gets gutted by a future supreme court?

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  28. @advancedatheist
    I hadn't heard the story about Franklin and d'Holbach's widow.

    I've wondered why the philosophes with money, like d'Holbach, Voltaire and Helvétius, didn't leave instructions for using their wealth to carry on the work of the Enlightenment after they died. Instead they just left the fate of the Enlightenment to the haphazard.

    These kinds of provisions might have proved difficult in the French monarchy, but those horrible aristocratic countries we hear so much demotic propaganda about these days didn't have the ability to control the movement of capital across borders. Seems like these guys blew an interesting opportunity.

    Meanwhile, in America, I know of only two plausible cases of such legacies to promote the Enlightenment to future generations, namely, Thomas Jefferson's founding of the University of Virginia, and the banker Stephen Girard's bequest of his fortune to fund a secular school for poor white orphans boys, which became Girard College. Girard's trust still exists, BTW, and it has a respectable balance sheet:

    http://citytrusts.com/Financial%20Reports/Girard%202013%20Financial%20Statements.pdf

    Franklin set aside a modest amount of money for 200 years to demonstrate the power of compound interest. The fund was finally distributed to beneficiaries not too many years ago.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The fund was finally distributed to beneficiaries not too many years ago.
     
    Is this what pays for the parts in Mark Skousen's '58 MGA?
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  29. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    ” We keep hearing that Muslims must tolerate blasphemy because free speech. But Europe doesn’t have free speech.”

    Muslims should tolerate blasphemy or get the hell out of Europe and return to their ancestral homeland countries like Algeria, Tunisia, Egypt, Morocco, etc.

    Muslims are guests in Europe and guests do not get to set the rules when they are in someone else’s house.

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    • Replies: @gzu
    Those who have European citizenships are no longer guests.

    Also, it's not that they wish to impose new rules. It is that they wish to see existing rules enforced fairly.
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  30. The Paris jihadis are a rainbow coalition:

    They appear to be three North Africans and one Sub-Saharan.

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  31. @Ron Unz
    This whole ridiculous situation reminds me of the old joke about someone boasting of the total freedom of political speech in Stalinist Russia: "If I were in Berlin and I shouted 'Death to Hitler' on the street, the Gestapo would surely drag me away. But here in Moscow, I can shout 'Death to Hitler' in perfect safety. Indeed, I can even shout 'Death to Trotsky.'"

    Although France's ruling elites seem utterly committed to freedom of speech, my strong impression is that if our webzine were based there, Steve and half our writers would have long since gone to prison, along with maybe 70% of our commenters. It's also pretty obvious why no MSM journalists have pointed this out---they're terrified of losing their jobs and being blacklisted!

    And this is exactly the sort of reason I launched this small webzine a year ago.

    I’m biased to the left because it’s naturally more willing to take a chance with the unknown. But some unknowns are clearly known at this point and need face time with the public.

    And usually conservative commentary is asinine. But Steve represents intelligent conservative commentary that’s hard to find. Incredible that Bill O’Reilly, Glen Beck are standard-bearers for right commentary and Steve is toxic to bring up in conversation. It’s the paralysis of the right white, or white right.

    Great site, Ron. Ingenious, too.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ace
    Yes, the left is more willing to take a chance on the unknown.

    With other peoples' lives, liberty, and property as going-in-proposition numero uno.

    I assume that the leftist-favored known unknowns will inevitably be accepted by the unwashed if enough face time is allotted. Like the three (?) days Obama talked about within which the unwashed could examine bills he would be signing.

    O’Reilly is hardly a conservative standard bearer. He's worth listening to and produces a quality show. A bit on the generic side, but that's just me.

    Beck has done yeoman's work in exposing the agenda of progressives, whom you no doubt admire. In Beck's case in particular, it's not incredible at all that he's achieved considerable prominence. He consistently produces quality, substantive commentary and, unless you're Bill Whittle in disguise, I dare say you produce nothing remotely comparable. Not to mention that he has amassed a personal fortune, beaten alcoholism, created a media empire out of nothing, and is a thoroughly decent human being. Ho hum.

    But you're amazed at their success.

    Conservatism has a bit more to it than is dreamt of in your philosophy. It's a free for all, more accurately, with flashes of brilliance and insight at all points of the compass. E.g., Coulter, Malkin, Gabriele, Reed, Buchanan, Theodoracopulos, Dalrymple, Auster, Steyn, Seiyo, Bodissey, Derbyshire, Synon, West, Greenfield, Elder, Fjordman, Sailer, Kersey, Brimelow, Williams, Limbaugh, Savage, Levin, Simon, Hanson, Williamson, Trifkovik, Simpson, Delingpole, Horowitz, Brandt, Sayet, Mercer, Cashill, Nyqust, Whittle, Byrne, Gorin, Wilders, Amselem, Stix, Spengler, Hoppe, Simon, Porretto, Remus, O'Rourke, Neal, Deace, Breitbart, Taylor, Fleming, Polin, Wilson, Tyrrell, Francis, Sobran, Stein, Babbin, Handlery, de Jong, Condell, and my shoe repair guy.

    But you think that O'Reilly and Beck are the standard bearers of conservatism. And that conservative commentary is asinine.
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  32. @Ron Unz
    This whole ridiculous situation reminds me of the old joke about someone boasting of the total freedom of political speech in Stalinist Russia: "If I were in Berlin and I shouted 'Death to Hitler' on the street, the Gestapo would surely drag me away. But here in Moscow, I can shout 'Death to Hitler' in perfect safety. Indeed, I can even shout 'Death to Trotsky.'"

    Although France's ruling elites seem utterly committed to freedom of speech, my strong impression is that if our webzine were based there, Steve and half our writers would have long since gone to prison, along with maybe 70% of our commenters. It's also pretty obvious why no MSM journalists have pointed this out---they're terrified of losing their jobs and being blacklisted!

    And this is exactly the sort of reason I launched this small webzine a year ago.

    Thank you for that.

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  33. Recall that USG is bringing France up to US standards of diversity and acceptable speech, according to Wikileaks Cablegate: http://curmudgeonjoy.blogspot.com/2011/01/other-one.html?m=1

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  34. It makes one vomit hearing all pathetic “defendants” of free speech in Europe when
    more than a few of its citizens are rotting in prison for “hate” speech
    As for pathetic “Je suis Charlie” I believe that Le Pen father came with ” Je suis Charles Martel”

    And more importantly in this affair it is absolutely disgusting how these defenders of free speech have forgotten what just happened a few years ago (2009)
    Link below explains how they fired its best cartoonist Sine for alleged “antisemitism”

    http://www.worldbulletin.net/world/152585/charlie-hebdo-fired-cartoonist-for-anti-semitism-in-2009

    A bit more information for those who read French

    http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affaire_Sin%C3%A9

    Écrasez l’infâme

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  35. @Dave Pinsen
    Chuck Johnson (who was right and early on UVA and the Sony hack) says Dersh wasn't involved.

    Dersh is counter suing and seeking disbarment of the attorneys who filed the suit, saying his travel records show he was elsewhere two of the dates in question.

    Seems an Obama playbook ala Ryan to dump Hillary! for Sharpton or whoever Obama wants to suceed him.

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    • Replies: @Big Bill

    Seems an Obama playbook ala Ryan to dump Hillary! for Sharpton or whoever Obama wants to suceed him.
     
    Please. Enough with the misdirection, Whiskey. Obama no more has a "playbook" for his "succession" (or anything else) than I do. They tell him what to do and he does it. He was picked and groomed by others for Imperial reasons. And they will pick his replacements (both R and D) as well.
    , @fish

    Seems an Obama playbook ala Ryan to dump Hillary! for Sharpton or whoever Obama wants to suceed him.
     
    If somebody can arrange for Sharpton somewhere on either ticket (I'm sure "Snitchy Al" would make a fine republican!) I promise to never ask for another Christmas present ever!

    Pinkie swear!
    , @Rifleman

    Seems an Obama playbook ala Ryan to dump Hillary! for Sharpton or whoever Obama wants to suceed him.
     
    Sure that makes sense if you think Obama is a Republican party activist/strategist.

    Whiskey get some psychiatric treatment.
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  36. Anon @17:

    My problems with Charlie Hebdo come from the fact that many of their cartoons are simply 1st grade “shock ‘em” with no redeeming social value. Should they be legal? Yes. Celebrated? No way.

    Hebdo petitioned the government to ban the Front National Party.

    My opinion of Charlie Hebdo can be summarized in the cartoon at this post.

    If posting cartoons that offend is the way to celebrate free speech, then I feel I have celebrated in the face of both sides.

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    • Replies: @rod1963
    That cartoon you linked sums up my view of Charlie Hebdo as well.

    Here's the thing, Charlie was run by a bunch of venom spewing leftists/communists that hated anyone to the right of Marx and had no qualms about trying shut down their freedom of speech ans assembly.

    They were to the end hypocrites.

    Laws for thee but not for me,

    And it's rather fitting that they saw their demise at the hands of the very group they supported - Muslims.

    And here's a bit from a Charlie Hebdo cartoonist who survived the attack(he wasn't there).

    http://www.themalaymailonline.com/world/article/we-vomit-on-charlie-hebdos-sudden-friends-staff-cartoonist-says

    He demonstrates what sort of pathetic miscreants the magazine attracted.
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  37. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Former BNP leader Nick Griffin, was arrested many many times by the UK police simply for making purely political speeches – to invited like minded audiences -, which in essence only questioned the ‘wisdom’ of multi racialism, and nothing else. He was never deliberately insulting, blasphemous or insulting to any religious personage.
    In fact, back in 2005, Griffin was prosecuted by the British state merely, in a private speech, for mentioning Pakistani rape gangs before the issue gained notice. Mercifully, the jury, following great English traditions, acquitted him.
    Whatever you might think of Griffin and his politics, whenever I see David Cameron get up on his hind legs and pompously declare that ‘free speech’ is a ‘non negotiable fundamental western value’, I feel a wave of revulsion and contempt towards him.

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    • Replies: @dearieme
    "whenever I see David Cameron get up on his hind legs and pompously declare that ‘free speech’ is a ‘non negotiable fundamental western value’, I feel a wave of revulsion and contempt towards him." Me too; it sets up interesting interference fringes with all my other waves of revulsion and contempt towards him. Sometimes I think that I discern in the pattern a representation of the Virgin Mary, and sometimes of the P ...; hang on on, no, no, I meant of a potato. Phew!
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  38. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Well said, our beloved sponsor Ron Unz!

    Axiomatically, the only ‘free speech’ that needs to be protected is the subversive and the controversial – that which really annoys certain sections of society, who for whatever reason, seek to suppress it.

    Of course, the ordinary, the banal, the commonplace, the milquetoast, the namby-pamby, the benign, the unchallenging, the non-thought provoking – the vapid stupor producing, in fact, by definition needs absolutely no protection, because it’s as unnoticed as the dust in the atmosphere around us’ and, intellectually, is worth about as much.

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  39. @John Derbyshire
    From this weekend's Radio Derb:

    Taboos are part of any society, and you can always find intense believers willing to defend the taboos with violence.

    In present-day America there are taboos against open discussion of race. In May of 2012 a group of white Americans calling themselves "the 5th Annual White Nationalist Economic Summit" met for lunch at a restaurant in Tinley Park, Illinois, having arranged the event over the internet. A group of twenty or so self-styled "anti-racists," also all white, and armed with hammers, nunchucks, and baseball bats, stormed into the restaurant and attacked diners and staff. Two diners and a restaurant manager ended up in hospital. Five of the anti-racists were arrested, tried, convicted, and sent to jail for the attack. They were unrepentant. They had defended the taboos!

    Everywhere you have taboos, and people willing to defend them with violence. It's not an especially Muslim thing; although again, adding one more group to your society with a whole new set of taboos is stupid.
     

    I keep looking for a comparison between Muslim terrorism and Jerry Falwell vs Hustler but can’t find one. Derb seems to have overlooked that particular example of WASPish intolerance for free speech, possibly because Falwell failed to break out the nunchucks and AK47s.

    [This snark brought to you by the Dept of Fallacious Comparisons.]

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    • Replies: @ben tillman

    I keep looking for a comparison between Muslim terrorism and Jerry Falwell vs Hustler but can’t find one.
     
    But the Falwell v. Flynt case illustrates why this was not an act of terrorism. If Falwell had killed Flynt instead of suing him, it wouldn't have been terrorism; it would be been revenge, retaliation, settling a score. The same applies to the massacre at the offices of Charlie Hebdo.
    , @Ace
    Plus, Falwell wasn't an agent of the state, only seeking to vindicate his private interests. He had a colorable case as a jury could have determined that Flynt acted with actual malice. Hardly anything "Anglo-Saxon" or resembling "intolerance."
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  40. @Ron Unz
    This whole ridiculous situation reminds me of the old joke about someone boasting of the total freedom of political speech in Stalinist Russia: "If I were in Berlin and I shouted 'Death to Hitler' on the street, the Gestapo would surely drag me away. But here in Moscow, I can shout 'Death to Hitler' in perfect safety. Indeed, I can even shout 'Death to Trotsky.'"

    Although France's ruling elites seem utterly committed to freedom of speech, my strong impression is that if our webzine were based there, Steve and half our writers would have long since gone to prison, along with maybe 70% of our commenters. It's also pretty obvious why no MSM journalists have pointed this out---they're terrified of losing their jobs and being blacklisted!

    And this is exactly the sort of reason I launched this small webzine a year ago.

    Ridiculous. Steve is an antisemite but not a holocaust denier. No country in Europe imprisons antisemites.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "Steve is an antisemite"

    No, I'm not.

    , @syonredux

    Ridiculous. Steve is an antisemite but not a holocaust denier. No country in Europe imprisons antisemites.
     
    Steve is not an anti-Semite, dear fellow. He simply believes (correctly) that Jews are a very important group of people, and that their beliefs (and unconscious biases) should be discussed freely and openly.
    , @ben tillman

    Ridiculous. Steve is an antisemite but not a holocaust denier. No country in Europe imprisons antisemites.
     
    Not true.

    The UK does. See Simon Sheppard, Stephen Whittle, and Garron Helm.
    , @annamaria
    There is country that was able to silence an honorable and had-working woman of an advanced age, just because a scoundrel that overheard a private conversation found this conversation anti-semitic.
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  41. @Ron Unz
    This whole ridiculous situation reminds me of the old joke about someone boasting of the total freedom of political speech in Stalinist Russia: "If I were in Berlin and I shouted 'Death to Hitler' on the street, the Gestapo would surely drag me away. But here in Moscow, I can shout 'Death to Hitler' in perfect safety. Indeed, I can even shout 'Death to Trotsky.'"

    Although France's ruling elites seem utterly committed to freedom of speech, my strong impression is that if our webzine were based there, Steve and half our writers would have long since gone to prison, along with maybe 70% of our commenters. It's also pretty obvious why no MSM journalists have pointed this out---they're terrified of losing their jobs and being blacklisted!

    And this is exactly the sort of reason I launched this small webzine a year ago.

    Thank you Mr Unz for hosting this site. I hope within a decade or so it is no longer necessary (e.g. that Steve could be employed by a MSM outlet). Or that this becomes the new mainstream.

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  42. @Prof. Woland
    Mr. Unz,

    My hat is off to you.

    pw

    Yes, definitely. Unz doesn’t get nearly enough credit for bringing together this ensemble of dissidents. I’m proud to say I stood up for him when he was weathering the storm of criticism at the old blogs.

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    • Replies: @Prof. Woland
    He hired Steve Sailer and put his money where his mouth is.
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  43. @John Derbyshire
    From this weekend's Radio Derb:

    Taboos are part of any society, and you can always find intense believers willing to defend the taboos with violence.

    In present-day America there are taboos against open discussion of race. In May of 2012 a group of white Americans calling themselves "the 5th Annual White Nationalist Economic Summit" met for lunch at a restaurant in Tinley Park, Illinois, having arranged the event over the internet. A group of twenty or so self-styled "anti-racists," also all white, and armed with hammers, nunchucks, and baseball bats, stormed into the restaurant and attacked diners and staff. Two diners and a restaurant manager ended up in hospital. Five of the anti-racists were arrested, tried, convicted, and sent to jail for the attack. They were unrepentant. They had defended the taboos!

    Everywhere you have taboos, and people willing to defend them with violence. It's not an especially Muslim thing; although again, adding one more group to your society with a whole new set of taboos is stupid.
     

    “adding one more group to your society with a whole new set of taboos is stupid.” Spot on.

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    • Replies: @WowJustWow
    Of course the problem is not just that there are more taboos, but that there are incompatible sets of taboos. With one set of taboos, unless you're a stubborn curmudgeon or autistic, as part of your basic social development you can learn to get by without breaking them. With two sets, you can't avoid breaking one or the other without taking a vow of silence.
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  44. @Anonymous
    Former BNP leader Nick Griffin, was arrested many many times by the UK police simply for making purely political speeches - to invited like minded audiences -, which in essence only questioned the 'wisdom' of multi racialism, and nothing else. He was never deliberately insulting, blasphemous or insulting to any religious personage.
    In fact, back in 2005, Griffin was prosecuted by the British state merely, in a private speech, for mentioning Pakistani rape gangs before the issue gained notice. Mercifully, the jury, following great English traditions, acquitted him.
    Whatever you might think of Griffin and his politics, whenever I see David Cameron get up on his hind legs and pompously declare that 'free speech' is a 'non negotiable fundamental western value', I feel a wave of revulsion and contempt towards him.

    “whenever I see David Cameron get up on his hind legs and pompously declare that ‘free speech’ is a ‘non negotiable fundamental western value’, I feel a wave of revulsion and contempt towards him.” Me too; it sets up interesting interference fringes with all my other waves of revulsion and contempt towards him. Sometimes I think that I discern in the pattern a representation of the Virgin Mary, and sometimes of the P …; hang on on, no, no, I meant of a potato. Phew!

    Read More
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  45. france is like a communist country, the press is not free at all and there is no freedom

    yes, you can be sent to jail for saying something in france, it happened many times

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2695076/Member-French-National-Front-jailed-compared-countrys-black-justice-minister-monkey-Facebook.html

    but charlie hebdo also justified the use of armed illegal militias to silence the ones who are not 100% on the same line as the communist party
    they said so when the anti-fascist skinhead clement meric was killed by a “fascist” who tried to defend himself (and who spent more than a year in prison without being judged, because the justice is also controled by the left: http://lajeunepolitique.com/2013/05/06/wall-of-jerks-in-french-magistrates-union-raises-concerns-of-political-neutrality/ )
    this skinhead was also honored by the government: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x10n52p_l-hommage-de-l-assemblee-nationale-a-clement-meric_news#from=embediframe

    so in france not only you can be put in jail but also harassed and possibly killed by anti-fascist militia suported by the government if you don’t agree with the communist party
    then the media who are 100% leftists and controlled by the state won’t defend you

    in france the information is controlled by AFP, a single leftist organisation
    it is estimated that AFP are responsible for 80% of the information that is published in the french media
    they are suposed to be neutral but they are leftists, and censor what they want

    to give you an idea of how much freedom of press there is in france, the current ministre francois rebsamen (parti socialiste, so a leftist) says that his father went to switzerland because he was affraid of the nazis
    but the problem is that it is not true, everybody can now go and see the municipal archives in dijon (now that he’s no longer the city’s mayor, and can no longer maintain the archives closed) and see that his father was a collaborationist
    this information circulated on the internet, but the media never said a word about it
    in any democratic country where the press is free, this information would have been revealed, everybody would know that rebsamen lied about his father fleeing france because of the nazis, everybody would know that he lied to protect a collaborationist, a traitor, and that he censored his city’s municipal archives when he was the mayor
    this would have him fired
    but in france the media says nothing and he is still in the government

    i’d also like to point out that the front national, who are relentlessly called names like “nazi”, “collabo” etc by the left, didn’t use this information (how a leftist ministre lied to protect his collaborationist father) to silence the leftists
    they also didn’t use a photo that had manuel valls next to britain’s neo nazi terry cooper:another picture that wasn’t shown in the media
    so we can conclude that the front national are not a real political party but just actors who try to act like politics are not totally under control from the leftists

    internet is the only place that they don’t control entirely
    sure you can go to jail for what you say on the internet, but they still don’t control it
    the politicians in france openly ask for a way to censor internet

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  46. so charlie hebdo made a petition to ban the front national, to silence them, and justified the systematic aggression by an armed milicia of anybody who doesn’t agree with the left

    https://web.archive.org/web/20130702151055/http://www.charliehebdo.fr/news/clement-meric-est-mort-il-est-temps-de-se-reveiller-867.html

    https://web.archive.org/web/20130815101825/http://www.charliehebdo.fr/news/clement-meric-le-tueur-899.html

    “Renvoyer dos à dos le fascisme et l’antifascisme signifie que le remède vaut la
    maladie. En effet, qu’est-ce qui justifie l’existence des antifascistes
    si ce n’est celle des fascistes? Qui est apparu en premier: la poule
    collabo ou l’œuf résistant ? Pour une bonne partie de l’UMP vagissante,
    militer contre le racisme et les discriminations serait équivalent à
    promouvoir le racisme et les discriminations. Quel talent!
    Mettons les skinheads sous protection policière!
    En mettant dans le même sac Méric et Morillo, la droite cherche à
    relativiser la dangerosité des groupuscules fascistes. Si les fascistes
    sont aussi dangereux que les gauchistes, c’est que les fascistes ne
    sont pas si dangereux que ça… Ciotti et sa troupe de clowns ont beau
    essayer de jouer les braves gens terrorisés par le péril gauchiste, on
    n’y croit pas. Ils sont mauvais acteurs, c’est à pleurer. Ah, si
    seulement un gauchiste pouvait tuer (même accidentellement, hein) un
    militant d’extrême droite! Malheureusement pour les Ciotti, ça n’a pas
    été le cas. Et si cela l’avait été? Poser cette question a quelque
    chose de déplacé, puisque, rappelons-le à ceux qui essaient de nous
    le faire oublier, la victime est bien l’antifasciste. Mais bon, et si
    Méric avait tué un skinhead à coups de poing? Ça aurait fait de
    Méric un justiciable comme un autre, mais ça n’aurait pas fait de
    l’antifascisme une idéoogie mortifère. Et si Morillo avait été la
    victime, ça n’aurait pas fait du groupuscule d’extrême droite auquel
    il appartenait une école de tolérance…”

    and they are supported by the government

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  47. @eah
    @Wilkey

    It must seem to Muslims very hypocritical...

    Perhaps some muslims in France/Europe are sensitive enough to perceive this, but I doubt many are intelligent enough to formulate it as you have done.

    Not true – Muslims, both individually and in organisations in Europe make these comparisons frequently in Europe. I’ll try to write more later.

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  48. I guess it’s gone down the memory hole, but remember when Iran, in response to the Mohammed cartoons, had a holocaust cartoon contest? It was roundly condemned in the west as a ‘hate speech, neonazi, holocaust denial conference ( there were even dissident jewish groups there, like the Torah true Jews who think Israel is literally a blaspheme)

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  49. It must seem to Muslims very hypocritical to claim they must accept blasphemy while banning blasphemy against the Left.

    It’s certainly hypocritical to do so in the name of Freedom of Speech, yes. But otherwise, no. Muslims have their ideas about blasphemy, and Leftists have theirs, and both ban them. Without the false pose of Free Speech, the left’s position would not be hypocritical.

    And (American) leftists can twist out of this by saying private enforcement of “decency” is fine, it’s state and legal forms of censorship that are prohibited.

    All of that still leaves them as contemptible little witch-hunters, but that doesn’t really distinguish them from Muslims.

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  50. @Ron Unz
    This whole ridiculous situation reminds me of the old joke about someone boasting of the total freedom of political speech in Stalinist Russia: "If I were in Berlin and I shouted 'Death to Hitler' on the street, the Gestapo would surely drag me away. But here in Moscow, I can shout 'Death to Hitler' in perfect safety. Indeed, I can even shout 'Death to Trotsky.'"

    Although France's ruling elites seem utterly committed to freedom of speech, my strong impression is that if our webzine were based there, Steve and half our writers would have long since gone to prison, along with maybe 70% of our commenters. It's also pretty obvious why no MSM journalists have pointed this out---they're terrified of losing their jobs and being blacklisted!

    And this is exactly the sort of reason I launched this small webzine a year ago.

    That’s a smart joke; I’ll remember it and use it.

    Thanks for giving us this venue swap ideas and to try to make sense of this crazy world of ours.

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  51. el topo [AKA "darryl revok"] says:

    This whole “Muslim terrorists against free speech” meme is almost as stupid as W.’s “They hate us for our freedoms”. The guys who shot up Charlie Hebdo didn’t care about free speech; they were reacting to a specific kind of speech that offended them. When someone mugs you in the street, they’re not making a statement against private property rights – they just want your stuff.
    I just saw Christine Amanpour say this was an act “against satire”, as if these guys were equally outraged by Jonathan Swift and Terry Southern.
    The Western media and politicians seems to be swimming in empty, self-serving abstractions, unable to see the concrete reality in front if them.

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    • Replies: @Ace
    It's the elephant in the living room. Everyone in the family looks nervously left and right. Up at the ceiling. Down at their toes. No one wants to say the "I" word.
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  52. ” It has its own hymns – “Imagine.”
    Richard Dawkins and some new atheists tried to establish a ‘bible camp’ for children of atheists – and they literally would sing this ‘hymn’ in their morning chapel.

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  53. Read More
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  54. @Ron Unz
    This whole ridiculous situation reminds me of the old joke about someone boasting of the total freedom of political speech in Stalinist Russia: "If I were in Berlin and I shouted 'Death to Hitler' on the street, the Gestapo would surely drag me away. But here in Moscow, I can shout 'Death to Hitler' in perfect safety. Indeed, I can even shout 'Death to Trotsky.'"

    Although France's ruling elites seem utterly committed to freedom of speech, my strong impression is that if our webzine were based there, Steve and half our writers would have long since gone to prison, along with maybe 70% of our commenters. It's also pretty obvious why no MSM journalists have pointed this out---they're terrified of losing their jobs and being blacklisted!

    And this is exactly the sort of reason I launched this small webzine a year ago.

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  55. @Ron Unz
    This whole ridiculous situation reminds me of the old joke about someone boasting of the total freedom of political speech in Stalinist Russia: "If I were in Berlin and I shouted 'Death to Hitler' on the street, the Gestapo would surely drag me away. But here in Moscow, I can shout 'Death to Hitler' in perfect safety. Indeed, I can even shout 'Death to Trotsky.'"

    Although France's ruling elites seem utterly committed to freedom of speech, my strong impression is that if our webzine were based there, Steve and half our writers would have long since gone to prison, along with maybe 70% of our commenters. It's also pretty obvious why no MSM journalists have pointed this out---they're terrified of losing their jobs and being blacklisted!

    And this is exactly the sort of reason I launched this small webzine a year ago.

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  56. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Ron (or Steve),
    Is it possible for you to be harassed or prosecuted if you travel to Europe or Canada, or is that too far-fetched? Are you wary of retroactive hate speech prosecution if (when?) the first amendment finally gets gutted by a future supreme court?

    I don’t think they are high-profile enough to get the attention abroad. And if so, they would simply be banned from entering like talk show Michael Savage, who is banned from the U.K.

    Btw, with the advancement of neurosciences and technology, how far are we from hate think laws? A year from now the polygraph will be scrapped for the lie-detecting full-body suit.

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  57. @Dave Pinsen
    Chuck Johnson (who was right and early on UVA and the Sony hack) says Dersh wasn't involved.

    And how does Chuck know? Dersh told him? Frankly, I fail to see any logical connection between UVA and Epstein’s island paradise.

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  58. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    In present-day America there are taboos against open discussion of race. In May of 2012 a group of white Americans calling themselves “the 5th Annual White Nationalist Economic Summit” met for lunch at a restaurant in Tinley Park, Illinois, having arranged the event over the internet. A group of twenty or so self-styled “anti-racists,” also all white, and armed with hammers, nunchucks, and baseball bats, stormed into the restaurant and attacked diners and staff. Two diners and a restaurant manager ended up in hospital. Five of the anti-racists were arrested, tried, convicted, and sent to jail for the attack. They were unrepentant. They had defended the taboos!

    They were sent to prison, not jail. Cook County jail is a country club compared to the level-4 IDOC max prison. Judging from their activities prior to the attack they should have a good time there.

    “The Sutherlin brothers became interested in combating fascism while growing up in diverse family in Bloomington, a predominantly white city that is home to Indiana University, Domke said. Though they are white, their half sister’s father is black.

    The Indiana group has several initiatives in the area, including raising money for hate crime victims and providing security for gay and lesbian events, Domke said. Stuck teaches English to immigrants while Jason Sutherlin and Tucker teach self-defense classes, he said.”

    I hope those self-defense tactics will be effective in fending off daily, multiple brutal attacks and anal rape.

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  59. Big Bill [AKA "Caesar"] says:
    @Whiskey
    Dersh is counter suing and seeking disbarment of the attorneys who filed the suit, saying his travel records show he was elsewhere two of the dates in question.

    Seems an Obama playbook ala Ryan to dump Hillary! for Sharpton or whoever Obama wants to suceed him.

    Seems an Obama playbook ala Ryan to dump Hillary! for Sharpton or whoever Obama wants to suceed him.

    Please. Enough with the misdirection, Whiskey. Obama no more has a “playbook” for his “succession” (or anything else) than I do. They tell him what to do and he does it. He was picked and groomed by others for Imperial reasons. And they will pick his replacements (both R and D) as well.

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  60. Btw, Tinley Park, IL is the lily-white suburb of Chicago where Rev. Jeremiah Wright retired to and built a $1.6 million-dollar home.

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  61. @Ron Unz
    This whole ridiculous situation reminds me of the old joke about someone boasting of the total freedom of political speech in Stalinist Russia: "If I were in Berlin and I shouted 'Death to Hitler' on the street, the Gestapo would surely drag me away. But here in Moscow, I can shout 'Death to Hitler' in perfect safety. Indeed, I can even shout 'Death to Trotsky.'"

    Although France's ruling elites seem utterly committed to freedom of speech, my strong impression is that if our webzine were based there, Steve and half our writers would have long since gone to prison, along with maybe 70% of our commenters. It's also pretty obvious why no MSM journalists have pointed this out---they're terrified of losing their jobs and being blacklisted!

    And this is exactly the sort of reason I launched this small webzine a year ago.

    It is very important what you are doing. Keep it going! The whole site is great.

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  62. I thought the hypocrisy was much more obvious during the Pussy Riot outrage.

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  63. this dumb leftoid magazine, who was already artificially kept alive by government subsidies, will receive an extra $1.2 million dollar

    French government donates $1.2 million to ensure Charlie Hebdo lives on

    http://mashable.com/2015/01/08/france-charlie-hebdo-donations/

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  64. @Lot
    France ought to think about a 3-strikes law

    From the article below, here's my timeline

    Born in 1982, one of 10 children from a Senegalese woman.

    1995-2007 - Multiple arrests for robbery and drug offenses.

    Unknown date - diagnosed as a psychopath

    2009 - Released from prison, given a make-work government job, meets President Sarkozy

    2010 - his apartment is found to contain 240 rounds of ammo

    2011-2014 regularly associates with jailed, free, and house-arrested terrorists, posts pictures of his hijabed girlfriend aiming weapons at the camara to social media

    2015 - Goes into a kosher supermarket and kills four people with a machine gun, wires the place with explosives but fails to do so properly, shot by swat team

    He was born in 1982 in the Paris suburb of Juvisy-sur-Orge, Le Monde reports. He grew up in Grigny south of Paris, the only boy in a family of 10 children. Since his late teens, he has been convicted several times for robbery and at least one time for drug trafficking, according to Liberation, a French newspaper.

    According to Liberation, in a report prepared at one point for a Paris court, a psychiatric expert found Coulibaly had an “immature and psychopathic personality” and “poor powers of introspection.” His sense of morality was apparently “lacking,” and he had a wish to be “all powerful,” Liberation says the expert wrote.

    In a 2009 interview for French newspaper Le Parisien, shortly after being released from jail, Coulibaly spoke of being excited to meet former French President Nicolas Sarkozy. The president wanted to meet young people working in companies that make efforts to employ youth, Le Parisien reported, according to a reprint of the story published Friday in Le Monde. “I don't know what I would say. So I would begin with hello,” Coulibaly, then 27, told Le Parisien. Coulibaly, whose contract was ending soon, said he would tell the president about his professional life and his job.

    Just 10 months afterwards, police searched Coulibaly's apartment and found 240 rounds of ammunition that could be used in Kalashnikov assault weapons, according to the Washington Post.
     
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/09/amedy-coulibaly-paris-kosher-market_n_6444418.html

    The pyschopath diagnosis is interesting. One might speculate on how often religion provides the text for the violent behavior the person wants to do anyway. In a different time these people might have been anarchists.

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    • Replies: @gzu
    Agree 100%.
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  65. @Glaivester
    Anon @17:

    My problems with Charlie Hebdo come from the fact that many of their cartoons are simply 1st grade "shock 'em" with no redeeming social value. Should they be legal? Yes. Celebrated? No way.

    Hebdo petitioned the government to ban the Front National Party.

    My opinion of Charlie Hebdo can be summarized in the cartoon at this post.

    If posting cartoons that offend is the way to celebrate free speech, then I feel I have celebrated in the face of both sides.

    That cartoon you linked sums up my view of Charlie Hebdo as well.

    Here’s the thing, Charlie was run by a bunch of venom spewing leftists/communists that hated anyone to the right of Marx and had no qualms about trying shut down their freedom of speech ans assembly.

    They were to the end hypocrites.

    Laws for thee but not for me,

    And it’s rather fitting that they saw their demise at the hands of the very group they supported – Muslims.

    And here’s a bit from a Charlie Hebdo cartoonist who survived the attack(he wasn’t there).

    http://www.themalaymailonline.com/world/article/we-vomit-on-charlie-hebdos-sudden-friends-staff-cartoonist-says

    He demonstrates what sort of pathetic miscreants the magazine attracted.

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  66. Big Bill [AKA "A Reader"] says:
    @advancedatheist
    At least the American Revolutionaries to their credit respected King George III's life, even if they rejected his authority. Of course, it helped the British monarch's personal security to have an ocean between him and the angry mobs.

    It kind of obscures the issue to consider the American Revolution the "good" one and the French Revolution the "bad" one, because they really belong on the same continuum. The Enlightenment worked as a common intellectual movement on both sides of the Atlantic, and the revolutionary colonials read the books coming out of the French philosophes' clandestine publishing operations. For example, Thomas Jefferson's library reportedly had more than one edition of the Baron d'Holbach's atheist treatise, Système de la Nature, a book which created enormous controversy in Europe and which the French authorities tried to suppress. Yet Jefferson over in Virginia knew about it, and he went out of his way to buy and presumably read it. His willingness to consider materialist philosophical arguments shows that he thought more like those "bad" French infidels than we want to admit. And this common turn of thinking in Atlantic white nations, which gave us the American Revolution first, just had to incubate a a few more years to make the more radical French Revolution imaginable.

    Yet Jefferson over in Virginia knew about it, and he went out of his way to buy and presumably read it. His willingness to consider materialist philosophical arguments shows that he thought more like those “bad” French infidels than we want to admit.

    Holy smokes! If owning a book equals “thinking like” the author I am damn glad you can’t see my library. I must “think like” Karl Marx, Adolf Hitler, Marcus Aurelius, Rosa Luxemburg, Hermann Goering, Augustine, Eusebius and R. Crumb … all at the same time! Its a wonder my head doesn’t explode!

    For an educated man, acquiring and reading books on philosophy, religion, history and politics is not “going out of one’s way” — it IS the Way.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Holy smokes! If owning a book equals “thinking like” the author I am damn glad you can’t see my library.
     
    Jefferson owned a copy of George Case's translation of the Koran. Does this make him a Mohammedan? Or an anti-Mohammedan?-- Case's intro shows he's anything but a fanboy.
    , @Jim
    The philosophes views on religion were actually not that radical in the intellectual climate of the late 18th century. It's likely that Jefferson like many other intellectuals of his time did not take the Christian gospels very seriously as the literal truth. Well before that time people like Descartes and Leibniz while sincere theists regarded the gospels as little more than edifying folk tales.
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  67. @silviosilver
    Yes, definitely. Unz doesn't get nearly enough credit for bringing together this ensemble of dissidents. I'm proud to say I stood up for him when he was weathering the storm of criticism at the old blogs.

    He hired Steve Sailer and put his money where his mouth is.

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  68. “I do know I am physically afraid of so-called Christian fundamentalists who are still angry that Jesus died”

    I find this very hard to believe.

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  69. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUhbTRs5RUU

    Dieudonné – SHOAHNANAS (HolocaustPineapples) with Eng …

    An example of holocaust comedy censored by French authorities, song starts at 4:10 if you want to skip the lecture.

    Just for fun search on inverted+nazi+salute, the officially censored gesture.

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    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    Dieudonné is doing a show tonight in Toulouse at the Zenith auditorium where he performed in February. You can see the size of the crowd in this video:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VaC0-CtZloQ

    The clip is from the end of the show, when Dieudonné leads them in a verse saying "up yours" to President Hollande. It's sung to the tune of the French Resistance anthem, "Le Chant des Partisans".

    Dieudonné's new show is called "La bête immonde", or "the vile beast". It's a reference to an overused phrase by the mainstream political class that sees the FN and Dieudonné as "a return of the vile beast" of 1930s fascist politics.
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  70. @Hal
    I do not know if the "average Muslim" reacts as strongly as the "average Christian" when the revered person is mocked. I do know I am physically afraid of so-called Christian fundamentalists who are still angry that Jesus died. I know they become angry at me if I suggest that Jesus may have been a Buddhist or that the virgin birth myth was borrowed from Hercules. I know they become furious when I suggest the Jesus had no eschatological beliefs, was concerned with the Kingdom of Heaven as a state of mind here in this life, and that to believe on him really means to believe him when taught spirituality as an enlightened path.

    I wonder if the average Muslim has more reverence for the teachings of Mohamed and living them, rather than being overly concerned with believing on him.

    I wonder if the dedication to heritage and some fantastic stories that delineates some Jews, and the dedication to some fantastic stories and the promise of eternal redemption that delineates some Christians are not viewed by their adherents as being inferior to the dedication to a massive set of teachings that delineates most Muslims.

    Isaiah 7:14 Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel.

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    • Replies: @Hal

    Isaiah 7:14 Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel.
     
    By this I am to assume what?

    The cult of Hercales predates 1,000 BC; Isaiah lived hundreds of years later. So I guess you are telling me that the myth of the virgin birth was pasted into Christianity by the prophet Isaiah, who incidentally got the name wrong?
    , @Wyrd
    I can dig it.
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  71. Cwhatfuture [AKA "Steve (not Sailer)"] says:

    “We keep hearing that Muslims must tolerate blasphemy because free speech”

    Where do you hear that? Muslims must “tolerate” blasphemy because of laws against murder, assault, battery, threats. They are perfectly free to socially ostracize you if they don’t like what you say – exactly as the Left does with everyone else. And in fact the Left does the exactly same with those that criticize Islam. So what the Muslims must “tolerate” are perceived insults, with the supreme discipline of not murdering someone. That is not unfair.

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  72. @Whiskey
    Dersh is counter suing and seeking disbarment of the attorneys who filed the suit, saying his travel records show he was elsewhere two of the dates in question.

    Seems an Obama playbook ala Ryan to dump Hillary! for Sharpton or whoever Obama wants to suceed him.

    Seems an Obama playbook ala Ryan to dump Hillary! for Sharpton or whoever Obama wants to suceed him.

    If somebody can arrange for Sharpton somewhere on either ticket (I’m sure “Snitchy Al” would make a fine republican!) I promise to never ask for another Christmas present ever!

    Pinkie swear!

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  73. @Ron Unz
    This whole ridiculous situation reminds me of the old joke about someone boasting of the total freedom of political speech in Stalinist Russia: "If I were in Berlin and I shouted 'Death to Hitler' on the street, the Gestapo would surely drag me away. But here in Moscow, I can shout 'Death to Hitler' in perfect safety. Indeed, I can even shout 'Death to Trotsky.'"

    Although France's ruling elites seem utterly committed to freedom of speech, my strong impression is that if our webzine were based there, Steve and half our writers would have long since gone to prison, along with maybe 70% of our commenters. It's also pretty obvious why no MSM journalists have pointed this out---they're terrified of losing their jobs and being blacklisted!

    And this is exactly the sort of reason I launched this small webzine a year ago.

    I’ll join the other people here who are saying, “Thank you, sir.”

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  74. @Bobbala
    Isaiah 7:14 Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel.

    Isaiah 7:14 Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel.

    By this I am to assume what?

    The cult of Hercales predates 1,000 BC; Isaiah lived hundreds of years later. So I guess you are telling me that the myth of the virgin birth was pasted into Christianity by the prophet Isaiah, who incidentally got the name wrong?

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  75. @george
    http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kUhbTRs5RUU

    Dieudonné - SHOAHNANAS (HolocaustPineapples) with Eng ...

    An example of holocaust comedy censored by French authorities, song starts at 4:10 if you want to skip the lecture.

    Just for fun search on inverted+nazi+salute, the officially censored gesture.

    Dieudonné is doing a show tonight in Toulouse at the Zenith auditorium where he performed in February. You can see the size of the crowd in this video:

    The clip is from the end of the show, when Dieudonné leads them in a verse saying “up yours” to President Hollande. It’s sung to the tune of the French Resistance anthem, “Le Chant des Partisans”.

    Dieudonné’s new show is called “La bête immonde”, or “the vile beast”. It’s a reference to an overused phrase by the mainstream political class that sees the FN and Dieudonné as “a return of the vile beast” of 1930s fascist politics.

    Read More
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  76. So much for free speech on this blog, eh? Nine hours and my comment is still “awaiting moderation”.

    Have fun with your sycophants then, Steve and Ron.

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  77. @Hal
    I do not know if the "average Muslim" reacts as strongly as the "average Christian" when the revered person is mocked. I do know I am physically afraid of so-called Christian fundamentalists who are still angry that Jesus died. I know they become angry at me if I suggest that Jesus may have been a Buddhist or that the virgin birth myth was borrowed from Hercules. I know they become furious when I suggest the Jesus had no eschatological beliefs, was concerned with the Kingdom of Heaven as a state of mind here in this life, and that to believe on him really means to believe him when taught spirituality as an enlightened path.

    I wonder if the average Muslim has more reverence for the teachings of Mohamed and living them, rather than being overly concerned with believing on him.

    I wonder if the dedication to heritage and some fantastic stories that delineates some Jews, and the dedication to some fantastic stories and the promise of eternal redemption that delineates some Christians are not viewed by their adherents as being inferior to the dedication to a massive set of teachings that delineates most Muslims.

    Your Christophobia is duly noted.

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  78. @Steve Sailer
    Franklin set aside a modest amount of money for 200 years to demonstrate the power of compound interest. The fund was finally distributed to beneficiaries not too many years ago.

    The fund was finally distributed to beneficiaries not too many years ago.

    Is this what pays for the parts in Mark Skousen’s ’58 MGA?

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  79. @Bobbala
    Isaiah 7:14 Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel.

    I can dig it.

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  80. Khaaaaaaaan!!!

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  81. this dumb leftoid magazine, who was already artificially kept alive by government subsidies, will receive an extra $1.2 million dollar

    French government donates $1.2 million to ensure Charlie Hebdo lives on

    -Martin

    This just proves that the French state subsidizes this garbage, as I suggested in another thread. It almost justifies Muslim aggression, as Charlie Hebdo is apparently a state-sponsored provocation. As an American, that would be intolerable to me.

    “Renvoyer dos à dos le fascisme et l’antifascisme signifie que le remède vaut la
    maladie. En effet, qu’est-ce qui justifie l’existence des antifascistes
    si ce n’est celle des fascistes? Qui est apparu en premier: la poule
    collabo ou l’œuf résistant ? Pour une bonne partie de l’UMP vagissante,
    militer contre le racisme et les discriminations serait équivalent à
    promouvoir le racisme et les discriminations. Quel talent!
    Mettons les skinheads sous protection policière!

    -frederic

    I suppose now it might be fair to ask “what came first: the leftist antifa chicken, or the militant Muslim egg?”

    That last sarcastic line about police protection is very revealing in light of recent events. Seems Charlie Hebdo writers were well aware of the benefits of state protection, and actively sought it so that they could continue to churn out their own version of “free” speech (it isn’t free when other people have to support it) even as they push to deny that same protection to others.

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    • Replies: @Ace
    No. It doesn't justify Muslim aggression.
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  82. Does anybody here on iSteve think the 2 Algerian terrorists are pure “White” ? Judging by their phenotypes they definitely look like they have the Sub Saharan in their family tree, they resemble what African Americans would call light skin Brothas. Look at the hair texture of the Algerian terrorist who is not bald, it is definitely Negro textured hair. Algeria is on the border between North Africa and Sub Saharan Africa. They share a border with Black as midnight countries like Niger and Mali. So it is a safe bet to assume those 2 Algerian terrorist are genetically less Caucasian than a White family in Nebraska for example.

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    • Replies: @Jim
    I recall reading genetic studies of North Africans indicating that about 8% or so of their genome on average is of Negroid origin. Of course the fact that they are predomonantly Caucasoid does not mean that they are genetically identical to Swedes. There is a large amount of genetic variation within all the major divisions of humanity. The most fundament difference is between Sub-Saharan Africans (Negroes) and most of the rest of humanity.
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  83. @A man in full
    Ridiculous. Steve is an antisemite but not a holocaust denier. No country in Europe imprisons antisemites.

    “Steve is an antisemite”

    No, I’m not.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    @A man in full
    “Steve is an antisemite”

    No, I’m not.

     

    Nobody is.

    Seriously, does anyone anywhere hate Semites, all the Semites, just because they're Semitic? Where are these Hamitic nationalists and Japhetite bigots? I want to meet one!
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  84. The mammon worshippers at the Wall Street Journal solution to the muslim terrorist attacks is better surveillance. They would rather western countries turn into totalitarian police states than call for immigration restriction.

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  85. @Hal
    I do not know if the "average Muslim" reacts as strongly as the "average Christian" when the revered person is mocked. I do know I am physically afraid of so-called Christian fundamentalists who are still angry that Jesus died. I know they become angry at me if I suggest that Jesus may have been a Buddhist or that the virgin birth myth was borrowed from Hercules. I know they become furious when I suggest the Jesus had no eschatological beliefs, was concerned with the Kingdom of Heaven as a state of mind here in this life, and that to believe on him really means to believe him when taught spirituality as an enlightened path.

    I wonder if the average Muslim has more reverence for the teachings of Mohamed and living them, rather than being overly concerned with believing on him.

    I wonder if the dedication to heritage and some fantastic stories that delineates some Jews, and the dedication to some fantastic stories and the promise of eternal redemption that delineates some Christians are not viewed by their adherents as being inferior to the dedication to a massive set of teachings that delineates most Muslims.

    Please tell us about the first time a fundamentalist Christian threatened you. I wouldn’t ask you to go into every incident, the list must be so long!

    Your ideas are so radical. You must be deep.

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  86. @A man in full
    Ridiculous. Steve is an antisemite but not a holocaust denier. No country in Europe imprisons antisemites.

    Ridiculous. Steve is an antisemite but not a holocaust denier. No country in Europe imprisons antisemites.

    Steve is not an anti-Semite, dear fellow. He simply believes (correctly) that Jews are a very important group of people, and that their beliefs (and unconscious biases) should be discussed freely and openly.

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    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    "Ridiculous. Steve is an antisemite but not a holocaust denier. No country in Europe imprisons antisemites.

    Steve is not an anti-Semite, dear fellow. He simply believes (correctly) that Jews are a very important group of people, and that their beliefs (and unconscious biases) should be discussed freely and openly."

    To me an "antisemite" is someone who is against Arabs, per se. Or more broadly, Semites as such, which includes Arabs, Sephardic and Mizrahi Jews, and other groups, but does not include Ashkenazi Jews. Arabs constitute the largest number of Semites, by far.

    Most Semites are certainly not Jews-most are Muslims, but as many are Christians or something else as Jews. And most Jews are not Semites, or are not primarily semites, in the sense that Ava Gardner was not primarily black.

    And yes, they do imprison anti-Semites in Europe. And anti-Jews as well.
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  87. “Most of us subscribe to the idea of human biodiversity and its implication here, but we should not underrate how much culture matters too.”

    We’re glad you did. Thank you.

    That should have said:

    And this is exactly the sort of reason I launched this small webzine a year ago.

    We’re glad you did. Thank you.

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    • Replies: @The most deplorable one

    Most of us subscribe to the idea of human biodiversity and its implication here, but we should not underrate how much culture matters too.
     
    Where did this quote come from? Ron Unz did not make it upstream as far as I can see.

    The fact is, IMO, since human behavioral traits are highly heritable (just ask Jayman), culture is a manifestation of genes and is constrained by genes.
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  88. “No country in Europe imprisons antisemites.”

    lol
    in france ofcourse you can go in jail for being antisemite
    in many other coutries too i believe

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  89. @Dai Alanye
    I keep looking for a comparison between Muslim terrorism and Jerry Falwell vs Hustler but can't find one. Derb seems to have overlooked that particular example of WASPish intolerance for free speech, possibly because Falwell failed to break out the nunchucks and AK47s.

    [This snark brought to you by the Dept of Fallacious Comparisons.]

    I keep looking for a comparison between Muslim terrorism and Jerry Falwell vs Hustler but can’t find one.

    But the Falwell v. Flynt case illustrates why this was not an act of terrorism. If Falwell had killed Flynt instead of suing him, it wouldn’t have been terrorism; it would be been revenge, retaliation, settling a score. The same applies to the massacre at the offices of Charlie Hebdo.

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    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    No the massacre at Charlie Hebdo is the most clear-cut case of terrorism I can think of. It was a matter of them killing civilians in order to strike fear in others and force compliance to their political demands.
    , @syonredux

    If Falwell had killed Flynt instead of suing him, it wouldn’t have been terrorism; it would be been revenge, retaliation, settling a score. The same applies to the massacre at the offices of Charlie Hebdo.
     
    I'm afraid that I don't quite follow you here. Leaving Falwell to one side, as I simply cannot imagine him doing such a thing, the cartoonist massacre was both an act of revenge ( for defaming the Prophet, etc) and an act of terrorism. It was an act of terrorism because it was quite clearly meant to terrify others, to make them too afraid to print anything negative about Muhammad.And, as evidenced by the NYTIMES and other prestige publications, it has been quite successful in that endeavor.
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  90. @A man in full
    Ridiculous. Steve is an antisemite but not a holocaust denier. No country in Europe imprisons antisemites.

    Ridiculous. Steve is an antisemite but not a holocaust denier. No country in Europe imprisons antisemites.

    Not true.

    The UK does. See Simon Sheppard, Stephen Whittle, and Garron Helm.

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  91. @ben tillman

    I keep looking for a comparison between Muslim terrorism and Jerry Falwell vs Hustler but can’t find one.
     
    But the Falwell v. Flynt case illustrates why this was not an act of terrorism. If Falwell had killed Flynt instead of suing him, it wouldn't have been terrorism; it would be been revenge, retaliation, settling a score. The same applies to the massacre at the offices of Charlie Hebdo.

    No the massacre at Charlie Hebdo is the most clear-cut case of terrorism I can think of. It was a matter of them killing civilians in order to strike fear in others and force compliance to their political demands.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    No the massacre at Charlie Hebdo is the most clear-cut case of terrorism I can think of.
     
    It's the clearest-cut case of Islam, if the accounts of Mohammed ordering the execution of satirical poets are accurate.
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  92. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @ben tillman


    @Ron Unz

    "Most of us subscribe to the idea of human biodiversity and its implication here, but we should not underrate how much culture matters too."

    We’re glad you did. Thank you.
     
    That should have said:

    And this is exactly the sort of reason I launched this small webzine a year ago.
     
    We’re glad you did. Thank you.

    Most of us subscribe to the idea of human biodiversity and its implication here, but we should not underrate how much culture matters too.

    Where did this quote come from? Ron Unz did not make it upstream as far as I can see.

    The fact is, IMO, since human behavioral traits are highly heritable (just ask Jayman), culture is a manifestation of genes and is constrained by genes.

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    • Replies: @ben tillman

    Where did this quote come from? Ron Unz did not make it upstream as far as I can see.
     
    It was from another comment thread. I copied and pasted it for a comment in that thread, and apparently I failed to copy the quote from this thread, so the HBD quote was still on my clipboard.
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  93. @ben tillman

    I keep looking for a comparison between Muslim terrorism and Jerry Falwell vs Hustler but can’t find one.
     
    But the Falwell v. Flynt case illustrates why this was not an act of terrorism. If Falwell had killed Flynt instead of suing him, it wouldn't have been terrorism; it would be been revenge, retaliation, settling a score. The same applies to the massacre at the offices of Charlie Hebdo.

    If Falwell had killed Flynt instead of suing him, it wouldn’t have been terrorism; it would be been revenge, retaliation, settling a score. The same applies to the massacre at the offices of Charlie Hebdo.

    I’m afraid that I don’t quite follow you here. Leaving Falwell to one side, as I simply cannot imagine him doing such a thing, the cartoonist massacre was both an act of revenge ( for defaming the Prophet, etc) and an act of terrorism. It was an act of terrorism because it was quite clearly meant to terrify others, to make them too afraid to print anything negative about Muhammad.And, as evidenced by the NYTIMES and other prestige publications, it has been quite successful in that endeavor.

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  94. @eah
    @Wilkey

    It must seem to Muslims very hypocritical...

    Perhaps some muslims in France/Europe are sensitive enough to perceive this, but I doubt many are intelligent enough to formulate it as you have done.

    I am one and I pointed that out immediately. Lol.

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  95. @Lot
    France ought to think about a 3-strikes law

    From the article below, here's my timeline

    Born in 1982, one of 10 children from a Senegalese woman.

    1995-2007 - Multiple arrests for robbery and drug offenses.

    Unknown date - diagnosed as a psychopath

    2009 - Released from prison, given a make-work government job, meets President Sarkozy

    2010 - his apartment is found to contain 240 rounds of ammo

    2011-2014 regularly associates with jailed, free, and house-arrested terrorists, posts pictures of his hijabed girlfriend aiming weapons at the camara to social media

    2015 - Goes into a kosher supermarket and kills four people with a machine gun, wires the place with explosives but fails to do so properly, shot by swat team

    He was born in 1982 in the Paris suburb of Juvisy-sur-Orge, Le Monde reports. He grew up in Grigny south of Paris, the only boy in a family of 10 children. Since his late teens, he has been convicted several times for robbery and at least one time for drug trafficking, according to Liberation, a French newspaper.

    According to Liberation, in a report prepared at one point for a Paris court, a psychiatric expert found Coulibaly had an “immature and psychopathic personality” and “poor powers of introspection.” His sense of morality was apparently “lacking,” and he had a wish to be “all powerful,” Liberation says the expert wrote.

    In a 2009 interview for French newspaper Le Parisien, shortly after being released from jail, Coulibaly spoke of being excited to meet former French President Nicolas Sarkozy. The president wanted to meet young people working in companies that make efforts to employ youth, Le Parisien reported, according to a reprint of the story published Friday in Le Monde. “I don't know what I would say. So I would begin with hello,” Coulibaly, then 27, told Le Parisien. Coulibaly, whose contract was ending soon, said he would tell the president about his professional life and his job.

    Just 10 months afterwards, police searched Coulibaly's apartment and found 240 rounds of ammunition that could be used in Kalashnikov assault weapons, according to the Washington Post.
     
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/09/amedy-coulibaly-paris-kosher-market_n_6444418.html

    This is the issue with these guys: they aren’t merely fundamentalist Muslims. They are also dangerous psychopaths. Islam is another line of seperation between people they care about and people they don’t care about.

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  96. @Anonymous
    " We keep hearing that Muslims must tolerate blasphemy because free speech. But Europe doesn’t have free speech."

    Muslims should tolerate blasphemy or get the hell out of Europe and return to their ancestral homeland countries like Algeria, Tunisia, Egypt, Morocco, etc.

    Muslims are guests in Europe and guests do not get to set the rules when they are in someone else's house.

    Those who have European citizenships are no longer guests.

    Also, it’s not that they wish to impose new rules. It is that they wish to see existing rules enforced fairly.

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    • Replies: @Ace
    But they (Muslims with French citizenship) are not citizens either.

    The last thing they want is existing rules applied fairly. Consider:

    "Democracy, liberalism, freedom, and so on, need to be destroyed." ~ Anjem Choudary
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  97. @Big Bill

    Yet Jefferson over in Virginia knew about it, and he went out of his way to buy and presumably read it. His willingness to consider materialist philosophical arguments shows that he thought more like those “bad” French infidels than we want to admit.
     
    Holy smokes! If owning a book equals "thinking like" the author I am damn glad you can't see my library. I must "think like" Karl Marx, Adolf Hitler, Marcus Aurelius, Rosa Luxemburg, Hermann Goering, Augustine, Eusebius and R. Crumb ... all at the same time! Its a wonder my head doesn't explode!

    For an educated man, acquiring and reading books on philosophy, religion, history and politics is not "going out of one's way" -- it IS the Way.

    Holy smokes! If owning a book equals “thinking like” the author I am damn glad you can’t see my library.

    Jefferson owned a copy of George Case’s translation of the Koran. Does this make him a Mohammedan? Or an anti-Mohammedan?– Case’s intro shows he’s anything but a fanboy.

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  98. @Whiskey
    Dersh is counter suing and seeking disbarment of the attorneys who filed the suit, saying his travel records show he was elsewhere two of the dates in question.

    Seems an Obama playbook ala Ryan to dump Hillary! for Sharpton or whoever Obama wants to suceed him.

    Seems an Obama playbook ala Ryan to dump Hillary! for Sharpton or whoever Obama wants to suceed him.

    Sure that makes sense if you think Obama is a Republican party activist/strategist.

    Whiskey get some psychiatric treatment.

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  99. @Stan #84
    …They would rather western countries turn into totalitarian police states than call for immigration restriction.
    —-
    from the dailymail :

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2904237/MAX-HASTINGS-liberals-defended-traitors-like-Snowden-Assange-look-photo-admit-deluded-fools.html

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  100. #82
    They could be from the southern algerian regions.
    Racial identity in the Maghreb is a complicated topic that I don’t fully understand but I’ve known quite a few Moroccans who looked obviously part subsaharan but who in no way identified with blacks at all. One even told me about his Black grandma from Senegal, but he still identified as arab, period.

    Still, one can’t say that actual racism doesn’t exist among them. My moroccan acquaintance would sometimes complain about people from the city of Fes, who seemed quite proud of their whiteness. People from Fes are often former spanish jews (who of course did not mix and thus have no recent subsaharan admixture).

    About those algerians, there could be Kabyle families who would have a problem with them marrying their very very white looking daughters, but I’d expect that for the most part they identified as arabs and muslims and were viewed as such by their community.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Southern Italy and Greece are included in the government's list of ancestral regions where somebody might have the sickle cell anemia gene variant.
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  101. @ogunsiron
    @Jefferson #82
    They could be from the southern algerian regions.
    Racial identity in the Maghreb is a complicated topic that I don't fully understand but I've known quite a few Moroccans who looked obviously part subsaharan but who in no way identified with blacks at all. One even told me about his Black grandma from Senegal, but he still identified as arab, period.

    Still, one can't say that actual racism doesn't exist among them. My moroccan acquaintance would sometimes complain about people from the city of Fes, who seemed quite proud of their whiteness. People from Fes are often former spanish jews (who of course did not mix and thus have no recent subsaharan admixture).

    About those algerians, there could be Kabyle families who would have a problem with them marrying their very very white looking daughters, but I'd expect that for the most part they identified as arabs and muslims and were viewed as such by their community.

    Southern Italy and Greece are included in the government’s list of ancestral regions where somebody might have the sickle cell anemia gene variant.

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  102. @Cagey Beast
    No the massacre at Charlie Hebdo is the most clear-cut case of terrorism I can think of. It was a matter of them killing civilians in order to strike fear in others and force compliance to their political demands.

    No the massacre at Charlie Hebdo is the most clear-cut case of terrorism I can think of.

    It’s the clearest-cut case of Islam, if the accounts of Mohammed ordering the execution of satirical poets are accurate.

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    • Replies: @gzu
    The problem is, the tribe, the faction they belonged to were his enemies to begin with. As in, those were the guys who attempted to assassinate him and his followers, threw rocks at his son, drove them out of Mecca (or face the sword) and seized their property. Before he engaged in violence himself.

    That might have something to do with it.
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  103. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Hal – “I do know I am physically afraid of so-called Christian fundamentalists who are still angry that Jesus died.”

    Then you need either a good shrink or testosterone injections, because your fear is preposterously irrational. You also ought to learn the basics of Christianity since no “Christian fundamentalists” are “angry that Jesus died”, but that’s an optional extra. Learn to crawl before you walk, little grasshopper.

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  104. @Steve:
    Interesting.
    Heterozygous carriers of the sickle-cell variant are protected from malaria and from
    what I hear, that disease used to be a problem on the mediterranean shores.

    I’m not sure if the sub-saharan variant is the only one or if humans in each malarial region came up with their own variant.

    I know that during the roman empire, they imported “ethiopians” (sub-saharan africans) but I’m really not sure how much of a demographic impact those black people had. Then again, when a gene is super advantageous, you don’t need to import lots of it at the beginning for that gene to multiply in its new population. So the black african sickle-cell variant may be noticeably present among Sicilians and Greeks without them being noticeably black otherwise.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Right, falciparum malaria is really, really bad, which is why the very crude sickle cell genetic defense spread. Even though it traditionally killed babies who inherited two copies of it, one copy provided some defense against it.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    I’m not sure if the sub-saharan variant is the only one or if humans in each malarial region came up with their own variant.
     
    Here's a map.
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  105. @ogunsiron
    @Steve:
    Interesting.
    Heterozygous carriers of the sickle-cell variant are protected from malaria and from
    what I hear, that disease used to be a problem on the mediterranean shores.

    I'm not sure if the sub-saharan variant is the only one or if humans in each malarial region came up with their own variant.

    I know that during the roman empire, they imported "ethiopians" (sub-saharan africans) but I'm really not sure how much of a demographic impact those black people had. Then again, when a gene is super advantageous, you don't need to import lots of it at the beginning for that gene to multiply in its new population. So the black african sickle-cell variant may be noticeably present among Sicilians and Greeks without them being noticeably black otherwise.

    Right, falciparum malaria is really, really bad, which is why the very crude sickle cell genetic defense spread. Even though it traditionally killed babies who inherited two copies of it, one copy provided some defense against it.

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  106. @Steve Sailer
    "Steve is an antisemite"

    No, I'm not.


    “Steve is an antisemite”

    No, I’m not.

    Nobody is.

    Seriously, does anyone anywhere hate Semites, all the Semites, just because they’re Semitic? Where are these Hamitic nationalists and Japhetite bigots? I want to meet one!

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  107. @ogunsiron
    @Steve:
    Interesting.
    Heterozygous carriers of the sickle-cell variant are protected from malaria and from
    what I hear, that disease used to be a problem on the mediterranean shores.

    I'm not sure if the sub-saharan variant is the only one or if humans in each malarial region came up with their own variant.

    I know that during the roman empire, they imported "ethiopians" (sub-saharan africans) but I'm really not sure how much of a demographic impact those black people had. Then again, when a gene is super advantageous, you don't need to import lots of it at the beginning for that gene to multiply in its new population. So the black african sickle-cell variant may be noticeably present among Sicilians and Greeks without them being noticeably black otherwise.

    I’m not sure if the sub-saharan variant is the only one or if humans in each malarial region came up with their own variant.

    Here’s a map.

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  108. @steve
    Sickle cell anemia and thalassemia ( I guess the Greeks called the mediterranean thalassa) make it harder for plasmodium to infect red blood cells, because of changes the shape of the hemoglobin molecule. The molecule is coded for slighty differently than normal, at the gene level, and that results in a change of shape and that has a lot of biochemical consequences.

    Plasmodium falciparum is the sub-saharan african plasmodium and the most deadly one. I had a few encounters with it. Not fun :(

    Plasmodium vivax is found elsewhere in the world and it’s a less deadly type of plasmodium.
    It’s serious enough to select for a crude genetic adaptation like sickle-cell anemia or thalassemia, though. But I still don’t know if those adaptations appeared in several places or if they appeared once and spread and got amplified wherever they were very useful.
    Paging @Greg Cochran or @Razib

    @RegCaesar :
    Thanks. I’d think that several variant have appeared indepentently like in the case of lactose tolerance. But for the mediterranean sickle-cell and thalassemia, is that a case of independent mutation or a case of sub-saharan sickle-cell wandering in and getting amplified ?

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    Here's another map.

    I'm surprised that India's sickle-cell epicenter is in the central latitudes, with low incidence in the darker south and Ceylon. The Persian Gulf is moderately high (guestworkers?), but Oman and Yemen free of it. So is NE Africa, from Libya to Somalia.
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  109. @Erik L
    The pyschopath diagnosis is interesting. One might speculate on how often religion provides the text for the violent behavior the person wants to do anyway. In a different time these people might have been anarchists.

    Agree 100%.

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  110. @Reg Cæsar

    No the massacre at Charlie Hebdo is the most clear-cut case of terrorism I can think of.
     
    It's the clearest-cut case of Islam, if the accounts of Mohammed ordering the execution of satirical poets are accurate.

    The problem is, the tribe, the faction they belonged to were his enemies to begin with. As in, those were the guys who attempted to assassinate him and his followers, threw rocks at his son, drove them out of Mecca (or face the sword) and seized their property. Before he engaged in violence himself.

    That might have something to do with it.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Before [Mohammed] engaged in violence himself. That might have something to do with it.

     

    WWJD?
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  111. @syonredux

    Ridiculous. Steve is an antisemite but not a holocaust denier. No country in Europe imprisons antisemites.
     
    Steve is not an anti-Semite, dear fellow. He simply believes (correctly) that Jews are a very important group of people, and that their beliefs (and unconscious biases) should be discussed freely and openly.

    “Ridiculous. Steve is an antisemite but not a holocaust denier. No country in Europe imprisons antisemites.

    Steve is not an anti-Semite, dear fellow. He simply believes (correctly) that Jews are a very important group of people, and that their beliefs (and unconscious biases) should be discussed freely and openly.”

    To me an “antisemite” is someone who is against Arabs, per se. Or more broadly, Semites as such, which includes Arabs, Sephardic and Mizrahi Jews, and other groups, but does not include Ashkenazi Jews. Arabs constitute the largest number of Semites, by far.

    Most Semites are certainly not Jews-most are Muslims, but as many are Christians or something else as Jews. And most Jews are not Semites, or are not primarily semites, in the sense that Ava Gardner was not primarily black.

    And yes, they do imprison anti-Semites in Europe. And anti-Jews as well.

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  112. “antisemitism” as a word has a history (150 years or so) and it’s always been related to attitudes towards jews. That assyrians are semites too is not really relevant.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    “antisemitism” as a word has a history (150 years or so)
     
    …as does another clumsy German invention, the bilingual oxymoron "homosexual".

    Germans are great at creating terms from the roots of their own language-- Weltschmerz, Schadenfreude, Backpfeifengesicht. They should leave the xenoneologisms to others.

    Judenfeindlichbesessenkrankheit?
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  113. @gzu
    The problem is, the tribe, the faction they belonged to were his enemies to begin with. As in, those were the guys who attempted to assassinate him and his followers, threw rocks at his son, drove them out of Mecca (or face the sword) and seized their property. Before he engaged in violence himself.

    That might have something to do with it.

    Before [Mohammed] engaged in violence himself. That might have something to do with it.

    WWJD?

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    • Replies: @gzu
    Probably chill in Medina and let the pagans have his property.

    Sorry, but not everyone can take injustice in stride.
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  114. @The most deplorable one

    Most of us subscribe to the idea of human biodiversity and its implication here, but we should not underrate how much culture matters too.
     
    Where did this quote come from? Ron Unz did not make it upstream as far as I can see.

    The fact is, IMO, since human behavioral traits are highly heritable (just ask Jayman), culture is a manifestation of genes and is constrained by genes.

    Where did this quote come from? Ron Unz did not make it upstream as far as I can see.

    It was from another comment thread. I copied and pasted it for a comment in that thread, and apparently I failed to copy the quote from this thread, so the HBD quote was still on my clipboard.

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  115. @ogunsiron
    @steve
    Sickle cell anemia and thalassemia ( I guess the Greeks called the mediterranean thalassa) make it harder for plasmodium to infect red blood cells, because of changes the shape of the hemoglobin molecule. The molecule is coded for slighty differently than normal, at the gene level, and that results in a change of shape and that has a lot of biochemical consequences.

    Plasmodium falciparum is the sub-saharan african plasmodium and the most deadly one. I had a few encounters with it. Not fun :(

    Plasmodium vivax is found elsewhere in the world and it's a less deadly type of plasmodium.
    It's serious enough to select for a crude genetic adaptation like sickle-cell anemia or thalassemia, though. But I still don't know if those adaptations appeared in several places or if they appeared once and spread and got amplified wherever they were very useful.
    Paging @Greg Cochran or @Razib

    @RegCaesar :
    Thanks. I'd think that several variant have appeared indepentently like in the case of lactose tolerance. But for the mediterranean sickle-cell and thalassemia, is that a case of independent mutation or a case of sub-saharan sickle-cell wandering in and getting amplified ?

    Here’s another map.

    I’m surprised that India’s sickle-cell epicenter is in the central latitudes, with low incidence in the darker south and Ceylon. The Persian Gulf is moderately high (guestworkers?), but Oman and Yemen free of it. So is NE Africa, from Libya to Somalia.

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  116. @ogunsiron
    "antisemitism" as a word has a history (150 years or so) and it's always been related to attitudes towards jews. That assyrians are semites too is not really relevant.

    “antisemitism” as a word has a history (150 years or so)

    …as does another clumsy German invention, the bilingual oxymoron “homosexual”.

    Germans are great at creating terms from the roots of their own language– Weltschmerz, Schadenfreude, Backpfeifengesicht. They should leave the xenoneologisms to others.

    Judenfeindlichbesessenkrankheit?

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  117. @Reg Caesar,
    i don’t think it should be described as krankheit, mental or somatic.

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  118. @advancedatheist
    I hadn't heard the story about Franklin and d'Holbach's widow.

    I've wondered why the philosophes with money, like d'Holbach, Voltaire and Helvétius, didn't leave instructions for using their wealth to carry on the work of the Enlightenment after they died. Instead they just left the fate of the Enlightenment to the haphazard.

    These kinds of provisions might have proved difficult in the French monarchy, but those horrible aristocratic countries we hear so much demotic propaganda about these days didn't have the ability to control the movement of capital across borders. Seems like these guys blew an interesting opportunity.

    Meanwhile, in America, I know of only two plausible cases of such legacies to promote the Enlightenment to future generations, namely, Thomas Jefferson's founding of the University of Virginia, and the banker Stephen Girard's bequest of his fortune to fund a secular school for poor white orphans boys, which became Girard College. Girard's trust still exists, BTW, and it has a respectable balance sheet:

    http://citytrusts.com/Financial%20Reports/Girard%202013%20Financial%20Statements.pdf

    Stephen Girard’s will was broken in the late 1960′s and black boys (and eventually girls) were admitted to his school. Recently, the school requested that they no longer board students as the trust fund is almost depleted.

    This is amazing. Girard College’s endowment was enormous up until the late 60′s. Somehow, the new guardians of the trust have blown hundreds of millions of dollars over a very short time period.

    A book should be written.

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  119. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “antisemitism” as a word has a history (150 years or so) and it’s always been related to attitudes towards jews.

    Of course its meaning has varied wildly over that time. Those who regarded Jews as demons? Anti-semites. Those who refused to acknowledge Jews as The Master Race? Also anti-semites. It’s not really “about Jews” qua Jews, it’s about a disagreement among non-Jews as to whether Jews should be tolerated, hated, or adored.

    We’ve been brain-washed into thinking that the natural fate of a minority is to be oppressed by the majority. While there are historical examples of this there are just as many examples of majorities fetishizing minority groups. Look at American attitudes towards Native Americans – it seems they all have a deep spiritual connection with the universe and a natural ability at tracking.

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  120. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    since human behavioral traits are highly heritable (just ask Jayman), culture is a manifestation of genes and is constrained by genes

    So you think the dramatic cultural changes in America (and much of the world) over the last fifty years are simply the manifestation of genetic changes? That’s not a sensible conclusion. For better or for worse what people think and believe is not determined by their genes. It’s in our genes to be programmable.

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  121. “Benjamin I. Espen says:

    My favorite version of Imagine is this one by A Perfect Circle. Maynard took a dippy utopian ballad and made it sound like a threat. A perfect anthem for our times.”

    Thanks for the introduction. Yes, I far prefer this version to the original. It is indeed a perfect anthem for our times – it could almost be the anthem for the liberal globalist order: Imagine……….or else!

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  122. I have a “love theory” for the Muslim terrorist attacks in places such as France and the United Kingdom, and it involves the bald head from Buddhism, as well as the dark-brown girls from India.

    Step 1 – Most Islamic terrorists in France are from North Africa, whereas Muslim terrorists in Britain tend to be from Pakistan (which was a part of India before partition).

    India is a diverse country but nevertheless Persian (ancient Aryan/modern day-Iran) invaders mixed with dark brown-skinned women (Dravidian women). Meanwhile, Arab slave traders mixed with black women in Ethiopia, a nation in the Horn of East Africa.

    Step 2 – There is a curse on the hair of dark-brown skinned women, since they’re more primitive and matriarchal by nature. They don’t understand that there is nothing there, and that they’re bald. That might explain the lack of hygiene and public sanitation in places such as India.

    Step 3 – A balanced union of yin and yang (yellow) and red (love) breaks this curse on the hair. They can finally see the truth, that there’s nothing there.

    Step 4 – The foreign ancestry from the black grandma in North African terrorists is attracted to France, which is a country renowned for Paris, the city of love, which means red. In addition, Muslim practitioners have an obsession with covering women in hijabs, again trying to “clean the hair” (expiate dirtiness). Meanwhile, the Dravidian ancestry in Muslim terrorists from Pakistan is attracted to Britain because they’re near Ireland, which hilariously has a certain population of redheads.

    Step 5 – Their “darker selves”, the one spiritually, is trying to find both yellow and red, to experience balanced love, in order to break the darkness within and become free (“pure”) from bondage.

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  123. Free Speech in France for Brigitte Bardot!

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  124. @dearieme
    "adding one more group to your society with a whole new set of taboos is stupid." Spot on.

    Of course the problem is not just that there are more taboos, but that there are incompatible sets of taboos. With one set of taboos, unless you’re a stubborn curmudgeon or autistic, as part of your basic social development you can learn to get by without breaking them. With two sets, you can’t avoid breaking one or the other without taking a vow of silence.

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  125. @Reg Cæsar

    Before [Mohammed] engaged in violence himself. That might have something to do with it.

     

    WWJD?

    Probably chill in Medina and let the pagans have his property.

    Sorry, but not everyone can take injustice in stride.

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  126. @Steve Sailer
    Didn't Ben Franklin want to marry D'Holbach's rich widow? Or was that somebody else's widow?

    Franklin carried on an affair with Mme. Helvétius, the widow of Claude-Adrien Helvétius. He had been one of the fermiers-général (the source of his fortune) and was an atheistic philosophe.

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    • Replies: @Ivy
    Tax farming (essentially buying from the king or other nobles the right to collect a certain amount of taxes, by whatever means) was a contributing factor to many fortunes (tribal and other) along with estate management, money lending and foreclosure.
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  127. MLK held traditional Christian beliefs about homosexual practice, which he publicly stated, as sin.

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  128. @Crawfurdmuir
    Franklin carried on an affair with Mme. Helvétius, the widow of Claude-Adrien Helvétius. He had been one of the fermiers-général (the source of his fortune) and was an atheistic philosophe.

    Tax farming (essentially buying from the king or other nobles the right to collect a certain amount of taxes, by whatever means) was a contributing factor to many fortunes (tribal and other) along with estate management, money lending and foreclosure.

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  129. […] And this is exactly the sort of reason I launched this small webzine a year ago.   More here, http://www.unz.com/isteve/21st-century-blasphemers/ ======================== They’re terrified of losing their jobs and being blacklisted!  […]

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  130. @Ron Unz
    This whole ridiculous situation reminds me of the old joke about someone boasting of the total freedom of political speech in Stalinist Russia: "If I were in Berlin and I shouted 'Death to Hitler' on the street, the Gestapo would surely drag me away. But here in Moscow, I can shout 'Death to Hitler' in perfect safety. Indeed, I can even shout 'Death to Trotsky.'"

    Although France's ruling elites seem utterly committed to freedom of speech, my strong impression is that if our webzine were based there, Steve and half our writers would have long since gone to prison, along with maybe 70% of our commenters. It's also pretty obvious why no MSM journalists have pointed this out---they're terrified of losing their jobs and being blacklisted!

    And this is exactly the sort of reason I launched this small webzine a year ago.

    As a practical matter in any society with a large Moslem population anything like the Hebdo cartoons is out. That in itself is not so bad. Hebdo’s cartoons were puerile, gatuitously offensive and of no intellectual value. However increasingly in the West even the most dispassionate discussion of Islam will become dangerous.

    It’s amusing of course that the politicians marching Paris in supposed support of free speech will immediately take steps to criminalize any expresson of thought or feeling that might be offensive to Moslems.

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    • Replies: @NOTA
    Have there been attacks like this inside the US? We have a reasonable-sized Muslim population, though not large enough to have much political power. I suspect we also benefit from having gotten a better class of immigrants from Muslim countries than France did.
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  131. @Hal
    I do not know if the "average Muslim" reacts as strongly as the "average Christian" when the revered person is mocked. I do know I am physically afraid of so-called Christian fundamentalists who are still angry that Jesus died. I know they become angry at me if I suggest that Jesus may have been a Buddhist or that the virgin birth myth was borrowed from Hercules. I know they become furious when I suggest the Jesus had no eschatological beliefs, was concerned with the Kingdom of Heaven as a state of mind here in this life, and that to believe on him really means to believe him when taught spirituality as an enlightened path.

    I wonder if the average Muslim has more reverence for the teachings of Mohamed and living them, rather than being overly concerned with believing on him.

    I wonder if the dedication to heritage and some fantastic stories that delineates some Jews, and the dedication to some fantastic stories and the promise of eternal redemption that delineates some Christians are not viewed by their adherents as being inferior to the dedication to a massive set of teachings that delineates most Muslims.

    What examples are there of actual religious violence committed by Christain fundamentalists in the US who as a group are among the strongest supporters of the state of Israel?

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  132. @Ron Unz
    This whole ridiculous situation reminds me of the old joke about someone boasting of the total freedom of political speech in Stalinist Russia: "If I were in Berlin and I shouted 'Death to Hitler' on the street, the Gestapo would surely drag me away. But here in Moscow, I can shout 'Death to Hitler' in perfect safety. Indeed, I can even shout 'Death to Trotsky.'"

    Although France's ruling elites seem utterly committed to freedom of speech, my strong impression is that if our webzine were based there, Steve and half our writers would have long since gone to prison, along with maybe 70% of our commenters. It's also pretty obvious why no MSM journalists have pointed this out---they're terrified of losing their jobs and being blacklisted!

    And this is exactly the sort of reason I launched this small webzine a year ago.

    From a legal perspective I’m not sure you’re right Ron, after all this website is in English. But if one of your contributors who speaks French were to write something on this webzine in French and directed towards the French people and then travel to France and bring attention to that article in some public way then he might be arrested. It would certainly bring a lot of publicity. And no publicity is bad publicity…

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  133. France follows apparently pointless rally with big crackdown on speech:

    http://jonathanturley.org/2015/01/14/france-follows-freedom-of-speech-rally-with-crackdown-on-free-speech/

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  134. @A man in full
    Ridiculous. Steve is an antisemite but not a holocaust denier. No country in Europe imprisons antisemites.

    There is country that was able to silence an honorable and had-working woman of an advanced age, just because a scoundrel that overheard a private conversation found this conversation anti-semitic.

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  135. @Sparkling Wiggle
    Bless us, oh saint Trayvon, and this, the purple drank we are about to receive...

    Ha! That’s good!

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  136. Please put me firmly in the brown-nose camp. Unz is to me as Alice cooper was to Garth and Wayne.
    “We’re not worthy!”

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  137. Certain Jews are helping subvert potential opposition to the Western elites’ immigration program for Europe. See, Can Kosher Nationalists Save the West?

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  138. In discussing the hymnody of the religion of the Left, Imagine is good, but let’s not omit mention of Andrea Bocelli and Celine Dion’s “the Prayer,” as well as Whitney Houston’s “the Greatest Love.”

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    "I believe the children are the future"
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  139. @Giuseppe
    In discussing the hymnody of the religion of the Left, Imagine is good, but let's not omit mention of Andrea Bocelli and Celine Dion's "the Prayer," as well as Whitney Houston's "the Greatest Love."

    “I believe the children are the future”

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    • Replies: @Giuseppe
    "...Guide us with your grace

    Give us faith so we'll be safe
    Sogniamo un mondo senza più violenza
    Un mondo di giustizia e di speranza
    Ognuno dia la mano al suo vicino
    Simbolo di pace, di fraternità

    La forza che ci dà
    We ask that life be kind...

    , @Giuseppe
    "Take your hymnals and turn to Bette Midler's sublime and incomparable 'From a Distance,' hymn number 363."
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  140. @Sparkling Wiggle
    Bless us, oh saint Trayvon, and this, the purple drank we are about to receive...

    “Bless us, oh saint Trayvon, and this, the purple drank we are about to receive…”

    I am so stealing that!

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  141. @Steve Sailer
    "I believe the children are the future"

    “…Guide us with your grace

    Give us faith so we’ll be safe
    Sogniamo un mondo senza più violenza
    Un mondo di giustizia e di speranza
    Ognuno dia la mano al suo vicino
    Simbolo di pace, di fraternità

    La forza che ci dà
    We ask that life be kind…

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  142. @Jim
    As a practical matter in any society with a large Moslem population anything like the Hebdo cartoons is out. That in itself is not so bad. Hebdo's cartoons were puerile, gatuitously offensive and of no intellectual value. However increasingly in the West even the most dispassionate discussion of Islam will become dangerous.

    It's amusing of course that the politicians marching Paris in supposed support of free speech will immediately take steps to criminalize any expresson of thought or feeling that might be offensive to Moslems.

    Have there been attacks like this inside the US? We have a reasonable-sized Muslim population, though not large enough to have much political power. I suspect we also benefit from having gotten a better class of immigrants from Muslim countries than France did.

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  143. Jews and free speech then and now, …

    Subject: Fw: NYTimes.com: Al Bendich, Defender of ?Howl? and Lenny Bruce?s Comedy, Is Dead at 85 (remembrances of things past..and humor)

    … I took Bendich’s First Amendment course at Berzerkeley, and A ed it of course, at a time when As were not handed out like condoms at college dorms.

    He was very funny and very bright and very enjoyable. I remember one of the right-wing cranks around campus who unfortunately lacked many social skills going on and on about something in class. Bendich let him finish and then remarked,”if you will.” which brought down the house in glee, all us young idealistic types who were waiting in the wings panting to enter center stage and show the world the path to paradise.

    A Lenny Bruce story: Bruce would work the jazz clubs in North Beach of San Francisco (now what’s cool is South Beach in Miami…a return to sex not intellect, as biased as it was at the time….maybe that is better… considering) and after a show would go to a Chinatown joint to get a late dinner.

    Bruce knew the waiter as he was a regular. So, the Chinese waiter says hello and ‘Wheas you lovely wife?” Bruce says that they have separated. The Chinese waiter says, “Oh you betta off!”

    All of this stuff now sounds sorta quaint, but it was real enough at the time. Free Speech, now under attack from the Jews, Inc. Dershowitz, alleged sex crime perp , as I recall, called a few years ago for a legal brief which would could sustain an attack on Free Speech and offered ten thousand dollars, again, as I recall, to anyone who could draft such to make Hate Speech illegal.

    Things change. When the Jews were On the Attack 50 years ago, etc, they used Free Speech in their Hate Attack on White America (Ginsberg’s Howl..”.I have seen the best minds of my generations…” …). Now that they have won, or think they have won their attack on White and Christian America, they want Free Speech ended. Hate Speech has no place in America the Beautiful. Where’s Lenny Bruce, or Mort Sahl nowadays? Holed up in Israel killing Palestinians.

    Then there was Tom Lehrer who was a bit more objective. I recall his being asked why he does not do comedy any more and he responded, “nothing’s funny any more.” Nothing’s funny these days for the Jews as nobody thinks Jews are funny. Except for Seinfeld, who retreated from politics to focus on About Nothing…which is sorta funny, in a South Beach kind of way, goofy sex, etc. …

    Joe Webb

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  144. @Hacienda
    I'm biased to the left because it's naturally more willing to take a chance with the unknown. But some unknowns are clearly known at this point and need face time with the public.

    And usually conservative commentary is asinine. But Steve represents intelligent conservative commentary that's hard to find. Incredible that Bill O'Reilly, Glen Beck are standard-bearers for right commentary and Steve is toxic to bring up in conversation. It's the paralysis of the right white, or white right.

    Great site, Ron. Ingenious, too.

    Yes, the left is more willing to take a chance on the unknown.

    With other peoples’ lives, liberty, and property as going-in-proposition numero uno.

    I assume that the leftist-favored known unknowns will inevitably be accepted by the unwashed if enough face time is allotted. Like the three (?) days Obama talked about within which the unwashed could examine bills he would be signing.

    O’Reilly is hardly a conservative standard bearer. He’s worth listening to and produces a quality show. A bit on the generic side, but that’s just me.

    Beck has done yeoman’s work in exposing the agenda of progressives, whom you no doubt admire. In Beck’s case in particular, it’s not incredible at all that he’s achieved considerable prominence. He consistently produces quality, substantive commentary and, unless you’re Bill Whittle in disguise, I dare say you produce nothing remotely comparable. Not to mention that he has amassed a personal fortune, beaten alcoholism, created a media empire out of nothing, and is a thoroughly decent human being. Ho hum.

    But you’re amazed at their success.

    Conservatism has a bit more to it than is dreamt of in your philosophy. It’s a free for all, more accurately, with flashes of brilliance and insight at all points of the compass. E.g., Coulter, Malkin, Gabriele, Reed, Buchanan, Theodoracopulos, Dalrymple, Auster, Steyn, Seiyo, Bodissey, Derbyshire, Synon, West, Greenfield, Elder, Fjordman, Sailer, Kersey, Brimelow, Williams, Limbaugh, Savage, Levin, Simon, Hanson, Williamson, Trifkovik, Simpson, Delingpole, Horowitz, Brandt, Sayet, Mercer, Cashill, Nyqust, Whittle, Byrne, Gorin, Wilders, Amselem, Stix, Spengler, Hoppe, Simon, Porretto, Remus, O’Rourke, Neal, Deace, Breitbart, Taylor, Fleming, Polin, Wilson, Tyrrell, Francis, Sobran, Stein, Babbin, Handlery, de Jong, Condell, and my shoe repair guy.

    But you think that O’Reilly and Beck are the standard bearers of conservatism. And that conservative commentary is asinine.

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    I think you misinterpreted what I wrote.

    O'Reilly and Beck are the most well-known, popular TV conservative commentators. So they are the standard bearers.

    And I didn't say all conservative commentary is asinine. Just most.

    The unknown that is known refers to a lot of the race/sex issues Steve brings up. I'd like to see these get discussed more openly in the MSM, not be taboo or media equivalents of knock-out games, where the person that brings them up gets knocked out of his career.

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  145. @Dai Alanye
    I keep looking for a comparison between Muslim terrorism and Jerry Falwell vs Hustler but can't find one. Derb seems to have overlooked that particular example of WASPish intolerance for free speech, possibly because Falwell failed to break out the nunchucks and AK47s.

    [This snark brought to you by the Dept of Fallacious Comparisons.]

    Plus, Falwell wasn’t an agent of the state, only seeking to vindicate his private interests. He had a colorable case as a jury could have determined that Flynt acted with actual malice. Hardly anything “Anglo-Saxon” or resembling “intolerance.”

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  146. @el topo
    This whole "Muslim terrorists against free speech" meme is almost as stupid as W.'s "They hate us for our freedoms". The guys who shot up Charlie Hebdo didn't care about free speech; they were reacting to a specific kind of speech that offended them. When someone mugs you in the street, they're not making a statement against private property rights - they just want your stuff.
    I just saw Christine Amanpour say this was an act "against satire", as if these guys were equally outraged by Jonathan Swift and Terry Southern.
    The Western media and politicians seems to be swimming in empty, self-serving abstractions, unable to see the concrete reality in front if them.

    It’s the elephant in the living room. Everyone in the family looks nervously left and right. Up at the ceiling. Down at their toes. No one wants to say the “I” word.

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  147. @Bill P

    this dumb leftoid magazine, who was already artificially kept alive by government subsidies, will receive an extra $1.2 million dollar

    French government donates $1.2 million to ensure Charlie Hebdo lives on

    -Martin
     
    This just proves that the French state subsidizes this garbage, as I suggested in another thread. It almost justifies Muslim aggression, as Charlie Hebdo is apparently a state-sponsored provocation. As an American, that would be intolerable to me.

    “Renvoyer dos à dos le fascisme et l’antifascisme signifie que le remède vaut la
    maladie. En effet, qu’est-ce qui justifie l’existence des antifascistes
    si ce n’est celle des fascistes? Qui est apparu en premier: la poule
    collabo ou l’œuf résistant ? Pour une bonne partie de l’UMP vagissante,
    militer contre le racisme et les discriminations serait équivalent à
    promouvoir le racisme et les discriminations. Quel talent!
    Mettons les skinheads sous protection policière!

    -frederic
     
    I suppose now it might be fair to ask "what came first: the leftist antifa chicken, or the militant Muslim egg?"

    That last sarcastic line about police protection is very revealing in light of recent events. Seems Charlie Hebdo writers were well aware of the benefits of state protection, and actively sought it so that they could continue to churn out their own version of "free" speech (it isn't free when other people have to support it) even as they push to deny that same protection to others.

    No. It doesn’t justify Muslim aggression.

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  148. @gzu
    Those who have European citizenships are no longer guests.

    Also, it's not that they wish to impose new rules. It is that they wish to see existing rules enforced fairly.

    But they (Muslims with French citizenship) are not citizens either.

    The last thing they want is existing rules applied fairly. Consider:

    “Democracy, liberalism, freedom, and so on, need to be destroyed.” ~ Anjem Choudary

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  149. @Ace
    Yes, the left is more willing to take a chance on the unknown.

    With other peoples' lives, liberty, and property as going-in-proposition numero uno.

    I assume that the leftist-favored known unknowns will inevitably be accepted by the unwashed if enough face time is allotted. Like the three (?) days Obama talked about within which the unwashed could examine bills he would be signing.

    O’Reilly is hardly a conservative standard bearer. He's worth listening to and produces a quality show. A bit on the generic side, but that's just me.

    Beck has done yeoman's work in exposing the agenda of progressives, whom you no doubt admire. In Beck's case in particular, it's not incredible at all that he's achieved considerable prominence. He consistently produces quality, substantive commentary and, unless you're Bill Whittle in disguise, I dare say you produce nothing remotely comparable. Not to mention that he has amassed a personal fortune, beaten alcoholism, created a media empire out of nothing, and is a thoroughly decent human being. Ho hum.

    But you're amazed at their success.

    Conservatism has a bit more to it than is dreamt of in your philosophy. It's a free for all, more accurately, with flashes of brilliance and insight at all points of the compass. E.g., Coulter, Malkin, Gabriele, Reed, Buchanan, Theodoracopulos, Dalrymple, Auster, Steyn, Seiyo, Bodissey, Derbyshire, Synon, West, Greenfield, Elder, Fjordman, Sailer, Kersey, Brimelow, Williams, Limbaugh, Savage, Levin, Simon, Hanson, Williamson, Trifkovik, Simpson, Delingpole, Horowitz, Brandt, Sayet, Mercer, Cashill, Nyqust, Whittle, Byrne, Gorin, Wilders, Amselem, Stix, Spengler, Hoppe, Simon, Porretto, Remus, O'Rourke, Neal, Deace, Breitbart, Taylor, Fleming, Polin, Wilson, Tyrrell, Francis, Sobran, Stein, Babbin, Handlery, de Jong, Condell, and my shoe repair guy.

    But you think that O'Reilly and Beck are the standard bearers of conservatism. And that conservative commentary is asinine.

    I think you misinterpreted what I wrote.

    O’Reilly and Beck are the most well-known, popular TV conservative commentators. So they are the standard bearers.

    And I didn’t say all conservative commentary is asinine. Just most.

    The unknown that is known refers to a lot of the race/sex issues Steve brings up. I’d like to see these get discussed more openly in the MSM, not be taboo or media equivalents of knock-out games, where the person that brings them up gets knocked out of his career.

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    • Replies: @KA
    They are. They set the tone . They were handsomely paid to create the atmosphere of hate,intolerance,blame game ,and racial stereotyping . But they will ignore the threat or dangers from within . They are basically place holders in the field of hate manufacturing . Beck was replaced for his tearful idiocy was so obvious Drudge was also.




    The selectivity is so mind boggling ! They don't wait even a week.

    This is the selectivity does-https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2015/01/14/days-hosting-massive-free-speech-march-france-arrests-comedian-facebook-comments/
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  150. @Hacienda
    I think you misinterpreted what I wrote.

    O'Reilly and Beck are the most well-known, popular TV conservative commentators. So they are the standard bearers.

    And I didn't say all conservative commentary is asinine. Just most.

    The unknown that is known refers to a lot of the race/sex issues Steve brings up. I'd like to see these get discussed more openly in the MSM, not be taboo or media equivalents of knock-out games, where the person that brings them up gets knocked out of his career.

    They are. They set the tone . They were handsomely paid to create the atmosphere of hate,intolerance,blame game ,and racial stereotyping . But they will ignore the threat or dangers from within . They are basically place holders in the field of hate manufacturing . Beck was replaced for his tearful idiocy was so obvious Drudge was also.

    The selectivity is so mind boggling ! They don’t wait even a week.

    This is the selectivity does-https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2015/01/14/days-hosting-massive-free-speech-march-france-arrests-comedian-facebook-comments/

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  151. @Steve Sailer
    "I believe the children are the future"

    “Take your hymnals and turn to Bette Midler’s sublime and incomparable ‘From a Distance,’ hymn number 363.”

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  152. Well, I read in my morning NYT+WSJ that the French government had just arrested that very popular black comedian for posting a joke on his Facebook page about Jews and terrorists. He’s being charged with “incitement to violence.”

    However, the French government is meanwhile demonstrating its strong commitment to freedom of speech by encouraging the Charlie people to publish a new issue of their magazine that shows pictures of the Prophet Muhammad being sodomized or whatever, and then helping to distribute millions of copies in the most heavily Muslim parts of France.

    It’s obviously important to take a moderate position, balancing freedom of speech against incitement to violence.

    Given that Facebook jokes by professional comedians in France are now punishable by prison sentences, I’ll need to revise my earlier estimate. I’d guess that if this website were in France, about 80% of the contributors and maybe 99% of the commenters would be serving hard prison time…

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    • Replies: @Ex Submarine Officer
    " I’d guess that if this website were in France, about 80% of the contributors and maybe 99% of the commenters would be serving hard prison time…"

    Now if that isn't the basis for a great marketing campaign for this site, I don't know what is....
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  153. @Hal
    I do not know if the "average Muslim" reacts as strongly as the "average Christian" when the revered person is mocked. I do know I am physically afraid of so-called Christian fundamentalists who are still angry that Jesus died. I know they become angry at me if I suggest that Jesus may have been a Buddhist or that the virgin birth myth was borrowed from Hercules. I know they become furious when I suggest the Jesus had no eschatological beliefs, was concerned with the Kingdom of Heaven as a state of mind here in this life, and that to believe on him really means to believe him when taught spirituality as an enlightened path.

    I wonder if the average Muslim has more reverence for the teachings of Mohamed and living them, rather than being overly concerned with believing on him.

    I wonder if the dedication to heritage and some fantastic stories that delineates some Jews, and the dedication to some fantastic stories and the promise of eternal redemption that delineates some Christians are not viewed by their adherents as being inferior to the dedication to a massive set of teachings that delineates most Muslims.

    Good thing you know all about being a Christian, while the Christian does not.

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  154. @Jefferson
    Does anybody here on iSteve think the 2 Algerian terrorists are pure "White" ? Judging by their phenotypes they definitely look like they have the Sub Saharan in their family tree, they resemble what African Americans would call light skin Brothas. Look at the hair texture of the Algerian terrorist who is not bald, it is definitely Negro textured hair. Algeria is on the border between North Africa and Sub Saharan Africa. They share a border with Black as midnight countries like Niger and Mali. So it is a safe bet to assume those 2 Algerian terrorist are genetically less Caucasian than a White family in Nebraska for example.

    I recall reading genetic studies of North Africans indicating that about 8% or so of their genome on average is of Negroid origin. Of course the fact that they are predomonantly Caucasoid does not mean that they are genetically identical to Swedes. There is a large amount of genetic variation within all the major divisions of humanity. The most fundament difference is between Sub-Saharan Africans (Negroes) and most of the rest of humanity.

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  155. @Big Bill

    Yet Jefferson over in Virginia knew about it, and he went out of his way to buy and presumably read it. His willingness to consider materialist philosophical arguments shows that he thought more like those “bad” French infidels than we want to admit.
     
    Holy smokes! If owning a book equals "thinking like" the author I am damn glad you can't see my library. I must "think like" Karl Marx, Adolf Hitler, Marcus Aurelius, Rosa Luxemburg, Hermann Goering, Augustine, Eusebius and R. Crumb ... all at the same time! Its a wonder my head doesn't explode!

    For an educated man, acquiring and reading books on philosophy, religion, history and politics is not "going out of one's way" -- it IS the Way.

    The philosophes views on religion were actually not that radical in the intellectual climate of the late 18th century. It’s likely that Jefferson like many other intellectuals of his time did not take the Christian gospels very seriously as the literal truth. Well before that time people like Descartes and Leibniz while sincere theists regarded the gospels as little more than edifying folk tales.

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  156. That’s why I don’t get why our State department is giving the Saudis crap about flogging a Saudi blogger. Objecting to them financing the spread of Wahabiism in the US would make more sense.

    What makes you think that “our” State Dept. is opposed to spreading Islam in the USA?

    It’s likely that Jefferson like many other intellectuals of his time did not take the Christian gospels very seriously as the literal truth.

    T. Jefferson made his own version of the New Testament. His version, basically, stripped out all sayings attributed to St. Paul and kept only the sayings of J.C., and also did the following:

    THE JEFFERSON BIBLE What Thomas Jefferson Selected as The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth [Kindle Edition]



    NOTE: ALL SECTIONS OF THIS E-BOOK ARE FULLY LINKED FOR EASY READING AND NAVIGATION.
    In 1820, Thomas Jefferson worked for months, often by candlelight, carefully cutting the pages of several Bibles to remove the teachings of Jesus. He then reorganized those verses and pasted them into a new book that he called simply, “The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth”.

    Jefferson believed that the words of Jesus were “the most benevolent code of morals which has ever been offered to man”, and he wanted to study his teachings apart from the rest of the Gospels.

    With a boldness that would have shocked many of his contemporaries, Jefferson eliminated anything that he felt was unsupported by history or science, including the virgin birth, Jesus’ miracles and the resurrection. He then rearranged the remaining passages chronologically and in parallel translations in English, French, Greek and Latin, combining parts of all four gospels into a narrative that begins in Bethlehem with Jesus’ birth and ends with his burial.

    Too controversial to be published during Jefferson’s lifetime, The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth,—now usually called The Jefferson Bible—was reprinted by an act of Congress in 1904, and for fifty years all freshman congressmen were given a copy when they took their oath of office.

    The Jefferson Bible: What Thomas Jefferson Selected as the Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth,includes Jefferson’s original English text, as well as a new introduction that examines his life and complicated religious beliefs. There is also an index listing Jefferson’s selections from each gospel and how he chose to reorganize them.

    Jefferson’s clear narrative, nicely formatted in this edition, makes this book a good introduction to Jesus’ life and teachings for both adults and younger readers. It will also be of special note for anyone interested in ethics, Christianity, American history, or the religious ideas of one of America’s most influential Founding Fathers, and is recommended as a worthy and very readable companion to the Smithsonian’s recent facsimile edition.

    Highly recommended.

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  157. @Ron Unz
    Well, I read in my morning NYT+WSJ that the French government had just arrested that very popular black comedian for posting a joke on his Facebook page about Jews and terrorists. He's being charged with "incitement to violence."

    However, the French government is meanwhile demonstrating its strong commitment to freedom of speech by encouraging the Charlie people to publish a new issue of their magazine that shows pictures of the Prophet Muhammad being sodomized or whatever, and then helping to distribute millions of copies in the most heavily Muslim parts of France.

    It's obviously important to take a moderate position, balancing freedom of speech against incitement to violence.

    Given that Facebook jokes by professional comedians in France are now punishable by prison sentences, I'll need to revise my earlier estimate. I'd guess that if this website were in France, about 80% of the contributors and maybe 99% of the commenters would be serving hard prison time...

    ” I’d guess that if this website were in France, about 80% of the contributors and maybe 99% of the commenters would be serving hard prison time…”

    Now if that isn’t the basis for a great marketing campaign for this site, I don’t know what is….

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    • Replies: @eisermann
    discussion forums are a great place to collect valuable Ips and emails.
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  158. While Rotherham seemed to get by w/o much more than a shrug , the EU Capos really seem to be cracking down on their home grown Jihadis . Very different response from past policies of coddling them . Why the change of heart ? Maybe looking ahead to the EU elections they plan to take the wind out of Le Pen’s sails. After which they will go back to a policy of “variety is the spice of life “.

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  159. @Lot
    France ought to think about a 3-strikes law

    From the article below, here's my timeline

    Born in 1982, one of 10 children from a Senegalese woman.

    1995-2007 - Multiple arrests for robbery and drug offenses.

    Unknown date - diagnosed as a psychopath

    2009 - Released from prison, given a make-work government job, meets President Sarkozy

    2010 - his apartment is found to contain 240 rounds of ammo

    2011-2014 regularly associates with jailed, free, and house-arrested terrorists, posts pictures of his hijabed girlfriend aiming weapons at the camara to social media

    2015 - Goes into a kosher supermarket and kills four people with a machine gun, wires the place with explosives but fails to do so properly, shot by swat team

    He was born in 1982 in the Paris suburb of Juvisy-sur-Orge, Le Monde reports. He grew up in Grigny south of Paris, the only boy in a family of 10 children. Since his late teens, he has been convicted several times for robbery and at least one time for drug trafficking, according to Liberation, a French newspaper.

    According to Liberation, in a report prepared at one point for a Paris court, a psychiatric expert found Coulibaly had an “immature and psychopathic personality” and “poor powers of introspection.” His sense of morality was apparently “lacking,” and he had a wish to be “all powerful,” Liberation says the expert wrote.

    In a 2009 interview for French newspaper Le Parisien, shortly after being released from jail, Coulibaly spoke of being excited to meet former French President Nicolas Sarkozy. The president wanted to meet young people working in companies that make efforts to employ youth, Le Parisien reported, according to a reprint of the story published Friday in Le Monde. “I don't know what I would say. So I would begin with hello,” Coulibaly, then 27, told Le Parisien. Coulibaly, whose contract was ending soon, said he would tell the president about his professional life and his job.

    Just 10 months afterwards, police searched Coulibaly's apartment and found 240 rounds of ammunition that could be used in Kalashnikov assault weapons, according to the Washington Post.
     
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/09/amedy-coulibaly-paris-kosher-market_n_6444418.html

    Looks like the Parish shooting – Bulgarian handler (AP report) followed the same FBI modus operandus in recruiting terror perps:

    FBI Celebrates Duping Another Mentally Ill Man Into Fake Terror Plot

    http://www.thenewamerican.com/usnews/crime/item/14528-fbi-celebrates-duping-another-mentally-ill-man-into-fake-terror-plot

    dramatized by Diane Keaton as a terrorist plant in Little Drummer Girl, J LeCarre. w/ Klaus Kinski as mos sad.

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  160. @Ex Submarine Officer
    " I’d guess that if this website were in France, about 80% of the contributors and maybe 99% of the commenters would be serving hard prison time…"

    Now if that isn't the basis for a great marketing campaign for this site, I don't know what is....

    discussion forums are a great place to collect valuable Ips and emails.

    Read More
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