The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 BlogviewIsrael Shamir Archive
Putin’s Missiles: Deterring an American Attack?
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>
shutterstock_644921497

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

Putin’s March 1st presentation of new Russian weapons has been greatly misunderstood as a declaration of strategic parity or triumphalism. There was a much more urgent need, namely, to prevent an imminent strike. This danger is not over yet, for a week later, on March, 7, President Putin emphasised his readiness to employ the nuclear weapons for retaliation purposes, even if it would end the world.

“Certainly, it would be a global disaster for humanity; a disaster for the entire world,” Putin said, “but, as a citizen of Russia and the head of the Russian state I must ask myself: Why would we want a world without Russia?”

This was a bold answer. A lesser man would probably reply hypocritically, dodging the brutal “yes, I shall destroy the world.” It means that the danger is still imminent, and that by these frank words President Putin wants to dissuade whoever intends to push him too far.

Why indeed, all of a sudden, did the Russian President decide now, of all times, to tell the world about these new weapons? It’s not that the Russians (or the Americans, for that matter) are accustomed to deliver hardware updates orbi et urbi. And 2002, the year the US withdrew from the ABM treaty, was consigned to history years ago. What was the reason, or at least the trigger?

Some observers bet it was a wily pre-election trick aimed at a domestic audience. This could be a consideration, but a minor one. The leading opponent of Mr Putin, the communist candidate Mr Grudinin, didn’t argue against Putin’s foreign policy or defence spending; the voters do approve of Putin’s foreign policy, anyway. Putin’s revelation made Russians proud, but they would vote Putin anyway.

The reason for Putin’s speech was a different and more urgent one: a terrible crescendo of threats had made Russia feel very vulnerable. Presumably their spy agencies convinced the Russian leader the threats were real.

The US establishment has been looking for a way to humiliate and punish Russia since Mueller’s indictment of 13 Russians. The indictment alleged that “the Russian conspirators wanted to promote discord in the United States and undermine public confidence in democracy,” in the words of Rod Rosenstein, the deputy attorney general overseeing the Mueller’s inquiry. It did not matter that the indicted Russians weren’t officials of the Russian state; that their effort (if these existed at all) were puny: a few ads at the cost of about $100,000, a drop in the ocean compared to the vast amounts of money spent by both the Clinton and Trump campaigns. However, the US establishment called these minor actions of private Russian citizens an “act of war.”

On February 19, Glenn Greenwald summed up the US reactions in the piece called A Consensus Emerges: Russia Committed an “Act of War” on Par With Pearl Harbor and 9/11. He reminded us that Senators from both parties, such as Republican John McCain and Democrat Jeanne Shaheen, have long described Russian meddling in 2016 as an “act of war.” Hillary Clinton described Russia’s alleged hacking of the DNC and John Podesta’s email inbox as a “cyber 9/11.” Tom Friedman of the New York Times said on “Morning Joe” that Russian hacking “was a 9/11-scale event. They attacked the core of our democracy. That was a Pearl Harbor-scale event.”

After the indictment, this comparison became a common place rhetoric. “The Washington Post’s Karen Tumulty, complaining about President Donald Trump’s inaction, asked readers to “imagine how history would have judged Franklin D. Roosevelt in the aftermath of Pearl Harbor, if he had taken to the radio airwaves to declare that Tokyo was ‘laughing their asses off.’ Or if George W. Bush had stood in the rubble of the World Trade Center with a bullhorn and launched a name-calling tirade against the Democrats.”

Greenwald concluded: “If Russian election meddling is on par with the Pearl Harbor and 9/11 attacks, then should the U.S. response be on par with its response to those attacks?” In other words, the US politicians and media called to give Russia the same treatment the US gave to Japan (Hiroshima and Nagasaki) and to Afghanistan (invasion followed by 16 years of occupation).

In the search for escalation from fiery talk to fire, the Anglo-American establishment turned to the familiar device of alleged Syrian gas attacks. People have been trained to respond to such accusations (and alternatively, to keep mum while the US bombs Mosul and Raqqa, or prepares to nuke North Korea). Assad and Russia were accused of gassing the rebel stronghold of Eastern Ghouta, the West’s last chance to enforce regime change in Syria by virtue of its location near the capital.

The alleged gas chlorine attack was reported on February 25th, and it was immediately denied by the Russians and the Syrians. The Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said that this anonymous ‘bogus report’ had been originated in the US in order to denigrate Syrian government and its troops, to accuse them of war crimes and to cause permanent breakup of Syria. The US and its allies, he said, were “simply exploiting baseless allegations of toxic weapons use by Damascus as a tool of anti-Syrian political engineering”.

The rebels said they were attacked by chlorine gas, as opposed to previous times when they claimed gas sarin was used. Chlorine gas is a tricky stuff; it is not deadly though unhealthy for inhaling. It is also quite difficult to monitor and verify, for chlorine is widely used for domestic purposes from cleaning bathrooms to purifying water and is not a banned substance (though the gas chlorine is forbidden). This difficulty to verify had made it an easy one to claim.

ORDER IT NOW

The situation in E. Ghouta was a replay of Aleppo; reports of wounded children, films produced by the White Helmets, and stubborn attempts by the rebels to prevent civilian exodus from the area. Whenever the rebels are pushed hard, they produce a story of suffering civilians and of gas attacks, hoping the US will force the Syrian government and their Russian allies to relent.

Undoubtedly civilians have suffered in the Syrian war; however, there is a way to end their suffering. The rebels could lay down their arms and join the political process, like everybody else. There are plenty of Americans unhappy with the Trump regime, but they do not shell Washington DC; they hope for a better and different outcome at the next elections. Their example can be emulated by the Syrian rebels, and then, the civilians won’t suffer.

If that’s too much to ask for, they can let the civilians leave; and fight to the bitter end. But no, they do not let the civilians out; instead, they produce reports of civilians suffering and wait for the Mounties to ride in and save them.

There was an extra angle. The rebels of E. Ghouta are trained and led by British and American intelligence officers, and they came under Russian fire. Perhaps it was a Russian payoff for the bombardment of oil field installations near Deir ez-Zor where the Russian private military company (called Wagner after their leader nickname’s) bore the brunt of and suffered many casualties. Thierry Meyssan, the well known French journalist resident in Damascus claimed that Russian ground troops also participated in the assault on Eastern Ghouta. It is possible that the Russians and the Americans are already fighting directly, though both sides are loth to admit their losses.

The British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson was the first to “seriously consider” air strikes in Syria. He missed the fun of Libya (“we came, we saw, he died”) and now the redhead is eager to bomb anybody. However, his Parliament does not allow him to do so.

The ball was taken up by the Americans. Bloomberg editorialized: “It’s time for another red line, one that the U.S. won’t back away from. Trump should tell Assad and his Russian backers that any more proved use of any chemical weapon, including chlorine, will be met with even greater retaliation than what happened in April.”

[This is a reference to Trump’s cruise missile strike on Syria’s Shayrat air base, allegedly in revenge for Syrian sarin gas attack in Khan Sheikhoun. Doubts about this “sarin gas attack” emerged right away, and Unz.com published it quickly. In June 2017, Seymour Hersh exposed the full story behind Shayrat: there was no “sarin attack”, and President Trump was told by his own intelligence officers to drop the case. He still insisted and attacked but warned the Russians in advance, and there were no Russian or Syrian casualties, and very little damage at the cost of $100 million to the US taxpayer. The US mainstream media was exuberant, and congratulated Trump with this example of Presidential behaviour.]

The American Conservative, the Republican and Trump-friendly site objected to plans to bomb Syria: “Trump had no authority to order the attack on Syrian forces last year, and he still doesn’t have it now. There is no international mandate for U.S. forces to be in Syria, nor is there any authorization for military action against Syrian government forces or their allies. If Trump orders another illegal attack, the U.S. will be committing more acts of war against a government that poses no threat to us, has done nothing to us or our treaty allies, and is still fighting inside its own internationally recognized borders.”

But voices of those supporting the strikes and punishing Russians and Syrians sounded stronger. “White House considers new military action against Syrian regime,” wrote The Washington Post on March, 5. The newspaper added details who pushed for the attack (national security adviser H.R. McMaster) and who objected (Defense Secretary Jim Mattis). “Other officials, particularly at the White House and the State Department, appear more open to renewed action against Assad,” said the report.

This is the background of Putin’s speech of March 1st. The Russian president spoke of the new Russian missiles impervious to Aegis and unstoppable by ground fire that can turn the US aircraft carriers, the most potent symbol of the US power, into sitting ducks. Russia will sink them in case of an attack on Russia or on her allies, said Putin.

‘Allies’ is the keyword in the message. The threatened ally of Russia is Syria. Putin warned the Americans that their air strike on Syria may be answered with a strike upon their Carrier Strike Group (CSG) in the area. If you bomb Damascus, we shall send your CSGs in the Med and in the Gulf down to the sea bottom. We can incinerate your air bases in the area, too.

The sharply raised stakes were a game-changer. Who knows what will be the Russian response on this or other action of the Western allies? The warlike neocons say Russia is all talk, all bluff. Realists say that the US may suffer the humiliating and painful loss of its CSGs with thousands of lives at sea. The US President had enjoyed the previous strike of Syria with dozens of Tomahawks before returning to his beautiful chocolate cake. If the strike were revisited upon the striking SCGs – this is totally different matter. Did you say Pearl Harbour?

Even if this exchange would not lead to massive nuclear strikes of the mainland US and Russia and total world-destroying war, it would have a very high price tag. The Russians can even strike President Trump’s private club in Palm Beach, Fla as they naughtily presented on the mock video.

ORDER IT NOW

Apparently, President Trump discussed it now with the UK Prime Minister Theresa May. The Brits are for some reason more keen to push for war with Russia. Now they try their best to stop the rapprochement between the US and Russia. The peculiar story of poisoning their own ex-spy with a nerve gas adds spice to their effort, and the Russian Embassy UK Twitter troll twitted: “In today’s papers: pundits call on @Theresa_May to disrupt possible Russia-US thaw. No trust in Britain’s best friend and ally?”

The nuclear poker game just became more exciting. Are the Russians bluffing, or aren’t they? Will they play, or will they drop their cards, this is the question. There is no answer yet. Only history can answer it.

Meanwhile, judging by the tense calm in the Middle East and elsewhere, Putin’s game had been successful. The US missiles rested at their launching sites, and so did the Russian ones. The Russian-Syrian offensive in E. Ghouta proceeds unabated, while the US ground operations in Syria came to standstill, as the Kurds are too busy confronting the Turks. Perhaps we shall survive this almost-confrontation, as we have survived the 2011 almost-confrontation.

Israel Shamir can be reached at [email protected]

This article was first published at The Unz Review.

 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: American Military, Russia, Syria 
Hide 131 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. jojo says:

    Nice essay (as usual), but two factual corrections:

    1) You write: “He still insisted and attacked but warned the Russians in advance, and there were no Russian or Syrian casualties, and very little damage at the cost of $100 million to the US taxpayer.”
    From the article you referenced:
    >>Syrian officials said at least seven people were killed and nine wounded in US missile attack. <<

    2) You write: 'The British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson was the first to “seriously consider” air strikes in Syria.'
    Actually, Macron beat him to that — loathe to say — but maybe you are right here in that it was hard to "seriously consider" Macron's threat.

    • Replies: @Israel Shamir
    , @llloyd
  2. El Dato says:

    Thierry Meyssan, the well known French journalist resident in Damascus claimed that Russian ground troops also participated in the assault on Eastern Ghouta.

    Very unlikely. I mostly consider Thierry Meyssan to make random conspiratory shit up about things he doesn’t know all that much about to sell and drive people to his left-wing agenda. As such, he’s not a “journalist” but a “conspirationalist”.

    Unlike Seymour Hersh whose stories are well-based in reality.

  3. @jojo

    you are right, I had to say “very few casualties”. For $100 million, seven bodies is a poor return, but still something.

  4. SMERSH says:

    The most imminent threat is US sneak attack by biowarfare in breach of the Convention on the Opening of Hostilities and the Biological Weapons Convention.

    Let the Foreign Affairs Ministry explain the US threat [long quote but important]:

    “The Biological Weapons Convention (BTWC)

    “US Violations of Provisions of Article I of the BTWC

    “While formally not in breach of its obligations and supportive of the importance of the BTWC, the US administration, however, continues to avoid establishing international control over its biological activities in any form. A feature of this policy is its persistence in downplaying the BTWC’s role in strengthening the biological weapons nonproliferation regime.

    [MORE]

    “1. Begun at the University of Pennsylvania, research on a synthetic smallpox virus continues in the US that caused a mixed assessment in the world as early as 2002. Despite the prohibition of the World Health Organization on such work, the US is trying to justify the need for it by a desire to study this pathogenic organism at a qualitatively different level than was done before its official destruction in 1980.

    “2. Especially questionable from the standpoint of Article I of the BTWC look the so called “threat assessment investigations” that have noticeably intensified in recent years and are being justified on the grounds of the need to combat terrorism. They presuppose not only the traditional defense-related study of the damaging effects of known biological pathogenic agents (BPA), but also attempts at the practical creation of new (including genetically modified) agents as part of simulation of the relevant capabilities of terrorist organizations. Such research was launched way back in the mid-1990s, when the so called rogue states acted as the chief enemy of the United States (Projects Clear Vision, Bacchus, Jefferson and others). Conducting these investigations is currently entrusted to the research institutions of the Department of Homeland Security.

    “US Violations of Provisions of Article IV of the BTWC and UNSCR 1540

    “Under US law, all the country’s research outfits working with pathogenic (disease-causing) organisms must be specially certified by authorized Department of Health or Agriculture bodies according to the type of human, animal or plant pathogen, along with reporting regularly on their use and transfer. Meanwhile, the provisions of US law are routinely violated.

    “1. In a 2005 audit of the Department of Agriculture’s relevant activities, its Audit Office uncovered numerous violations of procedures for processing applications from interested organizations and decision making, control over the maintenance of security at the facilities and the preservation of collections of pathogens, employee access to the relevant work, and so on. The lack of adequate oversight by regulatory authorities had led to the identification in 2005 of three organizations in illegal possession of pathogenic agents of dangerous and infectious plant and animal diseases, including the eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus (the case-fatality rate in humans being 35%). As a result, the Department’s activities in monitoring the circulation of pathogenic microorganisms was evaluated as unsatisfactory, as well as highlighting the cases of concealment by its officials of the violations identified in the bodies under DA supervision.

    “2. Despite the tightening of rules on handling the pathogenic agents of dangerous and infectious diseases, the sharply increased number of persons given access to them in parallel with the general decline in their professional skills were objective reasons for the high incidence of intra-laboratory infection among staff and other incidents in this area that have occurred in recent years. In particular, such facts were noted in the Boston University Medical Center (tularemia infection, August 2004), Research Institute in Oakland, New Jersey (anthrax infection, June 2004), the Rocky Mountain Microbiology Laboratory in Denver, Colorado (Q fever infection, February 2005), the Health Research Institute (loss of rodents infected with plague, September 2005), the Midwest Research Institute in Kansas City, Kansas (anthrax infection, October 2005) and others.

    “3. The case of brucellosis infection of a female employee at the Texas University (College Station), concealed by senior university officials and made public only in April 2007, had special repercussions. It was caused by laboratory managers’ noncompliance with the regulations governing the admission of staff to work with pathogenic microorganisms, which had led to a breach of the special safety precautions. The ensuing check-up identified an additional number of Q fever infections among the staff, as well as the loss of several laboratory animals infected with it. The University had its license to conduct these studies revoked.

    “4. September 2008 saw the publication of the results of a Government Accountability Office examination of the physical security of private research centers with top biosafety laboratories (the Institute of Virology and Immunology, Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, San Antonio, Texas and the Center of Virology and Immunology of the University of Georgia, Atlanta). It was found that they were not secure enough and could not prevent unauthorized intrusion, ranking substantially lower than the security measures at similar federally owned facilities (the absence of roving armed guards, automatic barriers at the entrance gates, door frame metal detectors, etc.). The re-inspection conducted in July 2010 again revealed the same shortcomings, which shows their managements’ disregard for the previously made representations.

    “5. In recent years, US special services have repeatedly thwarted attempts at illegal exports of equipment and materials intended for microbiological and biotechnological research, as well as pathogenic microorganisms. Thus, in January 2006 Thomas Butler, a former Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center researcher convicted of pathogenic microorganism import and export violations, completed a two-year prison term. While working in Tanzania in 2001-2002, this expert had repeatedly smuggled vials of the human plague into the United States, as well as transporting them across the country. In addition, at the time of arrest by FBI agents in January 2003 Butler was unable to explain the disappearance of 30 samples of this pathogen, which were never subsequently found.

    “US Violations of Obligations to Comply with the BTWC Confidence Building Measures

    “The BTWC has a mechanism of confidence building measures that presupposes states parties should annually declare the content of their microbiological research and related research facilities. Furthermore, it particularly highlights the sections on the availability of biological security programs – Form A, part 2 (ii). The mechanism is now virtually the only significant tool for obtaining such information and thus ensuring at least the relative transparency of the work being done.

    “The US excludes from the declarable certain medical and biological facilities because of the insufficient certainty of criteria for assigning national research programs, including military, to the specified category. In particular, the US has not declared year after year its network of military medical research centers in Indonesia, Thailand, Peru, Egypt, Kenya and other countries under the pretext of their location outside of US territory.

    “In the conditions of a sharp escalation of the scope and pace of biological research in the period 2001-2009 the United States transferred a sizeable portion of the research to civilian departments and agencies and even private firms. In addition, some of the investigations have been moved from the category of “defense research” to the category of anti-terrorism research, which also helps the US avoid the need to declare them as part of the confidence building measures and further reduce the monitoring possibilities of the world community.”

  5. The Scalpel says: • Website

    “Why indeed, all of a sudden, did the Russian President decide now, of all times, to tell the world about these new weapons?”

    When Russian supplied Syrian SAMs start shooting down US aircraft, Putin wants to make sure things stay conventional

  6. ken_lov says: • Website

    Calling Daniel Larison “Trump-friendly” is absurd. He’s been a consistently strong critic of Trump and his approach to foreign policy since the Republican primary.

  7. Issac says:

    I have yet to be convinced that the Russia gag is anything but a foreign face being plastered on domestic theatrics. There are regular territorial spars between the ersatz empires, but nothing on the level of nuclear exchange. For all the American calamity over the election, deviance from the status quo has been entirely minimal. The supermajority of dagger work has taken place within the US political power structure, likely settling scores that have nothing to do with Russia.

    Given that both Russia and the US are allies of Israel (both pledging to defend us from Iran if the need arises) I see no major conflagration on the horizon. More soldiers will be frittered away in Syria and elsewhere, no doubt, as they always have, but nothing more.

  8. llloyd says: • Website
    @jojo

    “Goodness gracious anyone hurt.” “No Ma’am, killed seven Arabs.” It was that daughter of his Ivanka and Jared who forced POTUS’ hand on the missile strike. The story I heard is Donald and Jared had nearly come to blows over Holocaust Denial. That was pay off. In return, the grand daughters sang to the Club guest, President Xi of China who probably felt quite ill over the combination of the missile attack and the chocolate cake. I mean he was probably reminded of Japanese occupation movies that he has insisted must be shown on Chinese television.

  9. Beckow says:

    The media story that this is a ‘pre-election’ gimmick suggests that Kremlin is trying to threaten its own people with nuclear annihilation if they don’t come to vote. That’s rather extreme.

    Why now? Maybe the presentation was finally ready…

  10. Giuseppe says:

    The American Conservative, the Republican and Trump-friendly site…

    A very Trump unfriendly, anti war, anti mainstream GOP and paleoconservative site.

    • Replies: @Tsar Nicholas
  11. Cyrano says:

    Me personally, I think that Putin is in a panic mode. He might have his wonder weapons, but US has their diversity. And as we all know, diversity is their strength. As they continue to diversify their racial and ethnic portfolio in the coming years, they will only become stronger and stronger until at one point they will be practically invincible. Putin senses this, he knows that the window of opportunity is closing up fast and he wants to do something before US become invincible via diversity strength.

  12. Dmitry says:

    I would say specific timing has more to do with presenting achievements before the election.

  13. @Cyrano

    Diversity may have been a strength back in the days when immigrants quickly assimilated and became Americans but the diversity of today means they come for the passport and the perceived benefits but wish to retain the best (for themselves) of both worlds. Many people I knew who lived in Britain during WWII remarked that despite the hardships then the social cohesion was never stronger nor better. That ship sailed long ago in Britain as it has in the US. Social cohesion is a thing of the past, divide and rule is now the order of the day.

    • Replies: @mp
    , @Alfred
    , @Ben Sampson
  14. Seraphim says:
    @Cyrano

    I gather that’s your ‘Balkan sense of humor’!

    • Replies: @Cyrano
  15. FB says:

    This is a good article by Shamir…

    Some points worth reflecting on…Syria is obviously heating up…

    D. Dump came in talking about getting out of that adventure cooked up by the Obama crowd…but he has made a quite spectacular U turn…

    Funny how that works…maybe McMaster is really the president…?

    So bird dog Shamir is pointing in the right direction methinks…things could go kinetic in Syria…

    The huge media storm and ominous sounds coming from DC on behalf of the bearded fanatics in East Ghouta is a sign that the regime change project has not been abandoned…

    Also the Turks have become a real headache for the US with their war against the Kurds…of course the Turks are a headache for Syria and Russia too…just not as much as for the silly US and their SDF contraption…

    So the old neocon agenda is stubbornly refusing to die in Syria…like the vampire that just can’t be killed…

    Also have to admit that Shamir’s scenario sounds awfully tantalizing…I for one would love to see things go kinetic…just to see how well the US paper tiger can take a punch…

    No doubt the Russian are in a position to throw a haymaker or two if the US decides it wants to dance…[and by 'US' I mean morons like McMaster and co...and increasingly Tillerson also]

    Who’s going to stand with them if they decide to tango with Russia in Syria…?

    Who will let them use their airfields…?

    Turkey…?…Iraq…?…Israel…?…KSA…?

    Heck even the UK parliament would likely say ‘no thanks’ to letting the yanks use their Akrotiri base in Cyprus to launch a war against Russia…[and see it get wiped off the map minutes later...]

    So this angle of Shamir’s may have some real meat on it…

    A very graphic warning from Putin…who is definitely not a bluffer…

    Why now…?

    It could well be all about Syria…

  16. Miro23 says:

    The reason for Putin’s speech was a different and more urgent one: a terrible crescendo of threats had made Russia feel very vulnerable. Presumably their spy agencies convinced the Russian leader the threats were real.

    There’s also the use of the interesting phrase “Pearl Harbor” connected to 9/11 (Tom Friedman of the New York Times said on “Morning Joe” that Russian hacking “was a 9/11-scale event. They attacked the core of our democracy. That was a Pearl Harbor-scale event.”). The “New Pearl Harbor” idea has history, connected as it is to 9/11 planning, and to the same crowd of people – and with the same kind of fakery and with the same kind of orchestration.

    So it does look (again) like the preparation of the US public for an “Event”.

    Putin’s reply, is that if they run a False Flag against Russia, then he’s not going to escalate, he’ll go directly into a full nuclear war – which is useful, since they probably calculated that 1) he would waste time on diplomatic moves 2) try some “measured response” – again giving time for their planned successful First Strike.

    And, another aspect is the chronic leakiness of information in the Digital Age.

    Orchestrated propaganda needs planning and secret meetings, which have no doubt happened, and which inevitably now serve to alert dissidents (same as the 9/11 planning) – not to speak of First Strike planning which would alert many more. Secrecy is not what it used to be (Example: the Aaron Russo 9/11 video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h6SdkRoBmvY ).

    • Replies: @Paw
  17. The recent murders or attempted murders in Britain, by a nerve gas, with May’s reaction, seem a repetition of the MH17 show.

    As to Putin’s statements, they remind me of the two atomic bombs on Japan.
    Until recently I considered these nonsense, after reading a nearly hour to hour description on how the emperor could end the war, I had to change my view.
    Together with the defeat of the invincible Japanese Kwantung army by the USSR this brought many in Japan to their senses.

    A great statesman, Putin, in my opinion.
    I hope his statements brought sense into more USA citizens.

    • Replies: @for-the-record
  18. yurivku says:

    The nuclear poker game just became more exciting. Are the Russians bluffing, or aren’t they? Will they play, or will they drop their cards, this is the question. There is no answer yet. Only history can answer it.

    Haley and May are going to prohibit Russian AF to hit anybody in Syria.
    Anglo-Hindi women not worse then Russian women are (в горящую избу войдут)…
    Russians are scared.

    https://vz.ru/news/2018/3/13/912176.html

    So answer is close, do not go away from the TV screen. Stay tuned.

  19. Fred7 says:

    re; Cyrano. Check your sarcasm meter Nosey.

  20. mp says:
    @NoseytheDuke

    Cyrano was making a joke… You could tell when he said Putin was in “panic mode.” Putin never panics, so we know that Cyrano was being facetious. The idea that our strength will increase in proportion to our diversity, making us invincible, is a pretty clever thought. It takes the meme to its absurd conclusion.

    • Replies: @NoseytheDuke
  21. The Western corporatocracy is in desperation. The 500 year European-USA colonial domination of most of the planet is at risk. They thought they’d get the whole planet, but they won’t.

    They bet $Trillions, £Billions, €Trillions and ¥Zillions in accumulated debt that they’d rule with the NWO.

    The Empire is built on usurious money lending and reserve and ‘hard’ currencies, while the nations of Latin America, Africa, Asia are screwed, and people impoverished with soft ever depreciating currencies. The petrodollar underpins it all, and a 1,000 US and NATO bases underpins the petrodollar- as does doing the Saudis bidding.

    But on 26th this month China launches the petroyuan. Developing world nations may be eager to throw off the Yankee yoke after all this time. Eventually the US$ loses reserve currency status and the G7 currencies slide with it. A hyperinflationary devalued $ won’t pay the legions and they’ll have to return home.

    Russia has almost no debt and vast resources. China has zero foreign debt, despite a lot of internal dodgy banks. The Third World cheers from the sidelines, dreaming of a better deal.

    So a final push to oust Assad and rescue the petrodollar and humiliate and drive Russia out of Syria to reaffirm the military might of the West might have been on the cards.

    That puts Shamir’s article in perspective.

    • Agree: Kiza
    • Replies: @Joe Levantine
    , @FB
  22. @mp

    He had mentioned he was considering doing stand-up comedy so I was forewarned. I suppose I’ve read too many comments by the likes of Michael Kenny and Quartermaster. Cheers.

  23. The rebels could lay down their arms and join the political process, like everybody else.

    This is risible. There was no political “process” under the Assads. That’s why they took up arms in the first place.

    Having said that, the Assads were the best Syria was going to get. Although Israel doesn’t like them, the Assads were best for them as well. They, at least, were predictable.

    The “revelation” of Putin’s super weapons changes nothing. There is no reason to believe they exist and Putin is increasingly in a weak position internationally. The DimoKKKRat’s fantasies about Russian meddling are just that, a fantasy.

  24. @PeacePlease

    Nicely thought and well written. Yes we may be at the cusp of a new monetary order, but I do not think the PTB will relinquish their cherished Dollar without a fight unless they realise they are contemplating suicide.

  25. yurivku says:

    I found a piece of discussion where are we going to when read Sun Tszu too much:

    http://www.unz.com/tsaker/escalation-in-syria-how-far-can-the-russians-be-pushed/#comment-2207397

    I said – that should be clear military reaction from Russia to hostile ZUS behaviour until too late:

    http://www.unz.com/tsaker/escalation-in-syria-how-far-can-the-russians-be-pushed/#comment-2207397

    And now seems to be almost too late.
    Now they need millions of US citizens to be killed in order to understand where is bluff and where reality begins.

  26. Putins statement was a warning to the Zionist neocons who control every facet of the U.S. government that Russia stands ready to respond to an attack with all its force and that includes nuclear weapons and that the Zionist warmongers have been put on notice.

    Russia will not be a victim of the Zionist NWO, and Russia realizes that the U.S. government is not controlled by the American people, and proof of this is that Israel and the deep state did 911 and got away with it and that the Zionists have kept America in perpetual wars for the goal of Zionist NWO.

    God bless Putin and Russia.

    • Replies: @Uncle Sam
  27. FB says:

    Well…some news items this morning…

    1. Tillerson is out…Pompeo in…will N. Haley follow Tillerson out the door…?

    2. Russia vows ‘response’ if Syria is attacked…

    3. Russia demands Skripal ‘poisoning’ docs as per OPCW protocol…UK refuses…

    4. Kalibr-carrying Admiral Essen Frigate steaming to Med sea…

    Come on McMaster and various McChicken US ‘men in uniform’…let’s see what you got…

  28. FB says:
    @PeacePlease

    ‘…So a final push to oust Assad and rescue the petrodollar and humiliate and drive Russia out of Syria to reaffirm the military might of the West might have been on the cards…’

    Yup…the Ponzi Empire is feeling very desperate now…

    They see Syria as the First Domino…the others will surely follow as described…

    ‘…But on 26th this month China launches the petroyuan. Developing world nations may be eager to throw off the Yankee yoke after all this time.

    Eventually the US$ loses reserve currency status and the G7 currencies slide with it. A hyperinflationary devalued $ won’t pay the legions and they’ll have to return home…’

    Yup…it’s the beginning of the end…

    ‘…The Western corporatocracy is in desperation…’

    ‘Nuff said…

  29. ” The “revelation” of Putin’s super weapons changes nothing. There is no reason to believe they exist and Putin is increasingly in a weak position internationally. ”

    Cannot remember Putin bluffing one time.
    Weak position, he has China, Iran, Turkey, Syria on his side, maybe India, possibly Brazil.
    And Germany is quite ambiguous about Russia.

    • Agree: FB
  30. FB says:

    And since Shamir mentioned the ‘fun of Libya’…[we came...we saw...he died...]

    Today from India…

    • Replies: @Ilyana_Rozumova
    , @bjondo
  31. wayfarer says:

    How the Zionist Owned U.S. Government and Israel Destroyed a Nation

    …..

  32. Russia can shower Syria by cruise missiles from ships from Caspian see.
    They already made a test run of it not long time ago.

  33. Alfred says:
    @NoseytheDuke

    Cyrano is being sarcastic. :-)

  34. Joe Hide says:

    What’s going on has got to be a mis-and dis-informational effort to distract and mis-direct the perverted deep state and it’s allies.
    After all, things are generally getting much better throughout the world. No WW3, no North Korean war, the Syrian War has been winding down, the Ukrainian war has not exploded, Crimea is solidly in the Russian camp, 1000′s of pedophiles, murderous pyschopaths, and extreme humanity abusers are being arrested/neutralized/disempowered globally, the world economy hasn’t collapsed, and a solidly insane she’s-not-a-lady isn’t the U.S. President
    Looks like a net global positive to me.
    STILL, Israel Shamir, This all just my take on events and I continue to love your writing style. Keep at it!

  35. @jilles dykstra

    Until recently I considered these nonsense, after reading a nearly hour to hour description on how the emperor could end the war, I had to change my view.

    Have you read Racing the Enemy: Stalin, Truman, and the Surrender of Japan by Tsuyoshi Hasegawa, a Japanese-American historian who was apparently the first to make significant use of documents from all 3 countries (Russia, Japan, USA). His basic conclusion is that:

    Rather, what decisively changed the views of the Japanese ruling elite was the Soviet entry into the war. It catapulted the Japanese government into taking immediate action. For the first time, it forced the government squarely to confront the issue of whether it should accept the Potsdam terms. In the tortuous discussions from August 9 through August 14, the peace party, motivated by a profound sense of betrayal, fear of Soviet influence on occupation policy, and above all by a desperate desire to preserve the imperial house, finally staged a conspiracy to impose the “emperor’s sacred decision” and accept the Potsdam terms, believing that under the circumstances surrendering to the United States would best assure the preservation of the imperial house and save the emperor.

    The quote above is from an article of his replying to some of his critics.

    https://apjjf.org/-tsuyoshi-hasegawa/2501/article.html

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  36. Why indeed, all of a sudden, did the Russian President decide now, of all times, to tell the world about these new weapons?

    Russians quite regularly boast about their invincible weapons particularly ballistic missiles. Pretty much every time the US builds another radar installation or places anti ballistic missile battery or constructs a military base close to their border. The first announcements of this sort date back to 2004.

    2004 – announcement about a new missile that would preserve nuclear parity with the US and overcome missile defense.

    2005 – announcement about superior Russian weaponry and new strategic missile that had no equal in the world

    2006 – Putin claim that Russia has new weapons which are not afraid of any missile defence.

    At least one such claim every year but I do not want to bore readers of this blog with a 4000 word long essay so I will skip the rest of the years and his latest announcement in 2018 you all know. Each such claim starts a short lived frenzy of media interviews, discussions, analyses, etc., as if a simple pronouncemet equaled hard facts. If he is so confident about the invincibility of his weapons why those constant reminders. I do not believe that it has anything to do with a warning to the West. I am sure the intelligece agencies are keeping a close watch on Russian military technology and do not need Putin to tell them what he is up to. If it is indeed a warning like the previous ones and he is taken seriously than there is no need to repeat them. If he is not taken seriously than he is wasting his time. He likes to boast and judging from the small sample of Russian contributors that seems to be part of a Russian national character. He was also cought lying on more than one occasion so I would not attach too much importance to his latest bravado.

  37. Mulegino1 says:
    @Cyrano

    Indeed, once the new Rainbow Division of the First Mechanized LGBQT Corps becomes operational, the Russians will have no other choice than to come to the negotiating table.

    The sight of those cadets marching in their red high heels must have sent chills down the spine of General Shoigu.

    • LOL: yurivku
  38. @for-the-record

    I read
    Japan’s Decision to Surrender
    Robert J. C. Butow
    A day to day description of what went on in the critical days, sometimes by the hour, or by minute.

    I cannot completely accept the above quote.
    What was at the time the ruling elite ?

    Since the mid or early thirties the military ruled Japan.
    The fanatical military were prepared to wage war on the Japanese mainland, accepting 20 million deaths.

    The Okinawa ratio US Japanese deaths was, from memory, 7000 to 150000.
    If one accepts this ratio continuing the war with an invasion on the mainland this would have cost over 900.000 USA deaths.

    Therefore the concept of unconditional surrender was left, as had been the case in Italy.

    And about imposing, the emperor played an active role in ending the war, risking his own life.
    Even after the recording had been made of the emperor announcing, in not too explicit terms, the surrender, by radio, the very first time Japanese heard his voice, fanatics tried to get hold of the recording.
    As I stated, the two atomic bombs, plus the annihilation of the Kwantung army, made it possible.

  39. A very good piece by Israel. Meanwhile Gerasimov was explicit in his warning to shoot down in Syria not only missiles but carriers too. This is first. I am pretty sure there is a lot of back and forth on “deconfliction line” in Syria between Russians and Americans.

  40. @FB

    It is clearly obvious that somebody there did not like her. Some person greased the stairs.
    Or maybe she did have a slippery slippers.

    • Replies: @NoseytheDuke
  41. bjondo says:
    @FB

    Hag Witch’s evil too much for her legs.

    She moves, she falls, the world laughs.

  42. ValmMond says:
    @Regnum Nostrum

    In the Mannerheim tape recording, Hitler (unaware that he’s being recorded), acknowledged that he seriously underestimated the Soviet military firepower and that he probably would have never invaded the USSR, had he known the real size and potential of the Soviet military machine .

    Putin is sending the delusional and amnesic collective West a gentle reminder of how history goes. See our weapons on pictures, so that you don’t have to see them coming at you. That’s all he’s saying. And he’s a master of understatement, as you probably soon will find out.

    the intelligece agencies are keeping a close watch on Russian military technology

    Russia has a culture of secrecy, of which neither you nor your “intelligence agencies” have the slightest idea. Not to mention that, lately, those agencies have been too busy staging false-flags operations here and there and serving non-US interests.
    I know for a fact that the Soviet military has been experimenting with new laws of physics at least since the late 70s. But please feel free to remain in denial. It’s a protective mechanism, which would allow you to preserve what’s left from your sanity.

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  43. Clearly, nobody is taking Putin seriously! It’s hard to blame them! The author quotes Putin as saying “why would we [Russians?] want a world without Russia?” OK. Why then would “a citizen of Russia and the head of the Russian state” deliberately cause such a situation to come about by starting a nuclear war? Even if the Russian Federation lost a conventional war, as it probably would, Russia would not cease to exist. Germany suffered massive destruction in WWII but still exists today. Ditto for Japan, which even had nuclear bombs dropped on it. As a matter of common sense, why would “the head of the Russian state “, faced with a choice between a “world without Russia” and a world with Russia, choose the former alternative? That’s bull! If Putin is reduced to such transparent scaremongering, then his position must be getting fairly desperate.

  44. @Regnum Nostrum

    Then you will be surprised when the US-UK-FRA bomb the Syrians for the fourth time in 3 years, but this time triggering a violent Russian response that will knock the teeth out of the Zionist US command in the region- hopefully for good.

    • Replies: @EliteCommInc.
  45. Russia was never going to quietly into the night communist or not. Th retraction was a shift in governmental structure, policy and the social order in ant of Russia. It never meant Russia was going away and anyone who thought so – was mistaken. She had no intention of leaving the world to the Europeans, the US and now the Chinese.

    I have absolutely no doubt that the Russians are intense defenders Russia and what it means to be Russian. Regardless of their internal machinations — as with most states – her enemies become her enemies to all. I would risk saying that is true even of the most critiques in her borders. There are plenty of areas for cooperation while still being competitors. I walk with caution on the terrorism as Russia remains in high tension over Chechnya and I am not convinced that we want to to be in a position of crushing people seeking independence that in the mind of Russia is a band or terrorists because of that desire to be independent.

    (I am sure that my suggestion to a Russian female co-worker – that Russia should cut Chechnya loose — ended any potential dating opportunity as she proceeded to school castigate my ignorance in no uncertain terms — leaving no doubt in my mind that whatever her reasons for being the US, she remained loyal to Russia.)

    Which is why the entire global war on Terror is a very dicey game. No offence to the Russians or the genuineness of unity of mind on the issue of terrorism. But I am very uncomfortable with sending troops Tibet on behalf of China or Chechnya based on the very dust covered definitions of terror. I am not a pacifist, but the image of the dalai lama being snatched by covert ops is discomfiting.

    That said, should we have made such a mess that violent conflict with Russia becomes inevitable, I will fully support our efforts to crush Russia, with a heavy heart and cursing our leadership with every breath. That if there is a God — well — no OT scripture calling for God’s vengeance is harsh enough for said leaderships’ calumny.

  46. @Jesse James

    Understand that is exactly what some in the US want as to cause for response.

  47. I know for a fact that the Soviet military has been experimenting with new laws of physics at least since the late 70s. But please feel free to remain in denial.

    Since I have no intention of remaining in denial could you please name some of the new laws of physics. I would hate to find out that the laws of physics I was taught in school are obsolete.

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
    , @FB
    , @ValmMond
  48. @Regnum Nostrum

    No idea what you were taught in school.
    But since quantum mechanics causality is out.
    Since entanglement Einstein seems to be out.
    It is asserted that China already built an entanglement computer, circling the earth in a satellite, the signals cannot be deciphered.
    It is asserted that a single Russian unarmed plane disabled all systems on one of the newest USA navy ships in the Black Sea.
    It may be that MH370 was made to crash because two teams of Chinese technicians in making planes invisible for radar were on board.
    The last method I have the idea I maybe understand.
    How an entanglement computer functions, no idea, but at Dutch technical university Delft scientists try to build one.

  49. @ValmMond

    I fear Hitler had no choice after the threats Molotov made when he visited Berlin at the end of 1939.

    • Replies: @ValmMond
  50. @Regnum Nostrum

    Because the USA sold anti tank weapons to Ukraine.

  51. ValmMond says:
    @Michael Kenny

    “(…) deliberately cause such a situation to come about by starting a nuclear war?”

    English must not be your first language, so it’s difficult to know what you mean. I can only assume that “such situation” refers to Russia existing as a country too close too NATO’s military bases, while Putin keeps calling your conniving neocons’ bluffs? Sure, your overlords wouldn’t mind if all of you, goy Western males and females disappear overnight. Well, we Russians see things differently. Back in the 70s, when the US still had politicians worth talking to, Americans and Soviets agreed on how to handle this nuclear business. We called it MAD – mutually assured destruction. Now, your “exceptional” elites may not think that if they strike first, we would have the means/the guts to annihilate you in turn. But that has always been our part of the deal and we keep our promises.

  52. Uncle Sam says:
    @DESERT FOX

    You hit the nail right on the head. Unless America rids itself of its Zionist Jewish population, within the next 100 years it will become a third world backwater with constant violent racial, ethnic and cultural wars. It will be very violent and very bloody. It could even result in a war of extermination.

  53. FB says:
    @Regnum Nostrum

    ‘…I would hate to find out that the laws of physics I was taught in school are obsolete…’

    Would be interested in hearing what you know about physics…

    Just one example of Newtonian mechanics would be sufficient to gauge the extent of your ‘knowledge’…

  54. Alister says:
    @Cyrano

    Obviously you do not live in the US. Yesterday I was at the Miami airport and had to ask three employees a question before I found one that spoke English….
    Or the years I lived in Philadelphia where being white in most neighborhoods was enough to get your ass kicked or even killed…
    Or when lived in the suburbs of Boston and there was only one black in our town, a CELTICS basketball player, who was stopped and speard eagled at gun point by the local police because they did not know a black moved in the neighborhood…
    America is only now beginning to develop the ethnic and social strata that is so common in the rest of the world….in a few more years Mexicans in California and Cubans in south Florida will demand their own rights to make Mexico and Cuba great again…

  55. ValmMond says:
    @jilles dykstra

    Hitler had a choice and he chose wrong – by his own admission. He was blinded by his mistrust and hatred for the Slavs. Which were even greater than his contempt for the jews and for the French. But that’s a different discussion.

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  56. ValmMond says:
    @Regnum Nostrum

    I seriously doubt you are familiar with the known physical laws to begin with. But since you ask, in the 70s the USSR experimented actively with weaponizing principles governing fields and anti-matter, among others.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  57. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @jilles dykstra

    You should describe what you mean by quantum mechanics. Either that or you have create a unique definition of causality. Also entanglement was known to Einstein. Entanglement has nothing to do with cryptography. It the case of messaging it only means that receiver knows whether or not the message has been intercepted thus denying the opportunity for a MITM attack. If you knew anything about quantum computation, i’m assuming this is what you meant, you would know that that the destructive interference of quantum probability vectors can only be used to solve a very narrow class of problems. None of this is new or violates any “laws” of physics. I think your tinfoil hat is leaking.

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  58. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @ValmMond

    You seem to have a novel definition of “principles governing fields”.

    People have thought about weaponizing antimatter since it was discovered, but if you want to destroy material there are way better ways to do it. If you want to destroy people there are better ways to do that as well, and if you’ve spent time in labs that create and store the stuff you’d know that outside of a science fiction fantasy it is utterly impractical to weaponize and even it you did it the result would be poor because the gamma radiation produced is weakly attenuated.

    • Replies: @ValmMond
    , @FB
  59. wayfarer says:
    @jilles dykstra

    How an entanglement computer functions, no idea, but at Dutch technical university Delft scientists try to build one.

    source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_entanglement

    How Does a Quantum Computer Work?

    Quantum Computers Explained.

  60. ValmMond says:
    @Anonymous

    “If you want to destroy people there are better ways to do that”

    Absolutely. Destroying people or material was not the only or the most important objective of these experiments.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  61. I may be wrong, but what I understood from what the Delft scientists want to construct is a computer with instantaneous information transmission.
    Normal computers transmit information at the speed of light.
    It is asserted that China already built such a computer.
    But again, I may be wrong.
    So, with my limited understanding, an entanglement computer is not a quantum computer.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Anonymous
  62. @Anonymous

    Causality and quantum mechanics, Einstein’s famous question ‘does god play dice’.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  63. Mulegino1 says:
    @jilles dykstra

    Quantum mechanics has definitely shown that the scientistic paradigm, the mechanistic view of the preeminence of the material and efficient causes cannot constitute the total ground of reality. Transcendent causality- namely the formal and final causes of things, those causes not bound by quantity, to space or time – remains preeminent in the ontologenic order.

  64. @ValmMond

    Hitler attacked the USSR three weeks before Stalin’s planned attack
    Bogdan Musial, ‘Kampfplatz Deutschland, Stalins Kriegspläne gegen den Westen’, Berlin 2008
    He had no choice.

  65. peterAUS says:
    @Regnum Nostrum

    Agree.

    I believe all that boils down to

    He likes to boast and judging from the small sample of Russian contributors that seems to be part of a Russian national character.

    and internal politics, elections in particular.

    They are both related. It’s expected, actually demanded, from the top man to behave that way.Makes proles happy, more able to grudge through their lives there.

    • Replies: @Regnum Nostrum
  66. peterAUS says:

    It appears that the opponent got the message.

    Tillerson just got fired; his replacement and, consequently, the CIA head replacement, are just the types to scale down threats, work hard towards peace etc.

    Looking forward to further boasts and similar results.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @NoseytheDuke
  67. @Cyrano

    That’s right, Cyrano. Maybe Putin could get some diversity over there as a new defense weapon. US diversity is just about to overwhelm this whole galaxy over here. Those aliens that are showing up here are probably looking for some diversity to take back to Alpha Centaury or where ever.

  68. ValmMond says:
    @jilles dykstra

    “Hitler attacked the USSR three weeks before Stalin’s planned attack”

    I hate the term “revisionism” and its derivatives, but for once, that’s revisionist nonsense. The so called “planned attack” consisted of a map and some sketchy handwritten notes that were presented to Stalin. Stalin discarded it at drafting stage. The map and the notes were archived by early May 1941. Hitler didn’t invade until more than a month later, on June 22. As of June 21, 1941 the Red Army was within Soviet borders and tragically unprepared to deflect the looming German invasion.

  69. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @ValmMond

    If they weren’t weaponizing them then what was the point of their research.

    • Replies: @ValmMond
  70. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @jilles dykstra

    Whether they are entangled or not photons still have to be transmitted for the information to get anywhere and they can’t travel faster than the speed of light.

  71. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @jilles dykstra

    Don’t confuse causality with determinism. They have specific definitions especially in the context of quantum mechanics.

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  72. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @jilles dykstra

    Whether they are entangled or not photons have to be transmitted for the information to get anywhere and they can’t travel faster than the speed of light.

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  73. ValmMond says:
    @jilles dykstra

    BTW, the planning and preparations for Barbarossa begun sometime around July 1940. By June 1941 Hitler didn’t need a reason to invade. Merely a pretext. And he didn’t even have that. Stalin had all intentions to stick to Molotov-Ribbentrop. Soviet diplomats have tried frantically to appease Hitler and kept reassuring von der Schulenburg and Ribbentrop that the USSR had no territorial pretensions etc. The “Molotov line” along the Soviet border was defensive in nature and Hitler knew that. He observed once that if Russia wanted to neutralize the Wehrmacht, it would have simply annexed Romania and taken control of its oil. Hitler didn’t preempt a Soviet threat. He invaded because he had momentum. His ultimate geopolitical objective was a conquest of Lebensraum. He hoped for a blitzkrieg and celebrating Weihnachten in Moscow. It was his biggest blunder.

    • Agree: Miro23
    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  74. @Giuseppe

    A very Trump unfriendly, anti war, anti mainstream GOP and paleoconservative site.

    But Trump is anti-mainstream GOP and, at least initially, was very antiwar.

  75. Quietly, untraceable and with complete plausible deniability Russian diplomats should be whispering in the ears of Berlin, Paris, London, Oslo, Canberra, Tokyo and especially Tel Aviv that if it comes down to it, they will earmark some nukes in reserve and make sure they all get the gift. Some of these folks might get the picture and start telling the U.S. to back off.

  76. peterAUS says:
    @El Dato

    War is coming.

    Always.

    Which one?
    Not easy.

    Iceland vs Finland……not likely I guess.

    US vs Mexico…..nahh……

    China vs Taiwan….still don’t think so.

    Ukraine vs Novorossya….maybe.
    The Empire vs Iran……perhaps.
    US vs NK…hard to say, really.

    Continuing mess, I mean resounding success, in Syria…..definitely.

    And in all those, the newest Russian vaporware , I mean superweapons, will be of utmost importance. The game changer. The …..best thing since sliced bread.
    Or Nagasaki.

  77. @Ilyana_Rozumova

    Or more likely she is just a slippery slapper.

  78. ValmMond says:
    @Anonymous

    Not sure what exactly are you asking. I didn’t say they were not weaponizing them. Quite the opposite.

  79. FB says:
    @Anonymous

    Your pompous comment is heavy on fancy sounding verbiage but light on substance…

    ‘ValmMond’ in his original post said this…

    ‘…I know for a fact that the Soviet military has been experimenting with new laws of physics at least since the late 70s…’

    It was a poor choice of words…in that new laws of physics are few and far between…[although many problems in physics remain unsolved...as we see from this list...]

    However…the idea of applying new physical principles is perfectly valid…and something that researchers strive to do all the time…

    A case in point is stealth aircraft technology…

    In 1962 Petr Ufimtsev…a Russian mathematician working at the Central Research Radio Engineering Institute…[[ЦНИРТИ]…published a seminal work…Method of Edge Waves in the Physical Theory of Diffraction…

    His administrators at the Defense Ministry saw no military or commercial value in this work and allowed it to be published internationally…

    In 1971 the USAF System Command’s Foreign Technology Division translated the book into English…which is still available from the US Defense Technical Information Center server…

    ‘…A stealth engineer at Lockheed, Denys Overholser, had read the publication and realized that Ufimtsev had created the mathematical theory and tools to do finite analysis of radar reflection.

    This discovery inspired and had a big role in the design of the first true stealth aircraft, the Lockheed F-117. Northrop also used Ufimtsev’s work to program super computers to predict the radar reflection of the B-2 bomber…’

    The basic theory of electromagnetic radio waves were formulated by Scottish phycisist James Clerk Maxwell in the 19′th century…before there was even the capability to replicate such waves by experiment…and this understanding was greatly advanced over the course of the next century…

    However…Ufimtsev brought new insights into this field of physics and developed a coherent theory and mathematical framework that could predict how radio waves interact with solid objects…

    ‘…Ufimtsev demonstrated that he could calculate the radar cross-section across a wing’s surface and along its edge.

    The obvious and logical conclusion was that even a large aircraft could reduce its radar signature by exploiting this principle…’

    Ufimtsev’s main insight was of profound significance…that it was the edge geometry…not the size…of the aircraft…which determined its visibility to radar…

    ‘…The Lockheed F–117 Stealth Fighter and the Northrop B–2 Stealth Bomber play key roles in today’s United States Air Force.

    These were the first two major aircraft designs to employ the principles of Pyotr Ufimtsev’s Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD). Ben Rich, who oversaw the F–117 project as head of
    Lockheed’s fabled Skunk Works, refers to Professor Ufimtsev’s as “the Rosetta Stone breakthrough for stealth technology.”

    At Northrop, where I worked on the B–2 project, we were so enthusiastic about PTD that a co-worker and I sometimes broke into choruses of “Go Ufimtsev” to the tune of “On, Wisconsin.”..’

    —Kenneth M. Mitzner…from the Foreword to Ufimtsev’s book…

    …which is why Ufimtsev is known as the ‘Father of Stealth’…[he later taught at UCLA]…

    So we see that ‘new physical principles’ do happen…in fact they happen with some regularity…

    The original poster was obviously referring to this…but simply chose the wrong word…

    The pompous reactions from many here which followed…are quite telling in their own right…

    • Replies: @Vojkan
  80. @peterAUS

    Yup! CIA people are the people to put in charge when peace is the goal. I’m about to upgrade the security on my property so would you suggest that I contact my local prison department to see if they’ll soon be discharging anyone who might need the work?

    Do you think before you comment? Do you even think?

    • Replies: @yurivku
  81. @Regnum Nostrum

    Obviously the intelligence services know about the weapons. But they do not care in the least how many people will die. So the announcements have to to with affecting public opinion. Perhaps the public cares. Or not. You don’t care, do you?

  82. @jilles dykstra

    Don’t be silly. No one will pay any attention to you in the future.

  83. Stealth says:
    @Michael Kenny

    “Germany suffered massive destruction in WWII but still exists today.”

    The Germans are a dying people. They won’t last much longer.

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  84. peterAUS says:

    Let’s summarize.

    Putin comes with ….that… thing…the “game changer”.
    “Your times of pushing other nations around is over. GET THAT!”

    Yeah…..

    And, a week later, the Secretary of State who “supported the continuation of the Iran nuclear deal and believed in dialogue to resolve the North Korean nuclear crisis” is out.
    Most likely, the replacement will be the guy who is “expected to reinforce Trump’s hardline instincts on Iran and North Korea”.

    Just funny.

    Looking forward to further boasts from Kremlin and their results in the real world.

    • Replies: @Miro23
  85. @Michael Kenny

    It seems you missed the point which is due to normalcy bias ( No one can punch the US in the teeth, because we are the US ). Putin is warning the US leadership that an attack on Russia or its allies will result in a Russian counterstrike against the forces and bases that delivered the first attack, and if the Russian state’s very existence is threatened ( even in Syria from what the text stated ) that nuclear weapons could be used. Putin is letting Pentagon aggressors know that Moscow will punch them in the teeth which is not typically how other leaders address the US Empire.

  86. Paw says:
    @Miro23

    Propagandists and ideologues work hard on the escalation towards the World WAR.
    Very importatnt is to generate THE JUSTIFIED ANGER like after 9/11 and the Pearl Harbour.
    They desperately look for and can not find it.
    The Russian Dead Hand is one device when after attack od USA this device triggers itself automaticaly response. Against USA and other countries.
    On top there are these new Putin’s weapens.
    As he said : When Russia will not exist , no one will exist.
    It means they in Kremlin are sick of these insane sick fools and their endless hatred .

    • Replies: @Miro23
  87. Miro23 says:
    @peterAUS

    Looking forward to further boasts from Kremlin and their results in the real world.

    There’s a difference between a boast and a warning – a boast is more of a generalized ego building thing, while a warning is usually more specific (You do this, and I’ll do that). Putin’s speech was more of a warning – and apparently it’s being ignored – which isn’t a great surprise.

    The US has been ignoring a multitude of social and economic warning signs since the 1960′s and it’s likely to continue doing so until the car crashes.

    • Replies: @peterAUS
  88. Miro23 says:
    @Paw

    It means they in Kremlin are sick of these insane sick fools and their endless hatred .

    If you’re being threatened by the criminally insane, then the minimum is to clearly warn them of the consequence of their actions.

    Police find that low IQ armed criminals sometimes decide not to shoot if they are loudly reminded that using the gun will put them in jail for life (they’d sort of forgotten about that).

  89. peterAUS says:
    @Miro23

    Putin’s speech was more of a warning – and apparently it’s being ignored – which isn’t a great surprise.

    That’s one way to look at it.

    Another is:

    Putin’s speech was more of a boast – and apparently it’s being ignored – which isn’t a great surprise, recognized as a boast and not a warning.
    That happens when he keeps warning, for years, without following up with a meaningful action. Something which could’ve put The Empire’s push BACK a bit, not just SLOW it down.

    The key: “push BACK” vs “SLOW down” approach.

    For the resident fanboys, in practice:
    Instead of US soldiers in Ukraine, Russian soldiers, at least, in all of Georgia.
    Instead of US soldiers in enclave in Syria, Russian soldiers in enclave in Iraq.
    Etc.

    More to come.
    Boasts and slowing down I mean.

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  90. Cyrano says:
    @Seraphim

    Not a big fan? Would it help if I explained the joke to you?

  91. Vojkan says:
    @FB

    Actually, if you descend to the quantum level, the idea to alter the laws of physics isn’t that outlandish.

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  92. yurivku says:
    @NoseytheDuke

    Yup! CIA people are the people to put in charge when peace is the goal.

    Well, Putin also was not a biologist either. So the key is not a profession, but something else.

    Do you think before you comment? Do you even think?

    Good question, but being here for long time you should have known the answer.
    I believe he’s mainly the writer of some kind, not the thinker ;-)

    • Replies: @NoseytheDuke
  93. @ValmMond

    ” Stalin had all intentions to stick to Molotov-Ribbentrop. ”

    Alas Russian archives tell a quite different story, a story that fits in what happened since Comintern times.
    Bogdan Musial, ‘Kampfplatz Deutschland, Stalins Kriegspläne gegen den Westen’, Berlin 2008
    Stalin’s intentions became clear to the world when he began the blockade of Berlin.
    Kennan had been warning for many years.
    George F. Kennan, ´Memoirs 1925 – 1950’, New York 1967, 1972
    The USA discovered that the FDR dream in fact always had been a nightmare, and, three years after the end of WWII, money was no longer a problem, Marshall aid.

  94. @peterAUS

    Cannot see any boast in how Putin prevented the fall of Assad.

  95. @Anonymous

    I know the argument.
    But, in entanglement two particles that before were one, both travelling at light speed, as seen by the observer, somehow still are one particle.
    As a scientist stated, it is incomprehensible, meaning, it cannot be related or compared to any existing experience.
    But this is how science works, according to what a British scientist once said ‘ I do not think we explain anything, we just describe’.
    In my arrogant opinion, Einstein cannot be understood, quantum mechanics cannot be understood.
    It has long been asserted that entanglement cannot be used to transmit information.
    However, at Delft technical university they have other ideas, and try to build a computer with instantaneous information transmission.
    It is asserted that China already has such a computer.

  96. @Stealth

    Merkel’s mass immigration will annihilate German culture in a few decades, thus annihilating the most capable people in the world.

  97. @peterAUS

    The US president has just replaced two individuals who in ” the good old times” used to be called doves with two hawks. The implications of that change seem to have escaped the otherwise acute intellect of the most pompous, pontificating products of various top notch educational institutions who flood this forum with their flatulent tirades, graphs and formulas. I often wonder if the get by without a formula in a washroom. I am not surprised because they are not equipped to perceive these subtleties. They never ponder for example why Russia with the greatest number of engineers per square mile is in such a miserable position compared to the rest of the world.

    • LOL: FB
  98. @Anonymous

    If Einstein was confused, then I’m in good company thinking that in quantum mechanics causality has been replaced with probability.

  99. Vojkan says:
    @Israel Shamir

    The US is playing a game of chicken, Russia is not because Russia can’t afford to yield. Each time the morons in Washington DC up the ante, we all move one step closer to Armageddon.

  100. Erebus says:

    Putin’s “Why would we want a world without Russia?” is as blunt as it can be. There will be no world without Russia. If anyone is so deluded as to think a world without Russia is possible, they better disabuse themselves of that before there is no USA to rule the Russia-less, or any world, or any world to rule.

    Putin, and now Gerasimov, are manning the claxons. They must be getting intel and/or analysis that’s telling them that the US has crossed some thresholds, and I gotta believe it’s more than yet another ginned up “gas attack by the brutal Assad regime” false flag. That dog hasn’t hunted in a while now. Something bigger is cooking.

    The risk inherent in their warning is that the US will dismiss it as pre-election grandstanding, or interpret the warnings as either [a] a bluff, or [b] that Putin’s weapons are not yet fully deployed so that a window of opportunity remains open – a window that will close should they delay. The former has already been voiced by Mad Dog Mattis, whose strategic calculation (as if he has any idea) is apparently unchanged by these weapons. Those true believers in exceptional American technology and its God-given right to rule the world through nuclear intimidation are the real danger here. They will pay either pay no heed to Putin’s threat of the Samson Option, or push to try to beat it.

    How the US handles these dilemmas and their corollaries will determine whether the USA and its Empire will crash and burn together, or whether the nation, having jettisoned the Empire that had a death grip on its throat, will survive a near death crash landing. The former may well entail the crash ‘n burn of us all. Jeezus, what a mess.

    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov
    , @FB
  101. @yurivku

    To be fair, Putin had a real “battle” ahead of him when he took over the reins of Russia including vast interference by the US, whilst the battles the US itself faces today are all of its own making.

    • Replies: @yurivku
  102. @Regnum Nostrum

    Fair suck of the sauce bottle sport, Russia has had to deal with countless invasions over time from Turks, Swedes, Germans, French, British and more, some of them more than once, while the US has had an easy time by comparison.

  103. yurivku says:
    @NoseytheDuke

    Probably, so what?
    Putin was not the worst case for Russia and for the whole world.
    But it was a just a lucky happening.

    As for US we can see one clown replaces previous one and nothing gonna change. It doesn’t depend on clown’s background, they all were produced on the same factory. And this factory produces only that kind of a shit. You can select piece you like it would not affect the result.

    Seeing the attitude of US guys to reality (“it’s communists and Jews are to blame”) I’m pessimistic on our future. But I think we urgently need some small clash of Russia with USA just for everybody (even most silly US citizens) to understand where they are and who the are until big one happened.

    • Replies: @FB
  104. peterAUS says:
    @Regnum Nostrum

    Well…that would go straight in the face of the prevalent mantra here and they simply can’t have it.

    “Putin speech changed the world” is the party line, apparently, around here. Facts don’t matter, the party line is the fact. Nothing new there as far as Russians are concerned. They’ve mastered the method since 1917.
    Seeing part of Western minority here buying it is peculiar, though. I suspect it’s a result of gnawing desperation, so sort of understandable. Sort of.

    Well, there are two good things about this site, nevertheless.
    First, mods still allow unpopular opinions posted here; something almost non-existant on the Internet today.
    Second, that “ignore” button. Keeps the most of the obnoxious noise out.

    As for

    They never ponder for example why Russia with the greatest number of engineers per square mile is in such a miserable position compared to the rest of the world.

    well, that is the question, isn’t it?
    And that’s the one they’ll never ask. Too painful, I suspect.

  105. FB says:
    @yurivku

    Worth repeating…

    ‘…But I think we urgently need some small clash of Russia with USA just for everybody (even most silly US citizens) to understand where they are and who the[y] are until big one happened…’

    Absolutely…sometimes strong delusions of grandeur can only be punctured by a sharp blow to the nose…

    • Agree: Cyrano
    • Replies: @NoseytheDuke
  106. @Regnum Nostrum

    US-advised predatory corporate raiding of the 1990′s gutted the manufacturing, financial and social infrastructure of the country. Repairing the massive large-scale economic and cultural arson is not corrected in a TV season but over several decades. Sorry to rain simple reality upon your phony world perceptions and anemic historical capacity.

    • Agree: FB
  107. @Erebus

    The former has already been voiced by Mad Dog Mattis, whose strategic calculation (as if he has any idea) is apparently unchanged by these weapons.

    We don’t know that. PR is one thing, what happens behind the curtain is completely different. You surely do not expect Mattis coming out to press shouting “I surrender.”

    Those true believers in exceptional American technology and its God-given right to rule the world through nuclear intimidation are the real danger here. They will pay either pay no heed to Putin’s threat of the Samson Option, or push to try to beat it.

    They always were, this is not the news. What we observe today is a complete moral, intellectual and cultural disintegration of American “elites”. They do not know how to govern and fight wars. So, the sense of this utter failure, even if not mentally rationalized in many cases, is beginning to set in, hence the hysteria. But judging by Theresa May’s pathetic all steam going into whistle failure of “ultimatum” to Russia–this is, for the most part, how it will go on. But true, it is unnerving for many. Russia, meanwhile, has plenty of conventional options in Syria if someone tries some stupid things.

    whether the nation, having jettisoned the Empire that had a death grip on its throat, will survive a near death crash landing.

    This is THE question–will American nation (which is still not formed fully) survive. In this sense the US faces an ordeal and a problem which in many senses is more intimidating than the collapse of the USSR.

    • Replies: @Erebus
  108. peterAUS says:

    And while all the fanboys are in trance about the SciFi vapoware, back on Earth it comes down to simple assassinations, Borgia style.

    True, the poison was apparently high-tech, so, maybe that’s the area where Russians spent the most of their time and resources in the arms race. In developing tools for murdering a senior citizen and his daughter, in a park.
    That’s apparently the mode, currently, when facing The Empire.
    The fat boy from NK did the similar not so long ago.

    Impressive.

    UK, still scared thistles, NOT, by the Great Leader speech simply expelled bunch of Russkies.
    Members of the Russian contingent in Syria could start getting worried. Just a couple of them. Just a bit.Probably by a missile, not a poison.

    Oh, sorry to interrupt.
    Please, back to the “game changing superweapons.”

    And, perhaps our resident experts could shed some light on that superweapon in the park?
    And the delivery system. Was it shoes or sneakers?

    Can’t wait.

  109. @Vojkan

    Does physics have laws ?
    Or just descriptions, that are useful until proven wrong ?

    • Replies: @Vojkan
  110. El Dato says:
    @jilles dykstra

    Hitler attacked the USSR three weeks before Stalin’s planned attack

    intredasting.jpg

    This attack was so well planned that Stalin got the shit pushed in right up to Moscow.

  111. FB says:
    @Erebus

    Just posted my technical evaluation of the nuclear cruise missile on Martyanov’s thread…

    wikipedia has added a new section on the nuclear propulsion cruise missile…

    …with some interesting citations…

    ‘…A RAND Corporation researcher specializing in Russia said “My guess is they’re not bluffing, that they’ve flight-tested this thing. But that’s incredible…’

    This from WaPo…

    ‘…The Pentagon told Fox News’s Lucas Tomlinson it was aware of a Russian test of a nuclear-powered cruise missile but the system was still under development and had recently crashed in the Arctic…’

    • Replies: @Erebus
  112. @peterAUS

    It is apparent that Russians did have a reason to kill that double agent to dissuade other Russian traitors.
    But then English did have also a reason to kill the Russian spy. The Russian spy did spill all the beans to English. By that he also did gain valuable knowledge of English interrogation methods, And also did get knowledge of MI intelligence personnel. and also probably other secrets.
    He was a double agent. So there was a little bit of worry that he would escape England and he would sell all that knowledge to Russians. So in every case he was to large extent nuisance to English. so there is a possibility that it was English who decided to get rid of him, And also it was benefit to English to blame Russia for their deed . The old qui bono always apply.
    What is suspicious to me is a fact that London and also other cities have cameras everywhere, so how come that they have no footage of the deed.
    So I am inclined to believe that it was English that did the deed,

    • Replies: @peterAUS
    , @FB
    , @jilles dykstra
  113. peterAUS says:
    @Ilyana_Rozumova

    So I am inclined to believe that it was English that did the deed

    Makes sense.
    I am not.

    Everything in “spy game” is smoke and mirrors, so anyone can construct any story and believe anything.

    I go for 70/30 Russians/Brits and Co.

    Actually, don’t care much about all that. One gets into that game he/she accepts such outcomes. Comes with the job.

    The point that interests me here is the method.
    If it’d been a firearm, blunt or bladed weapon, even common “mugging” bashing to death, no prob. Same with “accidents” and/or “suicides”. Even chemical and individual, in private.

    Two persons, at the same time, hit by a chemical, in public place, in U.K.

    Make of that what you will.

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  114. @FB

    I would prefer a widespread mutiny from members across the armed services, a mass walkout of hundreds of thousands, whether by feigning illness or by moral objections to foreign policies. Even the sabotaging of military equipment to send a clear message that, “we’ll defend the homeland but won’t go to ‘fight them over there’ so don’t count on having any military back up.

    I fear that any Russian response will be music to the ears of the Globalists who plan to deflate the US bubble ASAP anyway after gaining the total global domination that they seek and is currently under threat. They would simply escalate to a point of no return knowing that once the gig is up they might expect ropes all round.

  115. Erebus says:
    @Andrei Martyanov

    We don’t know that. PR is one thing, what happens behind the curtain is completely different. You surely do not expect Mattis coming out to press shouting “I surrender.”

    Oh, I know well that Mattis is not necessarily stating what he really thinks. Rather, his message addresses both those factions in the elites that may wish to either jump through that window of opportunity, or to steer the ship towards a more peaceful shore (EG: the 4 Senators calling for urgent arms talks). His message, “No need, these new weapons don’t change anything” tries to buy some time by putting both on the backburner.

    They do not know how to govern and fight wars. So, the sense of this utter failure, even if not mentally rationalized in many cases, is beginning to set in, hence the hysteria.

    That is the money shot. They inherited immense financial, political and military power, but don’t understand its use or limits. Confronted by less powerful adversaries who do understand, they find themselves in zugzwang, and at a loss as to how they got there, or what to do next. In the vernacular: “They don’t know whether to shit or go blind.”

    They ground to a halt at Madeline Albright’s question: “What’s the point of having this superb military you’re always talking about if we can’t use it?” Why indeed, and if there’s no point what the hell do you do with it?

    • Replies: @FB
  116. FB says:
    @Ilyana_Rozumova

    There may be another angle to the Skripal case…

    Former UK diplomat Craig Murray…he of the Assange / Podesta email non-hack saga…has some interesting info here…

    ‘…There is no doubt that Skripal was feeding secrets to MI6 at the time that Christopher Steele was an MI6 officer in Moscow, and at the the time that Pablo Miller, another member of Orbis Intelligence, was also an MI6 officer in Russia and directly recruiting agents.

    It is widely reported on the web and in US media that it was Miller who first recruited Skripal. My own ex-MI6 sources tell me that is not quite true as Skripal was “walk-in”, but that Miller certainly was involved in running Skripal for a while.

    Sadly Pablo Miller’s LinkedIn profile has recently been deleted, but it is again widely alleged on the web that it showed him as a consultant for Orbis Intelligence and a consultant to the FCO and – wait for it – with an address in Salisbury.

    If anyone can recover that Linkedin entry do get in touch, though British Government agencies will have been active in the internet scrubbing.

    It was of course Christopher Steele and Orbis Intelligence who produced for the Clinton camp the sensationalist dossier on Trump links with Russia – including the story of Trump paying to be urinated on by Russian prostitutes – that is a key part of the “Russiagate” affair gripping the US political classes…’

  117. Erebus says:
    @FB

    Just posted my technical evaluation of the nuclear cruise missile on Martyanov’s thread…

    Very informative and well worth a careful reading. Thanks!

  118. @peterAUS

    How can you say they were “murdered” when both are still alive, albeit in a critical state? Must you be wrong all the time?

    This was obviously a very sloppy operation and the manner it has been seized upon, coupled with the lack of any substantive investigation as revealed by the police spokesman, would suggest that this is yet another clumsy false flag that Britain seems to “excel” at. Compare it to the incident when the Labour Politician was shot and killed. The rush to judgement here is quite telling.

    Your lack of awareness in such matters would appear to contradict the impression you constantly try to create of being an accomplished soldier at some point.

    • LOL: FB
  119. FB says:
    @Erebus

    ‘…zugzwang…’

    Had to look that one up…

    A situation in chess where one player would prefer not to make a move…ie any move that he can make will only worsen his position…

    Nice one…

  120. @Ilyana_Rozumova

    You really think Russia is so stupid to use a nerve gas of which it is asserted that it is 60ties or 70ties Russian ?
    The only explanation I can think of explaining this show is that Brussel asked GB to set it up, in return for some concesssion in the present GB EU Brexit negotiations.
    As to this old fashioned nerve gas, I expect that a British laboratory can produce it.
    What is quite telling is that again, as with MH17, nobody, no journalist, no tv presentator, no politician, aks what the Russian motive could have been.

    • Replies: @Vojkan
  121. @peterAUS

    Until now Putin resisted any attempt to provoke him.

  122. Vojkan says:
    @jilles dykstra

    Let’s say that there are some useful formulas that fit our perception of reality and that have proven to work in many areas of technical engineering. That they don’t encompass the whole of reality is obvious to anyone having a basic apprehension of physics.

  123. Vojkan says:
    @jilles dykstra

    Yet in every criminal investigation, you look for motives in order to find suspects and for the suspicion to be plausible, the motive has to be compelling. When it comes to Russia though, anything goes, and no fact should be allowed that doesn’t fit the narrative Russia = sheer evil. I think that though ordinary Russians have a hard time accepting it, as just any people in the world would have a hard time accepting it if they were the ones demonised, Putin and the Russian government have by now fully grasped who they were dealing with.

    • Replies: @yurivku
  124. yurivku says:

    It’s a reply for Vojkan comment

    I think that though ordinary Russians have a hard time accepting it, as just any people in the world would have a hard time accepting it if they were the ones demonised,

    Well, seeing such an injustice we feel being insulted and the hate and contempt probably are the right words to describe our feelings.

    Putin and the Russian government have by now fully grasped who they were dealing with.

    We (people) did it earlier, Serbia was a final signal, but you are right, – we just can’t believe that such hypocricy can exist. And you can believe, many of us are ready for physical fight.
    But speaking about Goverment it’s not that easy, there are quite a some of 5th columns members there and it’s a main danger for Russia and (as a consequence) for world.

    • Agree: Cyrano
  125. @peterAUS

    The Novichok formula is available in science journals, Einstein. The goal of Novichok evidently was to to have an easily made nerve agent that did not require complex labs. Four EU countries are currently known to be experimenting with it right now- UK, Slovakia, Sweden and Czech Rep. Russia is not one of them as the old Uzbek SSR factory was closed in 1999 under contract by an American firm.

    The US has not destroyed its massive chem-bio weapon stockpile, but Russia has as has Syria. The US signed the treaty to do so, but the US never finished building its furnace facility citing “cost overruns”. Yeah, right. The US spends 18 times what Russia spends in a year on “defense”.

  126. sarz says:

    I have not read fhrough the comments, so apologise in case someone has mentioned this. This seems to be Trump’s response to the current Syrian mess:

    Trump Asked Saudi King For $4 Billion So US Troops Can Leave Syria

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-03-17/trump-asked-saudi-king-4-billion-so-us-troops-can-leave-syria

    It would be realistic to make a distinction between Trump’s actions in Syria as opposed to those of the Neocons/globalists. Tillerson was supposed to be pretending to play both sides while siding with Trump. That we can call the “fucking moron” game. He was really with the Neocons, first defending the American bases in Syria and then attacking Putin for the nerve gas.

    I think Trump has a complete understanding with Putin and is withdrawing where he can and over extending the Neocon game where his domestic circumstances dictate, as with Jerusalem and the challenge to Iran. These are also headed now for stalemate after they play out. With responsibility for the globalist game ready to be handed over to the Saudis (ha-ha) the Syrian engagement seems almost over.

  127. @NoseytheDuke

    buts isn’t Russia rather ethnically diverse itself ?

Current Commenter
says:

Leave a Reply - Comments on articles more than two weeks old will be judged much more strictly on quality and tone


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
Submitted comments become the property of The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Israel Shamir Comments via RSS