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Greeks

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GreecePlot

Byzantine Empire 717 A.D.

Byzantine Empire 717 A.D.

I’ve been looking at some European genotype data. So I have some samples from Greece. One of the things I noticed is that there seem to be two clusters of Greece. You can see it above. The Italian sample is really a southern Italian one (not Sicilian though). The Balkan sample are Serbs, Bulgarians, and Romanians. You can see that they are shifted toward the Poles. And so are the Greeks, in comparison to the Italians. This is not entirely surprising. What was surprising to me was that there were a number of Greeks who in the same cluster at the Italians.

The historical context for this are the Sclaveni migrations. These were Slavic peoples who pushed south, as far as the Peloponnese, after the Byzantine Empire ceded the Balkans to barbarian groups due to threats in the east from Persians and then Muslims. In fact the demographic basis of the Byzantine Empire between the loss of the Levant and Egypt and the Battle of Manzikert was Anatolia in 1056, though there were fortifications around major cities such as Thessaloniki. After the loss of their Anatolian heartlands to the Seljuks the Empire turned back toward the Balkans, which had been conquered by Basil II in the first decades of the 11th century.

51SyHrRbsQL._SX325_BO1,204,203,200_ These results, and others, indicate the impact of the Slavic migrations on the Balkans, and Greece proper. But, what they also suggest is that there is population structure within Greece. Why? I can think of two hypotheses. First, some of the islands in the Aegean were never touched by Slavs, and may have maintained endogamy until the modern period. Even if the Slavs never conquered the cities, their impact would be felt by migration from rural areas. But in a pre-modern era barriers such as water and mountains often serve as potent obstacles to continuous gene flow. The second, to me more plausible, scenario is the second cluster without much Slavic genetic impact are those who descend from Anatolian Greeks, who arrived in the early 20th century due to the population exchange with Turkey. These western Anatolian Greeks would have shielded from the Sclaveni migrations obviously.

To tease the relationships apart I decided to run TreeMix 20 times. As per reader suggestion, I won’t give you all the plots. But you can download them. Below is a representative one. The various Jewish groups form their own clade. The affinity of Cypriot Greeks with Anatolians is a function I believe of the fact that they are culturally Hellenized (the ancient Bronze Age polity of Cyprus was part of the orbit of Egypt, and was not Greek), even if that is an ancient occurrence. I separated the Greeks into two cluster, the major one being “Greece” and the minor one clustering with southern Italians as “GreeceItaly.” What is pretty obvious is that GreeceItaly has much less of the Slavic admixture. In this tree the Greeks proper are placed near the Balkan and Polish position on the graph, but with a huge migration arrow from nearly the GreeceItaly position. The Balkan node has a smaller migration parameter. The Greeks tend to flip from being near the Poles to being near the GreekItaly cluster, and swapping the migration arrow direction.

GreeceOut16

 
• Category: Science • Tags: Greeks 
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To the left you see a zoom in of a PCA which Dienekes produced for a post, Structure in West Asian Indo-European groups. The focus of the post is the peculiar genetic relationship of Kurds, an Iranian-speaking people, with Iranians proper, as well as Armenians (Indo-European) and Turks (not Indo-European). As you can see in some ways the Kurds seem to be the outgroup population, and the correspondence between linguistic and genetic affinity is difficult to interpret. For those of you interested in historical population genetics this shouldn’t be that surprising. West Asia is characterized by of endogamy, language shift, and a great deal of sub and supra-national communal identity (in fact, national identity is often perceived to be weak here). A paper from the mid-2000s already suggested that western and eastern Iran were genetically very distinctive, perhaps due to the simple fact of geography: central Iran is extremely arid and relatively unpopulated in relation to the peripheries.

But this post isn’t about Kurds, rather, observe the very close relationship between Turks and Armenians on the PCA. The _D denotes Dodecad samples, those which Dienekes himself as collected. This affinity could easily be predicted by the basic parameters of physical geography. Armenians and Anatolian Turks were neighbors for nearly 1,000 years. Below is a map which shows the expanse of the ancient kingdom of Armenia:

Historic Armenia was centered around lake Van in what is today eastern Turkey. The modern Republic of Armenia is very much a rump, and an artifact of the historic expansion of the Russian Empire in the Caucasus at the expense of the Ottomans and Persians. Were it not for the Armenian genocide there may today have been more Armenians resident in Turkey than in the modern nation-state of Armenia,* just as there are more Azeri Turks in Iran than in Azerbaijan. Many areas once occupied by Armenians are now occupied by Kurds and Turks. But a bigger question is the ethnogenesis of the Anatolian Turkish population over the past 1,000 years.

Dienekes has already shed light on this topic earlier, adding the Greek and Cypriot populations to the mix as well as Turks and Armenians. The disjunction between Kurds and the Armenian-Turk clade suggests to us that Turks did not emerge out of the milieu of Iranian tribes in the uplands of southeast Anatolia and western Persia. Like the Armenians the Kurds are an antique population, claiming descent from the Medes, and referred to as Isaurians during the Roman and Byzantine period.

Below is a reformatted K = 15 run of ADMIXTURE with Eurasian population. I’ve removed the labels for the ancestral components, but included in populations which have a high fraction of a given ancestral component. The geographical labels are for obscure populations. I’ve underlined the four populations of interest:

First, let’s get out of the way the fact that Turkish samples have non-trivial, though minor, northeast Asian ancestry. The Yakut themselves are a Turkic group situated to the north of Mongolia. The more southerly and central Asian affinities the nomadic ancestors of the Anatolia Turks may have picked up in their sojourns over the centuries between their original homeland in east-central Siberia and Mongolia and West Asia. The rest of ancestry is rather typical of northern West Asian groups. In particular, Armenians! Here is the ancestral breakdown for the four groups I want to focus on using Dienekes’ labels:


Population Greek Cypriots Turks Armenians
West Asian 37.6 54.1 47.2 56.3
Central-South Asian 5.3 8.6 18.2 18.4
North European 25.1 5.6 12 12.3
South European 27.4 20.8 9.4 8.4
Arabian 3.4 8 4.3 3.4
Altaic 0.3 0 2.6 0.1
East Asian 0.3 0.2 2.2 0
Central Siberian 0.1 0.2 1.4 0.2
Chukchi 0 0 1.1 0.2
South Indian 0 0.1 0.8 0.3
Nganasan 0.1 0 0.4 0.2
Koryak 0.1 0 0.2 0.1
East African 0 0.4 0.1 0
West African 0 0 0.1 0
Northwest African 0.3 1.9 0.1 0

And now the correlations between the populations by ancestral components:


Greek Cypriots Turks Armenians
Greek * 0.863 0.823 0.813
Cypriots * * 0.941 0.946
Turks * * * 0.997
Armenians * * * *

Let’s remove the East Eurasian and African components, and recalculate the proportions by taking what remains as the denominator:


Population Greek Cypriots Turks Armenians
West Asian 38.1 55.7 51.8 57.0
Central-South Asian 5.4 8.9 20.0 18.6
North European 25.4 5.8 13.2 12.4
South European 27.7 21.4 10.3 8.5
Arabian 3.4 8.2 4.7 3.4

And the recomputed correlations:


Greek Cypriots Turks Armenians
Greek * 0.747 0.640 0.647
Cypriots * * 0.901 0.908
Turks * * * 0.999
Armenians * * * *

With all the ~0 ancestral components which were common across these four populations removed the correlations have gone down. Except in the case of the Armenian-Turk pair, because I’ve removed the ancestries which differentiate them.

So what’s a plausible interpretation? A straightforward one would be that the Muslim Turk population of Anatolia has a strong bias toward having been assimilated Armenians, rather than Greeks. The cultural plasticity of Armenians in late antiquity and the early medieval period was clear: individuals of ethnic Armenian to origin rose the pinnacles of the status hierarchy of the Orthodox Christian Greek Byzantine Empire. The Macedonian dynasty of the Byzantines under which the civilization reached its mature peak were descended from Armenians who had resettled in Macedonia. Just as plausible to me is that eastern Anatolia as a whole exhibited little genetic difference between Greeks and Armenians, and the former were wholly assimilated or migrated, while the Armenians remained. One way to test this thesis would be type the descendants of Greeks who left eastern Anatolia during the population exchange between Greece and Turkey in the 1920s. But the difference between Greeks and Cypriots also points us to another possibility: perhaps the Greeks of Greece proper (as opposed to Anatolia) were much more strongly impacted by the arrival of Slavs? One need not necessarily rely solely on the Scalveni migrations either, water tends to be a major dampener to conventional isolation-by-distance gene flow, so the Greek mainland may always have been subject to more influence from the lands to the north.

Whatever the details of ethnogenesis may be, it will be interesting to see how things shake out as we increase sample sizes and get better population coverage. These results may be due to regional selection bias. One might expect that the descendants of Rumelian Turks be more “European” than Anatolian Turks. But, these data do seem to suggest on face value that Armenians are the population which Anatolian Turks have the most genetic affinity with.

* My main hesitation would be that Armenians are a very mobile population, and their numbers within a modern Turkey may have declined simply through emigration, just as those of Christian Arabs have over the 20th century.

(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
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Razib Khan
About Razib Khan

"I have degrees in biology and biochemistry, a passion for genetics, history, and philosophy, and shrimp is my favorite food. If you want to know more, see the links at http://www.razib.com"