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Razib Khan
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Friday Fluff

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They’re bbbaaaccckkkk!

(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Science • Tags: Blog, Friday Fluff, Katz 
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FF3

1) Weird search query of the week: “hat is the difference between loose and tight magazine circulation”

2) Picture of a kitten that we fostered recently….


(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Science • Tags: Friday Fluff 
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FF3

1) Post from the past, One Nation Under Gods, and Mitt Romney, over before it began.

2) Weird search query of the week: “false jewish genetic studies racist.”he

3) Comment of the week:

Frank Sweet’s “Legal History of the Color Line” is a good read on this topic. One of Sweet’s arguments is that black leaders, particularly Northeastern leaders, had a seminal role in the creation of an artificial, fiat-defined African American ethnos.

I think Sweet stresses the centrality of black leaders too much. They were more in a reactive, rather than proactive position vis-a-vis white racial codes and attitudes. But, still, a worthwhile read and this is not his central point.

The one drop rule wasn’t enforced effectively because the Jim Crow system was not totalitarian, the funds for an effectively intrusive bureucracy weren’t there. I think people are finally discussing the many ways it was ignored in practice. I had relatives who were remembered as “white colored men” in newspapers, and in one government document from the 1930s was described as “white” with some black ancestry. In other words, these are people who were legally and socially white, they voted, their kids went to white schools, and they married, but local memory knew that they had some African ancestry. My father told me that as a child it was the equivalent of having a crazy aunt in the family.

I read an old article from the Richmond Times Dispatch, by Walter Plecker, a colleague of Grant’s, and the VA state registrar of vital statistics. In the article Plecker was complaining about Greene County, and some other counties, I believe, midwives listing mixed ancestry children as Mexican. On the face of it, Plecker was correct, the kids obviously weren’t Mexican. But it shows how Plecker was relatively powerless in the face of local ad hoc decisions on who was non-black and who wasn’t. Unlike the Nazis, he was not operating in a totalitarian system. I’ve never seen these Mexican birth certificates, they are still closed per state laws. Plecker also made an infamous list of surnames, you can find it online, of mixed-race families.

4) Your weekly fluff fix:

(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
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1) Weird search query of the week: “choropleth of jehovah witness population.”

2 Your weekly fluff fix:


(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Science • Tags: Blog, Friday Fluff, Katz 
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FF3

Very busy week. I don’t have time to look for past posts and I haven’t been reading the comments closely, so I’m skipping those.

1) Weird search query of the week: “why, according to christian, did foragers become farmers?.”

2) And finally, your weekly fluff fix:

(a guest kat who made as sojourn at casa Khan):

(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
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FF3

Been very busy of late.

1) Post from the past: Of pigs, people and porcine polygenism.


2) Weird search query of the week: “kate gosselin before and after.”

3) Comment of the week, in response to Why Melanesians are blonde resolved?:

…Besides melianin production, tyrosinase (and hence Tyrp1) is at a key step of catecholamine synthesis. And anything effecting neurotransmitter synthesis has potential to significantly affect fitness. Pleiotropy is a rule rather than exception.

4) And finally, your weekly fluff fix. I met this “Kitler” in Coeur d’Alene:

(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
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FF3

1) Post from the past: Men at work: hoes, ploughs, and steel.


2) Weird search query of the week: “neanderthal human hybrid.” Do they have someone in mind?

3) Comment of the week, in response to Twin studies are not useless:

Brian Palmer’s identical twin … is a moron.

4) And finally, your weekly fluff fix:

(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
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FF3

1) Post from the past: Dwarfism and cell division.


2) Weird search query of the week: “is it legal to marry your third cousin.”

3) Comment of the week, in response to Pleasure through signalling:

Once at a farmer’s market I bought a couple little things that looked like habaneros. The guy who sold them to me looked at me like I was insane which I should have taken as a clue.

I chopped them up and through them in a salsa and the effect was –it wasn’t like a normal spiciness in any way. It was more like nerve gas. I was overcome with a sort of intense nausea and vertigo and violent ‘steaming’ sensation through my whole body. It was like I could feel areas of the surface of my skin violently spewing out some kind of gas like out of a steam vent.

Also it was really spicy and fried every part of my GI tract during it’s ten minute journey. (like Charlie Sheen on a bender in my bowels).

Anyone else ever run into this weird pepper?

4) And finally, your weekly fluff fix:

(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
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FF3

1) Post from the past: Genetics is One: Mendelism and quantitative traits


2) Weird search query of the week: “brad pitt look alike.”

3) Please note that I don’t endorse the views of the “comment of the week”! Comment of the week, in response to “1 in 3 Iranian men ‘gay’?”:

I think you are a bunch of idiots trying to judge everything with your nonsensical mindset.

I am a man and have fucked boys in Iran when I was at high school. They were supposedly gay and we used to call them sissy boys. So, will that make me gay? No! I did that because girls were not accessible. Also at a younger age `fucking somebody’ meant `proving your superiority’. Even now, I would happily fuck you mf* to show who has the upper hand!

But this sort of affairs would mostly happen between bullies and sissies. The rest 90% of children were immune of such activities. Those of us who did such things a couple of times also gave up doing so as we became more mature. I think you are out of your mind if you think 30% of men are gay or those unmarried are involved with other men!! You come up with such ideas only because your fucked-up society is so obsessed with gays, gayness, gay rights, etc.

As Ahmadinejad said, “we don’t have gays in Iran”! But we are happy to export our sissy boys to your fucked-up societies, as I am sure you will enjoy their company, since you new-generation nerdish westerners have turned gays yourselves.

4) And finally, your weekly fluff fix:

(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Science • Tags: Blog, Fluff, Friday Fluff, Katz 
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FF3

1) Post from the past: Why does race matter for women?


2) Weird search query of the week: “hustler buyuk memeli.”

3) Comment of the week, in response to “Smart educated men less likely to think cheating always wrong”:

BTW – the most interesting bit in that chart is the difference between atheists and agnostics. It makes sense when I think about it. To say one is an atheist rather than an agnostic requires a level of certainty towards ones beliefs. If there was a way to tease out relativism I’d lay good odds more agnostics are relativists than atheists are.

4) And finally, your weekly fluff fix:

(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
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FF3

1) Post from the past: Religion & IQ.


2) Weird search query of the week: “picture of john gillespie japanese sports.”

3) Comment of the week, in response to “Neanderthal-human mating, months later….”:

Humans mating with Neanderthals? Hmmm, could this be the first evidence of alcohol use?

4) And finally, your weekly fluff fix:

(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
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FF3

1) Post from the past: Race: the current consensus.


2) Weird search query of the week: “i, for one, welcome our aquatic overlords reddit.”

3) Comment of the week, in response to “What one (or more) genomes can tell us”:

An important constraint on mutation rate shifts is that chimpanzees and humans are almost exactly equally diverged from Gorilla (and Orang-Utan). As the mutation rate varies with generation time, this suggests that the mean generation time of humans and chimps since the split can’t be hugely different, and strongly argues against major mutation rate changes in our ancestors of the last few million years.

4) And finally, your weekly fluff fix:

(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
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FF3

1) Post from the past: From each according to their nature, to each according to their nature.


2) Weird search query of the week: “incest blogs.”

3) Comment of the week, in response to Scientific American blogs!”:

What’s there to compete for? Do blogging and ads pay much? I mean, besides prestige, attracting smart readership, thought-worthy comments, and possible collaborations? I guess, I kinda answered my own question.

4) And finally, your weekly fluff fix:

(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
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FF3

1) Post from the past: Blood of the British.


2) Weird search query of the week: “khan cannabilism and evolution.” FYI, I abstain from consumption of human flesh.

3) Comment of the week, in response to “Reify my genes!”:

I’m going to venture a guess that 12 and 29 are a wildly attractive and completely anonymous white female and Indian male.

4) And finally, your weekly fluff fix:

(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
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FF3

1) Post from the past: The wisdom of Seinfeld. How far in the past? When I wrote this it was closer to the series finale of Seinfeld than to now!


2) Weird search query of the week: “economics of having children marketplace.” I think I might have mentioned some of Murray Rothbard’s strange ideas on this at some point….

3) Comment of the week, in response to “Cave of Forgotten Dreams, see it, but tune the narration out”:

Razib,
You are not the first person to misspell his first name “Werner” in that manner, many do it with purpose to undercut the man and discredit his films (though I assume you would argue a minor overlook and/or simple mistake). His films continue to command viewing decades after their making and his legend grows with that.

Is it a perfect film? -No.
Is it an essential film? – Absolutely.
Was the scientific element that you vented about present? -Yes
If there was more scientific informations would we have missed out on the humanity of it? -Yes

“Humaness” as it was put in the film has much a place in the culture of man as the sciences of explanation. This was easily the best film to date of 2011, and the best film period I have seen in 3 years. Regardless of whether these Chauvet caves are ever filmed again or not, people in 100 years will still know of this film. Our grandchildren’s grandchildren who will not even know our names from their family trees will have access to this film when the Hangover Part II’s and the other films like it that are worthless in the “Humaness” sense will be forgotten in even the footnotes of history. Like it or not, Werner’s annoying commentary (annoying to you Razib) has just become the official voice of authority on the Chauvet Cave of our generation to all the generations of the world to come. He may not be Jean-Marie Chauvet or his colleagues, but unto future generations he will be like unto Howard Carter, Gertrude Bell and even Hemingway.

4) And finally, your weekly fluff fix:

(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
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FF3

1) Post from the past: The biological bases of behavioral variation.


2) Weird search query of the week: “clothedpornstars.” OK, so now I know what this is. But are there stars in this kink-genre?

3) Comment of the week, in response to “Does heritability of political orientation matter?”:

” This is why heritabilities of being conservative and liberal can remain the same over time and across cultures, even though conservative and liberal can mean very different things in different contexts.”
Possibly, but there’s a physiological basis underlying the liberal/conservative bias. The latter has been traced to differencies in dopamine neurotransmitter chemistry which are innate to the individual:

http://www.americanthinker.com//blog/2010/11/genetics_and_politics.html

This does not change with external circumstance. Accordingly, Liberals are feelings-driven and respond to political issues emotionally. They cherry-pick facts that support their pre-conceived conclusion. Conservatives are logic-driven, weigh all the facts and reason sequentially to a conclusion. Liberals cherish security; Conservatives cherish liberty. All else stems from those values.

4) And finally, your weekly fluff fix:

(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Science • Tags: Admin, Blog, Friday Fluff 
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FF3

1) Post from the past: What it means to be a Turk.


2) Weird search query of the week: “clothedporn.” 5 hits from this! Weird.

3) Comment of the week, in response to <a title=”"http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/gnxp/2011/06/dances-with-dragons-t-minus-month/#comment-74748Dances” href="http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/gnxp/2011/06/dances-with-dragons-t-minus-month/#comment-74748Dances with Dragons, t-minus ~ 1 month":

Maybe I’m a terrible person but I’m waiting for GRRM to either finish the series or die. I don’t want to get sucked into several thousand pages and then have to wait years for more of the story.
I recently read all 21 Aubrey/Maturin books and they were wonderful — but looking at the copyrights I can’t imagine having read them contemporaneously and having to go years between installments. I guess I am a terrible person, or at least a terrible book lover.

4) And finally, your weekly fluff fix:

(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
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FF3

1) I haven’t been feeling very well the last few days, and don’t have the energy or interest to go trolling through my archives. So I recommend you read Steve Brenner’s Does Arsenic Really Exist in the DNA from GFAJ-1?


2) Weird search query of the week: “‘julian o’dea’ grave?” Julie O’Dea is a reader of this weblog of long standing. Perhaps there’s a famous Julian O’Dea? I have no idea. I do know that there are people who are being “stalked” by others who read this weblog, because if they leave their names in the comments that comes up high in search queries. It’s pretty creepy sometimes to see others being stalked. Somehow it’s more disturbing than the search queries for my own name (I’m kind of stingy with my biographical data in some ways so the queries of the form “where does Razib live?” or “Razib married children” kind of make sense to me, even if they’re implicitly unwelcome).

3) Comment of the week, in response to “Hold the praise (re: comments)”:

This was a great post. Very informative! By the way have you seen my collection of genuine high end watches? I’m selling them cheap because I lost a lot of money in the financial crisis and have loans to pay off….

4) And finally, your weekly fluff fix:

(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
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FF3

1) First, a post from the past: Personality variation by region (USA).


2) Weird search query of the week: “why are ligers so big?”

3) Comment of the week, in response to “AIBioTech Sports X Factor is not worth the money”:

As you say, transparency is the key – without that the market has a more difficult job of deciding whether it is valid or not. However they do list the genes and since many of the effects are based on single studies (with small numbers), it is safe to say that it is:

a) valid if you are prepared to live with a high “might be right” factor

b) valid if you think that a single study on men over 70 years old has some relevance for your children

c) not valid if you prefer to have the interpretations actually repeated in separate studies so that they are less likely to be based on chance

They say: GROUNDBREAKING PERFORMANCE Tests based upon the newly developed Reynolds Score

So what is this Reynolds Score exactly. the test is based on it so it must be important, is it worh $180. Would you buy a $180 phone based on “Reynolds OS” without seeing it? The only Reynols Score I can find does not seem relevant: http://www.reynoldsriskscore.org/home.aspx

I’m certainly not against selling genetic tests, I’ve developed quite a few, I expect transparency though.
BTW – This is a good starting point for decigind on validity: http://www.trustortrash.org/
Try it and see if the Sports X Factor passes the test

4) And finally, your weekly fluff fix:

(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
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1) First, a post from the past: Pentecostals are stupid? Unitarians are smart?.


2) Weird search query of the week: “aki kaurismaki”

3) Comment of the week, in response to “Fixing science, in part”:

In one of Ben Goldacre’s books he cites a study about publication bias which shows that there’s a publication bias in studies about publication bias. Given reasonable assumptions about distributions, people aren’t publishing studies which would show only a small bias. I don’t k now if this is hilarious or just demonstrates how severe a problem publication bias is.

4) And finally, your weekly fluff fix:

(Republished from Discover/GNXP by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Science • Tags: Blog, Friday Fluff 
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Razib Khan
About Razib Khan

"I have degrees in biology and biochemistry, a passion for genetics, history, and philosophy, and shrimp is my favorite food. If you want to know more, see the links at http://www.razib.com"