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Would Mexicans Give Up Mexican Citizenship?
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Dear Mexican: I’ve read that 75% of Americans are against giving illegal immigrants citizenship. I’m for full amnesty and citizenship for the current 12 million that are here, but I have two absolute conditions. First, the border is locked up by both the U.S. and Mexico, and illegal entries are reduced by 90% even if that takes the military of both countries. Second, that citizenship would require pledging allegiance to America and denouncing their Mexican citizenship. My question is: Do you think that the Mexican portion of the 12 million would agree to this? And do you think the Mexican government would agree to helping to close the border if full amnesty was given to those that are now here?

Wally Wall

Dear Gabacho: You heard about how Donald Trump wants to build a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border and equip it with solar panels? Your idea is stupider. Primeramente, locking up the border accomplishes nada. There’s less Mexicans coming into los Estados Unidos right now not because of Trump’s pendejadas but because the United States is turning into Mexico—so why not just stay in Mexico? And putting both the American and Mexican military on la frontera is a waste of resources and firepower better used against the Saudis. Segundamente, any Mexican who would become legal has to pledge allegiance to the U.S.—it’s call the “naturalization oath of allegiance,” pendejo. And who cares if they have dual citizenship? Mexicans only get that so they can own land down there instead of having to give it up to the government—unless you’d rather Mexicans give that up and bring up their 91-year-old Tía Goya to live in el Norte? Gabachos like you need to get it into your mind that Mexicans (and other immigrants, for that matter) can simultaneously be American yet have another country on their mind, and not be disloyal to the Stars and Stripes. Why do conservatives get all pissy about that, yet cheer on losers who still love the Confederacy? Oh, yeah—because gabacho.

My husband has a disability that nobody in his Mexican family accepts (it’s a serious mental health disorder for which he receives government benefits, but they just tell him “Be strong, primo” and “How did you fool the government into giving you crazy money?”). Nobody has ever helped us with things he can’t do, but they expect him to help his mom with every home repair, because she raised him by herself. She’s verbally abuse and says nasty things about both of us when she’s alone with him, but to my face she acts like she wants us to be friends. Do we keep putting on the big, happy ethnic family act and explain away their ignorance of psychology and abuse? I understand that a history of oppression and struggle breeds dysfunction, but where do we draw the line? And don’t Mexicans watch Oprah and Dr. Phil?

Una Frustrated Gabacha-in-Law

ORDER IT NOW

Dear Gabacha: Confronting mental health issues among Mexicans is a serious topic that too often gets dismissed due to machismo. Without knowing his exact condition, all I can counsel is to ask your marido how he feels, and act accordingly. He might hate the familial abuse but is too afraid to say anything, and is waiting on you to say something. Or he might not feel abused at all. If it’s the latter case, keep him away from the primos and mom with promises of sexytimes—works on a Mexican man anytime!

 

Ask the Mexican at themexican@askamexican.net, be his fan on Facebook, follow him on Twitter @gustavoarellano or follow him on Instagram @gustavo_arellano!

 
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  1. “There’s less Mexicans coming into los Estados Unidos right now not because of Trump’s pendejadas but because the United States is turning into Mexico”- Gustavo Arellano

    Gee that wouldn’t happen to be because there are already plenty of Mexican immigrants here, eh Gus?

    “And putting both the American and Mexican military on la frontera is a waste of resources and firepower better used against the Saudis.”

    But wound’t that put a heavy dent on the narco cartels, sex traffickers, human smugglers, and illegals? Gee its almost as if you want illegals to continue to come here at free will.

    Is Gustavo just token opposition or something?

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  2. Well, in the event of a war between Mexico and the US, it sounds like a case of divided loyalties.

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    • Replies: @Romanian
    I think Americans would find divided loyalties to be an improvement.
  3. “because the United States is turning into Mexico”

    to paraphrase a real nutcase in American politics……”mission accomplished”

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  4. Romanian says: • Website
    @Daniel Chieh
    Well, in the event of a war between Mexico and the US, it sounds like a case of divided loyalties.

    I think Americans would find divided loyalties to be an improvement.

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  5. I believe Mexican law precludes renunciation of citizenship.

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    • Replies: @J. Dart
    Mexico lets Mexicans renounce citizenship if they want. They just have to go to the consulate and do some paperwork. (Almost no one does.)

    https://consulmex.sre.gob.mx/sandiego/index.php/doble-nacionalidad/renuncia-de-la-nacionalidad-mexicana

    What Mexico doesn't do is treat the U.S. naturalization oath as automatically cancelling Mexican citizenship. They stopped doing so in 1998 if I remember correctly.

    In Mexico's defense, the U.S. started that particular bad habit first. The 1980 Supreme Court case Vance v. Terrazas was about a guy born in the U.S. to Mexican parents (Terrazas) who, as part of the graduation paperwork at a public university in Mexico, signed a paper saying he renounced allegiance to the United States and swore allegiance to Mexico. SCOTUS said that Vance (U.S. Secretary of State) couldn't automatically conclude, just by looking at the words in the oath, that Terrazas intended to give up U.S. citizenship. In other words, SCOTUS adopted a legal presumption that oaths of allegiance to other countries are meaningless and sworn with false intent.

    In 1996, the State Department promulgated regulations (22 CFR 50.40) codifying that presumption. By 2014, they started charging a $2350 administrative fee for honest ex-Americans who'd sworn an oath of allegiance to another country and wanted State to overturn the presumption of false intent in their individual case.
  6. And don’t Mexicans watch Oprah and Dr. Phil?

    Man! Who the hell watches those shows any way? old women who don’t have nothing else to do?

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  7. Dear Fake Mexican:

    Take all 70 million of your Mexican buddies, and your Chinese buddies, and your African buddies, and your Middle East buddies, and get the hell out. Real Americans will be hanging your wealthy employers in the streets as you flood to the border to avoid being lynched yourself.

    Get out. Don’t come back.

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  8. Gus seems to get really angry responding to fake letters he’s written to himself, “gabacho” this, “pendejo” that. This sort of stuff may play well with the OC or LA Weekly crowd, but I can’t imagine that the typical visitor to this site thinks it’s anything but a sign of someone who’s got a screw loose.

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  9. J. Dart says:
    @Jim Bob Lassiter
    I believe Mexican law precludes renunciation of citizenship.

    Mexico lets Mexicans renounce citizenship if they want. They just have to go to the consulate and do some paperwork. (Almost no one does.)

    https://consulmex.sre.gob.mx/sandiego/index.php/doble-nacionalidad/renuncia-de-la-nacionalidad-mexicana

    What Mexico doesn’t do is treat the U.S. naturalization oath as automatically cancelling Mexican citizenship. They stopped doing so in 1998 if I remember correctly.

    In Mexico’s defense, the U.S. started that particular bad habit first. The 1980 Supreme Court case Vance v. Terrazas was about a guy born in the U.S. to Mexican parents (Terrazas) who, as part of the graduation paperwork at a public university in Mexico, signed a paper saying he renounced allegiance to the United States and swore allegiance to Mexico. SCOTUS said that Vance (U.S. Secretary of State) couldn’t automatically conclude, just by looking at the words in the oath, that Terrazas intended to give up U.S. citizenship. In other words, SCOTUS adopted a legal presumption that oaths of allegiance to other countries are meaningless and sworn with false intent.

    In 1996, the State Department promulgated regulations (22 CFR 50.40) codifying that presumption. By 2014, they started charging a $2350 administrative fee for honest ex-Americans who’d sworn an oath of allegiance to another country and wanted State to overturn the presumption of false intent in their individual case.

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  10. TheJester says:

    To have dual citizenship is to have no citizenship … being loyal to nothing. It is a sop for globalization. For the United States, dual citizenship started to accommodate Jews who wanted to have both US and Israeli citizenship … call this one of our many special “Jewish Laws”. Like I said, being loyal to nothing. But, given the power of the Jewish lobby, we could do nothing about it.

    Things do not appear much better south of the border. Wiki says that Mexico started allowing dual citizenship in 1998. Perhaps that is why so many assume that the US/Mexican border doesn’t exist. Why try to restrict and control cross-border travel based on that silly piece of paper called a passport? Mexican … American … Mexican/American … American/Mexican … what’s the difference?

    Why not do away with national citizenship and just consider everyone a World Citizen? Then, we could be like the Germans, Swedes, British, and other peoples in Western Europe and invite the world to joing us … while the newcomers, of course, maintain their racial, cultural, religious, and familial ties and loyalties to their home countries.

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  11. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    “I’m for full amnesty and citizenship for the current 12 million that are here, but I have two absolute conditions.”

    Your fake question is already starting on the wrong Mexican foot.

    The number of illegals are much closer to 40 million, according to some crackerjack research by Ann Coulter, author of “Adios, America: The Left’s Plan to Turn Our Country into a Third World Hellhole.”

    So are you saying you’d legalize 12 million, and send the rest back to their own nations? I think that’s a waste of time and resources. Best to send them all back to their host country’s and have them reapply for after the immigration ban has been lifted, preferably not for a good 10 years.

    I think you don’t know what you’re saying. I think you woke up on your couch at 4 in the morning, drenched in tequila again. When/if you sober up, run, don’t walk to Amazon, and pick up a copy of Ann Coulter’s “Adios, America: The Left’s Plan to Turn Our Country into a Third World Hellhole.”

    Her research is irrefutable, and you’ll learn a lot.

    https://www.amazon.com/Adios-America-Lefts-Country-Hellhole/dp/162157606X?SubscriptionId=AKIAILSHYYTFIVPWUY6Q&tag=duckduckgo-d-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=162157606X

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    • Replies: @Pgr
    "... a good 10 years"

    I think you misspelled 'generations'
  12. Pgr says:
    @anonymous
    "I’m for full amnesty and citizenship for the current 12 million that are here, but I have two absolute conditions."

    Your fake question is already starting on the wrong Mexican foot.

    The number of illegals are much closer to 40 million, according to some crackerjack research by Ann Coulter, author of "Adios, America: The Left's Plan to Turn Our Country into a Third World Hellhole."

    So are you saying you'd legalize 12 million, and send the rest back to their own nations? I think that's a waste of time and resources. Best to send them all back to their host country's and have them reapply for after the immigration ban has been lifted, preferably not for a good 10 years.

    I think you don't know what you're saying. I think you woke up on your couch at 4 in the morning, drenched in tequila again. When/if you sober up, run, don't walk to Amazon, and pick up a copy of Ann Coulter's "Adios, America: The Left's Plan to Turn Our Country into a Third World Hellhole."

    Her research is irrefutable, and you'll learn a lot.

    https://www.amazon.com/Adios-America-Lefts-Country-Hellhole/dp/162157606X?SubscriptionId=AKIAILSHYYTFIVPWUY6Q&tag=duckduckgo-d-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=162157606X

    “… a good 10 years”

    I think you misspelled ‘generations’

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  13. I thought that restrictions of foreigners owning property in Mexico applied only to coastal lands and within 100 miles (some such distance) from a border, that the foreigner must partner (it can be in a SA), not in majority, with a Mexican national.
    Nothing says loyalty to new country like not giving up (abjuring) previous citizenship, especially because of personal benefits.
    Go home … for many that means Mexico.

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    • Replies: @J. Dart

    I thought that restrictions of foreigners owning property in Mexico applied only to coastal lands and within 100 miles (some such distance) from a border, that the foreigner must partner (it can be in a SA), not in majority, with a Mexican national.

     

    This is basically right. Except you don't even need to partner with a Mexican citizen, you can just get a Mexican lawyer to create a fideicomiso for you (kind of like a trust) and assign the land to it, then you'll have full control over the land.

    Nothing says loyalty to new country like not giving up (abjuring) previous citizenship, especially because of personal benefits.
     
    The U.S. could just tell all the immigrants at naturalization ceremonies that they've got six months or a year or however long to send proof to USCIS that they went to the consulate and cancelled their old country's citizenship, or their naturalization will be cancelled as fraudulent.. Norway, Estonia, Japan, and Singapore all do this, for example.
  14. J. Dart says:
    @JaimeInTexas
    I thought that restrictions of foreigners owning property in Mexico applied only to coastal lands and within 100 miles (some such distance) from a border, that the foreigner must partner (it can be in a SA), not in majority, with a Mexican national.
    Nothing says loyalty to new country like not giving up (abjuring) previous citizenship, especially because of personal benefits.
    Go home ... for many that means Mexico.

    I thought that restrictions of foreigners owning property in Mexico applied only to coastal lands and within 100 miles (some such distance) from a border, that the foreigner must partner (it can be in a SA), not in majority, with a Mexican national.

    This is basically right. Except you don’t even need to partner with a Mexican citizen, you can just get a Mexican lawyer to create a fideicomiso for you (kind of like a trust) and assign the land to it, then you’ll have full control over the land.

    Nothing says loyalty to new country like not giving up (abjuring) previous citizenship, especially because of personal benefits.

    The U.S. could just tell all the immigrants at naturalization ceremonies that they’ve got six months or a year or however long to send proof to USCIS that they went to the consulate and cancelled their old country’s citizenship, or their naturalization will be cancelled as fraudulent.. Norway, Estonia, Japan, and Singapore all do this, for example.

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  15. As a Colombian I can say through personal experience that Mexicans are the most stupid among our Latin brethren. Just as stupid as any burro from Puerto Rico and they are unable to speak proper Spanish. animales tontos!

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  16. Mexicans (and other immigrants, for that matter) can simultaneously be American yet have another country on their mind, and not be disloyal to the Stars and Stripes.

    “Multitasking” is a lie, and multitasking citizenship is doubly so.

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  17. WJ says:

    No amnesty. Never again. It will be the end of the USA for certain. That end might already be in the cards as a result of the previous amnesty and poor border enforcement.

    The blogger makes a point that the USA has become more like Mexico. You can thank the illegals with the importation of their lousy culture and their wage depression.

    They have to go back.

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  18. Texaskid says:

    I partly agree with you. I don’t want amnesty. The Spanish were here long ago and the people have gone back and forth between the disputed areas for centuries. Remnants of Spanish/Mexican culture? The horse and much of cowboy culture.

    Even though my Mexican cousins don’t consider me Mexican at all, I have done the best I could to visit them and pay respects to family. Granted, there are huge differences culturally, but there are also big differences culturally between those of us from Texas and those from New York or Northern California, for example.

    Mexicans and Texans both love their beer, backyard barbeques, and visiting family (Mexican families are very close).

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  19. Texaskid says:

    “Why do conservatives get all pissy about that, yet cheer on losers who still love the Confederacy?”

    Texas was in the CSA. You had many Tejanos serve with distinction in the CSA military.

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  20. @J. Dart
    Mexico lets Mexicans renounce citizenship if they want. They just have to go to the consulate and do some paperwork. (Almost no one does.)

    https://consulmex.sre.gob.mx/sandiego/index.php/doble-nacionalidad/renuncia-de-la-nacionalidad-mexicana

    What Mexico doesn't do is treat the U.S. naturalization oath as automatically cancelling Mexican citizenship. They stopped doing so in 1998 if I remember correctly.

    In Mexico's defense, the U.S. started that particular bad habit first. The 1980 Supreme Court case Vance v. Terrazas was about a guy born in the U.S. to Mexican parents (Terrazas) who, as part of the graduation paperwork at a public university in Mexico, signed a paper saying he renounced allegiance to the United States and swore allegiance to Mexico. SCOTUS said that Vance (U.S. Secretary of State) couldn't automatically conclude, just by looking at the words in the oath, that Terrazas intended to give up U.S. citizenship. In other words, SCOTUS adopted a legal presumption that oaths of allegiance to other countries are meaningless and sworn with false intent.

    In 1996, the State Department promulgated regulations (22 CFR 50.40) codifying that presumption. By 2014, they started charging a $2350 administrative fee for honest ex-Americans who'd sworn an oath of allegiance to another country and wanted State to overturn the presumption of false intent in their individual case.

    Thanks for setting my straight on that.

    Read More
  21. I can see the OC Weekly giving a racist piece of shit like you a column, but why Unz? He likes illegals too I guess. Don’t be too cocky chico, don’t think you’ll be on top forever.

    Read More
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