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Why Is Mexican Spanish So Maligned?

Dear Mexican: Why is Mexican Spanish so maligned by the rest of the Hispanic world (even Dominicans!)? It doesn’t make any sense to me, but nonetheless I find myself worrying about my intended trip a Mexico para cursos de Español. Am I making a mistake in learning Mexican-accented Spanish?

No Puedo Usar Accentos

Dear I Can’t Use Accents: Have you ever talked to Colombians? At some point, they inevitably say that their Spanish is the best in the world, that someone from the Real Academia Española said that was so, and therefore, it’s true. And while I like Colombians (they’re as happy and drunk and angry as us Mexicans, and they gave the world cumbia), that’s an urban legend as preposterous as the one that maintains the husband of a jealous lover murdered Javier Solís. It’s true that rest of Latin American trashes Mexican Spanish for supposedly being lower-class than other Spanish varieties, but EVERYONE trashes everyone’s Spanish. Argentine Spanish get mocked for being wannabe Italian; Cuban and Puerto Rican Spanish gets grilled for being lightning-fast gable. Peruvian Spanish is supposedly too soft-spoken; Central American Spanish is considered backwater for their continued use of voseo (the second person singular pronoun vos).

Even Mexicans make fun of each other’s Spanish. Guadalajara natives are notorious for saying “O, sea” (the fresa version of “I mean, like”); rural folks are ridiculed as sing-song chúntaros. Mexico City is so large that two Spanishes are ascribed to it: the matter-of-fact tone of capitalinos (the rich) and the hilariously vulgar babadas of the chilangos (the poor). And all Latin Americans trash indigenous folks for not even knowing Spanish, period. So learn Mexican Spanish—that’s the one that the majority of Latinos in the U.S. speak, anyway. And my vote for the best Español? Chilean Spanish, cachai?

 

A dear friend of ours has married a Mexican man, who is now our dear friend. They have invited us to his sister’s wedding in Mexico. By North American standards, we barely know her. We would love to go, but we want to be sure that it is appropriate. What is expected of an acquaintance in this circumstance?

Vivacious for Vallarta

Dear Gabacho: You do realize Mexico is part of North America, right? Let’s start with knowing basic geographical facts about the host country before visiting it. It’s pendeja gabachas like you that make hotel workers continue to shove toothbrushes up their culos, then take pictures of that ass affront with the smartphone you left in your room while you’re getting drunk at the pool bar from your fifth Adios Mother Fucker.

 

I was wondering what the origin is of so many Mexican food restaurants having the word “Agave” in it?

#3 Combo, Extra Sour Cream

Dear Gabacho: “So many”? Betcha more Mexican restaurants get named for the owner’s hometown/home state, tacos, or use a –berto’s suffix than there are restaurants using “Agave.” But the word offers a fascinating insight into the history of Mexican-food restaurant aesthetics. They started getting named after the mother plant of tequila back in the 1980s, during the Southwestern cuisine craze. Back then, chefs overloaded on Southwestern signifiers—agave paintings and silhouettes of howling coyotes and Kokopelli, mostly—to advertise their “authenticity,” much like modern-day taquerías bump Vicente Fernández on the jukebox or mariscos spots employ waitress who follow the gospel of #chichischrist and #nalgamedios.

 

Ask the Mexican at themexican@askamexican.net, be his fan on Facebook, follow him on Twitter @gustavoarellano or follow him on Instagram @gustavo_arellano!

 
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  1. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    It’s because Mexicans speak in a beaner-ish Gomezian way.

    They sound like a bunch of lazy hickez.

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  2. Mexican’s being dissed by Dominicans for the quality of their Spanish? As surprised as many of you may be, I’m going to have come down on the side of the Mexicans on that particular angle. In fact, most Caribbean Spanish/Spanglish is far more of a Charles Foxtrot patois language than most Mexican Spanish you will hear. (controlling for education/social class/immigration status of course)

    However, I do have a hunch that the Castro regime made major advances in improving Cuban Spanish.

    In support of my thesis, I would suggest that Spanish proficient readers give a comparative listen to a six o’clock TV newscast out of Mexico City to an in-house Univision Coral Gables TV newscast production. (anchors are predominantly of Caribbean origins)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Gringo
    Mexican’s being dissed by Dominicans for the quality of their Spanish? As surprised as many of you may be, I’m going to have come down on the side of the Mexicans on that particular angle. In fact, most Caribbean Spanish/Spanglish is far more of a Charles Foxtrot patois language than most Mexican Spanish you will hear.

    Couldn't agree more. Caribbean Spanish is painful to my ear. An egregious example is the Maracucho [Maracaibo,Venezuela] accent, here illustrated by the deceased Chavista legislator Robert Serra. Habla Chino, pues. [not comprehensible to me.]

    Gustavo Arrelano: And my vote for the best Español? Chilean Spanish, cachai?
    To each their own. Sounds OK to me, if a bit fast. Definitely better than Caribbean Spanish. I am partial to the Spanish of voseo-speaking countries, perhaps because I spent more time there. For example, Decime sounds better to me than Dime.[Tell me.]OTOH, vos-speaking Pepe Mujica, former President of Uruguay, sounds to me like an old drunk. I like the Spanish of the Peruvian announcer Jaime Bayly.
    , @RaceRealist88
    Dominicans have the most annoying accents I have ever heard.
  3. One little forgotten historical fact. Mex and USA have such a long relationship, that we are like a modern marriage. for literally hundreds of years we live together and at the same time separated. Each ignorant of the other, stranded, and aloof. So close and yet each so different, from each other. The gringo cowboy and the Mexican ranchero so intertwined with similar lifestyles, yet so astronomically different. One idolized (cowboys) and the other disparagingly ignored. Yet both cultures are intertwined, and something tells me that the cowboys learnt their trade from the inhabitants they found upon their arrival to Texas, and the southwest. Just a thought.

    Read More
    • Replies: @OutWest
    As I recall cowboys learned their trade from acting coaches in Hollywood.
  4. @in the middle
    One little forgotten historical fact. Mex and USA have such a long relationship, that we are like a modern marriage. for literally hundreds of years we live together and at the same time separated. Each ignorant of the other, stranded, and aloof. So close and yet each so different, from each other. The gringo cowboy and the Mexican ranchero so intertwined with similar lifestyles, yet so astronomically different. One idolized (cowboys) and the other disparagingly ignored. Yet both cultures are intertwined, and something tells me that the cowboys learnt their trade from the inhabitants they found upon their arrival to Texas, and the southwest. Just a thought.

    As I recall cowboys learned their trade from acting coaches in Hollywood.

    Read More
  5. @Jim Bob Lassiter
    Mexican's being dissed by Dominicans for the quality of their Spanish? As surprised as many of you may be, I'm going to have come down on the side of the Mexicans on that particular angle. In fact, most Caribbean Spanish/Spanglish is far more of a Charles Foxtrot patois language than most Mexican Spanish you will hear. (controlling for education/social class/immigration status of course)

    However, I do have a hunch that the Castro regime made major advances in improving Cuban Spanish.

    In support of my thesis, I would suggest that Spanish proficient readers give a comparative listen to a six o'clock TV newscast out of Mexico City to an in-house Univision Coral Gables TV newscast production. (anchors are predominantly of Caribbean origins)

    Mexican’s being dissed by Dominicans for the quality of their Spanish? As surprised as many of you may be, I’m going to have come down on the side of the Mexicans on that particular angle. In fact, most Caribbean Spanish/Spanglish is far more of a Charles Foxtrot patois language than most Mexican Spanish you will hear.

    Couldn’t agree more. Caribbean Spanish is painful to my ear. An egregious example is the Maracucho [Maracaibo,Venezuela] accent, here illustrated by the deceased Chavista legislator Robert Serra. Habla Chino, pues. [not comprehensible to me.]

    Gustavo Arrelano: And my vote for the best Español? Chilean Spanish, cachai?
    To each their own. Sounds OK to me, if a bit fast. Definitely better than Caribbean Spanish. I am partial to the Spanish of voseo-speaking countries, perhaps because I spent more time there. For example, Decime sounds better to me than Dime.[Tell me.]OTOH, vos-speaking Pepe Mujica, former President of Uruguay, sounds to me like an old drunk. I like the Spanish of the Peruvian announcer Jaime Bayly.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    10-4 good buddy. And Gus is way off (surprised?) in his characterization of voseo as some backwater Central American version of Spanish. That's the way I learned Castilian, and it is not restricted to Central America-- to wit Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay as well as parts of Columbia and Chile are voseo territories in addition to some small voseo isolates in Meh-Hee-Coh. That said, the Guanacos and Catrachos really do butcher things up with their mixing of tuteo and voseo in the same utterance directed at the same person.

    Costa Ricans would rightfully chaffe at Gus's "backwater" remarks too.
  6. ” A dear friend of ours has married a Mexican man, who is now our dear friend. They have invited us to his sister’s wedding in Mexico. By North American standards, we barely know her….”

    (Everyone please take notice.)

    Gustavo

    Honestly, you vulgar, abrasive, abusive, left-wing La Raza poser! You little man! Please tell me, sir, why in the world you couldn’t simply answer this person’s seemingly legitimate question about Mexican wedding etiquette without dragging them through cesspit of you own rage and resentment?

    You are a small man, Sir. Very, very small.

    And beyond pity besides.

    Just a thought.

    VicB3

    Read More
    • Replies: @RaceRealist88
    "Honestly, you vulgar, abrasive, abusive, left-wing La Raza poser! You little man! Please tell me, sir, why in the world you couldn’t simply answer this person’s seemingly legitimate question about Mexican wedding etiquette without dragging them through cesspit of you own rage and resentment?"

    It's clear that he hates 'gringos' and has resentment towards 'gringos' yet 'gringos' both in America and Mexico (I'm not counting Mexico's ruling class as 'gringo', as they largely trace their ancestry back to Spain) make it possible for him to spew vitriol to people just asking simple questions.

    I've been saying this for months, this column is garbage and anti-white.
  7. @Gringo
    Mexican’s being dissed by Dominicans for the quality of their Spanish? As surprised as many of you may be, I’m going to have come down on the side of the Mexicans on that particular angle. In fact, most Caribbean Spanish/Spanglish is far more of a Charles Foxtrot patois language than most Mexican Spanish you will hear.

    Couldn't agree more. Caribbean Spanish is painful to my ear. An egregious example is the Maracucho [Maracaibo,Venezuela] accent, here illustrated by the deceased Chavista legislator Robert Serra. Habla Chino, pues. [not comprehensible to me.]

    Gustavo Arrelano: And my vote for the best Español? Chilean Spanish, cachai?
    To each their own. Sounds OK to me, if a bit fast. Definitely better than Caribbean Spanish. I am partial to the Spanish of voseo-speaking countries, perhaps because I spent more time there. For example, Decime sounds better to me than Dime.[Tell me.]OTOH, vos-speaking Pepe Mujica, former President of Uruguay, sounds to me like an old drunk. I like the Spanish of the Peruvian announcer Jaime Bayly.

    10-4 good buddy. And Gus is way off (surprised?) in his characterization of voseo as some backwater Central American version of Spanish. That’s the way I learned Castilian, and it is not restricted to Central America– to wit Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay as well as parts of Columbia and Chile are voseo territories in addition to some small voseo isolates in Meh-Hee-Coh. That said, the Guanacos and Catrachos really do butcher things up with their mixing of tuteo and voseo in the same utterance directed at the same person.

    Costa Ricans would rightfully chaffe at Gus’s “backwater” remarks too.

    Read More
  8. Re: the toothbrush thing

    Never let it be said Sr. Arellano isn’t doing his bit for the tourism industry. They’ll probably survive despite the assistance.

    Read More
  9. People cap on Mexican Spanish because you can’t even remember the proper name of the letter ‘y’ (i griega) and want everyone else to follow along. But the Caribbeans. La lengua del Caribe e epañol.

    Read More
  10. Asi son los venezolanos! Everyone claims their version of spoken Spanish is the best but it depends on the ear. It is interesting that the Cubans, recently arrived from Spain in the 1890′s or so spoke the language of the Caribe with their nasal gallego guajiro accent and it is more representative because they were Spaniards.

    Read More
  11. It’s a personal opinion, of course, but I’ve been exposed to many different varieties for many years and Colombia and Chile, for some reason unknown to me, have probably the best Spanish in America. We’re always referring, of course, to the ‘norma culta’, that is, the one spoken or written by highly-cultivated people.

    Anyway, the ‘norma culta’ in Mexico, just like in many other places, is perfectly good. If you look for high-quality Spanish you can find it without any doubt.

    Read More
  12. “It’s pendeja gabachas like you that make hotel workers continue to shove toothbrushes up their culos, then take pictures of that ass affront with the smartphone you left in your room while you’re getting drunk at the pool bar from your fifth Adios Mother Fucker.”

    Remember guys, we allow these people in droves into our country (both legally and illegally).

    Read More
  13. @Jim Bob Lassiter
    Mexican's being dissed by Dominicans for the quality of their Spanish? As surprised as many of you may be, I'm going to have come down on the side of the Mexicans on that particular angle. In fact, most Caribbean Spanish/Spanglish is far more of a Charles Foxtrot patois language than most Mexican Spanish you will hear. (controlling for education/social class/immigration status of course)

    However, I do have a hunch that the Castro regime made major advances in improving Cuban Spanish.

    In support of my thesis, I would suggest that Spanish proficient readers give a comparative listen to a six o'clock TV newscast out of Mexico City to an in-house Univision Coral Gables TV newscast production. (anchors are predominantly of Caribbean origins)

    Dominicans have the most annoying accents I have ever heard.

    Read More
  14. @VICB3
    " A dear friend of ours has married a Mexican man, who is now our dear friend. They have invited us to his sister’s wedding in Mexico. By North American standards, we barely know her...."

    (Everyone please take notice.)

    Gustavo

    Honestly, you vulgar, abrasive, abusive, left-wing La Raza poser! You little man! Please tell me, sir, why in the world you couldn't simply answer this person's seemingly legitimate question about Mexican wedding etiquette without dragging them through cesspit of you own rage and resentment?

    You are a small man, Sir. Very, very small.

    And beyond pity besides.

    Just a thought.

    VicB3

    “Honestly, you vulgar, abrasive, abusive, left-wing La Raza poser! You little man! Please tell me, sir, why in the world you couldn’t simply answer this person’s seemingly legitimate question about Mexican wedding etiquette without dragging them through cesspit of you own rage and resentment?”

    It’s clear that he hates ‘gringos’ and has resentment towards ‘gringos’ yet ‘gringos’ both in America and Mexico (I’m not counting Mexico’s ruling class as ‘gringo’, as they largely trace their ancestry back to Spain) make it possible for him to spew vitriol to people just asking simple questions.

    I’ve been saying this for months, this column is garbage and anti-white.

    Read More
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