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Anti-American Slogan in Caracas, Venezuela. Credit: IBTimes
Anti-American Slogan in Caracas, Venezuela. Credit: IBTimes

A frequent theme nowadays is “Why do they hate us?” meaning why does so much of the world detest the United States. The reasons given are usually absurd: They hate our freedom or democracy. They hate us for our cultural superiority. They hate us because we are wonderful.

No. Actually the reason is simple if unpalatable. They hate us because we meddle, and have meddled. They hate us because we are the most murderous nation on the planet. They hate our insufferable smugness.

People remember slights. They may not remember them as they actually happened, but they remember them. The Civil War ended in 1865, the Federal occupation in 1877. Yet today many Southerners are still bitter, to the point that their emotional loyalty is to the South, not to Washington.

Silly? Yes, if you are from the North. Grievances matter more to those aggrieved than to the aggrievers.

In Guadalajara, near my home in Mexico, a towering monument in a traffic circle honors Los Niños Héroes, the Heroic Children. These are the little boys who, when the invading American armies attacked Chapultepec in 1847, went out to fight for their country. Avenues are named Niños Héroes all over Mexico. Few Americans even know that there was a war.

Wounds to national pride gall people, and endure. Exactly why, I don’t know, but it happens. Consider China. How many have heard of the Opium Wars of 1839 and 1856? Or understand that the United States and the European powers simply occupied such parts of China as they chose, forced opium sales on China, imposed extraterritoriality, and bloodily suppressed the Boxers? How many people have even heard of the Boxers?

Over a billion Chinese.

My point is not that China is morally superior to the United States. It isn’t. However, if you want to understand why so many countries loathe us, you have to understand how they see us. Whether you agree is irrelevant. Nor does it matter whether their grievances are factual. For example, many South Americans believe their countries to be poor because of exploitation by America. This isn’t true, which doesn’t matter at all.

A few years back I was in Laos and chatted with a young Lao woman. She mentioned in passing the death of her father. What happened to him, I asked? Oh, she said, he died fighting the Americans. A war that many Americans saw as a meritorious crusade against communism was, to the countries involved, an inexplicable attack that killed their fathers and brothers and children. They didn’t see why the internal affairs of their country were America’s business.

Agree with them or don’t, but that’s why they hate us.

Countries usually see their own virtues and the warts of others. Americans, perhaps because they do not much travel, carry this to an extreme and regard their country as superior to all others. The attitude is highly annoying. Consider the US from the point of view of others:

America is both a rogue state and a bully, constantly attacking countries hopelessly inferior in military strength — Cambodia, Vietnam, Laos, Panama, Cuba, Iraq, Somalia, Afghanistan, etc. Civil rights? The US has more people in prison than any other country. Many of our cities are festering slums. The world saw the victims of Katrina. Morality? The country is rife with drugs, crime, sex. Culture? In education, American students are annually shown to be inferior to those of Thailand, Hungary, Singapore, and so on. America is tasteless and sordid. Look at the movies….

Yes, yes, some of that isn’t fair, and an American might ask, for example, how an Arab country, practicing female circumcision and not allowing girls to study, can lecture anyone on morality. I agree. But how they see things determines their attitudes.

In Google Images, search on “Abu Ghraib.” You will see American Army women grinning as they torture and humiliate Arab men. They are having a wonderful time, and the whole world can see those pictures. This was American policy — low-ranking girl soldiers do not undertake this kind of thing without approval from command. The general in charge was a woman. Torture is still American policy.

Stalin did this sort of thing. So did Adolf. So did Pol Pot. And so does the United States. Other countries know it. (Google recently pulled its ads from Antiwar.com because the site posted an Abu Ghraib photo. Does Google support torture, or did the Feds threaten….? Nah. Impossible. Not our government.) When I think how other countries react, I cringe.

Below the Rio Bravo? The first rule of American hemispheric diplomacy south of Texas should be “Don’t get into Latin faces unless you have to.” The US has a long history, of which most Americans aren’t aware, of meddling to the south. At least three invasions of Mexico depending on whether Veracruz counts as an invastion or just a bombardment), at least one of Panama, the installation of Pinochet in Chile and of support for various Central American dictators, United Fruit, the Canal Zone, the Bay of Pigs, on and on and on. These things are remembered.

A couple of examples of abjectly stupid, obnoxious meddling: First, many decades back, Mexico had a comic-book character called Memin Pinguin, a caricature black kid with exaggerated lips and so on who had adventures with white friends. In 2005, Mexico issued postage stamps with Memin’s picture, as we might of Elvis. To Mexicans it was innocent nostalgia. Yet in America outrage erupted. Jesse Jackson attacked the Mexican government and George Bush denounced the stamps as racism. People here were furious: Mexico couldn’t even issue postage stamps without approval from Washington.

ORDER IT NOW

Second: In 2006 , some Cuban businessmen took a room in the Sheraton in Mexico City. Washington got wind of it and forced Sheraton, an American company, to eject them. Childish, pointless, it enraged Mexicans who see Cuba as yet another small country being bullied by the US, and regarded the ejection as meddling with national sovereignty. The effect of course was to fan sympathy for Cuba.

Further, we tend to see things through lenses of moralistic abstractions: Democracy is good, and freedom is good, and therefore if we bomb Iraq and kill many thousands of soldiers who are someone’s husbands, brothers, children, and fathers, the survivors will throw flowers and turn into Fifth Century Athens. It’s all right to destroy cities because we say we have good intentions.

People detest condescension. Yet we lecture Russia and China condescendingly on human rights, and speak openly of committing “regime change” in various countries as if we had a divine right to determine their form of government. It smells of armed mommyism, which no one can stand.

It is even worth reflecting that our “democracy” and “freedom” do not look as resplendent as we might think to the people of a more collective-minded and well-run country. Try Singapore. Neither democratic nor free in our sense, it is prosperous, free of crime, without a drug problem (a country that executes drug dealers has few of them), enjoys schools far better than ours; lacks graffiti, vandalism, and trash in the streets, and has a high degree of technological advancement. Its people quietly regard themselves as civilizationally superior to a degraded America in decline. (Humility is not a besetting sin of the Chinese.)

Why do we not behave more sensibly? Americans obviously are not stupid people. Dummies don’t build Mars rovers. Yet we seem to have a wanton, almost genetic non-grasp of how others think — which means that we can’t predict what they will do. Often Americans just don’t care what others think. This of course plays into the hands of Hugo Chavez and bin Laden.

That’s why they hate us. We meddle.

(Republished from Fred on Everything by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: American Media, American Military 
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  1. And there’s the misuse of the word “we”. Or maybe I could paraphrase Clinton and say, It depends upon what the meaning of the word ‘we’ is. Now 99.99999% of the U.S. people have never had anything to do with how our foreign policy is formed and executed by the other .00001% (the elected officials). And we should not be a part of that particular “we”. And I think the generic public is waking up to the fact that we generally elect criminals and thugs proficient in extortion, theft and intimidation. Our government could teach the Mafia. Our elected officials only concerns are getting reelected via telling more convincing lies than the other candidates then pandering to the moneyed interests that got them there in the first place.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dwright
    I came here from Lew Rockwell's site just to comment on the "we" aspect. Right away I see that others picked up on it. Come on Fred, there is the United States the country and also it's citizens.

    Don't confuse the two.
    , @Frankie P
    It's kind of ridiculous to assume that American foreign policy is formed by the elected officials. Elected officials may seem to form the foreign policy, but the marching orders come from the money behind those officials; and we all know that it is the SAME money that funds both parties. What did George Carlin say? I paraphrase: You have elections so that people have the perception that they have a choice. You don't have a choice. You have owners.
    , @marcelo paes
    The pronoun is right, they do hate you. YOUR government should be YOUR problem, not the REST OF THE WORLD problem.
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  2. Travis says:

    True , the United States meddling is one reason they hate us…but their own politicians exploit past meddling to build their own power and incite more hatred toward the United States. For some reason our own media played into it and hollywood loves promoting films which far too often portray America as an evil force in the world with nefarious goals. This propaganda certainly helps foreign dictators in their agenda to balm America for their nations problems.
    Foreign leaders use our past actions to excuse their own inept governments and to deflect eyes from their own malfeasance.

    While China incites anti-Americanism by calling our protection of South Korea the War of American Aggression , which clearly distorts this war which was started by North Korea, they fail to mention how the United States gave support to China in their war with Japan and just as Americans helped liberate France from Nazi occupation we helped Liberate China and Korea from the Japanese occupation…

    Nevertheless maybe we should have abandoned our friends and allowed Korea to be taken over by the communists , it was not worth losing 50,000 American lives and countless billions to keep our troops in Korea to defend their border. We certainly should have allowed Spain to continue to rule Cuba. By liberating Cuba from Spanish occupation we got years of grief.

    Hopefully Americans will learn to stay out of foreign affairs as they never end favorable for us. It only provides more ammunition for our enemies and gains us nothing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    We certainly should have allowed Spain to continue to rule Cuba. By liberating Cuba from Spanish occupation we got years of grief.

    I don't think we liberated Cuba from Spain any more than we liberated Panama from Columbia. There were Cubans in Cuba that wanted to run the place for themselves and cut Spain out same as for Panama and we interceded because rich guys in the US wanted a piece of the action.

    Most of our meddling in Latin America was because some rich guys had investments there and couldn't take the fact that foreign investment is risky. The government changed and they took a hit. They got their stooges in the US government to get their assets back. Of course, the government usually tells the rubes back home that the commies are fomenting revolution or some other nonsense to hide the fact that our army is being used to get some guy's resort or plantation back.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  3. Tom_R says:

    US AND THEM?
    LETS MAKE THE WORLD HATE AMERICA’S BIGGEST LOBBY, NOT US.

    Thanks for the interesting article, Fred. I agree with you on most points.

    Except we have to explain the word “us”? When I travel overseas, and people criticize me or “us”, about what the US govt. did, I calmly explain to them that we the people in America have no power. WE did not make the decisions. Our govt. did.

    So how do we make them hate our crooked corrupt criminal govt. for what THEY DO and not us? For example, the biggest lobby in USA is the Jewish lobby that bribes politicians and makes THEM do most of the bad things the govt. is doing, such as causing wars in the Middle East or promoting homopathy or other depravity, including Hollywood, which is Jewish controlled. The people have no say in the matter. Since they are the biggest lobby, and 50% of the campaign contributions to the Democrats and 40% to the Republicans are from the Judaists, they basically own and operate our govt.

    http://business.financialpost.com/fp-comment/lawrence-solomon-obama-jewish-financiers

    So the people must hate them, not us!

    Read More
    • Replies: @WGG
    Very true. However, we do have a large portion of home-grown Israel-firsters that ferociously support everything the aforementioned lobby wants. Generally of the John Hagee variety. The first thing we should be doing is trying to educate these useful idiot boobs.
    , @Flower
    "I calmly explain to them that we the people in America have no power. " - No offense Tom, but you have inadvertently explained that you are#1 a dumb fck, #2 You are completely immaterial to any solution, #3 if you said the truth, you have said to these folks, "you are on your own. We have ours, and you don't, it is your problem, let me know how it comes out." Fred's entire article is about WHY they "hate us" and you have agreed word for word. I salute you for your verve; however, if Fred and his group are all that are in complaint of this situation, you will come out as a crackpot and a threat. How can you convince a thirty something making middle class wages doing a middle class job designed to support liars and thieves in order to KEEP that job, what the f do you suppose the answer will be?

    Fred, I love your work, your attitude, your conception of such words as "truth" and "freedom". But explaining to us "why they hate us" is as enlightening as explaining why we have two feet. We know why they hate us. After all, we are the stupid cork soakers that KEEP electing these pieces of S. We keep electing those that don't care if "they hate us", if we f them, or even if we lie to them so we can f them. Fred, without equivocation, I challenge you to give us a viable way out. Yeah Fred, it's time to put your money where your mouth is. If the best that you can do with your history, your experience, your damnation is to explain what was and what might have been, then f you. You and your pieces are worthless.

    David, if this is the best that Fred can do, f him.
    , @marcelo paes
    Well, you do volunteer in your army to kill people around the world. And there are sooo many accomplices.
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  4. Priss Factor [AKA "The Priss Factory"] says:

    LOL

    Read More
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  5. Mexico meddles in our business too Fred. There are politicians, ostensibly American, in this country who facilitate and champion that meddling. I would bet there are few, if any, Mexican politicians who openly proclaim that their job is to facilitate American meddling in Mexico’s business.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Big Bill
    So true. As President of Mexico Vincente Fox said, "wherever there is a Mexican, there is Mexico."

    And Governor Scott Walker is doing his part in Wisconsin. He has arranged with the Mexican government to open two Mexican Consulates in Wisconsin to connect illegal aliens with welfare, immigration lawyers, and to cultivate activists who organize pro-illegal immigrant demonstrations, etc.

    Thank you Governor Walker! You are a true "compassionate conservative' ... for illegal aliens, that is.
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  6. WGG [AKA "World's Greatest Grandson"] says:
    @Tom_R
    US AND THEM?
    LETS MAKE THE WORLD HATE AMERICA’S BIGGEST LOBBY, NOT US.

    Thanks for the interesting article, Fred. I agree with you on most points.

    Except we have to explain the word “us”? When I travel overseas, and people criticize me or “us”, about what the US govt. did, I calmly explain to them that we the people in America have no power. WE did not make the decisions. Our govt. did.

    So how do we make them hate our crooked corrupt criminal govt. for what THEY DO and not us? For example, the biggest lobby in USA is the Jewish lobby that bribes politicians and makes THEM do most of the bad things the govt. is doing, such as causing wars in the Middle East or promoting homopathy or other depravity, including Hollywood, which is Jewish controlled. The people have no say in the matter. Since they are the biggest lobby, and 50% of the campaign contributions to the Democrats and 40% to the Republicans are from the Judaists, they basically own and operate our govt.

    http://business.financialpost.com/fp-comment/lawrence-solomon-obama-jewish-financiers

    So the people must hate them, not us!

    Very true. However, we do have a large portion of home-grown Israel-firsters that ferociously support everything the aforementioned lobby wants. Generally of the John Hagee variety. The first thing we should be doing is trying to educate these useful idiot boobs.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  7. MarkinLA says:
    @Travis
    True , the United States meddling is one reason they hate us...but their own politicians exploit past meddling to build their own power and incite more hatred toward the United States. For some reason our own media played into it and hollywood loves promoting films which far too often portray America as an evil force in the world with nefarious goals. This propaganda certainly helps foreign dictators in their agenda to balm America for their nations problems.
    Foreign leaders use our past actions to excuse their own inept governments and to deflect eyes from their own malfeasance.

    While China incites anti-Americanism by calling our protection of South Korea the War of American Aggression , which clearly distorts this war which was started by North Korea, they fail to mention how the United States gave support to China in their war with Japan and just as Americans helped liberate France from Nazi occupation we helped Liberate China and Korea from the Japanese occupation...

    Nevertheless maybe we should have abandoned our friends and allowed Korea to be taken over by the communists , it was not worth losing 50,000 American lives and countless billions to keep our troops in Korea to defend their border. We certainly should have allowed Spain to continue to rule Cuba. By liberating Cuba from Spanish occupation we got years of grief.

    Hopefully Americans will learn to stay out of foreign affairs as they never end favorable for us. It only provides more ammunition for our enemies and gains us nothing.

    We certainly should have allowed Spain to continue to rule Cuba. By liberating Cuba from Spanish occupation we got years of grief.

    I don’t think we liberated Cuba from Spain any more than we liberated Panama from Columbia. There were Cubans in Cuba that wanted to run the place for themselves and cut Spain out same as for Panama and we interceded because rich guys in the US wanted a piece of the action.

    Most of our meddling in Latin America was because some rich guys had investments there and couldn’t take the fact that foreign investment is risky. The government changed and they took a hit. They got their stooges in the US government to get their assets back. Of course, the government usually tells the rubes back home that the commies are fomenting revolution or some other nonsense to hide the fact that our army is being used to get some guy’s resort or plantation back.

    Read More
    • Agree: Travis
    • Replies: @Threecranes
    How do I hit the "Agree" button on this site?

    At any rate, your two paragraphs do a better job of summing up U.S. foreign policy than every issue of Foreign Affairs ever published.
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  8. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    It’s a peculiarity of the American psyche that everything must be shrouded with high-minded, moralistic sounding rhetoric. Thus, something as tawdry as plundering others has to be accompanied by explanations that we’re doing it in order to benefit them and if things turn out to be embarrassingly bad then it’s claimed that we ‘meant well’. I’d feel better if they were up front about things and would just come out and say it: they’re weak, we’re strong so we can get away with mugging them and there’s nothing they can do about it; might makes right; there’s only one law in this world and that’s the law of the jungle; and so on. At least that would remove the fog of hypocrisy that’s such an ingrained feature of American life.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Andrew Nichols
    I’d feel better if they were up front about things and would just come out and say it: they’re weak, we’re strong so we can get away with mugging them and there’s nothing they can do about it; might makes right; there’s only one law in this world and that’s the law of the jungle; and so on. At least that would remove the fog of hypocrisy that’s such an ingrained feature of American life.

    Michael Ledeen fascist ideologist said just that "Every ten years or so, the United States needs to pick up some small crappy little country and throw it against the wall, just to show the world we mean business,"
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  9. Priss Factor [AKA "The Priss Factory"] says:

    Envy + fear = hatred.

    But it’s a hatred grounded in admiration of American riches and power.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Andrew Nichols
    I think you've just conclusively proved the authors point mate.
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  10. Jim says:

    Human morality is mostly an in-group out-group thing, it’s essentially ethnocentric. Actually Northwest Europeans are probably somewhat more inclined to universalize morality than most other groups.

    Read More
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  11. Jim says:

    Democracy tends to exacerbate internal conflict so while it seems to work OK in highly homogeneous countries like Iceland it would probably be a disaster for a place like Singapore. This is not to say that Singapore is necessarily going to be that stable in the long run.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
    On the assumption that you must know something about Singapore to make that comment I would be pleased to know what it is based on (both parts re Singapore).

    A quick Google search for Singapore's ethnic composition comes up with 74.2 per cent Chinese, 13.3 per cent Malay and 9.1 per cent Indian. Where's the problem!

    As I understand it there is no legal or extra-legal barrier to the long dominant People's Action Party losing an election but its founder Lee Kwan Yew was so successful in making Singapore grow economically until it became, as it is now, a rich country, and one that constantly improves public transport and basic housing as well as providing excellent health care and personal security that even the flickerings of opposition don't now have to be crushed by heavy handed libel suits or other sophisticated but heavy handed methods.

    I suspect that Singapore may remain both stable and prosperous well after many larger democracies are in a very disgruntled state or worse. After all it is prosperity which seems to have allowed Western democracies to buy off (and confuse) class enmities. Since the simple formula of growing GDP per person from which nearly everyone benefits has been so effective without much tinkering or deep examination it is probably true that the more likely source of breakdown would be incompatible ethnic mixing on top of a static economy rather than economies going backwards since that generally won't happen in a world of ever increasing technological innovation even if increased longevity and sub-replacement fertility created strains.
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  12. Gene Su says:

    I would like to add that the same case can be applied to American blacks. They don’t hate us because of envy, lower intelligence, wealth differences, or a messed up welfare bureaucracy. They hate whites because whites have enslaved and oppressed their ancestors. It doesn’t matter that this was all in the past. It doesn’t matter that they would have been far worse off if they remained in Africa or been taken to the Middle East (where there is far more slavery and oppression). It doesn’t matter that American blacks are some of the most affluent blacks in the world. Blacks hates whites because of what whites did to them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    While you may be right the net effect of that thinking is to just magnify the dysfunction of blacks. This leads to more resentment because of their own personal failure which they then blame on the "racism" of current whites and cannot see that they have become a negative force that nobody wants to associate with.
    , @Jim
    I find it hard to believe that people really care or generally even know what happened to their ancestors more than 150 years ago. Some of my ancestors came from the Rhineland which was invaded and devastated by French armies in the wars of the French Revolution. But it srikes me as ludicrous to hate Frenchmen because of this. The truth is that I don't give a flying fuck what happened to my ancestors back then. I doubt that many blacks really care anything about what happened to ancestors of theirs more than 150 years ago.
    , @a German
    Maybe they hate. Seems unknown to them that whites bought the slaves from the black and arab slave hunters.

    Here in Germany live a lot of Turkish immigrants (some millions). Up to 3rd generation. In average they live the live they want. Interested in families, good income, cars TV a.s.o. Leave me alone with politics, like everyone else.

    Only the few who are unlucky (and a lot of young mans) insist of "their religion". Because this "religion" (Islam) is not much more then a crazy rationalization of their own "superior" above "unbelievers". And a license to kill them. So they "believe" in this irrational "unwritten -book".
    If this religion will forbade things like this they will find something else. who cares?
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  13. Dwright says:
    @Seoulsurvivor
    And there's the misuse of the word "we". Or maybe I could paraphrase Clinton and say, It depends upon what the meaning of the word 'we' is. Now 99.99999% of the U.S. people have never had anything to do with how our foreign policy is formed and executed by the other .00001% (the elected officials). And we should not be a part of that particular "we". And I think the generic public is waking up to the fact that we generally elect criminals and thugs proficient in extortion, theft and intimidation. Our government could teach the Mafia. Our elected officials only concerns are getting reelected via telling more convincing lies than the other candidates then pandering to the moneyed interests that got them there in the first place.

    I came here from Lew Rockwell’s site just to comment on the “we” aspect. Right away I see that others picked up on it. Come on Fred, there is the United States the country and also it’s citizens.

    Don’t confuse the two.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SecretaryNS
    Yes, but do we not continue to mindlessly elect the same corrupt Congressmen and Presidents over and over again? Citizens still have the power to throw up massive stumbling blocks for the oligarchy, but most are too mindless or fearful to think for themselves or intelligently fight. No, I think Fred is right to use the word "we".
    , @Stan D Mute

    I came here from Lew Rockwell’s site just to comment on the “we” aspect. Right away I see that others picked up on it. Come on Fred, there is the United States the country and also it’s citizens.
     
    Fred's point is that it doesn't matter whether we think ourselves innocent of what our government has done, it is the reality that Mexicans (or Panamanians or Iraqis or etc) hold a grudge for the action. It's the same thing internally with our absurd national debt. I'm always hearing people lament the debt and blaming baby boomers, but it's our so-called "greatest generation" that permitted it to happen. They permitted the abominable civil right act and the even worse immigration act. They permitted the creation of the military industrial complex. They fought wars and spent money like drunken sailers. Because of their incompetence my generation was raised hiding under desks in classrooms as if a desk would stop nuclear annihilation.

    You may think yourself innocent of the atrocities of America's foreign crimes. You didn't incinerate half a million innocent Germans in Dresden or a hundred thousand Japanese civilians in Nagasaki. But just as "we" held Afghanistan responsible for 9/11, many Germans and Japanese hold Americans responsible. Either we have a Nation and accept responsibility for what it did, good or bad, or we have what exactly? Are we Stateless Beings? Or do we accept responsibility and do everything we can to stop our Nation from continuing its mistakes? Or do we admit that we live under a Tyranny and do all we can to escape it?
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  14. Yeah, that’s all very well Fred, but if we were to imitate Singapore’s policy and become “a country that executes drug dealers” and consequently, have “few of them”, what would happen to our diversity?

    Diversity trumps everything.

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  15. MarkinLA says:
    @Gene Su
    I would like to add that the same case can be applied to American blacks. They don't hate us because of envy, lower intelligence, wealth differences, or a messed up welfare bureaucracy. They hate whites because whites have enslaved and oppressed their ancestors. It doesn't matter that this was all in the past. It doesn't matter that they would have been far worse off if they remained in Africa or been taken to the Middle East (where there is far more slavery and oppression). It doesn't matter that American blacks are some of the most affluent blacks in the world. Blacks hates whites because of what whites did to them.

    While you may be right the net effect of that thinking is to just magnify the dysfunction of blacks. This leads to more resentment because of their own personal failure which they then blame on the “racism” of current whites and cannot see that they have become a negative force that nobody wants to associate with.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Gene Su
    Here is the thing that Fred Reed does not bring up: Why do "THEY" hold us to such a higher standard than they would for themselves? I remember once talking to a Muslim activist to point out that even though America inflicted civilian causalities in its invasion of Iraq, Saddam Hussein did far worse with his gassing of civilians (especially Kurds). He replied that he expected America to behave in a civilized manner because of its posturing as a world leader but not Saddam Hussein because he was a two-bit dictator. I think Hispanics and blacks have a similar mindset.

    Perhaps we Americans need to start learning to mind our own business and isolate ourselves from hostile outsiders.
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  16. Absolutely spot on!

    I’d further expand to say that what we have here are remnants of a Puritanism, confident in its own status as the elect of God, but minus the God – and the accompanying humility – who conferred such status, that now feels called and justified in imposing its superior morality and way of life on all and sundry! Somehow, anyone who resists must be morally degenerate, and likely somehow less than human.

    We ought to know better, but we’re blinded by this self-satisfied, self-righteousness. “USA! USA!”

    Whatever.

    Read More
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  17. Mark Green says: • Website

    Hi Fred. You’re back on top! Great article.

    America is insufferably intrusive and meddlesome. US policies are both unprincipled and lawless (Washington’s policies, that is). American ‘exceptionalism’ allows for aggressive wars of choice. This is a cancer on international law.

    The US killing spree in the Middle East puts Washington into rogue state territory. And the ‘refugee crisis’ in Europe can be traced directly to Zio-America’s destruction of Iraq and Libya, along with the destabilization of Syria, Lebanon, Egypt, Iran and Yemen. The cancerous conditions in Palestine are also a byproduct of US intervention. Even Russia is being stalked by rapacious, Western neocons. Conclusion? The Empire must be stopped.

    Global Washington respects no nation’s sovereignty, only its own global ‘interests’. State terror is real. And it’s reached its zenith in the good ol USA.

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    • Replies: @Gene Su
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    America is insufferably intrusive and meddlesome. US policies are both unprincipled and lawless (Washington’s policies, that is). American ‘exceptionalism’ allows for aggressive wars of choice. This is a cancer on international law.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    It's a shame that someone like Michael Scheuer will never become President of the United States. He would make sure that the American military and intelligence communities protected America first instead of messing around in the Middle East, Central Asia, and Eastern Europe.
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  18. Gene Su says:
    @MarkinLA
    While you may be right the net effect of that thinking is to just magnify the dysfunction of blacks. This leads to more resentment because of their own personal failure which they then blame on the "racism" of current whites and cannot see that they have become a negative force that nobody wants to associate with.

    Here is the thing that Fred Reed does not bring up: Why do “THEY” hold us to such a higher standard than they would for themselves? I remember once talking to a Muslim activist to point out that even though America inflicted civilian causalities in its invasion of Iraq, Saddam Hussein did far worse with his gassing of civilians (especially Kurds). He replied that he expected America to behave in a civilized manner because of its posturing as a world leader but not Saddam Hussein because he was a two-bit dictator. I think Hispanics and blacks have a similar mindset.

    Perhaps we Americans need to start learning to mind our own business and isolate ourselves from hostile outsiders.

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  19. Gene Su says:
    @Mark Green
    Hi Fred. You're back on top! Great article.

    America is insufferably intrusive and meddlesome. US policies are both unprincipled and lawless (Washington's policies, that is). American 'exceptionalism' allows for aggressive wars of choice. This is a cancer on international law.

    The US killing spree in the Middle East puts Washington into rogue state territory. And the 'refugee crisis' in Europe can be traced directly to Zio-America's destruction of Iraq and Libya, along with the destabilization of Syria, Lebanon, Egypt, Iran and Yemen. The cancerous conditions in Palestine are also a byproduct of US intervention. Even Russia is being stalked by rapacious, Western neocons. Conclusion? The Empire must be stopped.

    Global Washington respects no nation's sovereignty, only its own global 'interests'. State terror is real. And it's reached its zenith in the good ol USA.

    —————————————————————————————————–
    America is insufferably intrusive and meddlesome. US policies are both unprincipled and lawless (Washington’s policies, that is). American ‘exceptionalism’ allows for aggressive wars of choice. This is a cancer on international law.
    —————————————————————————————————–

    It’s a shame that someone like Michael Scheuer will never become President of the United States. He would make sure that the American military and intelligence communities protected America first instead of messing around in the Middle East, Central Asia, and Eastern Europe.

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  20. Jim says:
    @Gene Su
    I would like to add that the same case can be applied to American blacks. They don't hate us because of envy, lower intelligence, wealth differences, or a messed up welfare bureaucracy. They hate whites because whites have enslaved and oppressed their ancestors. It doesn't matter that this was all in the past. It doesn't matter that they would have been far worse off if they remained in Africa or been taken to the Middle East (where there is far more slavery and oppression). It doesn't matter that American blacks are some of the most affluent blacks in the world. Blacks hates whites because of what whites did to them.

    I find it hard to believe that people really care or generally even know what happened to their ancestors more than 150 years ago. Some of my ancestors came from the Rhineland which was invaded and devastated by French armies in the wars of the French Revolution. But it srikes me as ludicrous to hate Frenchmen because of this. The truth is that I don’t give a flying fuck what happened to my ancestors back then. I doubt that many blacks really care anything about what happened to ancestors of theirs more than 150 years ago.

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    • Replies: @Chris Mallory
    All the more reason we should have sank the boats bringing the Germans to America after the revolutions of 1849. If you don't give "a flying fuck " about your ancestors, then you surely don't care about mine and the nation they founded. The best for all concerned would be for you to buy a ticket on Lufthansa and head back to the land of your ancestors.
    , @anon
    It depends if there's someone stirring it up or not - in the US stirring up anti-white feeling is the prime directive of the media / academia.
    , @Begemot
    Believe it Jimmie. Just because you prefer to remain historically ignorant and see no value in knowing history, others do. Case in point: years ago I worked with an Iranian gentleman who had emigrated to the US after the fall of the Shah. One day I casually mentioned that I was aware that the Mongols had invaded his country many centuries in the past. He immediately responded with much emotion: "Those barbarians! They destroyed our literature!"

    There are many people out there Jimmie who do know their past and can carry grievance for past wrongs. Like it or not, this has a bearing on how they look at their world. You've been warned.
    , @MarkinLA
    Being in southern California with a large Armenian population you get this every year with these Armenians trying to push the US government to do something to embarrass Turkey over the Armenian genocide which may or may not have happened exactly as Armenians say.

    I even worked with one. He was a nice guy but ranting about this and refusing to acknowledge that Armenians have committed terrorist acts in the US against people who do not believe in the genocide story and those who are related to Turkish interests. I showed him proof and said that I as an American am sick and tired of people bringing their old hatreds into this country and trying to make our government champion their causes that we had nothing to do with.
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  21. @MarkinLA
    We certainly should have allowed Spain to continue to rule Cuba. By liberating Cuba from Spanish occupation we got years of grief.

    I don't think we liberated Cuba from Spain any more than we liberated Panama from Columbia. There were Cubans in Cuba that wanted to run the place for themselves and cut Spain out same as for Panama and we interceded because rich guys in the US wanted a piece of the action.

    Most of our meddling in Latin America was because some rich guys had investments there and couldn't take the fact that foreign investment is risky. The government changed and they took a hit. They got their stooges in the US government to get their assets back. Of course, the government usually tells the rubes back home that the commies are fomenting revolution or some other nonsense to hide the fact that our army is being used to get some guy's resort or plantation back.

    How do I hit the “Agree” button on this site?

    At any rate, your two paragraphs do a better job of summing up U.S. foreign policy than every issue of Foreign Affairs ever published.

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  22. @Jim
    I find it hard to believe that people really care or generally even know what happened to their ancestors more than 150 years ago. Some of my ancestors came from the Rhineland which was invaded and devastated by French armies in the wars of the French Revolution. But it srikes me as ludicrous to hate Frenchmen because of this. The truth is that I don't give a flying fuck what happened to my ancestors back then. I doubt that many blacks really care anything about what happened to ancestors of theirs more than 150 years ago.

    All the more reason we should have sank the boats bringing the Germans to America after the revolutions of 1849. If you don’t give “a flying fuck ” about your ancestors, then you surely don’t care about mine and the nation they founded. The best for all concerned would be for you to buy a ticket on Lufthansa and head back to the land of your ancestors.

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    • Replies: @Rich
    You're joking, right? Do you hate the British and Canadians because of the War of 1812? Do you hate Mexicans because of the Mexican-American War? You can respect your ancestors without hating the enemies they had 200 years ago. As for sinking the boatloads of German immigrants, I wish we'd built more boats and let more Germans in, their descendants are among the best the US has to offer.
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  23. Farenheit says:

    Hey, the Romans were hated too. The History of man is more advanced societies pulling, pushing and prodding less advanced societies for a whole host of reason. Being forced to view the backwardness and uncompetitiveness of your society naturally engenders resentment on those who are farther advance…the US bitterly resented Britain for quite sometime. Just human nature..

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  24. Hubbub says:

    “Yet we lecture Russia and China condescendingly on human rights, and speak openly of committing “regime change” in various countries as if we had a divine right to determine their form of government.”

    Fred, we do have the divine right to determine any number of things relative to other countries, nations, entities, etc. That’s just the way power works. If you have it, you exercise it; you don’t ask or plead with recalcitrant ‘others’; you are the ‘bad ass’ on the block. If we didn’t meddle to create a world ‘we’ want to have, then we do not deserve our rank as numero uno.

    Live and let live, you say? Hey, look around you to what is happening in the world as the US, ‘we’, slip into the dustbin of history. What do you see? Chaos – lots and lots of chaos. ‘We’ are losing our hold on Time, and the next ‘WE’ is waiting just around the corner. Russia, China, Brazil, Togoland? Who will it be? Who knows, and who cares? Regardless, the ‘we’ of the new power will ask the same question(s) you have tried to answer. It’s just history; it’s just life, you know what I mean?

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  25. Well! That explains why so many millions of Mexicans are evacuating this American hell-hole as fast as they can leave.

    Oh, wait.

    What do you mean, they are still coming here? As bad as they hate us? Impossible! ¡Recuerde Veracruz!

    And now we learn that Chinese and Indians are overtaking Mexicans as the most numerous immigrants?

    Don’t they know? Have they not read Fred about what a foul civilization this is?

    We must be getting only the dumbest immigrants who have not been told that their countries all hate America. So they come here in blind folly to be ingested by the American beast and then excreted as another pellet of evil from the Great Satan.

    Peace, love, truth,

    The Grate Deign

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  26. I’m rather of the opinion if you’re three generations or more removed/beyond whatever “slight” might’ve taken place, you’re only tangently related to it. After that the slight becomes more mythologized than real. Now, the South gets an exception there (not the negroes, the’ve proven themselves unilaterally inferior on their own), because in it never really left federal occupation nor its constant influence; there’s quite a bit of room to bitch there.

    Where I think Buchanan has really cucked himself and turns into a horse-faced flag waving liberal is his insistence the U.S. is the greatest murder empire in the world. If true, it also follows there are people it deems need to be killed, yet those targeted seem readily willing to appear in the gun sights, oddly enough.

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  27. anon says: • Disclaimer

    The US elite are amoral sociopaths.

    The US population requires moral reasons to support the elite’s foreign policy.

    So the US elite tell extraordinary lies to US citizens to get them to support what the US elite want (e.g. Iraq).

    The elite know they’re lies but the majority of the public are blissfully unaware.

    It’s the hypocrisy of the lies told by the US elite to their own citizens to get them to support the elite’s meddling that makes outsiders mad.

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    • Replies: @rod1963
    A fine summation of how our foreign policy works when they need the public stamp of approval.

    The thing they never teach American school kids is that our foreign policy is almost entirely dictated by a handful of industry and political insiders. Never the public. Even if the public disapproves, the President and Congress can ignore their demands and will.

    And never is anyone held accountable for foreign policy disasters like Iraq, Syria, Libya or Afghanistan. No one. Even national security screwups like 9/11, Ft. Hood, Boston - no one is ever punished. Meetings are held and reports made and that's that.

    All we get is kabuki theater.

    If foreigners want to hate us, hate the elite that is ensconced in the beltway and hides in the shadows and run things. If they want to nuke that pest hole, more power to them. No one will miss those cockroaches.
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  28. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Jim
    I find it hard to believe that people really care or generally even know what happened to their ancestors more than 150 years ago. Some of my ancestors came from the Rhineland which was invaded and devastated by French armies in the wars of the French Revolution. But it srikes me as ludicrous to hate Frenchmen because of this. The truth is that I don't give a flying fuck what happened to my ancestors back then. I doubt that many blacks really care anything about what happened to ancestors of theirs more than 150 years ago.

    It depends if there’s someone stirring it up or not – in the US stirring up anti-white feeling is the prime directive of the media / academia.

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  29. I’m guessing its the mass murder. Meddling is annoying but mass murder can really piss you off.

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  30. Begemot says:
    @Jim
    I find it hard to believe that people really care or generally even know what happened to their ancestors more than 150 years ago. Some of my ancestors came from the Rhineland which was invaded and devastated by French armies in the wars of the French Revolution. But it srikes me as ludicrous to hate Frenchmen because of this. The truth is that I don't give a flying fuck what happened to my ancestors back then. I doubt that many blacks really care anything about what happened to ancestors of theirs more than 150 years ago.

    Believe it Jimmie. Just because you prefer to remain historically ignorant and see no value in knowing history, others do. Case in point: years ago I worked with an Iranian gentleman who had emigrated to the US after the fall of the Shah. One day I casually mentioned that I was aware that the Mongols had invaded his country many centuries in the past. He immediately responded with much emotion: “Those barbarians! They destroyed our literature!”

    There are many people out there Jimmie who do know their past and can carry grievance for past wrongs. Like it or not, this has a bearing on how they look at their world. You’ve been warned.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    There are many people out there Jimmie who do know their past and can carry grievance for past wrongs.
     
    Some of the wrongs aren't even past. The Arabs continue their centuries-long occupation of Coptic Egypt, with nary a sign of contrition to be seen.
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  31. Michelle says:

    The Germans and the Japanese should really hate us then!

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  32. Matra says:

    Hispanic American nations have always had an inferiority complex towards the US. So even if foreign policy was not an issue they would still seethe with resentment. It’s the same all over the world. Whites are resented everywhere.

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  33. MarkinLA says:
    @Jim
    I find it hard to believe that people really care or generally even know what happened to their ancestors more than 150 years ago. Some of my ancestors came from the Rhineland which was invaded and devastated by French armies in the wars of the French Revolution. But it srikes me as ludicrous to hate Frenchmen because of this. The truth is that I don't give a flying fuck what happened to my ancestors back then. I doubt that many blacks really care anything about what happened to ancestors of theirs more than 150 years ago.

    Being in southern California with a large Armenian population you get this every year with these Armenians trying to push the US government to do something to embarrass Turkey over the Armenian genocide which may or may not have happened exactly as Armenians say.

    I even worked with one. He was a nice guy but ranting about this and refusing to acknowledge that Armenians have committed terrorist acts in the US against people who do not believe in the genocide story and those who are related to Turkish interests. I showed him proof and said that I as an American am sick and tired of people bringing their old hatreds into this country and trying to make our government champion their causes that we had nothing to do with.

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    • Replies: @Thomas O. Meehan
    "….and said that I as an American am sick and tired of people bringing their old hatreds into this country and trying to make our government champion their causes that we had nothing to do with."

    Bravo! And that goes for the Irish Americans and their anti-brit fixation, Greek Americans, and the Israeli-Americans.
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  34. Fred, your points are well taken, but tell me how many US consulates there are in Mexico today Are there 51? Do they assist in organizing groups of Gringo advocates to go into state and federal legislative buildings to demand this, that or the other? Do they conspire with Gringo activists to try to get local Sheriffs defeated in elections?

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  35. Rich says:
    @Chris Mallory
    All the more reason we should have sank the boats bringing the Germans to America after the revolutions of 1849. If you don't give "a flying fuck " about your ancestors, then you surely don't care about mine and the nation they founded. The best for all concerned would be for you to buy a ticket on Lufthansa and head back to the land of your ancestors.

    You’re joking, right? Do you hate the British and Canadians because of the War of 1812? Do you hate Mexicans because of the Mexican-American War? You can respect your ancestors without hating the enemies they had 200 years ago. As for sinking the boatloads of German immigrants, I wish we’d built more boats and let more Germans in, their descendants are among the best the US has to offer.

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  36. JI says:

    I think we Americans should put up huge signs saying, “Wetback go home!” And why would we do that? What slights have we suffered at the hands of the poor innocent little Hispanics from the south? Well, 1/3 of prisoners in American prisons are full of just illegals, never mind legals from the south, who have committed felonies. I think we should take a page from their book and hold grudges against them, not for invasions that happened a hundred or more years ago, but for the far, far larger invasion that is happening right now. Wetback. Go. Home.

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  37. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    America is not hated for its virtues.

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  38. I don’t believe for 1 second we, the USA have good intentions.

    Everything is done in the name of national interest, OUR national interest.

    I am actually 100% a ok with this, as long as we don’t dress it up as “good intentions” This is akin to stabbing someone in the back while telling them you are their friend, in front of a room full of others. and then trying to repeat the same thing with others in the same room.

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    • Replies: @guest
    Please look upthread for a couple of comments on the "we."

    You seem especially overt in conflating your personal interests, those of other Americans, and those of Uncle Sam. I believe that much of what people like Dick Cheney, Hillary Clinton, and Victoria Nuland (who served under both) do to people in other countries is contrary to the interests of Americans.

    A sincere question: As someone who considers himself astute, have you reflected on this?
    , @Divine Right
    "Everything is done in the name of national interest, OUR national interest."

    I think that is a bit extreme. There are several examples available of actions taken by the US government that are decidedly not in our national interest. That implies either incompetence on their part or a willingness to act in a select group's interest at the expense of the whole.
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  39. rod1963 says:
    @anon
    The US elite are amoral sociopaths.

    The US population requires moral reasons to support the elite's foreign policy.

    So the US elite tell extraordinary lies to US citizens to get them to support what the US elite want (e.g. Iraq).

    The elite know they're lies but the majority of the public are blissfully unaware.

    It's the hypocrisy of the lies told by the US elite to their own citizens to get them to support the elite's meddling that makes outsiders mad.

    A fine summation of how our foreign policy works when they need the public stamp of approval.

    The thing they never teach American school kids is that our foreign policy is almost entirely dictated by a handful of industry and political insiders. Never the public. Even if the public disapproves, the President and Congress can ignore their demands and will.

    And never is anyone held accountable for foreign policy disasters like Iraq, Syria, Libya or Afghanistan. No one. Even national security screwups like 9/11, Ft. Hood, Boston – no one is ever punished. Meetings are held and reports made and that’s that.

    All we get is kabuki theater.

    If foreigners want to hate us, hate the elite that is ensconced in the beltway and hides in the shadows and run things. If they want to nuke that pest hole, more power to them. No one will miss those cockroaches.

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  40. GW says:

    You can always tell a member of the Vietnam generation. The psychological effects of losing a war tend to reduce men to emotional teenagers and skew their outlook on reality. Such effects reveal themselves in many ways. Being overly cynical about the efficacy of military campaigns. Being quick to take the side of foreign nations who feel some overblown grievance. Reducing all international disputes into one side’s “meddling” while ignoring all other potential sociological factors the other side may have–feelings of inferiority, shame, guilt, fear, ethnocentrism, etc. Highlighting only the worst of what their nation has done while repressing the best examples of bravery, sacrafice, generosity, and charity that would defeat the thesis.

    Of course if America were as hated as we’ve been led to believe we’d expect circumstances to be different. European anti-war leftist fury wouldn’t have ceased once Obama was elected. Half of Latin America wouldn’t want to live in the United States. The U.S. would have little power over international affairs and little influence in multinational bodies like the U.N.

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    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    Please explain what was to be gained in Vietnam and how was it vital to us. You have to have real concrete reasons to fight a war not just some lame domino theory drivel to tell the rubes,
    , @Divine Right
    "Being overly cynical about the efficacy of military campaigns."

    There is no reason not to be cynical about the efficacy of American military campaigns: the Iraq War was a disaster, and the country has now disintegrated into squabbling sectarian areas; Libya turned into a disaster, resulting in waves of migrants flooding into Europe; it's not inconceivable that the Taliban may one day return to power in Afghanistan, erasing all of our gains there; our military efforts against ISIS have yielded few positive results; our efforts to train Syrian rebels have utterly failed; our drone campaign in Yemen outright failed - now the Saudi's are attacking the country, transforming the situation into a humanitarian nightmare.....and that's just recent history.

    "You can always tell a member of the Vietnam generation. The psychological effects of losing a war tend to reduce men to emotional teenagers and skew their outlook on reality."

    If we had listed to some members of the Vietnam generation, we wouldn't have invaded Iraq.

    You can always tell a member of the Gulf War generation. The psychological effects of winning a quick war on television have produced a crop of people who cannot accept that other conflicts may not be as quick, as easy, or produce as good of an outcome. Hence, they advocate for war after war without learning anything from defeat.

    "Being quick to take the side of foreign nations who feel some overblown grievance."

    Quick? Quick might be the case for any one of the things brought up by the author, but this seems to be a pattern that has occurred over several decades. That's not quick. That's just recognizing the truth for what it is.

    "Of course if America were as hated as we’ve been led to believe we’d expect circumstances to be different. European anti-war leftist fury wouldn’t have ceased once Obama was elected.

    Some of that can be attributed to the fact that we haven't invaded any countries the size of Iraq since Obama has been president. When Obama and company wanted to attack Syria, there was quite an uprising, and the UK parliament voted down the action.

    "...Half of Latin America wouldn’t want to live in the United States."

    Wanting greater economic opportunity for yourself and liking the government of the United States are two separate things.

    "...The U.S. would have little power over international affairs and little influence in multinational bodies like the U.N."

    Ironically, we probably do have less power in those areas these days. For example, the US demanded that their allies stay out of China's AIIB; none of them listened, and they all joined anyway. At the U.N., some of that power is structural. The US has a veto in the UN Security Council, so I don't think that can be used as a reliable judge on waning American influence.
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  41. GW says:

    Below the Rio Bravo? The first rule of American hemispheric diplomacy south of Texas should be “Don’t get into Latin faces unless you have to.

    I got in a few brown faces today, they were leaning against my car as if they owned it, loitering in the parking lot of a country in which they were never invited. I firmly told them to quit leaning on my car, after making eye contact from about fifty yards away and marching directly toward them. They obliged.

    You’d see a whole lot less hatred of America if we acted like the alpha dogs we actually are. You’d start to see the respect we earned from Japan and Germany following Hiroshima and Dresden.

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    • Replies: @Biff

    You’d see a whole lot less hatred of America if we acted like the alpha dogs we actually are. You’d start to see the respect we earned from Japan and Germany following Hiroshima and Dresden.
     
    Ok, tough guy.......
    , @guest
    Well bless my soul -- another little "we" person!

    You mention Vietnam, Dresden, Hiroshima, but that may be due to modesty.

    Where did you do your valiant killing for Uncle Sam?
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  42. ” It’s arrogant meddling. It’s what got us in trouble in the first place. Doesn’t anybody understand that? Interfering with Nature. Over 90 percent, over, way over 90 percent, of the species that have ever lived on this planet, ever lived, are gone. Wooosh! They’re extinct. We didn’t kill them all. They just disappeared. That’s what nature does. They disappear these days at the rate of 25 a day—and I mean regardless of our behavior. Irrespective of how we act on this planet, 25 species that were here today will be gone tomorrow. Let them go gracefully. Leave Nature alone. Haven’t we done enough?” Carlin

    We can run everything on scrap metal and moonshine.
    “With such comprehensive viewability as is provided by World Game and its Sky-Ocean World Map, it is quickly realized that (with a few rare exceptions) humanity need do very little further mining. The metals already scrapped from obsolete machinery and structures, which recirculate on a sum-total-of-all-metals-average every twenty-two years, are now able to do so much more work with ever less weight per each given function with each recirculation as to make the present scrap resources of almost all metals adequate to take care of all humanity’s forward needs.”

    We have enough old beer cans to build a space station. We don’t have a space ship to get to a space station because we scrapped the program.

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  43. Beach says:

    Civil rights? The US has more people in prison than any other country.

    1) America is the third most populous nation on Earth. It is possible to drive from Miami, FL to Seattle, WA, a distance equivalent to driving from London to Jerusalem, without once stopping at a border or “papers-check” of any kind. It is legal to own a gun in all but a handful of states. That combination creates the opportunity for a lot of crime from those so inclined, but still hasn’t affected the free movement and gun ownership of the law-abiding.

    2) It could be successfully argued that America has more people in prison than any other country because it’s a lot easier to take them out and shoot them, which is what one is inclined to believe happens in less civil-rights minded countries, such as Russia and China. You said it yourself:

    Try Singapore. Neither democratic nor free in our sense, it is prosperous, free of crime, without a drug problem (a country that executes drug dealers has few of them)

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    It is legal to own a gun in all but a handful of states.
     
    It's legal to own a gun in all 50 states. Always has been.

    Unless you were a "free negro or mulatto", in some states, eg Fred's beloved Commonwealth of Virginia. But the 14th took care of that loophole in the 2nd.
    , @Mr. Creosote
    " It is legal to own a gun in all but a handful of states."

    I'll have to assume you meant something other than what you stated here, or it was a colossal brain fart made in haste.

    To suppose that you are entirely ignorant of the 2nd Amendment to the US Constitution is a leap I would hesitate to make, but the prima facie evidence for that conclusion is rather damning.
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  44. Frankie P says:
    @Seoulsurvivor
    And there's the misuse of the word "we". Or maybe I could paraphrase Clinton and say, It depends upon what the meaning of the word 'we' is. Now 99.99999% of the U.S. people have never had anything to do with how our foreign policy is formed and executed by the other .00001% (the elected officials). And we should not be a part of that particular "we". And I think the generic public is waking up to the fact that we generally elect criminals and thugs proficient in extortion, theft and intimidation. Our government could teach the Mafia. Our elected officials only concerns are getting reelected via telling more convincing lies than the other candidates then pandering to the moneyed interests that got them there in the first place.

    It’s kind of ridiculous to assume that American foreign policy is formed by the elected officials. Elected officials may seem to form the foreign policy, but the marching orders come from the money behind those officials; and we all know that it is the SAME money that funds both parties. What did George Carlin say? I paraphrase: You have elections so that people have the perception that they have a choice. You don’t have a choice. You have owners.

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  45. @anonymous
    It's a peculiarity of the American psyche that everything must be shrouded with high-minded, moralistic sounding rhetoric. Thus, something as tawdry as plundering others has to be accompanied by explanations that we're doing it in order to benefit them and if things turn out to be embarrassingly bad then it's claimed that we 'meant well'. I'd feel better if they were up front about things and would just come out and say it: they're weak, we're strong so we can get away with mugging them and there's nothing they can do about it; might makes right; there's only one law in this world and that's the law of the jungle; and so on. At least that would remove the fog of hypocrisy that's such an ingrained feature of American life.

    I’d feel better if they were up front about things and would just come out and say it: they’re weak, we’re strong so we can get away with mugging them and there’s nothing they can do about it; might makes right; there’s only one law in this world and that’s the law of the jungle; and so on. At least that would remove the fog of hypocrisy that’s such an ingrained feature of American life.

    Michael Ledeen fascist ideologist said just that “Every ten years or so, the United States needs to pick up some small crappy little country and throw it against the wall, just to show the world we mean business,”

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  46. @Priss Factor
    Envy + fear = hatred.

    But it's a hatred grounded in admiration of American riches and power.

    I think you’ve just conclusively proved the authors point mate.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar


    I think you’ve just conclusively proved the authors point mate.

     

    How? There is absolutely no reason to immigrate to America except for the money. (Or to join a relative who came for the money.)

    So why do we have so many wannabe immigrants? Can you name a single country that takes in more Americans than we take of theirs? It's the riches, matey.

    Priss is wrong about one thing, though. It's not "admiration" for American riches that drives the traffic, it's the mercenary desire for a cut of them.
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  47. Clyde says:

    So they hate us? I wish they hated us so much that they would stay the f out and not try to immigrate here legally and illegally.

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  48. M_Young says:

    Yeah, we took half their country…the half with the good roads.

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  49. For example, many South Americans believe their countries to be poor because of exploitation by America. This isn’t true, which doesn’t matter at all.

    Surely you jest? Imperialism in S. America has been ongoing since at least 1898 and continues today.
    Sometimes we use outright force, other times massive amounts of money to help keep our SOB in place while he loots that nation, pretending to root out Commies or Jihadists.

    Try reading John Perkins “Confessions of an Economic Hitman.”

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  50. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Bravo Fred. Great article.

    There are a lot if people here who want to distance themselves from the ruling class when something bad happens like Vietnam or some school gets bombed in the Middle east.

    They will blame the Jews or say things like we have no power in America and it is the ruling class that made those decisions.

    But here is the thing, we are a democracy here in America. If we are truly against our ruling class we could collectively kick them out of power.

    But we dont. The American public has no problems with the benefits of empire. So they just ignore the moral problems or blame it the ruling elite.

    How is that any different than radical islam? You think the majority are extremists? Or Nazis or Imperial Japan that raped and killed hundreds of thousands. All of these groups are maligned for the crimes their people committed but it was only a small percent that made decisions for everyone else.

    The same is true of America. Only a small percent of people will decide to bomb this country or that country but why do Americans get asm break when Muslims dont?

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    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    But here is the thing, we are a democracy here in America. If we are truly against our ruling class we could collectively kick them out of power.

    Yeah, except the government controls the media and tells the people what it needs to get the war started and keep it going. The people are never given the whole truth and the government uses it's power to crush opposition - either by infiltrating groups and prosecuting them for alleged crimes or using disinformation campaigns to smear them as unpatriotic. Only after a long drawn out mess do you get the necessary opposition at the ballot box.
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  51. Leftist conservative [AKA "radical_centrist"] says: • Website

    these meddlings are on behalf of powerful corporate interests….the people of america do not generally support these meddling excursions….the corporations are behind it…

    the reason the corporations have always been in control of america is because this nation’s federal governmental structure is too undemocratic, and because the USA is too large to be very democratic.

    Too little democracy in america means the corporations control the federal gov’t.

    I will say it again:
    1) an undemocratic federal governmental structure damages democracy and lets the corporations control the government.
    2) the nation is too large for the people to control.

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  52. guest says:
    @Astuteobservor II
    I don't believe for 1 second we, the USA have good intentions.

    Everything is done in the name of national interest, OUR national interest.

    I am actually 100% a ok with this, as long as we don't dress it up as "good intentions" This is akin to stabbing someone in the back while telling them you are their friend, in front of a room full of others. and then trying to repeat the same thing with others in the same room.

    Please look upthread for a couple of comments on the “we.”

    You seem especially overt in conflating your personal interests, those of other Americans, and those of Uncle Sam. I believe that much of what people like Dick Cheney, Hillary Clinton, and Victoria Nuland (who served under both) do to people in other countries is contrary to the interests of Americans.

    A sincere question: As someone who considers himself astute, have you reflected on this?

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    • Replies: @Astuteobservor II
    no matter how you disagree, but everyone is selfish, so is every nation on earth. usa isn't alone in this.

    I am 100% sure every nation on earth would act like USA if they can get away with it.

    simple right?

    This would only change when the majority of humans become humanists. and we actively ban people like you listed from governing. I don't see that happening. I would love to be wrong on this.
    , @Divine Right
    "You seem especially overt in conflating your personal interests, those of other Americans, and those of Uncle Sam. I believe that much of what people like Dick Cheney, Hillary Clinton, and Victoria Nuland (who served under both) do to people in other countries is contrary to the interests of Americans."

    You may believe that, but many Americans do not. Most republicans supported the Iraq War at the time it was undertaken and large numbers of Americans didn't see any problem with what Victoria Nuland and company did in Ukraine. In some instances, "we" is appropriate.
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  53. Marian says:

    Does the world hate the English for their empire? Or is there something honest about being an open colonial power? There is something repulsive about the US’s deception with the current policy of regime change as a form conquering. I am American who holds it in total contempt.

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  54. We had better hurry up and get that fence built, or we won’t be able to keep anyone in this vile excuse for a country.

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  55. KA says:

    We now have evolved into a system which doesn’t allow the pro peace to survive ,flourish,or have any voice. Nothing unexpected . Empires go through every stage ,and follow all the steps way to the oblivion.
    It is difficult to love when the main product of the empire is violence and war

    1 George Kenney, a U.S. foreign service officer who resigned from the State Department in 1992 to protest U.S. policy toward the crisis in Yugoslavia, told me recently that the full-throated embrace of military violence is the fastest, surest way for the best and brightest to get ahead in Washington, and that their delusive faith in military violence as a humanitarian salve cannot be disentangled from their cynical careerism

    http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2013/09/16/foggy-bottom-and-the-fog-of-war/diplomats-have-been-dropping-their-pens-and-waving-guns

    2
    COLUMN-Why it’s so much easier for Congress to vote for war than peace.

    Reuters

    -http://www.trust.org/item/20150903213219-hj0be/?source=fiTheWire

    It is no coincidence that the retired generals and politicians speak of the need for engagement ,negotiation,pursuing diplomacy and establishing trust with respect but don’t while they are on the job.

    The Sun King of France after some 70 yrs on the throne and after hundreds of ruthless wars campaigns against neighbors advised his children not to pursue war .But by that time Sun was getting very dim in France and treasury was empty.

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  56. Robert21 says:

    Freddie is a Cuck.

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  57. KA says:

    from Tufts professor Michael Glennon, in an important essay that deserves wide attention. One conclusion Glennon draws is that the only way you can advance to a bigger, more influential job is to be seen as “hard-hitting” and “tough minded.” And that means you can never ignore a foreign policy problem, or argue that an issue really isn’t such a big problem, or, perish the thought, muse that “this is not really our concern” in an official meeting and expect to be taken seriously in Washington.

    The most compelling explanation of why the Obama administration seemed to be shifting towards a more hawkish policy (arming the Kiev government now) is that key players in the administration have begun maneuvering for jobs in a future Hillary Clinton administration. Reflexive (but not shrill) hawkishness a necessary form of careerism in the foreign policy bureaucracy set. .

    http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/the-ambitions-driving-the-ukraine-consensus/

    If war offers the opportunity of a life time for a politician,or a military brass or analyst or adviser , excuses for wars becomes a frequent fixtures on the lay of land in plannings,discussion,entertainment,movies,essays and OpED and in ancillary industries and substitutes for alternative any alternative . But imagine the hatred of those affected – some are silent impotent and domestic and others are furious overt hate filled abroad.

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  58. For example, many South Americans believe their countries to be poor because of exploitation by America. This isn’t true, which doesn’t matter at all.

    Fred, if you replace “America” in the above statement with Washington and Wall Street, you’ll see there’s plenty of the truth to it–then and now. While it’s true that we don’t literally send in the Marines anymore, in recent years Washington has backed coups (Honduras, Paraguay), attempted ‘color revolutions’ (Venezuela, Brazil), and look at what vulture-capitalist Paul Singer is doing to Argentina right now. So at a deep level, not much has really changed.

    By the way, I’m surprised nobody has mentioned Gen. Smedley Butler:

    I spent 33 years and four months in active military service and during that period I spent most of my time as a high class muscle man for Big Business, for Wall Street and the bankers. In short, I was a racketeer, a gangster for capitalism. I helped make Mexico and especially Tampico safe for American oil interests in 1914. I helped make Haiti and Cuba a decent place for the National City Bank boys to collect revenues in. I helped in the raping of half a dozen Central American republics for the benefit of Wall Street. I helped purify Nicaragua for the International Banking House of Brown Brothers in 1902–1912. I brought light to the Dominican Republic for the American sugar interests in 1916. I helped make Honduras right for the American fruit companies in 1903. In China in 1927 I helped see to it that Standard Oil went on its way unmolested. Looking back on it, I might have given Al Capone a few hints. The best he could do was to operate his racket in three districts. I operated on three continents.

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  59. @Andrew Nichols
    I think you've just conclusively proved the authors point mate.

    I think you’ve just conclusively proved the authors point mate.

    How? There is absolutely no reason to immigrate to America except for the money. (Or to join a relative who came for the money.)

    So why do we have so many wannabe immigrants? Can you name a single country that takes in more Americans than we take of theirs? It’s the riches, matey.

    Priss is wrong about one thing, though. It’s not “admiration” for American riches that drives the traffic, it’s the mercenary desire for a cut of them.

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  60. @Beach

    Civil rights? The US has more people in prison than any other country.
     
    1) America is the third most populous nation on Earth. It is possible to drive from Miami, FL to Seattle, WA, a distance equivalent to driving from London to Jerusalem, without once stopping at a border or "papers-check" of any kind. It is legal to own a gun in all but a handful of states. That combination creates the opportunity for a lot of crime from those so inclined, but still hasn't affected the free movement and gun ownership of the law-abiding.

    2) It could be successfully argued that America has more people in prison than any other country because it's a lot easier to take them out and shoot them, which is what one is inclined to believe happens in less civil-rights minded countries, such as Russia and China. You said it yourself:

    Try Singapore. Neither democratic nor free in our sense, it is prosperous, free of crime, without a drug problem (a country that executes drug dealers has few of them)
     

    It is legal to own a gun in all but a handful of states.

    It’s legal to own a gun in all 50 states. Always has been.

    Unless you were a “free negro or mulatto”, in some states, eg Fred’s beloved Commonwealth of Virginia. But the 14th took care of that loophole in the 2nd.

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  61. @Begemot
    Believe it Jimmie. Just because you prefer to remain historically ignorant and see no value in knowing history, others do. Case in point: years ago I worked with an Iranian gentleman who had emigrated to the US after the fall of the Shah. One day I casually mentioned that I was aware that the Mongols had invaded his country many centuries in the past. He immediately responded with much emotion: "Those barbarians! They destroyed our literature!"

    There are many people out there Jimmie who do know their past and can carry grievance for past wrongs. Like it or not, this has a bearing on how they look at their world. You've been warned.

    There are many people out there Jimmie who do know their past and can carry grievance for past wrongs.

    Some of the wrongs aren’t even past. The Arabs continue their centuries-long occupation of Coptic Egypt, with nary a sign of contrition to be seen.

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  62. MarkinLA says:
    @GW
    You can always tell a member of the Vietnam generation. The psychological effects of losing a war tend to reduce men to emotional teenagers and skew their outlook on reality. Such effects reveal themselves in many ways. Being overly cynical about the efficacy of military campaigns. Being quick to take the side of foreign nations who feel some overblown grievance. Reducing all international disputes into one side's "meddling" while ignoring all other potential sociological factors the other side may have--feelings of inferiority, shame, guilt, fear, ethnocentrism, etc. Highlighting only the worst of what their nation has done while repressing the best examples of bravery, sacrafice, generosity, and charity that would defeat the thesis.

    Of course if America were as hated as we've been led to believe we'd expect circumstances to be different. European anti-war leftist fury wouldn't have ceased once Obama was elected. Half of Latin America wouldn't want to live in the United States. The U.S. would have little power over international affairs and little influence in multinational bodies like the U.N.

    Please explain what was to be gained in Vietnam and how was it vital to us. You have to have real concrete reasons to fight a war not just some lame domino theory drivel to tell the rubes,

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    • Replies: @Marty
    Read Michael Lind's "Vietnam, The Necessary War" then tell us which points you disagree with and why.
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  63. America is both a rogue state and a bully, constantly attacking countries hopelessly inferior in military strength… Cambodia, Vietnam, Laos…

    France, Italy, Austria, Germany, Japan, Korea…

    There were no presidents more imperialistic, more militaristic, more meddling, more vile, than the second Roosevelt and the first Wilson (a Virginian, like Fred!)

    Yet Paris has major thoroughfares named for these monsters. How does this make sense?

    They should honor the Lindberghs, who labored to keep us out of France.

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    • Replies: @Divine Right
    "There were no presidents more imperialistic, more militaristic, more meddling, more vile, than the second Roosevelt and the first Wilson (a Virginian, like Fred!). Yet Paris has major thoroughfares named for these monsters. How does this make sense?"

    How does it not make sense? Both Roosevelt and Wilson led a country that fought on France's side in two world wars. I don't think it is much of a surprise that the French might respect their memory.

    "They should honor the Lindberghs, who labored to keep us out of France."

    Do Southerners honor Europeans who labored to keep Europeans out of the Civil War?
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  64. TheBoom says:

    I have lived in 5 countries outside of the USA. Most people don’t hate “us.” They hate some of the USA’s actions but most have bigger fish to fry. Plus, for most people we are not the center of the universe.

    In Taiwan, where I live now, most of the people are far more concerned with China than the US.

    When I lived in Mexico, most wanted to move to the USA. Their biggest problems were with Mexico where they felt the deck was stacked against them.

    In Thailand, their biggest concerns were internal conflicts and the Muslim insurrection.

    In China, with a few exceptions, their biggest concerns were with how to get ahead, the environment, food quality problems and their kids’ futures.

    Now Muslim nations are a different story. But even there a recent poll of young people found their biggest concern was ISIS not the US or Israel. However, that area is definitely a conspiracy laden area and we have played into their tendency to look for infidel conspiracies.

    I’ve spent some time in Vietnam and the Vietnamese to an amazing extent do not hate the USA. The only real animosity I encountered was from German expats living there. I had to remind them that if memory serves me well Germany had a few problems with misguided wars too.

    In a nutshell, we are not the center of the universe. People don’t spend every waking moment thinking about us as hard as that seems. They have their own lives to live and their own more local issues to deal with.

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    • Replies: @Biff

    In Thailand, their biggest concerns were internal conflicts and the Muslim insurrection.
     
    I’m married into a wealthy Thai family, and what I hear about their biggest concern is/was Thaksin introducing the Western debt based banking system into Thailand. They loath the IMF and World Bank, and seen all too often how accepting debt will get you owned. They see the pain Greece and Ireland are experiencing, and don’t want to live that kind of financial agony.

    Thaksin is down, but he’s not out. He’s still got a lot of support, so Thailand must stay vigilant against the debt devils.
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  65. MarkinLA says:
    @Anonymous
    Bravo Fred. Great article.

    There are a lot if people here who want to distance themselves from the ruling class when something bad happens like Vietnam or some school gets bombed in the Middle east.

    They will blame the Jews or say things like we have no power in America and it is the ruling class that made those decisions.

    But here is the thing, we are a democracy here in America. If we are truly against our ruling class we could collectively kick them out of power.

    But we dont. The American public has no problems with the benefits of empire. So they just ignore the moral problems or blame it the ruling elite.

    How is that any different than radical islam? You think the majority are extremists? Or Nazis or Imperial Japan that raped and killed hundreds of thousands. All of these groups are maligned for the crimes their people committed but it was only a small percent that made decisions for everyone else.

    The same is true of America. Only a small percent of people will decide to bomb this country or that country but why do Americans get asm break when Muslims dont?

    But here is the thing, we are a democracy here in America. If we are truly against our ruling class we could collectively kick them out of power.

    Yeah, except the government controls the media and tells the people what it needs to get the war started and keep it going. The people are never given the whole truth and the government uses it’s power to crush opposition – either by infiltrating groups and prosecuting them for alleged crimes or using disinformation campaigns to smear them as unpatriotic. Only after a long drawn out mess do you get the necessary opposition at the ballot box.

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  66. Biff says:
    @GW

    Below the Rio Bravo? The first rule of American hemispheric diplomacy south of Texas should be “Don’t get into Latin faces unless you have to.
     
    I got in a few brown faces today, they were leaning against my car as if they owned it, loitering in the parking lot of a country in which they were never invited. I firmly told them to quit leaning on my car, after making eye contact from about fifty yards away and marching directly toward them. They obliged.

    You'd see a whole lot less hatred of America if we acted like the alpha dogs we actually are. You'd start to see the respect we earned from Japan and Germany following Hiroshima and Dresden.

    You’d see a whole lot less hatred of America if we acted like the alpha dogs we actually are. You’d start to see the respect we earned from Japan and Germany following Hiroshima and Dresden.

    Ok, tough guy…….

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  67. Biff says:

    War, and meddling is also tied to Careerism. Many generals in high places depend on it. War colleges employ thousands to do the research.

    It has developed to the point where the rest of the world now views the United States as the number one threat to peace:

    http://www.ijreview.com/2015/03/279944-country-named-biggest-threat-world-peace/

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  68. guest says:
    @GW

    Below the Rio Bravo? The first rule of American hemispheric diplomacy south of Texas should be “Don’t get into Latin faces unless you have to.
     
    I got in a few brown faces today, they were leaning against my car as if they owned it, loitering in the parking lot of a country in which they were never invited. I firmly told them to quit leaning on my car, after making eye contact from about fifty yards away and marching directly toward them. They obliged.

    You'd see a whole lot less hatred of America if we acted like the alpha dogs we actually are. You'd start to see the respect we earned from Japan and Germany following Hiroshima and Dresden.

    Well bless my soul — another little “we” person!

    You mention Vietnam, Dresden, Hiroshima, but that may be due to modesty.

    Where did you do your valiant killing for Uncle Sam?

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  69. Giuseppe says:

    From Manifest Destiny to American Exceptionalism to Empire, American consciences are untroubled by the possibility that that we might not be the best in anything. How many times I have heard the comment in a political discussion, “it’s not a perfect system but it’s the best in the world.”

    And this is just our native inclination, unengineered. What will we look like after years of being groomed into a pugilistic patriotic machine by endless war, totalitarianism, and the merger of the national media with the state?

    You referenced the personal antidote to all of this. Read broadly and well, especially in history, and never forget.

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  70. Biff says:
    @TheBoom
    I have lived in 5 countries outside of the USA. Most people don't hate "us." They hate some of the USA's actions but most have bigger fish to fry. Plus, for most people we are not the center of the universe.

    In Taiwan, where I live now, most of the people are far more concerned with China than the US.

    When I lived in Mexico, most wanted to move to the USA. Their biggest problems were with Mexico where they felt the deck was stacked against them.

    In Thailand, their biggest concerns were internal conflicts and the Muslim insurrection.

    In China, with a few exceptions, their biggest concerns were with how to get ahead, the environment, food quality problems and their kids' futures.

    Now Muslim nations are a different story. But even there a recent poll of young people found their biggest concern was ISIS not the US or Israel. However, that area is definitely a conspiracy laden area and we have played into their tendency to look for infidel conspiracies.

    I've spent some time in Vietnam and the Vietnamese to an amazing extent do not hate the USA. The only real animosity I encountered was from German expats living there. I had to remind them that if memory serves me well Germany had a few problems with misguided wars too.

    In a nutshell, we are not the center of the universe. People don't spend every waking moment thinking about us as hard as that seems. They have their own lives to live and their own more local issues to deal with.

    In Thailand, their biggest concerns were internal conflicts and the Muslim insurrection.

    I’m married into a wealthy Thai family, and what I hear about their biggest concern is/was Thaksin introducing the Western debt based banking system into Thailand. They loath the IMF and World Bank, and seen all too often how accepting debt will get you owned. They see the pain Greece and Ireland are experiencing, and don’t want to live that kind of financial agony.

    Thaksin is down, but he’s not out. He’s still got a lot of support, so Thailand must stay vigilant against the debt devils.

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    • Agree: Thomas O. Meehan
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  71. Big Bill says:
    @Sgt. Joe Friday
    Mexico meddles in our business too Fred. There are politicians, ostensibly American, in this country who facilitate and champion that meddling. I would bet there are few, if any, Mexican politicians who openly proclaim that their job is to facilitate American meddling in Mexico's business.

    So true. As President of Mexico Vincente Fox said, “wherever there is a Mexican, there is Mexico.”

    And Governor Scott Walker is doing his part in Wisconsin. He has arranged with the Mexican government to open two Mexican Consulates in Wisconsin to connect illegal aliens with welfare, immigration lawyers, and to cultivate activists who organize pro-illegal immigrant demonstrations, etc.

    Thank you Governor Walker! You are a true “compassionate conservative’ … for illegal aliens, that is.

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  72. They hate us because we meddle, and have meddled.

    Exactly!

    You cannot believe the amount of push-back I get when I point this out.

    The problem gets worse from there. The schools do not teach history well. The events, such as the Opium wars in China or the U.S. invasion of Mexico of 1845 are not taught well or at all. Thus, most Americans do not know these events. You can be damn sure Chinese and Mexicans DO know these events.

    This problem is exacerbated when leftists (nearly all teachers and school administrators are leftists) get in charge and do decide to teach about these events. They use such instruction to denounce not only American imperialism (which should be denounced) but to denounce all American values such a free markets, entrepreneurship, technological innovation, individualism, and productive enterprise in general. Thus, the kids grow up either to be bitter leftists who denounce any positive trait whatsoever, or they grow up to be right-wing skeptics who decide that all of what they were taught was all made-up claptrap, including the American imperialism.

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    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    There was no US "invasion" of 1845. That is Mexico whining about a war they started and lost. There was a disputed border region and both sides had troops in it. Mexico fired upon a small American force.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nueces_Strip

    Mexicans only know the bullshit their government tells them.
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  73. The problem is amplified by the political (and big business) class, both left and right but more on the right, that believes in the “missionary” interventionist foreign policy that seeks to convert the rest of the world to “Americanism”. This foreign policy is made worse by the state department hacks that will make decisions that affect the populations of the countries they deal with, often for no other reason than just to further their careers (as resume stuffers). The first Gulf War (in 1991) was inadvertently triggered by a female state department employee who did something so stupid that makes clear she had to be an affirmative action hiree. Since bureaucracy always protects its own, this particular career employee never suffered any consequences for her actions.

    There are plenty good reasons why much of the world does not like us.

    All of what we do is very stupid on our part. Having lived outside the U.S. for 10 years (and traveled and done business in many countries during that time) I learned that the rest of the world really has no desire to “conquer” us or to impose any kind of ideology on to us. They simply want us to leave them alone.

    I have no problem with that.

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  74. Corvinus says:

    “They use such instruction to denounce not only American imperialism (which should be denounced) but to denounce all American values such a free markets, entrepreneurship, technological innovation, individualism, and productive enterprise in general. Thus, the kids grow up either to be bitter leftists who denounce any positive trait whatsoever, or they grow up to be right-wing skeptics who decide that all of what they were taught was all made-up claptrap, including the American imperialism.”

    You haven’t been to school in a long time. This doesn’t happen quite nearly as much as you think it does.

    “I’m married into a wealthy Thai family…”

    So, you are a multi-culturalist. Thank you for admitting that salient point. Important to know that you, of your own free will, found someone outside of race (assuming you are not Asian). Although, others would call you a race traitor.

    “The people are never given the whole truth and the government uses it’s power to crush opposition…”

    That’s actually untrue. People today have access to the Internet. Here, there are all kinds of truths. If the government was crushing opposition, for example, you would have been put in jail for reading and contributing to this site.

    “There were no presidents more imperialistic, more militaristic, more meddling, more vile, than the second Roosevelt and the first Wilson…”

    You’re leaving out McKinley. And Reagan. And both Bushes. And JFK. And (the list goes on).

    “All the more reason we should have sank the boats bringing the Germans to America after the revolutions of 1849.”

    Chris, aren’t Germans white? Why would want whites to be killed? We’re suppose to be united.

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  75. Art says:

    Disliking the powerful, is human nature – the clumsy nature of power always leaves damage – no matter who is in charge, government power is always a bull in a china shop – it comes with the territory – it is the nature of the beast.

    However something more is happening with America’s falling standing in the world – disgust and disrespect.

    We do not see the giant unfriendly invisible elephant that straddles our nation – Jew Zionism. But the rest of the world does – they see that we have given over our sovereignty to an evil tribal cabal of Jews. The mighty American democracy, the foundation of our existence – is dead, a shell of itself, run by a greedy bloody mob of Jews. America is no longer America.

    The world sees it and they rightfully disrespect you and me for it.

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    • Replies: @Stan D Mute

    We do not see the giant unfriendly invisible elephant that straddles our nation – Jew Zionism. But the rest of the world does – they see that we have given over our sovereignty to an evil tribal cabal of Jews. The mighty American democracy, the foundation of our existence – is dead, a shell of itself, run by a greedy bloody mob of Jews. America is no longer America.
     
    Okay, but you've let your anti-Jew feelings blind you. I agree 100% that America should walk away from the zionists. We should swear off Arab oil and do our own drilling and refining. The zionists chose to live in the most hostile neighborhood on the planet, let them deal with the consequences. But zionists didn't put us in Vietnam. They didn't put us in Africa. They didn't put us in Korea. The core problem is our military industrial complex led by special interests. We forget the greatest american's admonition to avoid foreign entanglements and instead allow lobbyists to stampede us into wars. Want to sell more arms? Gin up a war against those dang commies in Korea. Ignore the commies in South Africa and Europe. Ignore the commies infiltrating our schools. Send billions and billions of dollars worth of stuff to blow up in an unwanted southeast Asian jungle. And today, ignore the invasion of Europe. Ignore the invasion of America. Instead, gin up wars with Arabs to please both our arms manufacturers and our Zionist campaign contributors.

    Perhaps we went wrong when our political leaders stopped having any personal risk in their wars? Washington ducked a *lot* of bullets in the Revolution. Maybe current and future Presidents should be forced to the Front of any wars they propose? Maybe votes in favor of war should require the voter to either go himself or to have his children fighting at the Front?

    You shouldn't hate the Zionists anyway. Hate the traitors who work for them instead of America. Hate the communists who work endlessly for bigger government. Hate the quislings who excuse and protect the traitors in our midst. Clean up our house - once that's done I suspect we won't even care about the situation in the Middle East.
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  76. Good effort Fred, with a lot of truth. That said, a few caveats are in order.

    Of course you’re right that the factuality behind others perceptions of us can be irrelevant. That is no reason for us to lose sight of those facts however. For instance.

    US China relations were quite good until the Chi-Com takeover in 49′. It’s true that the European imperial powers took great advantage of China. The USA did not act with anything like the rapacity of the Europeans (Or the Japanese). The Chinese at that time saw that we, unlike them, sought to sell products while sending medical missionaries. Many Chinese understood this and genuinely liked Americans. Decades of commie propaganda may have erased much of this. That is no excuse for us take up the commie talking points as if they were true.

    It’s a curious fact that many countries that we clobbered have positive attitudes toward us today. The Vietnamese are notoriously American friendly. We fought them. They survived and we became part of their national saga. We fought to keep part of Korea in the non-Communist world and now a great many Koreans are Christian, trade with us and want to live here. We ran the Philippines for a long time and they are happy to live under our umbrella. Many move here. Our “meddling” has not resulted in universal condemnation.

    Latin America is a different matter. Frankly, I think we are bound to be unpopular there no matter what we do. We are simply too big for them. They feel the weight of their own poor performance, both internally and on the international stage. You are right, we can benefit from not making them feel small. On the other hand, we have regional interests and like any state, we need to attend to them.

    The Cold War is over. We don’t have to worry that Paraguay will “Go Communist.” It’s time we made a few choices, picked some reliable allies and had a rational policy for the region.

    The meddling you decrie is mostly an outgrowth of first the Cold War, and now from the Neocon-Liberal Internationalist takeover of our foreign policy. I agree with you that this is a disaster. We need to end it, pronto. It’s ironic that the old Wasp business oriented foreign policy of the preceding era was less invasive and more flexible than that of the soulless academic psychopaths we have now. That’s a topic for another day.

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    • Replies: @Biff

    We fought to keep part of Korea in the non-Communist world and now a great many Koreans are Christian, trade with us and want to live here.
     
    Or

    The U.S. government/military believed Korea to be their own, and nobody was going to take it from them - not even the Koreans.

    Korea was Washington’s largest outpost outside of the continental U.S. Until the Spanish American war got them focused on the Philippines, and then they decided Hawaii would be a great place to have. South Korea doesn’t pass major laws, elect politicians, or negotiate with the North unless it is Washington approved.
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  77. Sam Shama says:

    The powerful and wealthy are always hated, curiously also, set up as examples to embrace, and the moralisers amongst us- with varying degrees of guilt and “conscience” – will continue to decry the never ending cycles of human behaviour. Thus it always was, and thus it shall always be.

    (Even the damn HLMI robots we inherit, will likely be coded the same!)

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    • Replies: @The Plutonium Kid
    "The powerful and wealthy are always hated ... "

    ... and envied. Never underestimate envy as a source of irrational hatred. Often the ones complaining about the big bully are little bullies who can't compete.
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  78. @MarkinLA
    Being in southern California with a large Armenian population you get this every year with these Armenians trying to push the US government to do something to embarrass Turkey over the Armenian genocide which may or may not have happened exactly as Armenians say.

    I even worked with one. He was a nice guy but ranting about this and refusing to acknowledge that Armenians have committed terrorist acts in the US against people who do not believe in the genocide story and those who are related to Turkish interests. I showed him proof and said that I as an American am sick and tired of people bringing their old hatreds into this country and trying to make our government champion their causes that we had nothing to do with.

    “….and said that I as an American am sick and tired of people bringing their old hatreds into this country and trying to make our government champion their causes that we had nothing to do with.”

    Bravo! And that goes for the Irish Americans and their anti-brit fixation, Greek Americans, and the Israeli-Americans.

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  79. @guest
    Please look upthread for a couple of comments on the "we."

    You seem especially overt in conflating your personal interests, those of other Americans, and those of Uncle Sam. I believe that much of what people like Dick Cheney, Hillary Clinton, and Victoria Nuland (who served under both) do to people in other countries is contrary to the interests of Americans.

    A sincere question: As someone who considers himself astute, have you reflected on this?

    no matter how you disagree, but everyone is selfish, so is every nation on earth. usa isn’t alone in this.

    I am 100% sure every nation on earth would act like USA if they can get away with it.

    simple right?

    This would only change when the majority of humans become humanists. and we actively ban people like you listed from governing. I don’t see that happening. I would love to be wrong on this.

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  80. Biff says:
    @Thomas O. Meehan
    Good effort Fred, with a lot of truth. That said, a few caveats are in order.

    Of course you're right that the factuality behind others perceptions of us can be irrelevant. That is no reason for us to lose sight of those facts however. For instance.

    US China relations were quite good until the Chi-Com takeover in 49'. It's true that the European imperial powers took great advantage of China. The USA did not act with anything like the rapacity of the Europeans (Or the Japanese). The Chinese at that time saw that we, unlike them, sought to sell products while sending medical missionaries. Many Chinese understood this and genuinely liked Americans. Decades of commie propaganda may have erased much of this. That is no excuse for us take up the commie talking points as if they were true.

    It's a curious fact that many countries that we clobbered have positive attitudes toward us today. The Vietnamese are notoriously American friendly. We fought them. They survived and we became part of their national saga. We fought to keep part of Korea in the non-Communist world and now a great many Koreans are Christian, trade with us and want to live here. We ran the Philippines for a long time and they are happy to live under our umbrella. Many move here. Our "meddling" has not resulted in universal condemnation.

    Latin America is a different matter. Frankly, I think we are bound to be unpopular there no matter what we do. We are simply too big for them. They feel the weight of their own poor performance, both internally and on the international stage. You are right, we can benefit from not making them feel small. On the other hand, we have regional interests and like any state, we need to attend to them.

    The Cold War is over. We don't have to worry that Paraguay will "Go Communist." It's time we made a few choices, picked some reliable allies and had a rational policy for the region.

    The meddling you decrie is mostly an outgrowth of first the Cold War, and now from the Neocon-Liberal Internationalist takeover of our foreign policy. I agree with you that this is a disaster. We need to end it, pronto. It's ironic that the old Wasp business oriented foreign policy of the preceding era was less invasive and more flexible than that of the soulless academic psychopaths we have now. That's a topic for another day.

    We fought to keep part of Korea in the non-Communist world and now a great many Koreans are Christian, trade with us and want to live here.

    Or

    The U.S. government/military believed Korea to be their own, and nobody was going to take it from them – not even the Koreans.

    Korea was Washington’s largest outpost outside of the continental U.S. Until the Spanish American war got them focused on the Philippines, and then they decided Hawaii would be a great place to have. South Korea doesn’t pass major laws, elect politicians, or negotiate with the North unless it is Washington approved.

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    • Replies: @Thomas O. Meehan
    Can you cite some sources for your remarkable statements? Such as:

    "Korea was Washington’s largest outpost outside of the continental U.S"

    The US never had a garrison in Korea until the end of WWII. We only had a treaty with the Korean Kingdom in 1882. By 1904 Korea was already firmly in Japanese possession.

    "The U.S. government/military believed Korea to be their own, and nobody was going to take it from them – not even the Koreans." This is a remarkably silly statement. The famed 38th parallel demarcation line between Soviet and other areas of occupation was drawn up by a lowly US colonel. The US showed a lackadaisical attitude toward the fate of Korea right up until the Soviet backed North Korean invasion. Are you of the opinion that the South Koreans who fought along side of us not real Koreans?

    "….Until the Spanish American war got them focused on the Philippines, and then they decided Hawaii would be a great place to have."

    Hawaii was already an American hands by 1894. The Spanish American War was in 1898.
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  81. @Astuteobservor II
    I don't believe for 1 second we, the USA have good intentions.

    Everything is done in the name of national interest, OUR national interest.

    I am actually 100% a ok with this, as long as we don't dress it up as "good intentions" This is akin to stabbing someone in the back while telling them you are their friend, in front of a room full of others. and then trying to repeat the same thing with others in the same room.

    “Everything is done in the name of national interest, OUR national interest.”

    I think that is a bit extreme. There are several examples available of actions taken by the US government that are decidedly not in our national interest. That implies either incompetence on their part or a willingness to act in a select group’s interest at the expense of the whole.

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    • Replies: @Astuteobservor II
    then list them.
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  82. @Reg Cæsar

    America is both a rogue state and a bully, constantly attacking countries hopelessly inferior in military strength… Cambodia, Vietnam, Laos…
     
    France, Italy, Austria, Germany, Japan, Korea…

    There were no presidents more imperialistic, more militaristic, more meddling, more vile, than the second Roosevelt and the first Wilson (a Virginian, like Fred!)

    Yet Paris has major thoroughfares named for these monsters. How does this make sense?

    They should honor the Lindberghs, who labored to keep us out of France.

    “There were no presidents more imperialistic, more militaristic, more meddling, more vile, than the second Roosevelt and the first Wilson (a Virginian, like Fred!). Yet Paris has major thoroughfares named for these monsters. How does this make sense?”

    How does it not make sense? Both Roosevelt and Wilson led a country that fought on France’s side in two world wars. I don’t think it is much of a surprise that the French might respect their memory.

    “They should honor the Lindberghs, who labored to keep us out of France.”

    Do Southerners honor Europeans who labored to keep Europeans out of the Civil War?

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Both Roosevelt and Wilson led a country that fought on France’s side in two world wars
     
    So meddling is okay, if it's on their side? Rather hypocritical of the French.
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  83. @guest
    Please look upthread for a couple of comments on the "we."

    You seem especially overt in conflating your personal interests, those of other Americans, and those of Uncle Sam. I believe that much of what people like Dick Cheney, Hillary Clinton, and Victoria Nuland (who served under both) do to people in other countries is contrary to the interests of Americans.

    A sincere question: As someone who considers himself astute, have you reflected on this?

    “You seem especially overt in conflating your personal interests, those of other Americans, and those of Uncle Sam. I believe that much of what people like Dick Cheney, Hillary Clinton, and Victoria Nuland (who served under both) do to people in other countries is contrary to the interests of Americans.”

    You may believe that, but many Americans do not. Most republicans supported the Iraq War at the time it was undertaken and large numbers of Americans didn’t see any problem with what Victoria Nuland and company did in Ukraine. In some instances, “we” is appropriate.

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    • Replies: @Stan D Mute

    Most republicans supported the Iraq War at the time it was undertaken and large numbers of Americans didn’t see any problem with what Victoria Nuland and company did in Ukraine.
     
    And you are conflating what average citizens are led to believe they want with their true best interests. Average white Christians have been taught that "Israel is our best ally" and "Israel is our only friend in the Middle East" and "Israel is the Holy Land." Thus they will say they want to have war with a billion Muslims to preserve Israel's occupation of that stretch of sand. But is it in their best interest to go bleed out in the desert? Or to send their children to be maimed, mutilated, or beheaded on behalf of a people who believe themselves fundamentally superior and who would *never* return the favor?

    We have a controlled media. The people *never* hear opposing positions. Party R says, "We must invade Iraq tomorrow to protect our beloved only friend Israel." Party D says, "Party R is stupid and racist - we must invade Iraq *and* Syria tomorrow to protect our beloved only friend Israel." The people are polled: "Do we invade Iraq tomorrow or both Iraq and Syria to protect our beloved only friend Israel?" The people reply, "Iraq" and thus it is said the people "supported" the war.
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  84. @GW
    You can always tell a member of the Vietnam generation. The psychological effects of losing a war tend to reduce men to emotional teenagers and skew their outlook on reality. Such effects reveal themselves in many ways. Being overly cynical about the efficacy of military campaigns. Being quick to take the side of foreign nations who feel some overblown grievance. Reducing all international disputes into one side's "meddling" while ignoring all other potential sociological factors the other side may have--feelings of inferiority, shame, guilt, fear, ethnocentrism, etc. Highlighting only the worst of what their nation has done while repressing the best examples of bravery, sacrafice, generosity, and charity that would defeat the thesis.

    Of course if America were as hated as we've been led to believe we'd expect circumstances to be different. European anti-war leftist fury wouldn't have ceased once Obama was elected. Half of Latin America wouldn't want to live in the United States. The U.S. would have little power over international affairs and little influence in multinational bodies like the U.N.

    “Being overly cynical about the efficacy of military campaigns.”

    There is no reason not to be cynical about the efficacy of American military campaigns: the Iraq War was a disaster, and the country has now disintegrated into squabbling sectarian areas; Libya turned into a disaster, resulting in waves of migrants flooding into Europe; it’s not inconceivable that the Taliban may one day return to power in Afghanistan, erasing all of our gains there; our military efforts against ISIS have yielded few positive results; our efforts to train Syrian rebels have utterly failed; our drone campaign in Yemen outright failed – now the Saudi’s are attacking the country, transforming the situation into a humanitarian nightmare…..and that’s just recent history.

    “You can always tell a member of the Vietnam generation. The psychological effects of losing a war tend to reduce men to emotional teenagers and skew their outlook on reality.”

    If we had listed to some members of the Vietnam generation, we wouldn’t have invaded Iraq.

    You can always tell a member of the Gulf War generation. The psychological effects of winning a quick war on television have produced a crop of people who cannot accept that other conflicts may not be as quick, as easy, or produce as good of an outcome. Hence, they advocate for war after war without learning anything from defeat.

    “Being quick to take the side of foreign nations who feel some overblown grievance.”

    Quick? Quick might be the case for any one of the things brought up by the author, but this seems to be a pattern that has occurred over several decades. That’s not quick. That’s just recognizing the truth for what it is.

    “Of course if America were as hated as we’ve been led to believe we’d expect circumstances to be different. European anti-war leftist fury wouldn’t have ceased once Obama was elected.

    Some of that can be attributed to the fact that we haven’t invaded any countries the size of Iraq since Obama has been president. When Obama and company wanted to attack Syria, there was quite an uprising, and the UK parliament voted down the action.

    “…Half of Latin America wouldn’t want to live in the United States.”

    Wanting greater economic opportunity for yourself and liking the government of the United States are two separate things.

    “…The U.S. would have little power over international affairs and little influence in multinational bodies like the U.N.”

    Ironically, we probably do have less power in those areas these days. For example, the US demanded that their allies stay out of China’s AIIB; none of them listened, and they all joined anyway. At the U.N., some of that power is structural. The US has a veto in the UN Security Council, so I don’t think that can be used as a reliable judge on waning American influence.

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  85. @Biff

    We fought to keep part of Korea in the non-Communist world and now a great many Koreans are Christian, trade with us and want to live here.
     
    Or

    The U.S. government/military believed Korea to be their own, and nobody was going to take it from them - not even the Koreans.

    Korea was Washington’s largest outpost outside of the continental U.S. Until the Spanish American war got them focused on the Philippines, and then they decided Hawaii would be a great place to have. South Korea doesn’t pass major laws, elect politicians, or negotiate with the North unless it is Washington approved.

    Can you cite some sources for your remarkable statements? Such as:

    “Korea was Washington’s largest outpost outside of the continental U.S”

    The US never had a garrison in Korea until the end of WWII. We only had a treaty with the Korean Kingdom in 1882. By 1904 Korea was already firmly in Japanese possession.

    “The U.S. government/military believed Korea to be their own, and nobody was going to take it from them – not even the Koreans.” This is a remarkably silly statement. The famed 38th parallel demarcation line between Soviet and other areas of occupation was drawn up by a lowly US colonel. The US showed a lackadaisical attitude toward the fate of Korea right up until the Soviet backed North Korean invasion. Are you of the opinion that the South Koreans who fought along side of us not real Koreans?

    “….Until the Spanish American war got them focused on the Philippines, and then they decided Hawaii would be a great place to have.”

    Hawaii was already an American hands by 1894. The Spanish American War was in 1898.

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  86. @Divine Right
    "Everything is done in the name of national interest, OUR national interest."

    I think that is a bit extreme. There are several examples available of actions taken by the US government that are decidedly not in our national interest. That implies either incompetence on their part or a willingness to act in a select group's interest at the expense of the whole.

    then list them.

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  87. Don’t recall the United States participating in the Opium Wars….

    I would be happy for them to hate us if it meant they stop coming to our country illegally.

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    • Replies: @Thomas O. Meehan
    "Don’t recall the United States participating in the Opium Wars…." You're right.

    We did have some skirmishing with the old Korean Kingdom over the Ginseng trade. It seems they had the best Ginseng, with a near monopoly on the China trade. Then we started selling the stuff to China and the Koreans didn't take that in stride.
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  88. Marty says:
    @MarkinLA
    Please explain what was to be gained in Vietnam and how was it vital to us. You have to have real concrete reasons to fight a war not just some lame domino theory drivel to tell the rubes,

    Read Michael Lind’s “Vietnam, The Necessary War” then tell us which points you disagree with and why.

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    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    Why should I read some idiot's opinion as fact? Why don't you explain what was so vitally important to the US that we had to fight a war half way around the world that cost trillions in today's dollars, cost 50,000 lives, ruined hundreds of thousands more, escalated the drug problem in the US and when we finally pulled out, it was as though the whole thing never existed to the people of the US as far as back home was concerned.

    Of course, this doesn't even mention the cost to the Vietnamese both north and south who detested our presence there.

    Surely you don't need some moron like Lind to think for you. Maybe I can get a paper from PNAC about why the Iraq war was such a necessary success while I'm at it.

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  89. I don’t hate you, but I hate the USG and the ruling elites as a whole. They’re sometimes foolish, dangerous, arrogant and meddling. I think there are also psychopaths in the commanding heights. Considering the astonishing power they can wield against anyone, it’s scary.

    There’s also this mindset about “improving the world”, that I find particularly harmful.

    If you just managed to get rid of these people… But you can’t have your own “colour revolution”, do you?

    It would be great if you just could have Coolidge back again in the White House. He was a sensible guy (I don’t know if he meddled in Latin America, I’m not a Latin American.)

    I hope the US will never, ever, bomb Europeans again into “democracy”, in case we decide to take our sovereignity back (don’t underestimate the chances of political changes in Europe) and stop living under the aegis of the USG.

    Thank you very much, and don’t let Hillary become the next POTUS!

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  90. @Gilbert Ratchet
    Don't recall the United States participating in the Opium Wars....

    I would be happy for them to hate us if it meant they stop coming to our country illegally.

    “Don’t recall the United States participating in the Opium Wars….” You’re right.

    We did have some skirmishing with the old Korean Kingdom over the Ginseng trade. It seems they had the best Ginseng, with a near monopoly on the China trade. Then we started selling the stuff to China and the Koreans didn’t take that in stride.

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  91. @Dwright
    I came here from Lew Rockwell's site just to comment on the "we" aspect. Right away I see that others picked up on it. Come on Fred, there is the United States the country and also it's citizens.

    Don't confuse the two.

    Yes, but do we not continue to mindlessly elect the same corrupt Congressmen and Presidents over and over again? Citizens still have the power to throw up massive stumbling blocks for the oligarchy, but most are too mindless or fearful to think for themselves or intelligently fight. No, I think Fred is right to use the word “we”.

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  92. Flower says:
    @Tom_R
    US AND THEM?
    LETS MAKE THE WORLD HATE AMERICA’S BIGGEST LOBBY, NOT US.

    Thanks for the interesting article, Fred. I agree with you on most points.

    Except we have to explain the word “us”? When I travel overseas, and people criticize me or “us”, about what the US govt. did, I calmly explain to them that we the people in America have no power. WE did not make the decisions. Our govt. did.

    So how do we make them hate our crooked corrupt criminal govt. for what THEY DO and not us? For example, the biggest lobby in USA is the Jewish lobby that bribes politicians and makes THEM do most of the bad things the govt. is doing, such as causing wars in the Middle East or promoting homopathy or other depravity, including Hollywood, which is Jewish controlled. The people have no say in the matter. Since they are the biggest lobby, and 50% of the campaign contributions to the Democrats and 40% to the Republicans are from the Judaists, they basically own and operate our govt.

    http://business.financialpost.com/fp-comment/lawrence-solomon-obama-jewish-financiers

    So the people must hate them, not us!

    “I calmly explain to them that we the people in America have no power. ” – No offense Tom, but you have inadvertently explained that you are#1 a dumb fck, #2 You are completely immaterial to any solution, #3 if you said the truth, you have said to these folks, “you are on your own. We have ours, and you don’t, it is your problem, let me know how it comes out.” Fred’s entire article is about WHY they “hate us” and you have agreed word for word. I salute you for your verve; however, if Fred and his group are all that are in complaint of this situation, you will come out as a crackpot and a threat. How can you convince a thirty something making middle class wages doing a middle class job designed to support liars and thieves in order to KEEP that job, what the f do you suppose the answer will be?

    Fred, I love your work, your attitude, your conception of such words as “truth” and “freedom”. But explaining to us “why they hate us” is as enlightening as explaining why we have two feet. We know why they hate us. After all, we are the stupid cork soakers that KEEP electing these pieces of S. We keep electing those that don’t care if “they hate us”, if we f them, or even if we lie to them so we can f them. Fred, without equivocation, I challenge you to give us a viable way out. Yeah Fred, it’s time to put your money where your mouth is. If the best that you can do with your history, your experience, your damnation is to explain what was and what might have been, then f you. You and your pieces are worthless.

    David, if this is the best that Fred can do, f him.

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  93. joe webb says:

    O Fred throws chum to the malcontents.

    Fred is Wrong about just about Everything.

    People hate us and risk their lives getting here, or Europe.

    The Meddling that we do is done by every great and lesser Power. That is political life.

    As for Latin Americans with their low IQs, of course, the Yanqui is resented, just as people who work hard are resented at home. Mañana is the Latin American laziness.

    O, and just where is Israel in all of this.? It never shows up in Fred’s Everything. Fred’s wife is Jewish, I hear, from reliable sources. What about it Fred? Full disclosure.

    The White Man is resented but not his Free Money…go Norte hombre…Free, free, free. Half of the mexers here are on welfare, even when they are working. Free, free, free, thanks to the transgendered liberal males who have turned into pussies.

    The wretched know the mind of the liberal White, and cash in on it.

    Fred sounds like a leftie jew running down anything White.

    When Trump trumps the pols, and throws out the mexers, I suppose Fred will run him down as some kind of racist.

    Yup. Joe Webb

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stan D Mute

    Fred sounds like a leftie jew running down anything White.
     
    Fred is married to a Mexican. He has a *massive* soft spot on Mexicans. We know this. And yet I don't recall reading Fred suggesting we continue allowing unrestricted invasion. No, all he does is say that Mexicans appear smarter to him than they do to us. On almost every other issue Fred has a clear eyed view and he is a very talented writer. So he hasn't written about Israel? He hasn't written about Panama either. And Panama is far more important to us strategically than Israel.

    You are taking the Jew obsession too far. It's like you went for the early bird special in Boca Raton only to learn it was sold out. Yes, the beanie-boys got there first and saved their shekels. Get over it. Order the ham and enjoy it.
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  94. MarkinLA says:
    @Marty
    Read Michael Lind's "Vietnam, The Necessary War" then tell us which points you disagree with and why.

    Why should I read some idiot’s opinion as fact? Why don’t you explain what was so vitally important to the US that we had to fight a war half way around the world that cost trillions in today’s dollars, cost 50,000 lives, ruined hundreds of thousands more, escalated the drug problem in the US and when we finally pulled out, it was as though the whole thing never existed to the people of the US as far as back home was concerned.

    Of course, this doesn’t even mention the cost to the Vietnamese both north and south who detested our presence there.

    Surely you don’t need some moron like Lind to think for you. Maybe I can get a paper from PNAC about why the Iraq war was such a necessary success while I’m at it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonymous
    Those types of people are still trying to fight the Vietnam war. If only they were in charge they'd have won it. They're all a bunch of armchair warriors playing war games. The internet is full of them.
    , @Auntie Analogue
    My dear MarkinLA, before you peremptorily write off Michael Lind as "some idiot," you ought to read his book Vietnam: The Necessary War.

    By no means am I a fan of Lind or in agreement with much else that Lind has written, but I have read Vietnam: The Necessary War in which Lind lays out cogent, often irrefutable arguments for his case. Most importantly, in the book Lind examines that war from the available knowledge and points of view of the time in which the war spanned - not from today's 20/20 hindsight; and, further, Lind accurately reviews that war in its proper context within the full breadth of the Cold War and all of its U.S. vs. USSR proxy wars. To you, then, I heartily commend Lind's book.
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  95. Retired says:

    That’s why no one wants to live here anymore.

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  96. MarkinLA says:
    @Abelard Lindsey

    They hate us because we meddle, and have meddled.
     
    Exactly!

    You cannot believe the amount of push-back I get when I point this out.

    The problem gets worse from there. The schools do not teach history well. The events, such as the Opium wars in China or the U.S. invasion of Mexico of 1845 are not taught well or at all. Thus, most Americans do not know these events. You can be damn sure Chinese and Mexicans DO know these events.

    This problem is exacerbated when leftists (nearly all teachers and school administrators are leftists) get in charge and do decide to teach about these events. They use such instruction to denounce not only American imperialism (which should be denounced) but to denounce all American values such a free markets, entrepreneurship, technological innovation, individualism, and productive enterprise in general. Thus, the kids grow up either to be bitter leftists who denounce any positive trait whatsoever, or they grow up to be right-wing skeptics who decide that all of what they were taught was all made-up claptrap, including the American imperialism.

    There was no US “invasion” of 1845. That is Mexico whining about a war they started and lost. There was a disputed border region and both sides had troops in it. Mexico fired upon a small American force.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nueces_Strip

    Mexicans only know the bullshit their government tells them.

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  97. @Divine Right
    "There were no presidents more imperialistic, more militaristic, more meddling, more vile, than the second Roosevelt and the first Wilson (a Virginian, like Fred!). Yet Paris has major thoroughfares named for these monsters. How does this make sense?"

    How does it not make sense? Both Roosevelt and Wilson led a country that fought on France's side in two world wars. I don't think it is much of a surprise that the French might respect their memory.

    "They should honor the Lindberghs, who labored to keep us out of France."

    Do Southerners honor Europeans who labored to keep Europeans out of the Civil War?

    Both Roosevelt and Wilson led a country that fought on France’s side in two world wars

    So meddling is okay, if it’s on their side? Rather hypocritical of the French.

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  98. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @MarkinLA
    Why should I read some idiot's opinion as fact? Why don't you explain what was so vitally important to the US that we had to fight a war half way around the world that cost trillions in today's dollars, cost 50,000 lives, ruined hundreds of thousands more, escalated the drug problem in the US and when we finally pulled out, it was as though the whole thing never existed to the people of the US as far as back home was concerned.

    Of course, this doesn't even mention the cost to the Vietnamese both north and south who detested our presence there.

    Surely you don't need some moron like Lind to think for you. Maybe I can get a paper from PNAC about why the Iraq war was such a necessary success while I'm at it.

    Those types of people are still trying to fight the Vietnam war. If only they were in charge they’d have won it. They’re all a bunch of armchair warriors playing war games. The internet is full of them.

    Read More
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  99. @Tom_R
    US AND THEM?
    LETS MAKE THE WORLD HATE AMERICA’S BIGGEST LOBBY, NOT US.

    Thanks for the interesting article, Fred. I agree with you on most points.

    Except we have to explain the word “us”? When I travel overseas, and people criticize me or “us”, about what the US govt. did, I calmly explain to them that we the people in America have no power. WE did not make the decisions. Our govt. did.

    So how do we make them hate our crooked corrupt criminal govt. for what THEY DO and not us? For example, the biggest lobby in USA is the Jewish lobby that bribes politicians and makes THEM do most of the bad things the govt. is doing, such as causing wars in the Middle East or promoting homopathy or other depravity, including Hollywood, which is Jewish controlled. The people have no say in the matter. Since they are the biggest lobby, and 50% of the campaign contributions to the Democrats and 40% to the Republicans are from the Judaists, they basically own and operate our govt.

    http://business.financialpost.com/fp-comment/lawrence-solomon-obama-jewish-financiers

    So the people must hate them, not us!

    Well, you do volunteer in your army to kill people around the world. And there are sooo many accomplices.

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  100. @Seoulsurvivor
    And there's the misuse of the word "we". Or maybe I could paraphrase Clinton and say, It depends upon what the meaning of the word 'we' is. Now 99.99999% of the U.S. people have never had anything to do with how our foreign policy is formed and executed by the other .00001% (the elected officials). And we should not be a part of that particular "we". And I think the generic public is waking up to the fact that we generally elect criminals and thugs proficient in extortion, theft and intimidation. Our government could teach the Mafia. Our elected officials only concerns are getting reelected via telling more convincing lies than the other candidates then pandering to the moneyed interests that got them there in the first place.

    The pronoun is right, they do hate you. YOUR government should be YOUR problem, not the REST OF THE WORLD problem.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Seoulsurvivor
    Then please, enlighten the audience to this thread. I agree, The U.S. government is a problem to the rest of the world. It is, in large part, the evil it tries to eradicate. But if you think "we" have some kind of control over how our government conducts itself on the world stage then I suppose you still buy into the fantasy of just voting out the offending bunch. Good luck with that. We'd have a better chance at resolving the problems that arise when a chapter of the Hells Angels moves in next door than doing something about the lawless thugs in D.C. The power they have amassed and accumulated would make Nixon giddy with delight. And they’re not going to give it up. Why would they?
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  101. KA says:

    “Senator Ben Cardin who came out against the deal the other day, his father was a leading Zionist and his cousin by marriage is on the board of the Jewish National Fund, which sustains the Jim Crow project of buying land for Jews in Israel. These are ardent stalwarts of the Israel lobby, and they are the heart of Jewish organizational life in the last generation.

    - See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2015/09/wasserman-netanyahu-valentine#sthash.nh0GzXq2.dpuf

    Another reason Middle Easterners hate American media and political set up because it dont establish the connection and doesnt air it for the voters to make an informed decision how and who to vote for at the polling booth .

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  102. @marcelo paes
    The pronoun is right, they do hate you. YOUR government should be YOUR problem, not the REST OF THE WORLD problem.

    Then please, enlighten the audience to this thread. I agree, The U.S. government is a problem to the rest of the world. It is, in large part, the evil it tries to eradicate. But if you think “we” have some kind of control over how our government conducts itself on the world stage then I suppose you still buy into the fantasy of just voting out the offending bunch. Good luck with that. We’d have a better chance at resolving the problems that arise when a chapter of the Hells Angels moves in next door than doing something about the lawless thugs in D.C. The power they have amassed and accumulated would make Nixon giddy with delight. And they’re not going to give it up. Why would they?

    Read More
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  103. KA says:

    Mr Reed
    I think the hatred varies in reason and intensity markedly among Arab and Muslim

    This is why –

    Countries have been hated and been forgiven as long as the countries follow certain accepted ( not necessarily moral or ethical or even legal) norms.
    America doesn’t bomb nuclear bomb on Germany but on Japan . Japan and German both get occupied .
    But the interest that determines the equation is the American interest and Japan ,German both understand it . They work with the system . They not have to be adjusting and readjusting the balance on a tripwire above a dark abyss.
    Vietnam learns same . So does Mexico or Colombia or Cambodia. Yes ,at some level they hate but at another level which is more promising,healthy,and constructive for the future of next generations,they engage with America with trust ,love ,respect and mutually beneficial cooperation .
    The current hatred against America largely emanate from Islamic countries in Africa and Middle East . This conflict is much older than that of Japan or Vietnam. Why it has so much sustaining power? Because there’s countries don’t see an end . Because they don’t see any compromise will bring them safety or security or promise prosperity. They also know why it won’t happen, because 1 they are not serving the master directly but indirectly who is unaffected whose name is Israel,
    2 they can’t satisfy the needs of the enemy which is America because the enemy has no national need but the interest of Israel who remains largely unaffected from the conflicts because Israeli interest are not harmed,often bolstered and never left unprotected by America.
    3 They find roadblock despite offering and promising same existing security for American military and economic interests in the region in the negotiating table ,that are offered by current arrangements .

    Their cotempt for America only gets get worst once they realize that the killing some Americans through IED or terrorism or making it lose trillions don’t awaken Americans because again the losses aren’t presented as preventable unnecessaryy national losses ,or the product of national policies but as the product of hatred of America, of faith,culture,sexual suppression por IQ,or of the history of the land .
    This horrible conclusion sends the following messages to the muslim countries- -give up your faith,culture,disown your history and sexual mores and forget about resisting American support for the Zionism, and forget about fighting the occupations of Palestine,Golan Heights or of S Lebanon.
    This contempt get only worst when they realize that the suppression of the ill effects on the west and the propagation of the distortions of the culture- religion- history- shame are done by same people who are Zionist or bought and paid by the Zionist.
    It is this sense of hopelessness that guides their’s giving up on America. To their ,horror ,they find that they can’t offer anything to America . Their is no finish line . Their is no negotiations to be had . Because mercenaries don’t wage war for a cause but for payment. American politicians are the mercenaries paid by the Zionist (who rake that part of the ill gotten profit or money from the American citizen.)

    Phillipnes,Colombia or Portugal could see the departure of the dictators because it was America deciding not the neighbors . American figured out that it’s interests would be best served by letting the dictators go .
    ( Same could have proved in case of Mubarek. )
    The neighbors of those countries ( China or Brazil or ) haven’t kept or been able to keep the American leaders as their paid mistresses and as glorified kings with no clothes on . So what America manages to get done in those situations? It manages to factor its national interest and decides accordingly . Dictators disappear and the new leaders navigate the changed situation with valid reasonable road signs or rules that are confined between the interests of the involved countries .
    Phillipines or Italy on way to US don’t have to stop midway on the intra state highways because a lightbulb were flashing in China or Spain or Morooco .
    But Arabs find out always invariably that they on their way to DC would get a traffic ticket violation because a new street sign had appeared in Tel Aviv and never they would make it to DC.
    They despise America because not only America hurts them but hurts itself .

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    Is English your mother tongue?

    Please have a friend or family member edit this mess, and try again.
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  104. guest says:
    @KA
    Mr Reed
    I think the hatred varies in reason and intensity markedly among Arab and Muslim

    This is why --



    Countries have been hated and been forgiven as long as the countries follow certain accepted ( not necessarily moral or ethical or even legal) norms.
    America doesn't bomb nuclear bomb on Germany but on Japan . Japan and German both get occupied .
    But the interest that determines the equation is the American interest and Japan ,German both understand it . They work with the system . They not have to be adjusting and readjusting the balance on a tripwire above a dark abyss.
    Vietnam learns same . So does Mexico or Colombia or Cambodia. Yes ,at some level they hate but at another level which is more promising,healthy,and constructive for the future of next generations,they engage with America with trust ,love ,respect and mutually beneficial cooperation .
    The current hatred against America largely emanate from Islamic countries in Africa and Middle East . This conflict is much older than that of Japan or Vietnam. Why it has so much sustaining power? Because there's countries don't see an end . Because they don't see any compromise will bring them safety or security or promise prosperity. They also know why it won't happen, because 1 they are not serving the master directly but indirectly who is unaffected whose name is Israel,
    2 they can't satisfy the needs of the enemy which is America because the enemy has no national need but the interest of Israel who remains largely unaffected from the conflicts because Israeli interest are not harmed,often bolstered and never left unprotected by America.
    3 They find roadblock despite offering and promising same existing security for American military and economic interests in the region in the negotiating table ,that are offered by current arrangements .

    Their cotempt for America only gets get worst once they realize that the killing some Americans through IED or terrorism or making it lose trillions don't awaken Americans because again the losses aren't presented as preventable unnecessaryy national losses ,or the product of national policies but as the product of hatred of America, of faith,culture,sexual suppression por IQ,or of the history of the land .
    This horrible conclusion sends the following messages to the muslim countries- -give up your faith,culture,disown your history and sexual mores and forget about resisting American support for the Zionism, and forget about fighting the occupations of Palestine,Golan Heights or of S Lebanon.
    This contempt get only worst when they realize that the suppression of the ill effects on the west and the propagation of the distortions of the culture- religion- history- shame are done by same people who are Zionist or bought and paid by the Zionist.
    It is this sense of hopelessness that guides their's giving up on America. To their ,horror ,they find that they can't offer anything to America . Their is no finish line . Their is no negotiations to be had . Because mercenaries don't wage war for a cause but for payment. American politicians are the mercenaries paid by the Zionist (who rake that part of the ill gotten profit or money from the American citizen.)

    Phillipnes,Colombia or Portugal could see the departure of the dictators because it was America deciding not the neighbors . American figured out that it's interests would be best served by letting the dictators go .
    ( Same could have proved in case of Mubarek. )
    The neighbors of those countries ( China or Brazil or ) haven't kept or been able to keep the American leaders as their paid mistresses and as glorified kings with no clothes on . So what America manages to get done in those situations? It manages to factor its national interest and decides accordingly . Dictators disappear and the new leaders navigate the changed situation with valid reasonable road signs or rules that are confined between the interests of the involved countries .
    Phillipines or Italy on way to US don't have to stop midway on the intra state highways because a lightbulb were flashing in China or Spain or Morooco .
    But Arabs find out always invariably that they on their way to DC would get a traffic ticket violation because a new street sign had appeared in Tel Aviv and never they would make it to DC.
    They despise America because not only America hurts them but hurts itself .

    Is English your mother tongue?

    Please have a friend or family member edit this mess, and try again.

    Read More
    • Replies: @KA
    Sure. Next time
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  105. KA says:
    @guest
    Is English your mother tongue?

    Please have a friend or family member edit this mess, and try again.

    Sure. Next time

    Read More
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  106. […] Source: Why They Hate Us – The Unz Review […]

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  107. @MarkinLA
    Why should I read some idiot's opinion as fact? Why don't you explain what was so vitally important to the US that we had to fight a war half way around the world that cost trillions in today's dollars, cost 50,000 lives, ruined hundreds of thousands more, escalated the drug problem in the US and when we finally pulled out, it was as though the whole thing never existed to the people of the US as far as back home was concerned.

    Of course, this doesn't even mention the cost to the Vietnamese both north and south who detested our presence there.

    Surely you don't need some moron like Lind to think for you. Maybe I can get a paper from PNAC about why the Iraq war was such a necessary success while I'm at it.

    My dear MarkinLA, before you peremptorily write off Michael Lind as “some idiot,” you ought to read his book Vietnam: The Necessary War.

    By no means am I a fan of Lind or in agreement with much else that Lind has written, but I have read Vietnam: The Necessary War in which Lind lays out cogent, often irrefutable arguments for his case. Most importantly, in the book Lind examines that war from the available knowledge and points of view of the time in which the war spanned – not from today’s 20/20 hindsight; and, further, Lind accurately reviews that war in its proper context within the full breadth of the Cold War and all of its U.S. vs. USSR proxy wars. To you, then, I heartily commend Lind’s book.

    Read More
    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    not from today’s 20/20 hindsight

    I think by the time Nixon promised us he had a secret end to the war yet never made good on his promise we knew everything we were told up til then was a big lie. However, people like Lind were probably still thinking this was a good war and something we needed to continue fighting. So it wasn't like everything is related to 20/20 hindsight. When did our government ever have a serious rethink about our involvement in Vietnam?
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  108. MarkinLA says:

    Most importantly, in the book Lind examines that war from the available knowledge and points of view of the time in which the war spanned

    Assuming that the available knowledge wasn’t just the usual crap spewed out by our government to convince the masses that the Ruskies were everywhere. Didn’t Ho Chi Mihn write letters to Truman offering friendship after WWII, something the government certainly didn’t make public to the average American? Didn’t Ho work with the OSS against the Japanese in WWII and was respected by OSS officers? Don’t China and Vietnam have a long standing animosity towards each other – something that our leadership should have known could be exploited? Didn’t our government constantly lie about the danger to the US of these insignificant communist revolutions in the third world? What is the point of having all these so-called wise men if they are so stupid? The problem was that our whole point of view was skewed by our propaganda and we should expect our leaders to actually view things from a lens of reality not the one they created for their political purposes.

    I am not going to put money in the pocket of somebody telling me the domino theory was correct.

    Didn’t the French tell us we were crazy for not getting out of Vietnam when they did? Why didn’t we? We didn’t because low-life politicians would use it like Kennedy used the phony missile gap as a campaign ploy.

    irrefutable arguments for his case

    This crap ain’t science there is nothing irrefutable in politics and some argument can be made for any position – no matter how stupid as long as it is framed correctly.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anowow
    MarkinLA,

    You should start a blog. Some of the best comments I've read on the webs.
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  109. @Sam Shama
    The powerful and wealthy are always hated, curiously also, set up as examples to embrace, and the moralisers amongst us- with varying degrees of guilt and "conscience" - will continue to decry the never ending cycles of human behaviour. Thus it always was, and thus it shall always be.

    (Even the damn HLMI robots we inherit, will likely be coded the same!)

    “The powerful and wealthy are always hated … ”

    … and envied. Never underestimate envy as a source of irrational hatred. Often the ones complaining about the big bully are little bullies who can’t compete.

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  110. MarkinLA says:
    @Auntie Analogue
    My dear MarkinLA, before you peremptorily write off Michael Lind as "some idiot," you ought to read his book Vietnam: The Necessary War.

    By no means am I a fan of Lind or in agreement with much else that Lind has written, but I have read Vietnam: The Necessary War in which Lind lays out cogent, often irrefutable arguments for his case. Most importantly, in the book Lind examines that war from the available knowledge and points of view of the time in which the war spanned - not from today's 20/20 hindsight; and, further, Lind accurately reviews that war in its proper context within the full breadth of the Cold War and all of its U.S. vs. USSR proxy wars. To you, then, I heartily commend Lind's book.

    not from today’s 20/20 hindsight

    I think by the time Nixon promised us he had a secret end to the war yet never made good on his promise we knew everything we were told up til then was a big lie. However, people like Lind were probably still thinking this was a good war and something we needed to continue fighting. So it wasn’t like everything is related to 20/20 hindsight. When did our government ever have a serious rethink about our involvement in Vietnam?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Auntie Analogue

    "I am not going to put money in the pocket of somebody telling me the domino theory was correct."

     

    Does Los Angeles lack a free public library? If it has one, then your tax dollars have already bought Mr. Lind's book for you. Further, as you haven't read Lind's book, you cannot reasonably - or honestly - claim that it tells that "the domino theory was correct."

    "[P]eople like Lind were probably still thinking this was a good war and something we needed to continue fighting."

     

    You ascribe to Lind probable thoughts that are not his, which forms one reason why you ought to avail yourself of the perspectives he explores, lays out and illuminates in his book.

    You seem to have fixed upon a startlingly simplistic, myopic view of the Vietnam War, of the knowledge, perspectives and aims of the U.S. leaders of that time, and of the knowledge, perspectives and aims of the leaders of Communist and non-aligned national leaders of that time.

    It can't hurt you to read it.
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  111. anowow says:
    @MarkinLA
    Most importantly, in the book Lind examines that war from the available knowledge and points of view of the time in which the war spanned

    Assuming that the available knowledge wasn't just the usual crap spewed out by our government to convince the masses that the Ruskies were everywhere. Didn't Ho Chi Mihn write letters to Truman offering friendship after WWII, something the government certainly didn't make public to the average American? Didn't Ho work with the OSS against the Japanese in WWII and was respected by OSS officers? Don't China and Vietnam have a long standing animosity towards each other - something that our leadership should have known could be exploited? Didn't our government constantly lie about the danger to the US of these insignificant communist revolutions in the third world? What is the point of having all these so-called wise men if they are so stupid? The problem was that our whole point of view was skewed by our propaganda and we should expect our leaders to actually view things from a lens of reality not the one they created for their political purposes.

    I am not going to put money in the pocket of somebody telling me the domino theory was correct.

    Didn't the French tell us we were crazy for not getting out of Vietnam when they did? Why didn't we? We didn't because low-life politicians would use it like Kennedy used the phony missile gap as a campaign ploy.

    irrefutable arguments for his case

    This crap ain't science there is nothing irrefutable in politics and some argument can be made for any position - no matter how stupid as long as it is framed correctly.

    MarkinLA,

    You should start a blog. Some of the best comments I’ve read on the webs.

    Read More
    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    Assuming this isn't some snark that I am not intelligent enough to get, thank you. However, if I did do as you suggest, I have no doubt that I would be wasting even more time on that than I am here because you would probably be the only reader.
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  112. @MarkinLA
    not from today’s 20/20 hindsight

    I think by the time Nixon promised us he had a secret end to the war yet never made good on his promise we knew everything we were told up til then was a big lie. However, people like Lind were probably still thinking this was a good war and something we needed to continue fighting. So it wasn't like everything is related to 20/20 hindsight. When did our government ever have a serious rethink about our involvement in Vietnam?

    “I am not going to put money in the pocket of somebody telling me the domino theory was correct.”

    Does Los Angeles lack a free public library? If it has one, then your tax dollars have already bought Mr. Lind’s book for you. Further, as you haven’t read Lind’s book, you cannot reasonably – or honestly – claim that it tells that “the domino theory was correct.”

    “[P]eople like Lind were probably still thinking this was a good war and something we needed to continue fighting.”

    You ascribe to Lind probable thoughts that are not his, which forms one reason why you ought to avail yourself of the perspectives he explores, lays out and illuminates in his book.

    You seem to have fixed upon a startlingly simplistic, myopic view of the Vietnam War, of the knowledge, perspectives and aims of the U.S. leaders of that time, and of the knowledge, perspectives and aims of the leaders of Communist and non-aligned national leaders of that time.

    It can’t hurt you to read it.

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    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    Here is my "irrefutable" reason for Vietnam.

    Johnson never wanted anything to do with Vietnam. He was only interested in his domestic policies. He wanted the Voting Rights Act and his Great Society policies to go forward. After Kennedy's assassination he was caught in a vise. Years of the the government lying to the people about the Red Menace and the impending collapse of the government of South Vietnam had put him in a tenuous position. If the South falls before the election, out he goes and there goes his chance for achieving his goals. Then he just becomes some obscure behind the scenes arm-twisting Senator nobody ever heard of with asterisk next to his name.

    He takes the chance that the threat of massive US power will force the North back to the bargaining table to get a favorable way for the US to exit Vietnam. He guesses wrong but continues to take the bad advice given him that there is some level of force that will do it so continues to double down on his first mistake.

    Everything else is just the kind of cold warrior BS I used to hear every day at work (Hughes Aircraft Company - the place was crawling with 50s era cold warrior types needing one more war to guarantee they won't get laid off before their retirements) in the 80s when Reagan was supporting all those murderers and drug runners in central America. When one reason for our involvement down there was shown to be stupid, they would pull another one out. If your basic premise is that communism is a mortal threat to the US and must be stopped no matter where it is in the world, then any stupid idea sounds good.

    You seem to have fixed upon a startlingly simplistic, myopic view of the Vietnam War, of the knowledge, perspectives and aims of the U.S. leaders of that time, and of the knowledge, perspectives and aims of the leaders of Communist and non-aligned national leaders of that time.


    None of this justifies a nuclear superpower with a navy unprecedented in the history of the world, with the world's largest most advanced industrial base needing to attack some third world hole that didn't want war with us.

    Yes the myopic view that there was no real threat to us where all we needed to do was to keep our strategic forces up to date so that no one dare attack us but pretty much ignore the dung-heaps of the world versus the sophisticated view that we had to stick our noses into every corner of the world, we had to keep the American people afraid of their own shadows, that we had to do nothing when our real interests were at stake (east Germany, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia) and waste thousands of American lives and trillions in treasure when there was nothing of real value at stake like Vietnam, central America, and the middle east.


    It can’t hurt you to read it.

    But why waste the time? I have more important things to do like painting my mom's house when I am not reading Unz.
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  113. The war on the South is ongoing, and the people running the U.S. also seem to not understand or care how they are viewed by their fellow Americans. Americans who never travel and do poorly in school are not the Americans who are pissing off the rest of the world. The people running America are obnoxious and high-handed at home, also.

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  114. @Jim
    Democracy tends to exacerbate internal conflict so while it seems to work OK in highly homogeneous countries like Iceland it would probably be a disaster for a place like Singapore. This is not to say that Singapore is necessarily going to be that stable in the long run.

    On the assumption that you must know something about Singapore to make that comment I would be pleased to know what it is based on (both parts re Singapore).

    A quick Google search for Singapore’s ethnic composition comes up with 74.2 per cent Chinese, 13.3 per cent Malay and 9.1 per cent Indian. Where’s the problem!

    As I understand it there is no legal or extra-legal barrier to the long dominant People’s Action Party losing an election but its founder Lee Kwan Yew was so successful in making Singapore grow economically until it became, as it is now, a rich country, and one that constantly improves public transport and basic housing as well as providing excellent health care and personal security that even the flickerings of opposition don’t now have to be crushed by heavy handed libel suits or other sophisticated but heavy handed methods.

    I suspect that Singapore may remain both stable and prosperous well after many larger democracies are in a very disgruntled state or worse. After all it is prosperity which seems to have allowed Western democracies to buy off (and confuse) class enmities. Since the simple formula of growing GDP per person from which nearly everyone benefits has been so effective without much tinkering or deep examination it is probably true that the more likely source of breakdown would be incompatible ethnic mixing on top of a static economy rather than economies going backwards since that generally won’t happen in a world of ever increasing technological innovation even if increased longevity and sub-replacement fertility created strains.

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  115. WJ says:

    They hate us yet they keep coming. 10 percent of Mexico, with half of the remaining Mexicans wanting to come here.

    Mexico nursing a grudge from the 1800′s is identical to Southerners nursing a grudge from the Civil War. Those Southerners are never acknowledged, their grievances never even given the slightest bit of understanding here. Why are the Mexicans so backwards that they nurse these long standing resentments?

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  116. MarkinLA says:
    @Auntie Analogue

    "I am not going to put money in the pocket of somebody telling me the domino theory was correct."

     

    Does Los Angeles lack a free public library? If it has one, then your tax dollars have already bought Mr. Lind's book for you. Further, as you haven't read Lind's book, you cannot reasonably - or honestly - claim that it tells that "the domino theory was correct."

    "[P]eople like Lind were probably still thinking this was a good war and something we needed to continue fighting."

     

    You ascribe to Lind probable thoughts that are not his, which forms one reason why you ought to avail yourself of the perspectives he explores, lays out and illuminates in his book.

    You seem to have fixed upon a startlingly simplistic, myopic view of the Vietnam War, of the knowledge, perspectives and aims of the U.S. leaders of that time, and of the knowledge, perspectives and aims of the leaders of Communist and non-aligned national leaders of that time.

    It can't hurt you to read it.

    Here is my “irrefutable” reason for Vietnam.

    Johnson never wanted anything to do with Vietnam. He was only interested in his domestic policies. He wanted the Voting Rights Act and his Great Society policies to go forward. After Kennedy’s assassination he was caught in a vise. Years of the the government lying to the people about the Red Menace and the impending collapse of the government of South Vietnam had put him in a tenuous position. If the South falls before the election, out he goes and there goes his chance for achieving his goals. Then he just becomes some obscure behind the scenes arm-twisting Senator nobody ever heard of with asterisk next to his name.

    He takes the chance that the threat of massive US power will force the North back to the bargaining table to get a favorable way for the US to exit Vietnam. He guesses wrong but continues to take the bad advice given him that there is some level of force that will do it so continues to double down on his first mistake.

    Everything else is just the kind of cold warrior BS I used to hear every day at work (Hughes Aircraft Company – the place was crawling with 50s era cold warrior types needing one more war to guarantee they won’t get laid off before their retirements) in the 80s when Reagan was supporting all those murderers and drug runners in central America. When one reason for our involvement down there was shown to be stupid, they would pull another one out. If your basic premise is that communism is a mortal threat to the US and must be stopped no matter where it is in the world, then any stupid idea sounds good.

    You seem to have fixed upon a startlingly simplistic, myopic view of the Vietnam War, of the knowledge, perspectives and aims of the U.S. leaders of that time, and of the knowledge, perspectives and aims of the leaders of Communist and non-aligned national leaders of that time.

    None of this justifies a nuclear superpower with a navy unprecedented in the history of the world, with the world’s largest most advanced industrial base needing to attack some third world hole that didn’t want war with us.

    Yes the myopic view that there was no real threat to us where all we needed to do was to keep our strategic forces up to date so that no one dare attack us but pretty much ignore the dung-heaps of the world versus the sophisticated view that we had to stick our noses into every corner of the world, we had to keep the American people afraid of their own shadows, that we had to do nothing when our real interests were at stake (east Germany, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia) and waste thousands of American lives and trillions in treasure when there was nothing of real value at stake like Vietnam, central America, and the middle east.

    It can’t hurt you to read it.

    But why waste the time? I have more important things to do like painting my mom’s house when I am not reading Unz.

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  117. @Beach

    Civil rights? The US has more people in prison than any other country.
     
    1) America is the third most populous nation on Earth. It is possible to drive from Miami, FL to Seattle, WA, a distance equivalent to driving from London to Jerusalem, without once stopping at a border or "papers-check" of any kind. It is legal to own a gun in all but a handful of states. That combination creates the opportunity for a lot of crime from those so inclined, but still hasn't affected the free movement and gun ownership of the law-abiding.

    2) It could be successfully argued that America has more people in prison than any other country because it's a lot easier to take them out and shoot them, which is what one is inclined to believe happens in less civil-rights minded countries, such as Russia and China. You said it yourself:

    Try Singapore. Neither democratic nor free in our sense, it is prosperous, free of crime, without a drug problem (a country that executes drug dealers has few of them)
     

    ” It is legal to own a gun in all but a handful of states.”

    I’ll have to assume you meant something other than what you stated here, or it was a colossal brain fart made in haste.

    To suppose that you are entirely ignorant of the 2nd Amendment to the US Constitution is a leap I would hesitate to make, but the prima facie evidence for that conclusion is rather damning.

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  118. MarkinLA says:
    @anowow
    MarkinLA,

    You should start a blog. Some of the best comments I've read on the webs.

    Assuming this isn’t some snark that I am not intelligent enough to get, thank you. However, if I did do as you suggest, I have no doubt that I would be wasting even more time on that than I am here because you would probably be the only reader.

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    • Replies: @anowow
    No snark intended.

    Perhaps I might be the only reader,

    but just like an ancient army using dummies or other tricks to make the enemy think their numbers were larger, maybe a plethora of blogs or twitter accounts, even if many are repetitive and some are not of high caliber, do help. We live in a country where numbers equal legitimacy, or maybe numbers equal legitimacy as long as they support elite favored positions, at which point bucking popular opinion becomes "statesmanship."


    I'm conflicted as to the utility of posts. Are we really changing anything? Probably not, but there is evidence that comments do affect centrist journalists and opinion writers. If it causes them the unease to the point that they censor responses or condescendingly respond in articles or blog posts, then the comments have done something. I'm curious as to how the ideas get disseminated beyond social media and internet users to cafeteria or water cooler discussions. Twitter seems to be an increasingly useful method of disseminating ideas. Based on conversations I remember from the 90's and now, I think all these comments have had an effect on mainstream discussions, affecting people who aren't avid forum readers. They certainly help people making arguments in informal discussions with friends, family, etc.
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  119. Kat Grey says:

    America tries to hard to be liked. All it needs is to be feared.

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  120. `WHY THEY HATE US?`

    `HATE`?

    ROFL.

    Nahh, here is a recent piece written by a popular Chinese blogger after he visited the US.

    Title: Strip the pants off the USA

    http://bbs.tianya.cn/post-worldlook-1475745-1.shtml (use web translate to get a general idea.)

    Tell Panda in a straight face that what he says is true or not true. LOL

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  121. Hmmmm… Fred, Fred, Fred…. The United States of America did, in fact, invade Mexico at least twice. Pity for the Mexicans and shame on us that we did not stay, insist on English being spoken, work being undertaken, and administer the place as a genuine colony. They would be MUCH better off today if we had eradicated (BAMN) the noxious Spanish colonial influence which permeates the place to this very moment.

    I could go on, Fred, but you really need a bit of genuine perspective. As loathsome as the US Government is, the American People are the greatest bunch of mutts the world has ever envied. Or loathed. And there is something to be said for that. When we are gone (it will not be too much longer), we will be sorely missed.

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  122. dcite says:

    Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara admitted before he died that the Gulf of Tonkin incident was staged so that LBJ could use it as an excuse to bomb and invade Vietnam. LBJ apparently thought it was worth the lives of 58,000 Americans to go to war with Vietnam, although at the time he probably didn’t think it would have that many casualties, though I doubt he’d have cared anyway.
    LBJ cared more about domestic policy but if a war made him more popular, then it was all good. He was a psychopath. The worst psychopath of the 20th c. presidents, and that’s a hard extreme to achieve. He also forced the Liberty disaster to unfold. He gave orders for the ship not to be saved when it went down. Even Bill Moyer said nobody would believe how insane LBJ was, and it was all he could do to cover him up in more ways than one (LBJ once exposed himself to reporters.)

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  123. KA says:

    Another reason concerned and informed Americans have become ” they” who hate us.

    Why do Jewish legislators carry more weight on Iran Deal? – See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2015/09/jewish-legislators-weight#sthash.faoEyA69.dpuf

    Why do non Jewish member talk of Israeli security but not of American safety,security and prosperity?

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  124. Priss Factor [AKA "The Priss Factory"] says:

    But keep in mind that many around the world learn to hate the US because so much of Hollywood movies and rap songs are about how evil white folks are.

    People around the world also watch TV shows where the villains are usually white.

    Or they hear rap songs about how white cops are scum of the earth.

    And there are plenty of Americans who hate other Americans.

    http://thehill.com/opinion/juan-williams/252672-juan-williams-blacklivesmatter-is-playing-with-fire

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  125. asdf says:

    I hate meddling. I’ll happily forgo bananas or whatever if that means the South Americans aren’t invaded by *us*. I don’t actually get the prerogative of making these calls.

    Please just hate everyone named Bush guys. I’m a big believer in minding your own business. My overlords, less so.

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  126. SeanK says:

    Once again Fred has managed to write an article with degrading negroes.

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  127. They hate our American-Israeli victim cult “Exceptionalism”.

    https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=exceptionalism

    Exceptionalism is the perception that a country, society, institution, movement, or time period is “exceptional” (i.e., unusual or extraordinary) in some way and thus does not need to conform to normal rules or general principles.

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  128. Flower says:

    This is hilarious. Fred, after a word for word explanation to them as to what you wanted them to do ( i.e. “However, if you want to understand why so many countries loathe us, you have to understand how they see us. “) I suspect that their sense of entitlement or wonderfulness causes blindness. Out of the 127 comments I do not see anyone trying to follow your instruction. I didn’t think it was that hard of an instruction, but what do I know.

    Let’s see, you have an idiot in the WH who promised, PROMISED, that the first thing he was going to do was end those “illegal” wars. Remember that? We even gave him a Nobel Peace Prize. And after he had started more wars, killed more people, destroyed more lives than the previous idiot, and done it all in OUR name, we elected him twice! I can’t say this about the previous WH idiot because he was never elected, as he stole both (I repeat BOTH) elections. But that’s not OUR fault, it’s the .0000001%. Yeah, that’s it, that’s the ticket. So we don’t have to see it from their point of view, that’s not important, as long as we’ve got someone or some THING else to blame.

    To witness the twists and turns of logic in the comments above to prove, PROVE I’m telling you, that it’s NOT us that is doing it (it must be those pesky Mongolians. Yeah, that’s it.) are truely hilarious. Clever of you , David Unz, who needs a comic page we you’ve got Fred to set these dancing monkeys alight.

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    • Replies: @Stan D Mute

    Clever of you , David Unz, who needs a comic page we you’ve got Fred to set these dancing monkeys alight.
     
    So after burning up everyone's tolerance using your "Art M" pseudonym, now you're blathering on incoherently with this new "Flower"? What gave you away was your usage of "David Unz" which nobody else has ever used. Seems even the stupidest commenters (except you) could read "Ron Unz" and keep that in memory until they managed to peck it out on their keyboard.

    Anyway "Art" - thankfully *Ron* Unz has given us this wonderful "commenters to hide" function. He allows us to do the work his writer/moderators won't do you see. And with just a click, I'll never have to read another insipid incoherent word from Flower Art or Art Flower or Fart Mower or whatever you choose to call yourself today.
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  129. anowow says:
    @MarkinLA
    Assuming this isn't some snark that I am not intelligent enough to get, thank you. However, if I did do as you suggest, I have no doubt that I would be wasting even more time on that than I am here because you would probably be the only reader.

    No snark intended.

    Perhaps I might be the only reader,

    but just like an ancient army using dummies or other tricks to make the enemy think their numbers were larger, maybe a plethora of blogs or twitter accounts, even if many are repetitive and some are not of high caliber, do help. We live in a country where numbers equal legitimacy, or maybe numbers equal legitimacy as long as they support elite favored positions, at which point bucking popular opinion becomes “statesmanship.”

    I’m conflicted as to the utility of posts. Are we really changing anything? Probably not, but there is evidence that comments do affect centrist journalists and opinion writers. If it causes them the unease to the point that they censor responses or condescendingly respond in articles or blog posts, then the comments have done something. I’m curious as to how the ideas get disseminated beyond social media and internet users to cafeteria or water cooler discussions. Twitter seems to be an increasingly useful method of disseminating ideas. Based on conversations I remember from the 90′s and now, I think all these comments have had an effect on mainstream discussions, affecting people who aren’t avid forum readers. They certainly help people making arguments in informal discussions with friends, family, etc.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stan D Mute

    I’m conflicted as to the utility of posts. Are we really changing anything?
     
    I've learned a great deal from comments in various fora. I'd venture to guess I've learned more from comments than from the articles that elicited those comments. Of course as with anything, you've got to fact check, but 9 times in 10 the facts hold up and we are all better for it.
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  130. a German says:
    @Gene Su
    I would like to add that the same case can be applied to American blacks. They don't hate us because of envy, lower intelligence, wealth differences, or a messed up welfare bureaucracy. They hate whites because whites have enslaved and oppressed their ancestors. It doesn't matter that this was all in the past. It doesn't matter that they would have been far worse off if they remained in Africa or been taken to the Middle East (where there is far more slavery and oppression). It doesn't matter that American blacks are some of the most affluent blacks in the world. Blacks hates whites because of what whites did to them.

    Maybe they hate. Seems unknown to them that whites bought the slaves from the black and arab slave hunters.

    Here in Germany live a lot of Turkish immigrants (some millions). Up to 3rd generation. In average they live the live they want. Interested in families, good income, cars TV a.s.o. Leave me alone with politics, like everyone else.

    Only the few who are unlucky (and a lot of young mans) insist of “their religion”. Because this “religion” (Islam) is not much more then a crazy rationalization of their own “superior” above “unbelievers”. And a license to kill them. So they “believe” in this irrational “unwritten -book”.
    If this religion will forbade things like this they will find something else. who cares?

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  131. a German says:

    America doesn’t bomb nuclear bomb on Germany

    Who cares about the weapon systems? USA has bombed half of my hometown (2 Million people) to ground. And a lot of other cities in Germany. Costs much much more lives then the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (and both are war crimes targeted civilians and only civilians).

    But the winner dictates the rules and suppress critics in media he controls.

    They financed the Nazis but this murderous regime goes out of control. Similar to the Iraq dictator who was forced to fight Iran (with applause and support of your fu****ng country). But he invaded another neighbor he was not allowed to do.

    Your dirt, but thats only a result of can do policy.

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  132. KA says:

    At the Trump’s DC demonstration

    “Aaaaaaaall weee are sayyyyyying… is shhhhhhut the fuck up!” he screamed. “Everybody! Aaaaaall weeeee are saaaayyyyying… is shut the fuck up!”

    “I don’t want them to get $150 billion of taxpayer money,” he said, referring to the frozen assets—none of them owned by U.S. taxpayers—that Iran may gain access to with sanctions relief, “so they can buy conventional weapons, so they can develop nuclear weapons, so they can terrorize Israel and the rest of the Democratic free world.”

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/09/09/trump-fans-to-iran-deal-peaceniks-shut-the-f-k-up.html

    Last night Fox reminded its audience in the presence of an Iraq vet how Iran was killing American soldiers and it reminded tus of Obama’s audacity of giving Iran 150 billion !

    Tonight Fox is reminding how stupid the youths are . According to Fox they shpuld be called stupid because they don’t know something about the constitution .

    Then we have L Graham who blames Iran for 911.

    Do they hate us or do they think the country is being run and entertained by the morons? Hopefully they will forgive once they figure it out .

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  133. @Dwright
    I came here from Lew Rockwell's site just to comment on the "we" aspect. Right away I see that others picked up on it. Come on Fred, there is the United States the country and also it's citizens.

    Don't confuse the two.

    I came here from Lew Rockwell’s site just to comment on the “we” aspect. Right away I see that others picked up on it. Come on Fred, there is the United States the country and also it’s citizens.

    Fred’s point is that it doesn’t matter whether we think ourselves innocent of what our government has done, it is the reality that Mexicans (or Panamanians or Iraqis or etc) hold a grudge for the action. It’s the same thing internally with our absurd national debt. I’m always hearing people lament the debt and blaming baby boomers, but it’s our so-called “greatest generation” that permitted it to happen. They permitted the abominable civil right act and the even worse immigration act. They permitted the creation of the military industrial complex. They fought wars and spent money like drunken sailers. Because of their incompetence my generation was raised hiding under desks in classrooms as if a desk would stop nuclear annihilation.

    You may think yourself innocent of the atrocities of America’s foreign crimes. You didn’t incinerate half a million innocent Germans in Dresden or a hundred thousand Japanese civilians in Nagasaki. But just as “we” held Afghanistan responsible for 9/11, many Germans and Japanese hold Americans responsible. Either we have a Nation and accept responsibility for what it did, good or bad, or we have what exactly? Are we Stateless Beings? Or do we accept responsibility and do everything we can to stop our Nation from continuing its mistakes? Or do we admit that we live under a Tyranny and do all we can to escape it?

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    • Replies: @Stubborn in Germany

    incinerate half a million innocent Germans in Dresden
     
    Your figure is too high by a factor of twenty. Look it up.
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  134. @Art
    Disliking the powerful, is human nature – the clumsy nature of power always leaves damage – no matter who is in charge, government power is always a bull in a china shop – it comes with the territory – it is the nature of the beast.

    However something more is happening with America’s falling standing in the world – disgust and disrespect.

    We do not see the giant unfriendly invisible elephant that straddles our nation – Jew Zionism. But the rest of the world does – they see that we have given over our sovereignty to an evil tribal cabal of Jews. The mighty American democracy, the foundation of our existence – is dead, a shell of itself, run by a greedy bloody mob of Jews. America is no longer America.

    The world sees it and they rightfully disrespect you and me for it.

    We do not see the giant unfriendly invisible elephant that straddles our nation – Jew Zionism. But the rest of the world does – they see that we have given over our sovereignty to an evil tribal cabal of Jews. The mighty American democracy, the foundation of our existence – is dead, a shell of itself, run by a greedy bloody mob of Jews. America is no longer America.

    Okay, but you’ve let your anti-Jew feelings blind you. I agree 100% that America should walk away from the zionists. We should swear off Arab oil and do our own drilling and refining. The zionists chose to live in the most hostile neighborhood on the planet, let them deal with the consequences. But zionists didn’t put us in Vietnam. They didn’t put us in Africa. They didn’t put us in Korea. The core problem is our military industrial complex led by special interests. We forget the greatest american’s admonition to avoid foreign entanglements and instead allow lobbyists to stampede us into wars. Want to sell more arms? Gin up a war against those dang commies in Korea. Ignore the commies in South Africa and Europe. Ignore the commies infiltrating our schools. Send billions and billions of dollars worth of stuff to blow up in an unwanted southeast Asian jungle. And today, ignore the invasion of Europe. Ignore the invasion of America. Instead, gin up wars with Arabs to please both our arms manufacturers and our Zionist campaign contributors.

    Perhaps we went wrong when our political leaders stopped having any personal risk in their wars? Washington ducked a *lot* of bullets in the Revolution. Maybe current and future Presidents should be forced to the Front of any wars they propose? Maybe votes in favor of war should require the voter to either go himself or to have his children fighting at the Front?

    You shouldn’t hate the Zionists anyway. Hate the traitors who work for them instead of America. Hate the communists who work endlessly for bigger government. Hate the quislings who excuse and protect the traitors in our midst. Clean up our house – once that’s done I suspect we won’t even care about the situation in the Middle East.

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  135. @Divine Right
    "You seem especially overt in conflating your personal interests, those of other Americans, and those of Uncle Sam. I believe that much of what people like Dick Cheney, Hillary Clinton, and Victoria Nuland (who served under both) do to people in other countries is contrary to the interests of Americans."

    You may believe that, but many Americans do not. Most republicans supported the Iraq War at the time it was undertaken and large numbers of Americans didn't see any problem with what Victoria Nuland and company did in Ukraine. In some instances, "we" is appropriate.

    Most republicans supported the Iraq War at the time it was undertaken and large numbers of Americans didn’t see any problem with what Victoria Nuland and company did in Ukraine.

    And you are conflating what average citizens are led to believe they want with their true best interests. Average white Christians have been taught that “Israel is our best ally” and “Israel is our only friend in the Middle East” and “Israel is the Holy Land.” Thus they will say they want to have war with a billion Muslims to preserve Israel’s occupation of that stretch of sand. But is it in their best interest to go bleed out in the desert? Or to send their children to be maimed, mutilated, or beheaded on behalf of a people who believe themselves fundamentally superior and who would *never* return the favor?

    We have a controlled media. The people *never* hear opposing positions. Party R says, “We must invade Iraq tomorrow to protect our beloved only friend Israel.” Party D says, “Party R is stupid and racist – we must invade Iraq *and* Syria tomorrow to protect our beloved only friend Israel.” The people are polled: “Do we invade Iraq tomorrow or both Iraq and Syria to protect our beloved only friend Israel?” The people reply, “Iraq” and thus it is said the people “supported” the war.

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  136. @joe webb
    O Fred throws chum to the malcontents.

    Fred is Wrong about just about Everything.

    People hate us and risk their lives getting here, or Europe.

    The Meddling that we do is done by every great and lesser Power. That is political life.

    As for Latin Americans with their low IQs, of course, the Yanqui is resented, just as people who work hard are resented at home. Mañana is the Latin American laziness.

    O, and just where is Israel in all of this.? It never shows up in Fred's Everything. Fred's wife is Jewish, I hear, from reliable sources. What about it Fred? Full disclosure.

    The White Man is resented but not his Free Money...go Norte hombre...Free, free, free. Half of the mexers here are on welfare, even when they are working. Free, free, free, thanks to the transgendered liberal males who have turned into pussies.

    The wretched know the mind of the liberal White, and cash in on it.

    Fred sounds like a leftie jew running down anything White.

    When Trump trumps the pols, and throws out the mexers, I suppose Fred will run him down as some kind of racist.

    Yup. Joe Webb

    Fred sounds like a leftie jew running down anything White.

    Fred is married to a Mexican. He has a *massive* soft spot on Mexicans. We know this. And yet I don’t recall reading Fred suggesting we continue allowing unrestricted invasion. No, all he does is say that Mexicans appear smarter to him than they do to us. On almost every other issue Fred has a clear eyed view and he is a very talented writer. So he hasn’t written about Israel? He hasn’t written about Panama either. And Panama is far more important to us strategically than Israel.

    You are taking the Jew obsession too far. It’s like you went for the early bird special in Boca Raton only to learn it was sold out. Yes, the beanie-boys got there first and saved their shekels. Get over it. Order the ham and enjoy it.

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  137. @Flower
    This is hilarious. Fred, after a word for word explanation to them as to what you wanted them to do ( i.e. "However, if you want to understand why so many countries loathe us, you have to understand how they see us. ") I suspect that their sense of entitlement or wonderfulness causes blindness. Out of the 127 comments I do not see anyone trying to follow your instruction. I didn't think it was that hard of an instruction, but what do I know.

    Let's see, you have an idiot in the WH who promised, PROMISED, that the first thing he was going to do was end those "illegal" wars. Remember that? We even gave him a Nobel Peace Prize. And after he had started more wars, killed more people, destroyed more lives than the previous idiot, and done it all in OUR name, we elected him twice! I can't say this about the previous WH idiot because he was never elected, as he stole both (I repeat BOTH) elections. But that's not OUR fault, it's the .0000001%. Yeah, that's it, that's the ticket. So we don't have to see it from their point of view, that's not important, as long as we've got someone or some THING else to blame.

    To witness the twists and turns of logic in the comments above to prove, PROVE I'm telling you, that it's NOT us that is doing it (it must be those pesky Mongolians. Yeah, that's it.) are truely hilarious. Clever of you , David Unz, who needs a comic page we you've got Fred to set these dancing monkeys alight.

    Clever of you , David Unz, who needs a comic page we you’ve got Fred to set these dancing monkeys alight.

    So after burning up everyone’s tolerance using your “Art M” pseudonym, now you’re blathering on incoherently with this new “Flower”? What gave you away was your usage of “David Unz” which nobody else has ever used. Seems even the stupidest commenters (except you) could read “Ron Unz” and keep that in memory until they managed to peck it out on their keyboard.

    Anyway “Art” – thankfully *Ron* Unz has given us this wonderful “commenters to hide” function. He allows us to do the work his writer/moderators won’t do you see. And with just a click, I’ll never have to read another insipid incoherent word from Flower Art or Art Flower or Fart Mower or whatever you choose to call yourself today.

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  138. @anowow
    No snark intended.

    Perhaps I might be the only reader,

    but just like an ancient army using dummies or other tricks to make the enemy think their numbers were larger, maybe a plethora of blogs or twitter accounts, even if many are repetitive and some are not of high caliber, do help. We live in a country where numbers equal legitimacy, or maybe numbers equal legitimacy as long as they support elite favored positions, at which point bucking popular opinion becomes "statesmanship."


    I'm conflicted as to the utility of posts. Are we really changing anything? Probably not, but there is evidence that comments do affect centrist journalists and opinion writers. If it causes them the unease to the point that they censor responses or condescendingly respond in articles or blog posts, then the comments have done something. I'm curious as to how the ideas get disseminated beyond social media and internet users to cafeteria or water cooler discussions. Twitter seems to be an increasingly useful method of disseminating ideas. Based on conversations I remember from the 90's and now, I think all these comments have had an effect on mainstream discussions, affecting people who aren't avid forum readers. They certainly help people making arguments in informal discussions with friends, family, etc.

    I’m conflicted as to the utility of posts. Are we really changing anything?

    I’ve learned a great deal from comments in various fora. I’d venture to guess I’ve learned more from comments than from the articles that elicited those comments. Of course as with anything, you’ve got to fact check, but 9 times in 10 the facts hold up and we are all better for it.

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  139. map says:

    I’m sorry, Fred, but this argument is beyond nonsense.

    The underlying assumption here is that the world simply acts and reacts to what the United States does. No one has any nefarious agenda of their own. Everyone is just a good and decent person wanting to live and let live but for the evil machinations of the United States. This is beyond caricature, sliding into farce.

    Guess what? Meddling is the norm. The world is divided between the acting and the acted upon. At this point in time, the USA is the primary actor. That may change in the future, but the dynamic won’t. Sure, the US had a policy of wanting no foreign entanglements. Guess what that got it? The War of 1812.

    So the US will continue to act as the hegemon and exercise its will around the world. The rest of the planet can suck it. The pleas will fall on deaf ears as they always had.

    As for the prescient Democrats like Jim Webb that criticized the Iraq War? Well, I remember well the stark choice Democrats presented to the United States: appeasement; chickens coming home to roost; analyzing root causes. The same Democrat argument of blaming the United States in when an external enemy attacked it. The Democrat Fifth Column was making the same argument as Fred Reed. Of course, war would be a better option.

    Though US foreign policy is listless and pointless, without any sort of rhyme or reason, the military might and power projection to exercise such a policy should never be given up, no matter how many foreigners bleat about it.

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    • Replies: @ppp
    Real question is "why you hate them"?

    Actually, you raise a point, the problem lies in the American culture "you have to act as a winner whatever..."

    So "yeah" brute force, rampage and carnage everywhere and "oh yeah, what's the problem we are the winners". But when they strike back you whine for years and the whole world has to whine with you or they'll test the same brute force, rampage and carnage everywhere...
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  140. @Stan D Mute

    I came here from Lew Rockwell’s site just to comment on the “we” aspect. Right away I see that others picked up on it. Come on Fred, there is the United States the country and also it’s citizens.
     
    Fred's point is that it doesn't matter whether we think ourselves innocent of what our government has done, it is the reality that Mexicans (or Panamanians or Iraqis or etc) hold a grudge for the action. It's the same thing internally with our absurd national debt. I'm always hearing people lament the debt and blaming baby boomers, but it's our so-called "greatest generation" that permitted it to happen. They permitted the abominable civil right act and the even worse immigration act. They permitted the creation of the military industrial complex. They fought wars and spent money like drunken sailers. Because of their incompetence my generation was raised hiding under desks in classrooms as if a desk would stop nuclear annihilation.

    You may think yourself innocent of the atrocities of America's foreign crimes. You didn't incinerate half a million innocent Germans in Dresden or a hundred thousand Japanese civilians in Nagasaki. But just as "we" held Afghanistan responsible for 9/11, many Germans and Japanese hold Americans responsible. Either we have a Nation and accept responsibility for what it did, good or bad, or we have what exactly? Are we Stateless Beings? Or do we accept responsibility and do everything we can to stop our Nation from continuing its mistakes? Or do we admit that we live under a Tyranny and do all we can to escape it?

    incinerate half a million innocent Germans in Dresden

    Your figure is too high by a factor of twenty. Look it up.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Nobody who has looked into matter takes the "official" number seriously. It is well known that it had been decided politically.

    "I won't accept any number higher than 25000", said the mayor of Dresden.
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  141. ppp says:
    @map
    I'm sorry, Fred, but this argument is beyond nonsense.

    The underlying assumption here is that the world simply acts and reacts to what the United States does. No one has any nefarious agenda of their own. Everyone is just a good and decent person wanting to live and let live but for the evil machinations of the United States. This is beyond caricature, sliding into farce.

    Guess what? Meddling is the norm. The world is divided between the acting and the acted upon. At this point in time, the USA is the primary actor. That may change in the future, but the dynamic won't. Sure, the US had a policy of wanting no foreign entanglements. Guess what that got it? The War of 1812.

    So the US will continue to act as the hegemon and exercise its will around the world. The rest of the planet can suck it. The pleas will fall on deaf ears as they always had.

    As for the prescient Democrats like Jim Webb that criticized the Iraq War? Well, I remember well the stark choice Democrats presented to the United States: appeasement; chickens coming home to roost; analyzing root causes. The same Democrat argument of blaming the United States in when an external enemy attacked it. The Democrat Fifth Column was making the same argument as Fred Reed. Of course, war would be a better option.

    Though US foreign policy is listless and pointless, without any sort of rhyme or reason, the military might and power projection to exercise such a policy should never be given up, no matter how many foreigners bleat about it.

    Real question is “why you hate them”?

    Actually, you raise a point, the problem lies in the American culture “you have to act as a winner whatever…”

    So “yeah” brute force, rampage and carnage everywhere and “oh yeah, what’s the problem we are the winners”. But when they strike back you whine for years and the whole world has to whine with you or they’ll test the same brute force, rampage and carnage everywhere…

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  142. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Stubborn in Germany

    incinerate half a million innocent Germans in Dresden
     
    Your figure is too high by a factor of twenty. Look it up.

    Nobody who has looked into matter takes the “official” number seriously. It is well known that it had been decided politically.

    “I won’t accept any number higher than 25000″, said the mayor of Dresden.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stubborn in Germany
    Oh look it's David Irving.
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  143. @Anonymous
    Nobody who has looked into matter takes the "official" number seriously. It is well known that it had been decided politically.

    "I won't accept any number higher than 25000", said the mayor of Dresden.

    Oh look it’s David Irving.

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