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The China-US Arms Race
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This worthy and public-spirited column seldom dives into the thickets of military hardware, which it regards as excessively technical. However, the arms race between China and Washington is of enough gravity that its more exotic armaments may be of interest. Herewith, the truly dangerous weaponry of the contending sides.

C-919 A Chinese narrow-body intended to compete with the Airbus A320 and the Boeing 737. Designed and built in China by Comarc. Not quite up to Boeing’s standards, not as fuel-efficient, uses a lot of Western-manufactured parts. (Think of it as a 1966 Toyota with wings, nothing to worry about.) Comarc has 570 orders for the 919, almost entirely in China. That’s 570 orders nobody else will get. The domestic market will provide the oomph to improve. By 2024 China is projected to be the world’s largest market for airliners.

Not to worry. They can’t innovate.

US Nuclear Weapon Upgrade Program: “CBO estimates that nuclear forces will cost $348 billion between FY 2015 and FY 2024. Three independent estimates put the expected total cost over the next 30 years at as much as $1 trillion.”

Artist’s conception of planned $100 Billion Chinese-Made City in Malaysia. Near Singapore “Scares the Hell Out of Everybody.” Will have 700,000 people, almost entirely Chinese. Pundits assert that in twenty years China will own Malaysia.
The Gerald R. Ford, $12.8 billion + $4.7 billion R&D (estimated). The Navy wants ten.

Sunway TaihuLight, World’s most powerful supercomputer, a Chinese design built with Chinese silicon. China leads the planet in supercomputers, both in power and numbers.

The B21. Yes, there is a seat for Robin.

The B21 is a new thermonuclear bomber for the Air Force. “The head of the U.S. Air Force Global Strike Command… envisions some 175–200 bombers in service.[8] Initial operating capability is expected to be reached by 2030. ”at a cost of $550 million each (2010 dollars).

It was rumored that Armour Star would be the lead contractor for the B21, but this was cancelled as being unduly candid. The B21 will funnel huge amounts of money to Northrop-Grumman and, in the event of a thermonuclear war, will arrive at the bubbling remains of targets several hours after the Navy’s D5 Trident II missiles get there. The aircraft relies on the assumption that, in thirteen years when it enters service, anti-stealth technology will not have reached the point of making it even more obviously useless.

This marvelous revelation from Wikipedia: “In July 2016, the U.S. Air Force stated they would not release the estimated cost for the B-21 contract with Northrop Grumman. The Air Force argued releasing the cost would reveal too much information about the classified project to potential adversaries.” As, for example, taxpayers.

One accepts yuan. The other doesn’t. Can you guess?

Columbia, the Navy’s upcoming new nukey-boomer, formerly ORP, Ohio Replacement Program. “The total lifecycle cost of the entire class is estimated at $347 billion.”: Wikipedia

Chinese freight cars in Europe. More all the time.

A Few News Blips

China is the greatest trading partner of the US, Germany, Japan, India, and Australia, among others. Russia’s biggest trading partner is Germany, followed by China.

“China is already South East Asia’s largest trading partner and is now one of the largest investors in the region.”

Argentina’s top trading partners: Brazil , China. The top trading partner of South America is China.

Trump’s proposed increase in US military spending is almost as big as Russia’s entire defense budget.”

“The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting.”: Sun Tzu, Chinese

(Republished from Fred on Everything by permission of author or representative)
 
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  1. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Arms Race aside, China needs to win the Charms Race.. and one way is by banning the horrible treatment of dogs and cats.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Roberto
    YES!
    , @Che Guava

    one way is by banning the horrible treatment of dogs and cats.
     
    If you mean eating them, why not? Cats are cruel predators, domestic cats in the wild should be wiped out.

    I've eaten horse and whale, not an everyday thing, but tasty. I know that is also shocking to most westerners, except that eating horse meat is common in continental Europe.

    In New Zealand, the government recently announced a programme to protect and restore its unique populations of ground-dwelling birds. Interestingly, feral 'domestic' cats were conspicuously not among the introduced species listed for extermination, so the effort is bound to fail.

    As for the conditions the animals in China are kept in before being on the table, I agree, but in the case of cats, don't care too much.

    Not a hater of the domestic cat, kept one kindly once (died of feline distemper, no possible treatment), but generally find fanatical human cat lovers pretty horrible, and their places, if urban, always stink of cat urine.

    The Internet cat cult also sucks.

    Westerners who keep pit-bull terriers and similar breeds, are more often than not cruel to them to bring out the nastiness bred into those varieties.

    Etc.
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  2. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Artist’s conception of planned $100 Billion Chinese-Made City in Malaysia. Near Singapore “Scares the Hell Out of Everybody.” Will have 700,000 people, almost entirely Chinese. Pundits assert that in twenty years China will own Malaysia.

    I think the Chinese own the economy of Malaysia already.

    But I don’t see Chinese owning Malaysia demographically. Chinese demographics is doing DOWN in China and overseas. And in the West, Chinese women have white kids via race-mixing. Or they have Jewish kids.
    Also, Malaysian Muslims have more kids than Chinese do.

    Also, Chinese have no ideas. Mao had ideas of his own and made a mess of things.
    So, Chinese intellectuals will get all the ideas from the West, and that means they will be mental-colonized by PC in the long run.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh

    Also, Chinese have no ideas. Mao had ideas of his own and made a mess of things.
    So, Chinese intellectuals will get all the ideas from the West, and that means they will be mental-colonized by PC in the long run.
     
    Not really the case. But at any rate, even from borrowing from the West, the Chinese intellectuals - which you don't hear very much here - also use a much larger canon of Western thought and philosophy than just the last 50 years. So at the very least, the product will be somewhat different. But yes, there's actually a really active political science scene in China, in part because its more free to explore wrongthink ideas than in the West - where every idea has to end in, basically, in justifying democracy.

    And of course, the effort to rehabilitate Confucius as well as advance "socialism", whatever that means. But yes, there are actually a lot of interesting ideas running around there.

    On the other hand, "pop culture" that's increasingly pozzed with PC thought being exported there. Hopefully it won't be overwhelming.

    , @aceofspades
    You're right, I think ethnic Chinese are around 25% of Malaysia's population, so China may not "take over" Malaysia, but I suspect they will have a considerable amount of influence on the Malaysian government and economy.
    As for getting mental-colonized by PC, haha, maybe, or maybe not. I've met a few Chinese who are into the Western SWJ nonsense, but they were pretty wealthy and have lived in the West for some time, while the average Chinese person didn't really care about PC stuff. Likewise, other Asian countries like Japan or the Philippines have been saturated with Western culture for decades, but they are not even close to reaching the SJW level of American or other Western countries.
    But then again, history is very unpredictable....so we'll see...maybe, maybe not
    , @Anonymous
    Ami Chua, ethnically Chinese:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amy_Chua
    Her husband, Jed Rubenfeld, ethnically Jewish:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jed_Rubenfeld
    They have two daughters.
    , @Alden
    If you think American Chinese women are not having 100 percent Chinese kids with Chinese men you should go to San Francisco, San Marino near Los Angeles and the eastern suburbs of Los Angeles in the San Gabriel Valley. Just drive around the schools between 2/30 and 3/30 every afternoon.
    And in China of course Chinese, not mixed race couples have children.
  3. As a side note to this article it always stuck in my craw the criteria for the naming of aircraft carriers. Gerald Ford? Seriously?

    Following the pattern of Idiocracy (sic) can we expect future aircraft carriers to be named the USS Anthony Weiner, USS Caitlyn Jenner, USS Mike Tyson? ( although the last one would actually be cool).

    On a serious note, Ford has always been a favorite of mine even before I became a deplorable cynic. A prototypical politician in a safe district with cookie cut credentials (U of Michigan, football) wending himself towards house leadership BECAUSE he is a mediocracy. The real powers in the pre Clinton era wanted a corn fed non-confrontational figure to add legitimacy to their crimes. Witness his signing off on the Warren Commission’s comic books and ‘Pappy’ Bush bringing this up to reinforce the commission’s legitimacy at Jerry’s funeral (when he was not otherwise bringing up on a Japanese politician).

    Because Karma is real and aircraft carriers are yesterdays battleships perhaps the USS Gerald R. Ford will be the first to be sunk. The USS Ronald Reagan had to reverse course after being radioactively doused by Fukushima.

    Man plans ,God laughs and Davey Jones’ locker awaits all awkward floatables.

    – Cheers

    Read More
    • Replies: @El Dato
    I discovered there is a "Page On That"™

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_ship_naming_conventions

    But yeah, why not adopt the naming scheme pioneered by esteemed SciFi writer Iain "M." Banks:

    http://concord.wikia.com/wiki/Iain_M._Banks_Culture_Universe_Spaceship_Names

    Imagine a CV named "Shoot Them Later" hanging around some 3rd world country for humanitarian mission and lillypad deposition.
    , @antipater_1

    Following the pattern of Idiocracy (sic) can we expect future aircraft carriers to be named the USS Anthony Weiner, USS Caitlyn Jenner, USS Mike Tyson?
     
    Some years ago, left wing nuts wanted a ship to be named the USS Harvey Milk. Even Washington DC Democrats wouldn't go for that.
  4. Seems like one can blow the other to pieces. Too much butter and turning into a race of nerds is why the Mongols beat us up and took our lunch money.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Astuteobservor II
    not with nukes on the table. guns were the equalizers. since the 50s, nukes has taken it's place. it is why nuclear deterrent will and should be china's life line. anything that threatens it should be taken care of with extreme prejudice.
    , @Sunbeam

    Seems like one can blow the other to pieces. Too much butter and turning into a race of nerds is why the Mongols beat us up and took our lunch money.
     
    Means nothing, but playing China in the Civilization series, they are a war nation, not a builder one. Maybe it's changed with Civ 6.

    Plus while I am not a historian or even an amateur, I am always boggled at the scale and scope of conflicts in China.

    They dwarf anything known in the West. WWII is the only conflict larger than something that occurred internally in China over the years.

    Yet all that is totally unknown in the West, save to a few scholars. I doubt even the State Department types are aware of that history unless they dug on their own.
    , @ThatDamnGood
    The Song's military tech was far better than the Mongols and so were its generals.
    But their Emperors sucked, a general who would become popular after a big victory would be seen as a threat to the dynasty.

    To put an end to this nonsense, an intervention was then. Some people decided the solution went by a name, that of Genghis Khan who would later make Qiu Chuji of the Dragon Gate sect head of all religious affairs among other things.

    And the Yuan would expanded China's territory like a demon. The Han had become too enamoured of Sun Zi's dictum of winning wars without fighting. Pacifist attitudes like good sons don't become soldiers don't make for a strong nation. The Manchurians would later re-established much of the Yuan's territorial boundaries where the Ming had failed.

  5. Well, this is very ironic. Back in the 1980′s, the Soviets spent a massive amount of money on their military to keep up with America, and this ended up bankrupting them and causing their collapse. Now the US of A is spending a horrific amount of money on their military, despite the fact we are 20 trillion dollars in debt. Not to mention that fact that we need to rebuild our infrastructure and pay off all the people on welfare and government benefits. 20 trillion will become 30 trillion, which will be 40 trillion…..whats the end game?

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    America is repeating "the" USSR's mistake and the results will be pretty much the same. Expect American overseas 'reach' to decline dramatically in the decades to come although it will still be strong at home much like Russia with its 'near abroad' (Georgia, Ukraine etc.). Then again America could also break apart much like the multi-ethnic USSR itself did.
    , @athEIst
    Back in the 1980′s,
    In 1981 the price of oil was $37.
    In 1985 the price of oil was abruptly $8 after the Saudis opened the spigots.
    The price of oil remained low for the rest of the 80's.
    The USSR goes bankrupt.
    , @NoseytheDuke
    I think the end game is for the NAFTA economic zone to be just as indebted, desperate and powerless as all of the other economic zones, including the ones currently under construction. They will then be played against one another in a global race to the bottom. The US military will be considered useful right up until global domination is achieved but after that it would be seen as a threat to the greater plan of total dictatorship, judgement and mass depopulation.
    , @another fred

    "...whats the end game?"
     
    The US debt is denominated in US$, so we can (and will) print all we want when push comes to shove. The whole world is floating on a sea of credit, including the Chinese, although theirs is internal. The US will not suffer more than most of the world when credit expansion ends.

    The penultimate result of popping the credit bubble will be a vast "reorganization" of the world which will require a massive expansion of government control in the US. Without expanding credit, belts will have to be tightened (which is already happening to a certain extent) as the "everybody gets a pony" days come to an end. Restraints on drug use will be further eased to "ease the pain."

    As government becomes more and more the province of an oligarchy separate from the non-productive masses, the masses will be seen as more and more of a burden. Eventually, war will reduce the burden.

    , @animalogic
    Not sure about the end-game beyond the reasonable chance of great depression II/GFC II....
    However, the US should not
    be compared to USSR, circa 1980's.
    1. US still has a massive economic base: yes, not as dominant, but still vast & complex.
    2. US still has reserve currency: yes, it's being slowly undermined, but still the dominant currency.
    3. God knows how, but many people & their governments still endow the US with somekind of "moral leadership" role.
    4. US has a gargantuan military which it can still leverage in various ways...
    No, the greatest dangers to the US, I suspect, are....intangibles. Lack of imagination, political rigor mortis, a ruling class best likened to a "vampire squid", not only systemic corruption but the inability to recognise itself as such, & general massive apathy (or as PCR calls it: insouciance) So I guess the US does have things in common with 80's USSR....
  6. @Anon
    Artist’s conception of planned $100 Billion Chinese-Made City in Malaysia. Near Singapore “Scares the Hell Out of Everybody.” Will have 700,000 people, almost entirely Chinese. Pundits assert that in twenty years China will own Malaysia.

    I think the Chinese own the economy of Malaysia already.

    But I don't see Chinese owning Malaysia demographically. Chinese demographics is doing DOWN in China and overseas. And in the West, Chinese women have white kids via race-mixing. Or they have Jewish kids.
    Also, Malaysian Muslims have more kids than Chinese do.

    Also, Chinese have no ideas. Mao had ideas of his own and made a mess of things.
    So, Chinese intellectuals will get all the ideas from the West, and that means they will be mental-colonized by PC in the long run.

    Also, Chinese have no ideas. Mao had ideas of his own and made a mess of things.
    So, Chinese intellectuals will get all the ideas from the West, and that means they will be mental-colonized by PC in the long run.

    Not really the case. But at any rate, even from borrowing from the West, the Chinese intellectuals – which you don’t hear very much here – also use a much larger canon of Western thought and philosophy than just the last 50 years. So at the very least, the product will be somewhat different. But yes, there’s actually a really active political science scene in China, in part because its more free to explore wrongthink ideas than in the West – where every idea has to end in, basically, in justifying democracy.

    And of course, the effort to rehabilitate Confucius as well as advance “socialism”, whatever that means. But yes, there are actually a lot of interesting ideas running around there.

    On the other hand, “pop culture” that’s increasingly pozzed with PC thought being exported there. Hopefully it won’t be overwhelming.

    Read More
    • Replies: @neutral

    Hopefully it won’t be overwhelming.
     
    China is now the biggest Hollywood audience, say I hate to say it, but it will be overwhelming.
  7. @Anon
    Artist’s conception of planned $100 Billion Chinese-Made City in Malaysia. Near Singapore “Scares the Hell Out of Everybody.” Will have 700,000 people, almost entirely Chinese. Pundits assert that in twenty years China will own Malaysia.

    I think the Chinese own the economy of Malaysia already.

    But I don't see Chinese owning Malaysia demographically. Chinese demographics is doing DOWN in China and overseas. And in the West, Chinese women have white kids via race-mixing. Or they have Jewish kids.
    Also, Malaysian Muslims have more kids than Chinese do.

    Also, Chinese have no ideas. Mao had ideas of his own and made a mess of things.
    So, Chinese intellectuals will get all the ideas from the West, and that means they will be mental-colonized by PC in the long run.

    You’re right, I think ethnic Chinese are around 25% of Malaysia’s population, so China may not “take over” Malaysia, but I suspect they will have a considerable amount of influence on the Malaysian government and economy.
    As for getting mental-colonized by PC, haha, maybe, or maybe not. I’ve met a few Chinese who are into the Western SWJ nonsense, but they were pretty wealthy and have lived in the West for some time, while the average Chinese person didn’t really care about PC stuff. Likewise, other Asian countries like Japan or the Philippines have been saturated with Western culture for decades, but they are not even close to reaching the SJW level of American or other Western countries.
    But then again, history is very unpredictable….so we’ll see…maybe, maybe not

    Read More
  8. @Daniel Chieh
    Seems like one can blow the other to pieces. Too much butter and turning into a race of nerds is why the Mongols beat us up and took our lunch money.

    not with nukes on the table. guns were the equalizers. since the 50s, nukes has taken it’s place. it is why nuclear deterrent will and should be china’s life line. anything that threatens it should be taken care of with extreme prejudice.

    Read More
  9. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @aceofspades
    Well, this is very ironic. Back in the 1980's, the Soviets spent a massive amount of money on their military to keep up with America, and this ended up bankrupting them and causing their collapse. Now the US of A is spending a horrific amount of money on their military, despite the fact we are 20 trillion dollars in debt. Not to mention that fact that we need to rebuild our infrastructure and pay off all the people on welfare and government benefits. 20 trillion will become 30 trillion, which will be 40 trillion.....whats the end game?

    America is repeating “the” USSR’s mistake and the results will be pretty much the same. Expect American overseas ‘reach’ to decline dramatically in the decades to come although it will still be strong at home much like Russia with its ‘near abroad’ (Georgia, Ukraine etc.). Then again America could also break apart much like the multi-ethnic USSR itself did.

    Read More
  10. athEIst says:
    @aceofspades
    Well, this is very ironic. Back in the 1980's, the Soviets spent a massive amount of money on their military to keep up with America, and this ended up bankrupting them and causing their collapse. Now the US of A is spending a horrific amount of money on their military, despite the fact we are 20 trillion dollars in debt. Not to mention that fact that we need to rebuild our infrastructure and pay off all the people on welfare and government benefits. 20 trillion will become 30 trillion, which will be 40 trillion.....whats the end game?

    Back in the 1980′s,
    In 1981 the price of oil was $37.
    In 1985 the price of oil was abruptly $8 after the Saudis opened the spigots.
    The price of oil remained low for the rest of the 80′s.
    The USSR goes bankrupt.

    Read More
  11. @aceofspades
    Well, this is very ironic. Back in the 1980's, the Soviets spent a massive amount of money on their military to keep up with America, and this ended up bankrupting them and causing their collapse. Now the US of A is spending a horrific amount of money on their military, despite the fact we are 20 trillion dollars in debt. Not to mention that fact that we need to rebuild our infrastructure and pay off all the people on welfare and government benefits. 20 trillion will become 30 trillion, which will be 40 trillion.....whats the end game?

    I think the end game is for the NAFTA economic zone to be just as indebted, desperate and powerless as all of the other economic zones, including the ones currently under construction. They will then be played against one another in a global race to the bottom. The US military will be considered useful right up until global domination is achieved but after that it would be seen as a threat to the greater plan of total dictatorship, judgement and mass depopulation.

    Read More
  12. El Dato says:
    @Timur The Lame
    As a side note to this article it always stuck in my craw the criteria for the naming of aircraft carriers. Gerald Ford? Seriously?

    Following the pattern of Idiocracy (sic) can we expect future aircraft carriers to be named the USS Anthony Weiner, USS Caitlyn Jenner, USS Mike Tyson? ( although the last one would actually be cool).

    On a serious note, Ford has always been a favorite of mine even before I became a deplorable cynic. A prototypical politician in a safe district with cookie cut credentials (U of Michigan, football) wending himself towards house leadership BECAUSE he is a mediocracy. The real powers in the pre Clinton era wanted a corn fed non-confrontational figure to add legitimacy to their crimes. Witness his signing off on the Warren Commission's comic books and 'Pappy' Bush bringing this up to reinforce the commission's legitimacy at Jerry's funeral (when he was not otherwise bringing up on a Japanese politician).

    Because Karma is real and aircraft carriers are yesterdays battleships perhaps the USS Gerald R. Ford will be the first to be sunk. The USS Ronald Reagan had to reverse course after being radioactively doused by Fukushima.

    Man plans ,God laughs and Davey Jones' locker awaits all awkward floatables.

    - Cheers

    I discovered there is a “Page On That”™

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_ship_naming_conventions

    But yeah, why not adopt the naming scheme pioneered by esteemed SciFi writer Iain “M.” Banks:

    http://concord.wikia.com/wiki/Iain_M._Banks_Culture_Universe_Spaceship_Names

    Imagine a CV named “Shoot Them Later” hanging around some 3rd world country for humanitarian mission and lillypad deposition.

    Read More
  13. Sunbeam says:
    @Daniel Chieh
    Seems like one can blow the other to pieces. Too much butter and turning into a race of nerds is why the Mongols beat us up and took our lunch money.

    Seems like one can blow the other to pieces. Too much butter and turning into a race of nerds is why the Mongols beat us up and took our lunch money.

    Means nothing, but playing China in the Civilization series, they are a war nation, not a builder one. Maybe it’s changed with Civ 6.

    Plus while I am not a historian or even an amateur, I am always boggled at the scale and scope of conflicts in China.

    They dwarf anything known in the West. WWII is the only conflict larger than something that occurred internally in China over the years.

    Yet all that is totally unknown in the West, save to a few scholars. I doubt even the State Department types are aware of that history unless they dug on their own.

    Read More
  14. Sunbeam says:

    One thing I’m waiting to see is when non-American culture producers start to beat Americans.

    Bollywood is gigantic. And has a huge presence in parts of Asia.

    There used to be Hong Kong Cinema. Not sure what happened to it. Successful, but not on the scale of Star Wars or The Fast And The Furious or something.

    Brazilian T&A soap operas are spreading around the world.

    K-Pop is doing the same.

    Japanese Anime and Manga, maybe the odd pop star, is worldwide now as well.

    But one day we are going to see that the past year’s biggest movie worldwide was made in Bollywood or China.

    I’m a nationalist, but I will absolutely cheer as the first nail goes in Hollywood’s coffin.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Randal
    This was an interesting straw in the wind, I thought, yesterday:

    Russia may charge extra to watch big-budget US films

    The risk in such a policy is that you just reinforce the Hollywood brand as a premium one, and state subsidised cinema is rarely good cinema. Hopefully they'll find an effective way of resisting it.

    Imo the Russians (and every major nation outside the US) should rightly regard US media output including cinema as a strategic cultural threat, and deal with it appropriately. I wish we'd done that here in Britain fifty years ago.

    Would be nice if we could have somehow completely excluded the entirety of US inner city ghetto culture for the past few decades.
    , @dfordoom

    One thing I’m waiting to see is when non-American culture producers start to beat Americans.
     
    I'm inclined to think that the USSR ultimately failed because they couldn't compete with American pop culture. The Chinese need to avoid that mistake.

    Pop culture is how globalism, political correctness, Social Justice and sexual degeneracy conquered the West. Movies, TV and pop music are more powerful than aircraft carriers and ballistic missiles.
  15. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Anon
    Artist’s conception of planned $100 Billion Chinese-Made City in Malaysia. Near Singapore “Scares the Hell Out of Everybody.” Will have 700,000 people, almost entirely Chinese. Pundits assert that in twenty years China will own Malaysia.

    I think the Chinese own the economy of Malaysia already.

    But I don't see Chinese owning Malaysia demographically. Chinese demographics is doing DOWN in China and overseas. And in the West, Chinese women have white kids via race-mixing. Or they have Jewish kids.
    Also, Malaysian Muslims have more kids than Chinese do.

    Also, Chinese have no ideas. Mao had ideas of his own and made a mess of things.
    So, Chinese intellectuals will get all the ideas from the West, and that means they will be mental-colonized by PC in the long run.

    Ami Chua, ethnically Chinese:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amy_Chua

    Her husband, Jed Rubenfeld, ethnically Jewish:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jed_Rubenfeld

    They have two daughters.

    Read More
    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    We live in L.A. and know zero Asian-Jewish couples but many couples where both are Chinese. Just anecdotal, I know.

    Presumably there will be Chinese/Mexican people in the USA as the years go on, just as there will be, unfortunately, EVERYTHING/Mexican people all over the USA as the mestizo colonization of our country continues apace.

    Chinese/Jewish? Just aren't that many Jewish people to go around, and there are vastly more Chinese immigrants than Jewish immigrants to the USA every year nowadays.

  16. @aceofspades
    Well, this is very ironic. Back in the 1980's, the Soviets spent a massive amount of money on their military to keep up with America, and this ended up bankrupting them and causing their collapse. Now the US of A is spending a horrific amount of money on their military, despite the fact we are 20 trillion dollars in debt. Not to mention that fact that we need to rebuild our infrastructure and pay off all the people on welfare and government benefits. 20 trillion will become 30 trillion, which will be 40 trillion.....whats the end game?

    “…whats the end game?”

    The US debt is denominated in US$, so we can (and will) print all we want when push comes to shove. The whole world is floating on a sea of credit, including the Chinese, although theirs is internal. The US will not suffer more than most of the world when credit expansion ends.

    The penultimate result of popping the credit bubble will be a vast “reorganization” of the world which will require a massive expansion of government control in the US. Without expanding credit, belts will have to be tightened (which is already happening to a certain extent) as the “everybody gets a pony” days come to an end. Restraints on drug use will be further eased to “ease the pain.”

    As government becomes more and more the province of an oligarchy separate from the non-productive masses, the masses will be seen as more and more of a burden. Eventually, war will reduce the burden.

    Read More
  17. @Anonymous
    Ami Chua, ethnically Chinese:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amy_Chua
    Her husband, Jed Rubenfeld, ethnically Jewish:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jed_Rubenfeld
    They have two daughters.

    We live in L.A. and know zero Asian-Jewish couples but many couples where both are Chinese. Just anecdotal, I know.

    Presumably there will be Chinese/Mexican people in the USA as the years go on, just as there will be, unfortunately, EVERYTHING/Mexican people all over the USA as the mestizo colonization of our country continues apace.

    Chinese/Jewish? Just aren’t that many Jewish people to go around, and there are vastly more Chinese immigrants than Jewish immigrants to the USA every year nowadays.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    RadicalCenter:

    Also anecdotally, but in New York City. Whenever I encounter a "mixed" White-Asian" couple (and there appears to quite a few of them), the male of the pair is almost invariably Jewish while his companion is North East Asian (usually Chinese, since until recently there were not that many Japanese residing in the 5 Boroughs of NYC).

    , @Daniel Chieh
    Chinese/Mexican is an extremely rare combination, I think, except for extremely light skinned latinos/latinas. I'll say despite some weird encouragement from an university dean to marry black and have "smart olympic athletes", its probably mostly white/Asian.
    , @anon
    You should see the south Asian and Oriental colonization here in Canada. I am frequently asking myself why my ancestors fought two pointless wars with Germany only to give away the country to the sub-continent and China.
  18. Randal says:
    @Sunbeam
    One thing I'm waiting to see is when non-American culture producers start to beat Americans.

    Bollywood is gigantic. And has a huge presence in parts of Asia.

    There used to be Hong Kong Cinema. Not sure what happened to it. Successful, but not on the scale of Star Wars or The Fast And The Furious or something.

    Brazilian T&A soap operas are spreading around the world.

    K-Pop is doing the same.

    Japanese Anime and Manga, maybe the odd pop star, is worldwide now as well.

    But one day we are going to see that the past year's biggest movie worldwide was made in Bollywood or China.

    I'm a nationalist, but I will absolutely cheer as the first nail goes in Hollywood's coffin.

    This was an interesting straw in the wind, I thought, yesterday:

    Russia may charge extra to watch big-budget US films

    The risk in such a policy is that you just reinforce the Hollywood brand as a premium one, and state subsidised cinema is rarely good cinema. Hopefully they’ll find an effective way of resisting it.

    Imo the Russians (and every major nation outside the US) should rightly regard US media output including cinema as a strategic cultural threat, and deal with it appropriately. I wish we’d done that here in Britain fifty years ago.

    Would be nice if we could have somehow completely excluded the entirety of US inner city ghetto culture for the past few decades.

    Read More
    • Agree: dfordoom
    • Replies: @Sunbeam
    I read that article.

    Is it some kind of English vaguely ironic thing? The Department of Missing the Point? Or maybe both of those applied to the Russians?

    Ok, this is from that article:

    "Russian film hits abroad

    2016 - Paradise, about a concentration camp inmate's relationship with an SS officer, wins director Andrei Konchalovsky a Silver Lion at the Venice Film Festival

    2014 - Leviathan, by director Andrei Zvyagintsev, named best film at the London Film Festival - a tragic drama about corruption in the far north of Russia

    2003 - The Return wins the Golden Lion at the Venice festival - Zvyagintsev's drama about two boys whose fishing trip with their father turns into a grim test of manhood

    1994 - Burnt by the Sun, by director Nikita Mikhalkov, wins the Palme d'Or at Cannes and the US Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. It encapsulates Stalin's communist terror in the story of a Red Army officer who is betrayed."

    WTF? In what country, on what planet do they expect any of that to do big box office?

    In the US they make vanity Oscar bait movies every year. Very occasionally one will wander off the reservation and become a hit.

    But everyone knows that in general they lose money on those.

    The money is in the blockbuster movies: Jaws, Star Wars, The Avengers, The Fast and the Furious.

    Porn used to make money. For reasons I do not truly understand that is no longer the case so much.

    Independent movies like The Toxic Avenger used to do better than you would think and actually be lucrative in the long run, because it would still be watched a long time after everyone forgot about The Crying Game. Maybe that's no longer the case.

    But seriously someone in Russia expects people to go to movies like the ones listed as opposed to The Fast And The Furious?

    At least they know how incredibly important boobs are in Latin America. Sounds like someone needs to teach the Russians a few things.
  19. Sunbeam says:
    @Randal
    This was an interesting straw in the wind, I thought, yesterday:

    Russia may charge extra to watch big-budget US films

    The risk in such a policy is that you just reinforce the Hollywood brand as a premium one, and state subsidised cinema is rarely good cinema. Hopefully they'll find an effective way of resisting it.

    Imo the Russians (and every major nation outside the US) should rightly regard US media output including cinema as a strategic cultural threat, and deal with it appropriately. I wish we'd done that here in Britain fifty years ago.

    Would be nice if we could have somehow completely excluded the entirety of US inner city ghetto culture for the past few decades.

    I read that article.

    Is it some kind of English vaguely ironic thing? The Department of Missing the Point? Or maybe both of those applied to the Russians?

    Ok, this is from that article:

    “Russian film hits abroad

    2016 – Paradise, about a concentration camp inmate’s relationship with an SS officer, wins director Andrei Konchalovsky a Silver Lion at the Venice Film Festival

    2014 – Leviathan, by director Andrei Zvyagintsev, named best film at the London Film Festival – a tragic drama about corruption in the far north of Russia

    2003 – The Return wins the Golden Lion at the Venice festival – Zvyagintsev’s drama about two boys whose fishing trip with their father turns into a grim test of manhood

    1994 – Burnt by the Sun, by director Nikita Mikhalkov, wins the Palme d’Or at Cannes and the US Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. It encapsulates Stalin’s communist terror in the story of a Red Army officer who is betrayed.”

    WTF? In what country, on what planet do they expect any of that to do big box office?

    In the US they make vanity Oscar bait movies every year. Very occasionally one will wander off the reservation and become a hit.

    But everyone knows that in general they lose money on those.

    The money is in the blockbuster movies: Jaws, Star Wars, The Avengers, The Fast and the Furious.

    Porn used to make money. For reasons I do not truly understand that is no longer the case so much.

    Independent movies like The Toxic Avenger used to do better than you would think and actually be lucrative in the long run, because it would still be watched a long time after everyone forgot about The Crying Game. Maybe that’s no longer the case.

    But seriously someone in Russia expects people to go to movies like the ones listed as opposed to The Fast And The Furious?

    At least they know how incredibly important boobs are in Latin America. Sounds like someone needs to teach the Russians a few things.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Randal
    As far as I can tell, the "Russian film hits abroad" bit is just a bit of padding info tacked into the piece by the journo, about ..... Russian films that happen to have been hits abroad (in other words, that the BBC's readers might recognise). It has little or nothing to do with the motivations of the Russian ministry in suggesting adding a surcharge on prices for US film tickets. No doubt there were plenty of action and sensationalist films also made in Russia in the same period. During Hollywood's heyday as the propaganda arm of particular segments of US culture, most of its profits were made domestically anyway.
  20. Dan Hayes says:
    @RadicalCenter
    We live in L.A. and know zero Asian-Jewish couples but many couples where both are Chinese. Just anecdotal, I know.

    Presumably there will be Chinese/Mexican people in the USA as the years go on, just as there will be, unfortunately, EVERYTHING/Mexican people all over the USA as the mestizo colonization of our country continues apace.

    Chinese/Jewish? Just aren't that many Jewish people to go around, and there are vastly more Chinese immigrants than Jewish immigrants to the USA every year nowadays.

    RadicalCenter:

    Also anecdotally, but in New York City. Whenever I encounter a “mixed” White-Asian” couple (and there appears to quite a few of them), the male of the pair is almost invariably Jewish while his companion is North East Asian (usually Chinese, since until recently there were not that many Japanese residing in the 5 Boroughs of NYC).

    Read More
  21. Randal says:
    @Sunbeam
    I read that article.

    Is it some kind of English vaguely ironic thing? The Department of Missing the Point? Or maybe both of those applied to the Russians?

    Ok, this is from that article:

    "Russian film hits abroad

    2016 - Paradise, about a concentration camp inmate's relationship with an SS officer, wins director Andrei Konchalovsky a Silver Lion at the Venice Film Festival

    2014 - Leviathan, by director Andrei Zvyagintsev, named best film at the London Film Festival - a tragic drama about corruption in the far north of Russia

    2003 - The Return wins the Golden Lion at the Venice festival - Zvyagintsev's drama about two boys whose fishing trip with their father turns into a grim test of manhood

    1994 - Burnt by the Sun, by director Nikita Mikhalkov, wins the Palme d'Or at Cannes and the US Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. It encapsulates Stalin's communist terror in the story of a Red Army officer who is betrayed."

    WTF? In what country, on what planet do they expect any of that to do big box office?

    In the US they make vanity Oscar bait movies every year. Very occasionally one will wander off the reservation and become a hit.

    But everyone knows that in general they lose money on those.

    The money is in the blockbuster movies: Jaws, Star Wars, The Avengers, The Fast and the Furious.

    Porn used to make money. For reasons I do not truly understand that is no longer the case so much.

    Independent movies like The Toxic Avenger used to do better than you would think and actually be lucrative in the long run, because it would still be watched a long time after everyone forgot about The Crying Game. Maybe that's no longer the case.

    But seriously someone in Russia expects people to go to movies like the ones listed as opposed to The Fast And The Furious?

    At least they know how incredibly important boobs are in Latin America. Sounds like someone needs to teach the Russians a few things.

    As far as I can tell, the “Russian film hits abroad” bit is just a bit of padding info tacked into the piece by the journo, about ….. Russian films that happen to have been hits abroad (in other words, that the BBC’s readers might recognise). It has little or nothing to do with the motivations of the Russian ministry in suggesting adding a surcharge on prices for US film tickets. No doubt there were plenty of action and sensationalist films also made in Russia in the same period. During Hollywood’s heyday as the propaganda arm of particular segments of US culture, most of its profits were made domestically anyway.

    Read More
  22. @RadicalCenter
    We live in L.A. and know zero Asian-Jewish couples but many couples where both are Chinese. Just anecdotal, I know.

    Presumably there will be Chinese/Mexican people in the USA as the years go on, just as there will be, unfortunately, EVERYTHING/Mexican people all over the USA as the mestizo colonization of our country continues apace.

    Chinese/Jewish? Just aren't that many Jewish people to go around, and there are vastly more Chinese immigrants than Jewish immigrants to the USA every year nowadays.

    Chinese/Mexican is an extremely rare combination, I think, except for extremely light skinned latinos/latinas. I’ll say despite some weird encouragement from an university dean to marry black and have “smart olympic athletes”, its probably mostly white/Asian.

    Read More
    • Agree: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Yep. But the sheer numbers of Mexicans and part Mexican people in the USA, especially California with its disproportionate number of Asians, very likely portends plenty of Chinese-Mexican families, strange as that may sound outside California or even here for now.
    , @Sunbeam
    You seem willing to speculate on things in a dispassionate matter.

    It's been remarked a number of times, re Jewish/Asian marriages.

    Do we know anything about how the children of such marriages identify? Jewish? Asian? Both? Elite (my money's on this one).

    Not sure when this got to be a thing, but the first cohort should be hitting a Stanford or Harvard near you soon.

    As an aside, I once watched on of those food porn shows. The episode in question was devoted to... traditional (actually I'd call it "oddball" food) European Jews once ate.

    Trying to imagine an SJW kid from Portland staring at a bagel smeared in Lox at a Jewish summer camp in the Hamptons.

    Or some of that hardcore stuff: "You want me to eat a Tongue!?" "We never eat crackers, and this cracker sucks! I want my granola!"
  23. Sean says:

    China is the greatest trading partner of the US, Germany, Japan, India, and Australia, among others. Russia’s biggest trading partner is Germany, followed by China.

    China gets a lot of its capital goods from Germany, they still need the West, and they are still vulnerable to being cut off. Which is why the latest mugging of the US in trade negotiations by the Chinese was a bad mistake on their part

    Read More
  24. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @RadicalCenter
    We live in L.A. and know zero Asian-Jewish couples but many couples where both are Chinese. Just anecdotal, I know.

    Presumably there will be Chinese/Mexican people in the USA as the years go on, just as there will be, unfortunately, EVERYTHING/Mexican people all over the USA as the mestizo colonization of our country continues apace.

    Chinese/Jewish? Just aren't that many Jewish people to go around, and there are vastly more Chinese immigrants than Jewish immigrants to the USA every year nowadays.

    You should see the south Asian and Oriental colonization here in Canada. I am frequently asking myself why my ancestors fought two pointless wars with Germany only to give away the country to the sub-continent and China.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    lol. The Canadians didn't do squat in either war. Maybe you guys served in the mess hall, but not any fighting. Stop with the Canadian propoganda.

    Also, if you had not been such a doormat to America and stood up to them maybe your country wouldn't be in this mess in the first place.
  25. @Daniel Chieh
    Chinese/Mexican is an extremely rare combination, I think, except for extremely light skinned latinos/latinas. I'll say despite some weird encouragement from an university dean to marry black and have "smart olympic athletes", its probably mostly white/Asian.

    Yep. But the sheer numbers of Mexicans and part Mexican people in the USA, especially California with its disproportionate number of Asians, very likely portends plenty of Chinese-Mexican families, strange as that may sound outside California or even here for now.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alden
    Never, never, never, maybe 100 years ago when the 2 groups were equal economically, but not now when the Chinese would never marry members of the lower caste.

    The Asian women who pursue White men are looking for height and fairness. I see mixed couples all the time, but I have never seen an Asian woman with a black haired White man.

    It's always fair skin and hair no darker than medium brown. I know about the height because Chinese co workers and friends have told me this.

    In Asian cultures being shorter than the norm is a sign of poverty that your parents were too poor to feed you properly.
  26. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @anon
    You should see the south Asian and Oriental colonization here in Canada. I am frequently asking myself why my ancestors fought two pointless wars with Germany only to give away the country to the sub-continent and China.

    lol. The Canadians didn’t do squat in either war. Maybe you guys served in the mess hall, but not any fighting. Stop with the Canadian propoganda.

    Also, if you had not been such a doormat to America and stood up to them maybe your country wouldn’t be in this mess in the first place.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stebbing Heuer
    The Canadians joined both wars earlier than the United States, and fought for longer than the United States.

    This is the first truly offensive comment I've read in my time here at Unz.
    , @Rich
    Wow, your lack of knowledge about the WW 1 and 2 is embarrassing. Read about the Battle of Vimy Ridge and Juno Beach, then move on from there. I'm not Canadian, but I'm well aware of their contributions , right or wrong. to the American and British wars of the 20th century.
    , @for-the-record

    lol. The Canadians didn’t do squat in either war. Maybe you guys served in the mess hall, but not any fighting. Stop with the Canadian propoganda.

     

    On D-Day there were 21,400 Canadian troops compared to 73,000 American troops. In other words, on a per capita basis there were more than 3 times as many Canadians.

    On a per capita basis, Canadian war deaths in WWII exceed US ones.

    If you go back to WWI you will find that Canadian war deaths exceeded those of the US. On a per capita basis they were 13 times higher.

    But that's all right, we know the US won both wars single-handedly.
  27. Sunbeam says:
    @Daniel Chieh
    Chinese/Mexican is an extremely rare combination, I think, except for extremely light skinned latinos/latinas. I'll say despite some weird encouragement from an university dean to marry black and have "smart olympic athletes", its probably mostly white/Asian.

    You seem willing to speculate on things in a dispassionate matter.

    It’s been remarked a number of times, re Jewish/Asian marriages.

    Do we know anything about how the children of such marriages identify? Jewish? Asian? Both? Elite (my money’s on this one).

    Not sure when this got to be a thing, but the first cohort should be hitting a Stanford or Harvard near you soon.

    As an aside, I once watched on of those food porn shows. The episode in question was devoted to… traditional (actually I’d call it “oddball” food) European Jews once ate.

    Trying to imagine an SJW kid from Portland staring at a bagel smeared in Lox at a Jewish summer camp in the Hamptons.

    Or some of that hardcore stuff: “You want me to eat a Tongue!?” “We never eat crackers, and this cracker sucks! I want my granola!”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    In my own experience, I just know two. One was a Jewish girl and a half-Vietnamese HAPA; their children and themselves identified with Asian - and since Vietnamese apparently was confusing for them, their children seem to mostly identify toward Chinese.

    The other was much more standard elite Chinese bureaucrat's son marries some Jewish elite's daughter, I don't know what their children will identify as. Elite, I guess. I hear their marriage is having some cracks.

    That's pretty funny about tongues. Its amazing how much food we pass up as creepy these days!
    , @Alden
    Stuffed derma, gribneses , and that kishka and noodle combination Gribbeses is onions fried with small pieces of not chicken, but pieces of chicken skin.

    They'll never give up lox and bagels though.
  28. dfordoom says: • Website

    The aircraft relies on the assumption that, in thirteen years when it enters service, anti-stealth technology will not have reached the point of making it even more obviously useless.

    The purpose of this sort of technology is to make lots and lots of money for the right people. Whether it works or not is entirely irrelevant.

    Read More
  29. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Sunbeam
    One thing I'm waiting to see is when non-American culture producers start to beat Americans.

    Bollywood is gigantic. And has a huge presence in parts of Asia.

    There used to be Hong Kong Cinema. Not sure what happened to it. Successful, but not on the scale of Star Wars or The Fast And The Furious or something.

    Brazilian T&A soap operas are spreading around the world.

    K-Pop is doing the same.

    Japanese Anime and Manga, maybe the odd pop star, is worldwide now as well.

    But one day we are going to see that the past year's biggest movie worldwide was made in Bollywood or China.

    I'm a nationalist, but I will absolutely cheer as the first nail goes in Hollywood's coffin.

    One thing I’m waiting to see is when non-American culture producers start to beat Americans.

    I’m inclined to think that the USSR ultimately failed because they couldn’t compete with American pop culture. The Chinese need to avoid that mistake.

    Pop culture is how globalism, political correctness, Social Justice and sexual degeneracy conquered the West. Movies, TV and pop music are more powerful than aircraft carriers and ballistic missiles.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Astuteobservor II
    China is already pouring massive amount of money into entertainment. they know culture values are spread through movies, tv and books etc.

    the only way to counter spin is with your own spin :)
  30. nsa says:

    The denizens of the Middle Kingdom believe each chink household will have a white house boy by the year 2100.

    Read More
  31. @Anonymous
    lol. The Canadians didn't do squat in either war. Maybe you guys served in the mess hall, but not any fighting. Stop with the Canadian propoganda.

    Also, if you had not been such a doormat to America and stood up to them maybe your country wouldn't be in this mess in the first place.

    The Canadians joined both wars earlier than the United States, and fought for longer than the United States.

    This is the first truly offensive comment I’ve read in my time here at Unz.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    Believe me, I've read many, and I've only been reading for a few months. But this fellow combines rather considerable amounts both of obnoxiousness and stupidity to a measure which is rare here.

    He seems to be right about the Americanization of Canada, though. What happened to the Tory country that sheltered the Loyalists and beat the U.S. in 1812?
  32. @dfordoom

    One thing I’m waiting to see is when non-American culture producers start to beat Americans.
     
    I'm inclined to think that the USSR ultimately failed because they couldn't compete with American pop culture. The Chinese need to avoid that mistake.

    Pop culture is how globalism, political correctness, Social Justice and sexual degeneracy conquered the West. Movies, TV and pop music are more powerful than aircraft carriers and ballistic missiles.

    China is already pouring massive amount of money into entertainment. they know culture values are spread through movies, tv and books etc.

    the only way to counter spin is with your own spin :)

    Read More
  33. @Sunbeam
    You seem willing to speculate on things in a dispassionate matter.

    It's been remarked a number of times, re Jewish/Asian marriages.

    Do we know anything about how the children of such marriages identify? Jewish? Asian? Both? Elite (my money's on this one).

    Not sure when this got to be a thing, but the first cohort should be hitting a Stanford or Harvard near you soon.

    As an aside, I once watched on of those food porn shows. The episode in question was devoted to... traditional (actually I'd call it "oddball" food) European Jews once ate.

    Trying to imagine an SJW kid from Portland staring at a bagel smeared in Lox at a Jewish summer camp in the Hamptons.

    Or some of that hardcore stuff: "You want me to eat a Tongue!?" "We never eat crackers, and this cracker sucks! I want my granola!"

    In my own experience, I just know two. One was a Jewish girl and a half-Vietnamese HAPA; their children and themselves identified with Asian – and since Vietnamese apparently was confusing for them, their children seem to mostly identify toward Chinese.

    The other was much more standard elite Chinese bureaucrat’s son marries some Jewish elite’s daughter, I don’t know what their children will identify as. Elite, I guess. I hear their marriage is having some cracks.

    That’s pretty funny about tongues. Its amazing how much food we pass up as creepy these days!

    Read More
  34. Rich says:
    @Anonymous
    lol. The Canadians didn't do squat in either war. Maybe you guys served in the mess hall, but not any fighting. Stop with the Canadian propoganda.

    Also, if you had not been such a doormat to America and stood up to them maybe your country wouldn't be in this mess in the first place.

    Wow, your lack of knowledge about the WW 1 and 2 is embarrassing. Read about the Battle of Vimy Ridge and Juno Beach, then move on from there. I’m not Canadian, but I’m well aware of their contributions , right or wrong. to the American and British wars of the 20th century.

    Read More
  35. @Anonymous
    lol. The Canadians didn't do squat in either war. Maybe you guys served in the mess hall, but not any fighting. Stop with the Canadian propoganda.

    Also, if you had not been such a doormat to America and stood up to them maybe your country wouldn't be in this mess in the first place.

    lol. The Canadians didn’t do squat in either war. Maybe you guys served in the mess hall, but not any fighting. Stop with the Canadian propoganda.

    On D-Day there were 21,400 Canadian troops compared to 73,000 American troops. In other words, on a per capita basis there were more than 3 times as many Canadians.

    On a per capita basis, Canadian war deaths in WWII exceed US ones.

    If you go back to WWI you will find that Canadian war deaths exceeded those of the US. On a per capita basis they were 13 times higher.

    But that’s all right, we know the US won both wars single-handedly.

    Read More
  36. Chico says:

    Great article, Fred. I highly recommend that anyone with the means to do so visit China, including Hong Kong.

    The development there is astounding. Cities are modern, brand-new clean rapid transit systems, new airports. A high degree of personal freedom – you don’t have police on every corner looking to bother someone. Of course political freedom is lower, but Chinese citizens get to vote on whether they are satisfied with their local officials. If not, they don’t get promoted. Mandarin meritocracy.

    Fred points out how they are going to kick our asses, with trade and investment rather than intimidation and bombing. Already, the other nations of Asia, like Philippines, Thailand and Malaysia, are seeing where their bread is buttered. The USA has done nothing, even for a former colony with deep cultural ties like the Philippines.

    The solipsism of Americans is on display here, where they think that a few mixed marriages in the USA means anything relative to the 1 billion Chinese population in the world.

    Read More
  37. In my old line of work (fire protection) there has been an ongoing problem with counterfeit sprinklers from China that don’t work. If bribery, taking shortcuts, substituting counterfeit parts, etc. etc. are rampant in a life safety business like fire protection, why would that mentality be suddenly go away just because they’re building airplanes? Thanks, but I’ll stick with Boeing and Airbus.

    Read More
    • Replies: @JustJeff
    Because selling faulty equipment to Americans is one thing but the Chinese themselves will be flying in those planes.
    , @Китайский дурак
    I do suspect that an overwhelming majority of the commentators above neither know the Mandarin language, nor have among close friends and acquaintances someone who actually have long experiences inside the Chinese contemporary society. I have recently taken rides in the new Chinese bullet trains. They are good. Give credit where credit is due. But Chinese cultural values? Chinese civilizational conquest of the world??? Hahaha...
  38. Roberto says:
    @Anon
    Arms Race aside, China needs to win the Charms Race.. and one way is by banning the horrible treatment of dogs and cats.

    YES!

    Read More
  39. Alden says:
    @Anon
    Artist’s conception of planned $100 Billion Chinese-Made City in Malaysia. Near Singapore “Scares the Hell Out of Everybody.” Will have 700,000 people, almost entirely Chinese. Pundits assert that in twenty years China will own Malaysia.

    I think the Chinese own the economy of Malaysia already.

    But I don't see Chinese owning Malaysia demographically. Chinese demographics is doing DOWN in China and overseas. And in the West, Chinese women have white kids via race-mixing. Or they have Jewish kids.
    Also, Malaysian Muslims have more kids than Chinese do.

    Also, Chinese have no ideas. Mao had ideas of his own and made a mess of things.
    So, Chinese intellectuals will get all the ideas from the West, and that means they will be mental-colonized by PC in the long run.

    If you think American Chinese women are not having 100 percent Chinese kids with Chinese men you should go to San Francisco, San Marino near Los Angeles and the eastern suburbs of Los Angeles in the San Gabriel Valley. Just drive around the schools between 2/30 and 3/30 every afternoon.
    And in China of course Chinese, not mixed race couples have children.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Erebus

    And in China of course Chinese, not mixed race couples have children.
     
    Assuming that you mean that Chinese coupled to foreign expats in China don't have children, you're talkin' nonsense, on a subject you clearly have no concept of.

    Ditto, your comment to RadicalCenter 10 mins later.

    Whereof one is ignorant, thereof one should remain silent.
  40. Alden says:
    @RadicalCenter
    Yep. But the sheer numbers of Mexicans and part Mexican people in the USA, especially California with its disproportionate number of Asians, very likely portends plenty of Chinese-Mexican families, strange as that may sound outside California or even here for now.

    Never, never, never, maybe 100 years ago when the 2 groups were equal economically, but not now when the Chinese would never marry members of the lower caste.

    The Asian women who pursue White men are looking for height and fairness. I see mixed couples all the time, but I have never seen an Asian woman with a black haired White man.

    It’s always fair skin and hair no darker than medium brown. I know about the height because Chinese co workers and friends have told me this.

    In Asian cultures being shorter than the norm is a sign of poverty that your parents were too poor to feed you properly.

    Read More
  41. Alden says:
    @Sunbeam
    You seem willing to speculate on things in a dispassionate matter.

    It's been remarked a number of times, re Jewish/Asian marriages.

    Do we know anything about how the children of such marriages identify? Jewish? Asian? Both? Elite (my money's on this one).

    Not sure when this got to be a thing, but the first cohort should be hitting a Stanford or Harvard near you soon.

    As an aside, I once watched on of those food porn shows. The episode in question was devoted to... traditional (actually I'd call it "oddball" food) European Jews once ate.

    Trying to imagine an SJW kid from Portland staring at a bagel smeared in Lox at a Jewish summer camp in the Hamptons.

    Or some of that hardcore stuff: "You want me to eat a Tongue!?" "We never eat crackers, and this cracker sucks! I want my granola!"

    Stuffed derma, gribneses , and that kishka and noodle combination Gribbeses is onions fried with small pieces of not chicken, but pieces of chicken skin.

    They’ll never give up lox and bagels though.

    Read More
  42. JustJeff says:
    @Sgt. Joe Friday
    In my old line of work (fire protection) there has been an ongoing problem with counterfeit sprinklers from China that don't work. If bribery, taking shortcuts, substituting counterfeit parts, etc. etc. are rampant in a life safety business like fire protection, why would that mentality be suddenly go away just because they're building airplanes? Thanks, but I'll stick with Boeing and Airbus.

    Because selling faulty equipment to Americans is one thing but the Chinese themselves will be flying in those planes.

    Read More
  43. As someone who has travelled to the US and China (Beijing), I was astounded by how advanced China’s infrastructure was to that of the US. Subways, freight trains, highways, airports, bridges you name it. The investment is still on going and only really been going on for 25 or so years. I had the feeling in the US things were being neglected. Also China is almost unbelievably safe walking the streets. Everybody behaved like mature adults. No forty year olds who dressed like teenagers, in fact most of the teenagers dressed like forty year olds should. Infrastructure is critical to a modern society, the military merely protects it. Economy is the source of viable military spending, not the other way around.

    Read More
  44. @aceofspades
    Well, this is very ironic. Back in the 1980's, the Soviets spent a massive amount of money on their military to keep up with America, and this ended up bankrupting them and causing their collapse. Now the US of A is spending a horrific amount of money on their military, despite the fact we are 20 trillion dollars in debt. Not to mention that fact that we need to rebuild our infrastructure and pay off all the people on welfare and government benefits. 20 trillion will become 30 trillion, which will be 40 trillion.....whats the end game?

    Not sure about the end-game beyond the reasonable chance of great depression II/GFC II….
    However, the US should not
    be compared to USSR, circa 1980′s.
    1. US still has a massive economic base: yes, not as dominant, but still vast & complex.
    2. US still has reserve currency: yes, it’s being slowly undermined, but still the dominant currency.
    3. God knows how, but many people & their governments still endow the US with somekind of “moral leadership” role.
    4. US has a gargantuan military which it can still leverage in various ways…
    No, the greatest dangers to the US, I suspect, are….intangibles. Lack of imagination, political rigor mortis, a ruling class best likened to a “vampire squid”, not only systemic corruption but the inability to recognise itself as such, & general massive apathy (or as PCR calls it: insouciance) So I guess the US does have things in common with 80′s USSR….

    Read More
  45. @Sgt. Joe Friday
    In my old line of work (fire protection) there has been an ongoing problem with counterfeit sprinklers from China that don't work. If bribery, taking shortcuts, substituting counterfeit parts, etc. etc. are rampant in a life safety business like fire protection, why would that mentality be suddenly go away just because they're building airplanes? Thanks, but I'll stick with Boeing and Airbus.

    I do suspect that an overwhelming majority of the commentators above neither know the Mandarin language, nor have among close friends and acquaintances someone who actually have long experiences inside the Chinese contemporary society. I have recently taken rides in the new Chinese bullet trains. They are good. Give credit where credit is due. But Chinese cultural values? Chinese civilizational conquest of the world??? Hahaha…

    Read More
    • Replies: @Erebus

    I have recently taken rides in the new Chinese bullet trains. They are good.
     
    IMHO, they're an awesome accomplishment. They're fast, comfortable, run dead on time, and cover almost all of China. They're also almost always full so getting a ticket over the counter for the next train is rarely possible on popular routes.
    China has built some 19,000km (12,000 miles) of hi-speed rail, along with countless stations. They're all inter-connected to new ferry & shipping terminals, new airports and new metro rail systems. That all of this was physically built in little more than 1.5 decades beggars belief.

    You are also quite right about Chinese "civilizational conquest of the world". Ain't gonna happen. Neither the language, nor the culture works outside of China. But money and development talks everywhere, and that's what China is focussing on. Bringing the obviously successful Chinese development model to others is what will cement China's place in the world.
    , @Sergey Krieger
    No they don't. I would love to ride that train. The last time I took train it was ying zuo from Shanghai to Urumqi 3 days ride with spitting and throwing garbage Chinese inside and sub zero temperatures outside with water frozen in lavatories. Now that's obvious progress since 1989. Agree about Chinese conquest of the world. Not gonna happen. Neither civilizational, nor cultural or military.
  46. “The aircraft relies on the assumption that, in thirteen years when it enters service, anti-stealth technology will not have reached the point of making it even more obviously useless.”

    It will still be good for terrorizing … sorry … for policing rogue states like N. Korea, Serbia, Yemen, and Syria.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Erebus
    I don't believe the F21 will ever get off the drawing board, much less off the ground. The next financial crisis is not that far away, and it will take the US out of the Empire business.

    By then, whatever's left of the USM will have to satisfy itself with bombing Cuba, or perhaps the Bahamas. If they can't afford the fuel, they can always bomb Arkansas.
  47. Erebus says:
    @Alden
    If you think American Chinese women are not having 100 percent Chinese kids with Chinese men you should go to San Francisco, San Marino near Los Angeles and the eastern suburbs of Los Angeles in the San Gabriel Valley. Just drive around the schools between 2/30 and 3/30 every afternoon.
    And in China of course Chinese, not mixed race couples have children.

    And in China of course Chinese, not mixed race couples have children.

    Assuming that you mean that Chinese coupled to foreign expats in China don’t have children, you’re talkin’ nonsense, on a subject you clearly have no concept of.

    Ditto, your comment to RadicalCenter 10 mins later.

    Whereof one is ignorant, thereof one should remain silent.

    Read More
  48. U.S. policymakers are idiots. Always, always, always putting short-term profits ahead of long-term success. China’s brilliance is in the direct simplicity of its approach, which is to take this easily identified weakness and use it against us, with staggering success, right before our very eyes. U.S. leaders are like the monkey who sees a banana in a bottle and reaches his hand in there to get it out, only to find that he can’t get his hand back out unless he lets go of the banana, i.e. short-term profits. I see no indication whatsoever that our leaders will ever let go of the banana. Absolutely amazing watching this unfold. Absolutely amazing how the most brilliant minds in the U.S. can ignore the one and only solution, and over complicate this very simply solved problem. The arrogance is astounding.

    Read More
  49. Erebus says:
    @Китайский дурак
    I do suspect that an overwhelming majority of the commentators above neither know the Mandarin language, nor have among close friends and acquaintances someone who actually have long experiences inside the Chinese contemporary society. I have recently taken rides in the new Chinese bullet trains. They are good. Give credit where credit is due. But Chinese cultural values? Chinese civilizational conquest of the world??? Hahaha...

    I have recently taken rides in the new Chinese bullet trains. They are good.

    IMHO, they’re an awesome accomplishment. They’re fast, comfortable, run dead on time, and cover almost all of China. They’re also almost always full so getting a ticket over the counter for the next train is rarely possible on popular routes.
    China has built some 19,000km (12,000 miles) of hi-speed rail, along with countless stations. They’re all inter-connected to new ferry & shipping terminals, new airports and new metro rail systems. That all of this was physically built in little more than 1.5 decades beggars belief.

    You are also quite right about Chinese “civilizational conquest of the world”. Ain’t gonna happen. Neither the language, nor the culture works outside of China. But money and development talks everywhere, and that’s what China is focussing on. Bringing the obviously successful Chinese development model to others is what will cement China’s place in the world.

    Read More
    • Agree: Sergey Krieger
    • Replies: @Biff

    You are also quite right about Chinese “civilizational conquest of the world”. Ain’t gonna happen. Neither the language, nor the culture works outside of China.
     
    Clearly many don't understand China or the term "Middle Kingdom". They already believe their country is the center of the universe; why would they want to crusade outside of it like a Baptist Ministry?
    They don't because they don't see much point in it, and when they do go abroad to live they tend to stick to their Chinatowns.

    If there language and culture spreads, it will mostly be done by others that find an interest in it.
  50. neutral says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    Also, Chinese have no ideas. Mao had ideas of his own and made a mess of things.
    So, Chinese intellectuals will get all the ideas from the West, and that means they will be mental-colonized by PC in the long run.
     
    Not really the case. But at any rate, even from borrowing from the West, the Chinese intellectuals - which you don't hear very much here - also use a much larger canon of Western thought and philosophy than just the last 50 years. So at the very least, the product will be somewhat different. But yes, there's actually a really active political science scene in China, in part because its more free to explore wrongthink ideas than in the West - where every idea has to end in, basically, in justifying democracy.

    And of course, the effort to rehabilitate Confucius as well as advance "socialism", whatever that means. But yes, there are actually a lot of interesting ideas running around there.

    On the other hand, "pop culture" that's increasingly pozzed with PC thought being exported there. Hopefully it won't be overwhelming.

    Hopefully it won’t be overwhelming.

    China is now the biggest Hollywood audience, say I hate to say it, but it will be overwhelming.

    Read More
  51. Z-man says:

    This marvelous revelation from Wikipedia: “In July 2016, the U.S. Air Force stated they would not release the estimated cost for the B-21 contract with Northrop Grumman. The Air Force argued releasing the cost would reveal too much information about the classified project to potential adversaries.” As, for example, taxpayers.

    Hilarious and unfortunately true.

    Read More
  52. Erebus says:
    @The Alarmist

    "The aircraft relies on the assumption that, in thirteen years when it enters service, anti-stealth technology will not have reached the point of making it even more obviously useless."
     
    It will still be good for terrorizing ... sorry ... for policing rogue states like N. Korea, Serbia, Yemen, and Syria.

    I don’t believe the F21 will ever get off the drawing board, much less off the ground. The next financial crisis is not that far away, and it will take the US out of the Empire business.

    By then, whatever’s left of the USM will have to satisfy itself with bombing Cuba, or perhaps the Bahamas. If they can’t afford the fuel, they can always bomb Arkansas.

    Read More
  53. Che Guava says:
    @Anon
    Arms Race aside, China needs to win the Charms Race.. and one way is by banning the horrible treatment of dogs and cats.

    one way is by banning the horrible treatment of dogs and cats.

    If you mean eating them, why not? Cats are cruel predators, domestic cats in the wild should be wiped out.

    I’ve eaten horse and whale, not an everyday thing, but tasty. I know that is also shocking to most westerners, except that eating horse meat is common in continental Europe.

    In New Zealand, the government recently announced a programme to protect and restore its unique populations of ground-dwelling birds. Interestingly, feral ‘domestic’ cats were conspicuously not among the introduced species listed for extermination, so the effort is bound to fail.

    As for the conditions the animals in China are kept in before being on the table, I agree, but in the case of cats, don’t care too much.

    Not a hater of the domestic cat, kept one kindly once (died of feline distemper, no possible treatment), but generally find fanatical human cat lovers pretty horrible, and their places, if urban, always stink of cat urine.

    The Internet cat cult also sucks.

    Westerners who keep pit-bull terriers and similar breeds, are more often than not cruel to them to bring out the nastiness bred into those varieties.

    Etc.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rurik

    but in the case of cats, don’t care too much.
     
    I was very effected once by a video I saw of a fur process in Asia (not sure if it was China or not) where the guy used some long tweezer-like clamps to grab the terrified cats and immersed them in a vat of boiling water and then proceeded to skin the animal alive. The guy was very perfunctory about the whole thing, as if the animal was like a clump of wood or something he was working with. I thought how hard would it be just to kill the pitiful creature first. But I guess the point would be lost on the people doing such things.

    I don't know whether or not its a case of people not understanding that animals feel pain- just like we do, or if they simply don't care one whit how much pain the animal feels. There's a video at the lower part of this link, but I don't advise clicking on it.

    ***warning***

    https://fightdogmeat.com/2017/03/20/china-dog-skinned-alive-fur/

    I only post it to show how wildly different people can be in their treatment of animals. I'd love to know if it's strictly cultural, or if there's something deeper going on. (I suspect so. Everything I know about Western people and culture is that they will expend the cost of the bullet to shoot the lame horse, rather than let it die slowly. And Western man's love of dogs is legendary)
  54. @Китайский дурак
    I do suspect that an overwhelming majority of the commentators above neither know the Mandarin language, nor have among close friends and acquaintances someone who actually have long experiences inside the Chinese contemporary society. I have recently taken rides in the new Chinese bullet trains. They are good. Give credit where credit is due. But Chinese cultural values? Chinese civilizational conquest of the world??? Hahaha...

    No they don’t. I would love to ride that train. The last time I took train it was ying zuo from Shanghai to Urumqi 3 days ride with spitting and throwing garbage Chinese inside and sub zero temperatures outside with water frozen in lavatories. Now that’s obvious progress since 1989. Agree about Chinese conquest of the world. Not gonna happen. Neither civilizational, nor cultural or military.

    Read More
  55. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Stebbing Heuer
    The Canadians joined both wars earlier than the United States, and fought for longer than the United States.

    This is the first truly offensive comment I've read in my time here at Unz.

    Believe me, I’ve read many, and I’ve only been reading for a few months. But this fellow combines rather considerable amounts both of obnoxiousness and stupidity to a measure which is rare here.

    He seems to be right about the Americanization of Canada, though. What happened to the Tory country that sheltered the Loyalists and beat the U.S. in 1812?

    Read More
  56. Che Guava says:

    As always, good lines Fred, many great comparison pics, but from the pics of the Chinese high-speed trains, they are clearly copied from recent Japanese designs.

    Japanese consortia bid for several stages in the developments in China, a few early successes for minor things, and automated safety, but China just stole a lot of tech.

    Don’t forget, as we see here, when the bullet trains are extended, local and high-speed rail on standard track is privatised and cut down, so the hell of long-distance buses becomes the only affordable means.

    I suppose that the older trunk-lines in China were less developed, but I look at old maps, and keep maps from the time-table books here, to track the shrinkage as the bullet-train lines expand.

    Although Japan was keeping the shrinkage to a minimum, the portion that was ripped up was tragic but very small. Privatised, another matter.

    Ride one bullet train, you see nothing. The first two or three times, the speed and speed of change to the view is interesting. What, as a child, annoyed me, people closing the curtain, even if no glare. It then becomes boring. Even when I am having an unlimited travel pass, including bullet trains, I will choose the local branch or trunk lines most of the time, because it is more interesting.

    Read More
  57. Agent76 says:

    MAY 18 2017 Two Chinese Fighter Jets Intercept U.S. Plane Over East China Sea, Officials Say

    Two Chinese fighter jets intercepted a U.S. “sniffer” plane over the East China Sea, two U.S. military officials told NBC News on Thursday.

    http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/two-chinese-fighter-jets-intercept-u-s-plane-officials-say-n761931?cid=eml_onsite

    Read More
  58. Agent76 says:

    Mar 25, 2016 Is China Ready to Challenge the Dollar?

    Introduction to the report: Is China Ready to Challenge the Dollar? Internationalization of the Renminbi and Its Implications for the United States.

    Read More
  59. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    In the early 80′s, 20% of Chinese work force were illiterate or semi-illiterate, and less than 1% were college educated. In 1991, the year the Soviet Union dissolved, China’s GDP was 15 times smaller than that of the US. China still has a long way to go before catching up with the US.

    Read More
  60. @Daniel Chieh
    Seems like one can blow the other to pieces. Too much butter and turning into a race of nerds is why the Mongols beat us up and took our lunch money.

    The Song’s military tech was far better than the Mongols and so were its generals.
    But their Emperors sucked, a general who would become popular after a big victory would be seen as a threat to the dynasty.

    To put an end to this nonsense, an intervention was then. Some people decided the solution went by a name, that of Genghis Khan who would later make Qiu Chuji of the Dragon Gate sect head of all religious affairs among other things.

    And the Yuan would expanded China’s territory like a demon. The Han had become too enamoured of Sun Zi’s dictum of winning wars without fighting. Pacifist attitudes like good sons don’t become soldiers don’t make for a strong nation. The Manchurians would later re-established much of the Yuan’s territorial boundaries where the Ming had failed.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sergey Krieger
    Song was losing not just to Mongols, but to czhurzhen and kidan too.hardly sign of good military and military leadership especially considering Song wealth and numbers.
  61. @ThatDamnGood
    The Song's military tech was far better than the Mongols and so were its generals.
    But their Emperors sucked, a general who would become popular after a big victory would be seen as a threat to the dynasty.

    To put an end to this nonsense, an intervention was then. Some people decided the solution went by a name, that of Genghis Khan who would later make Qiu Chuji of the Dragon Gate sect head of all religious affairs among other things.

    And the Yuan would expanded China's territory like a demon. The Han had become too enamoured of Sun Zi's dictum of winning wars without fighting. Pacifist attitudes like good sons don't become soldiers don't make for a strong nation. The Manchurians would later re-established much of the Yuan's territorial boundaries where the Ming had failed.

    Song was losing not just to Mongols, but to czhurzhen and kidan too.hardly sign of good military and military leadership especially considering Song wealth and numbers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ThatDamnGood
    First para, last sentence.

    Now what did you think happened to the good generals?
  62. US Nuclear Weapon Upgrade Program: “CBO estimates that nuclear forces will cost $348 billion between FY 2015 and FY 2024. Three independent estimates put the expected total cost over the next 30 years at as much as $1 trillion.

    Gee, I don’t know if China will lend us that much.

    Those new carriers they want won’t last an hour with today’s armaments. China only builds them to encourage us to go even broker, faster. They are so obsolete, but don’t tell the brass that.

    http://www.robertmagill.wordpress.com

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    Robert Magill:

    I believe that Admiral Rickover only gave carrier groups lifetimes of minutes in modern warfare.
  63. @Sergey Krieger
    Song was losing not just to Mongols, but to czhurzhen and kidan too.hardly sign of good military and military leadership especially considering Song wealth and numbers.

    First para, last sentence.

    Now what did you think happened to the good generals?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    In an amazing historical development, writing eight-legged essays apparently teaches you nothing about warfare.
  64. Dan Hayes says:
    @Robert Magill

    US Nuclear Weapon Upgrade Program: “CBO estimates that nuclear forces will cost $348 billion between FY 2015 and FY 2024. Three independent estimates put the expected total cost over the next 30 years at as much as $1 trillion.
     
    Gee, I don't know if China will lend us that much.

    Those new carriers they want won't last an hour with today's armaments. China only builds them to encourage us to go even broker, faster. They are so obsolete, but don't tell the brass that.

    www.robertmagill.wordpress.com

    Robert Magill:

    I believe that Admiral Rickover only gave carrier groups lifetimes of minutes in modern warfare.

    Read More
  65. @Timur The Lame
    As a side note to this article it always stuck in my craw the criteria for the naming of aircraft carriers. Gerald Ford? Seriously?

    Following the pattern of Idiocracy (sic) can we expect future aircraft carriers to be named the USS Anthony Weiner, USS Caitlyn Jenner, USS Mike Tyson? ( although the last one would actually be cool).

    On a serious note, Ford has always been a favorite of mine even before I became a deplorable cynic. A prototypical politician in a safe district with cookie cut credentials (U of Michigan, football) wending himself towards house leadership BECAUSE he is a mediocracy. The real powers in the pre Clinton era wanted a corn fed non-confrontational figure to add legitimacy to their crimes. Witness his signing off on the Warren Commission's comic books and 'Pappy' Bush bringing this up to reinforce the commission's legitimacy at Jerry's funeral (when he was not otherwise bringing up on a Japanese politician).

    Because Karma is real and aircraft carriers are yesterdays battleships perhaps the USS Gerald R. Ford will be the first to be sunk. The USS Ronald Reagan had to reverse course after being radioactively doused by Fukushima.

    Man plans ,God laughs and Davey Jones' locker awaits all awkward floatables.

    - Cheers

    Following the pattern of Idiocracy (sic) can we expect future aircraft carriers to be named the USS Anthony Weiner, USS Caitlyn Jenner, USS Mike Tyson?

    Some years ago, left wing nuts wanted a ship to be named the USS Harvey Milk. Even Washington DC Democrats wouldn’t go for that.

    Read More
  66. @ThatDamnGood
    First para, last sentence.

    Now what did you think happened to the good generals?

    In an amazing historical development, writing eight-legged essays apparently teaches you nothing about warfare.

    Read More
  67. Rurik says: • Website
    @Che Guava

    one way is by banning the horrible treatment of dogs and cats.
     
    If you mean eating them, why not? Cats are cruel predators, domestic cats in the wild should be wiped out.

    I've eaten horse and whale, not an everyday thing, but tasty. I know that is also shocking to most westerners, except that eating horse meat is common in continental Europe.

    In New Zealand, the government recently announced a programme to protect and restore its unique populations of ground-dwelling birds. Interestingly, feral 'domestic' cats were conspicuously not among the introduced species listed for extermination, so the effort is bound to fail.

    As for the conditions the animals in China are kept in before being on the table, I agree, but in the case of cats, don't care too much.

    Not a hater of the domestic cat, kept one kindly once (died of feline distemper, no possible treatment), but generally find fanatical human cat lovers pretty horrible, and their places, if urban, always stink of cat urine.

    The Internet cat cult also sucks.

    Westerners who keep pit-bull terriers and similar breeds, are more often than not cruel to them to bring out the nastiness bred into those varieties.

    Etc.

    but in the case of cats, don’t care too much.

    I was very effected once by a video I saw of a fur process in Asia (not sure if it was China or not) where the guy used some long tweezer-like clamps to grab the terrified cats and immersed them in a vat of boiling water and then proceeded to skin the animal alive. The guy was very perfunctory about the whole thing, as if the animal was like a clump of wood or something he was working with. I thought how hard would it be just to kill the pitiful creature first. But I guess the point would be lost on the people doing such things.

    I don’t know whether or not its a case of people not understanding that animals feel pain- just like we do, or if they simply don’t care one whit how much pain the animal feels. There’s a video at the lower part of this link, but I don’t advise clicking on it.

    ***warning***

    https://fightdogmeat.com/2017/03/20/china-dog-skinned-alive-fur/

    I only post it to show how wildly different people can be in their treatment of animals. I’d love to know if it’s strictly cultural, or if there’s something deeper going on. (I suspect so. Everything I know about Western people and culture is that they will expend the cost of the bullet to shoot the lame horse, rather than let it die slowly. And Western man’s love of dogs is legendary)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

    I only post it to show how wildly different people can be in their treatment of animals. I’d love to know if it’s strictly cultural, or if there’s something deeper going on. (I suspect so. Everything I know about Western people and culture is that they will expend the cost of the bullet to shoot the lame horse, rather than let it die slowly. And Western man’s love of dogs is legendary).
     
    Western mollycoddling of animals is a distinctly modern, explicitly popular phenomenon. In the history of the West there have been innumerable experiments, mutilations, and vivisections of animals, not to mention all the bear baiting, cockfighting, dog fighting, and sport hunting that went on and still goes on. What any rancher does to de-horn a bull is enough to make a city slicker squirm and puke, and our grandfathers used to drown sacks of kittens without troubled consciences. Agricultural people are distinctly unsentimental when it comes to animals.
    , @Che Guava
    I am on slow-connection mode now, so can't easily view it now, my post was intended to annoy the original poster, although I do sincerely mean my comments about feral domestic cats, and cat lovers.

    I am disagreeing with many points made by the OP who was replying to your reply to me.

    So will say a few things that I do know about.

    The Ainu particularly revered dogs and bears.

    Bear-baiting in Japan was often an anti-Ainu thing.

    The only interesting dog breed to be made in Japan was the Akita dog (looks like a mini-wolf), and, I cannot be sure, but think twice it was from the Ainu. If you look at old pictures of towns and so on, to the south, the only dogs are scavengers.

    In China, of course, toy dogs.

    For sure, most of the selective breeding was in Europe. Same with horses.

    As I have said before here, the attempted Mongol invasion did succeed, they did not take over, but the shogunate at the time fell, and populations of the Mongol invasion's ponies remain.

    Excuse my reply if a little incomprehisive, must sleep.
  68. Biff says:
    @Erebus

    I have recently taken rides in the new Chinese bullet trains. They are good.
     
    IMHO, they're an awesome accomplishment. They're fast, comfortable, run dead on time, and cover almost all of China. They're also almost always full so getting a ticket over the counter for the next train is rarely possible on popular routes.
    China has built some 19,000km (12,000 miles) of hi-speed rail, along with countless stations. They're all inter-connected to new ferry & shipping terminals, new airports and new metro rail systems. That all of this was physically built in little more than 1.5 decades beggars belief.

    You are also quite right about Chinese "civilizational conquest of the world". Ain't gonna happen. Neither the language, nor the culture works outside of China. But money and development talks everywhere, and that's what China is focussing on. Bringing the obviously successful Chinese development model to others is what will cement China's place in the world.

    You are also quite right about Chinese “civilizational conquest of the world”. Ain’t gonna happen. Neither the language, nor the culture works outside of China.

    Clearly many don’t understand China or the term “Middle Kingdom”. They already believe their country is the center of the universe; why would they want to crusade outside of it like a Baptist Ministry?
    They don’t because they don’t see much point in it, and when they do go abroad to live they tend to stick to their Chinatowns.

    If there language and culture spreads, it will mostly be done by others that find an interest in it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Erebus

    Clearly many don’t understand China or the term “Middle Kingdom”. They already believe their country is the center of the universe
     
    Chinese civilization is certainly not alone in that. It's a belief common to all peoples, and especially to their civilizations. Think about what the word "Mediterranean" means, or "All roads lead to Rome", or the ideology behind the Aztecs' mass ritual sacrifice. Or... American Exceptionalism.
  69. MBlanc46 says:

    They will bury us. And we made the shovel and are handing it to them.

    Read More
  70. MarkinLA says:

    Sunway TaihuLight, World’s most powerful supercomputer, a Chinese design built with Chinese silicon. China leads the planet in supercomputers, both in power and numbers.

    Not important as it is jts another massively parallel design with not very fast microprocessor cores at its heart. Anybody who wants to can build something similar. The issue with these processors is building the software that can turn a problem into parallel processing streams or many of the processors sit idle waiting for something else to finish.

    If building the fastest parallel processor were really that important the NSA and CIA would have banks of them.

    Read More
  71. @Rurik

    but in the case of cats, don’t care too much.
     
    I was very effected once by a video I saw of a fur process in Asia (not sure if it was China or not) where the guy used some long tweezer-like clamps to grab the terrified cats and immersed them in a vat of boiling water and then proceeded to skin the animal alive. The guy was very perfunctory about the whole thing, as if the animal was like a clump of wood or something he was working with. I thought how hard would it be just to kill the pitiful creature first. But I guess the point would be lost on the people doing such things.

    I don't know whether or not its a case of people not understanding that animals feel pain- just like we do, or if they simply don't care one whit how much pain the animal feels. There's a video at the lower part of this link, but I don't advise clicking on it.

    ***warning***

    https://fightdogmeat.com/2017/03/20/china-dog-skinned-alive-fur/

    I only post it to show how wildly different people can be in their treatment of animals. I'd love to know if it's strictly cultural, or if there's something deeper going on. (I suspect so. Everything I know about Western people and culture is that they will expend the cost of the bullet to shoot the lame horse, rather than let it die slowly. And Western man's love of dogs is legendary)

    I only post it to show how wildly different people can be in their treatment of animals. I’d love to know if it’s strictly cultural, or if there’s something deeper going on. (I suspect so. Everything I know about Western people and culture is that they will expend the cost of the bullet to shoot the lame horse, rather than let it die slowly. And Western man’s love of dogs is legendary).

    Western mollycoddling of animals is a distinctly modern, explicitly popular phenomenon. In the history of the West there have been innumerable experiments, mutilations, and vivisections of animals, not to mention all the bear baiting, cockfighting, dog fighting, and sport hunting that went on and still goes on. What any rancher does to de-horn a bull is enough to make a city slicker squirm and puke, and our grandfathers used to drown sacks of kittens without troubled consciences. Agricultural people are distinctly unsentimental when it comes to animals.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rurik

    our grandfathers used to drown sacks of kittens without troubled consciences.
     
    they did so out of compassion. They went to the trouble to kill them so they didn't starve to death.

    Agricultural people are distinctly unsentimental when it comes to animals.
     
    I was raised on a farm. I've killed and butchered many, many animals, both domesticated and wild. But no one ever had to tell me to make the death as quick and painless as possible. I did so instinctively. Intuitively, because I never wanted the animal to suffer needlessly.

    One of my most edifying experiences growing up was during the season that the yearlings are converted into steers. The sound that these animals make during this process haunts you when you're a young boy. And it was all just part of animal husbandry, nothing sinister about, (not that the young bull would agree with that I'm betting ; )

    But I'm no Peta type. I get that we eat animals and so forth, but I hate cruelty, in any form.

    I'll never forget a video I saw of what some of the blacks in Zimbabwe did to the white owned cattle when they were terrorizing the whites off their farms. They hacked the back tendon of the back legs of the animal and it would try to walk but wailed in excruciating pain. This was deliberate, they wanted the animal to suffer in extreme pain, and as all farmers know, cows have a high tolerance for pain. But the waling of those cows in that video, and how they struggled to walk, was a bit much for me.

    You don't have to be a bleeding heart Peta type to be outraged at the cruelty that humans can visit upon these animals.

    I also think that the worst sin that we humans are doing, is not what we do to each other, but rather what we're doing to this planet. How we're mindlessly overpopulating it blinded by our infinite greed, until the point where there will be no more wild animals of any kind for future generations to enjoy.

    Perhaps it's because I was born on a farm and have enjoyed the wild so much, that I value animals and wild places and their intrinsic value to our lives and the bounty of this earth. To destroy it all utterly is the greatest sin there is. And especially why - greed.

    Infinite greed.

    It seems like it's often hunters, like Teddy Roosevelt or fishermen like Jacque Cousteau who end up trying to explain to people that wild places and wild animals deserve to exist for their own sake, and that blindly destroying them all is a terrible, unforgivable enormity.

    sorry if this is too far off topic
  72. Erebus says:
    @Biff

    You are also quite right about Chinese “civilizational conquest of the world”. Ain’t gonna happen. Neither the language, nor the culture works outside of China.
     
    Clearly many don't understand China or the term "Middle Kingdom". They already believe their country is the center of the universe; why would they want to crusade outside of it like a Baptist Ministry?
    They don't because they don't see much point in it, and when they do go abroad to live they tend to stick to their Chinatowns.

    If there language and culture spreads, it will mostly be done by others that find an interest in it.

    Clearly many don’t understand China or the term “Middle Kingdom”. They already believe their country is the center of the universe

    Chinese civilization is certainly not alone in that. It’s a belief common to all peoples, and especially to their civilizations. Think about what the word “Mediterranean” means, or “All roads lead to Rome”, or the ideology behind the Aztecs’ mass ritual sacrifice. Or… American Exceptionalism.

    Read More
  73. Che Guava says:
    @Rurik

    but in the case of cats, don’t care too much.
     
    I was very effected once by a video I saw of a fur process in Asia (not sure if it was China or not) where the guy used some long tweezer-like clamps to grab the terrified cats and immersed them in a vat of boiling water and then proceeded to skin the animal alive. The guy was very perfunctory about the whole thing, as if the animal was like a clump of wood or something he was working with. I thought how hard would it be just to kill the pitiful creature first. But I guess the point would be lost on the people doing such things.

    I don't know whether or not its a case of people not understanding that animals feel pain- just like we do, or if they simply don't care one whit how much pain the animal feels. There's a video at the lower part of this link, but I don't advise clicking on it.

    ***warning***

    https://fightdogmeat.com/2017/03/20/china-dog-skinned-alive-fur/

    I only post it to show how wildly different people can be in their treatment of animals. I'd love to know if it's strictly cultural, or if there's something deeper going on. (I suspect so. Everything I know about Western people and culture is that they will expend the cost of the bullet to shoot the lame horse, rather than let it die slowly. And Western man's love of dogs is legendary)

    I am on slow-connection mode now, so can’t easily view it now, my post was intended to annoy the original poster, although I do sincerely mean my comments about feral domestic cats, and cat lovers.

    I am disagreeing with many points made by the OP who was replying to your reply to me.

    So will say a few things that I do know about.

    The Ainu particularly revered dogs and bears.

    Bear-baiting in Japan was often an anti-Ainu thing.

    The only interesting dog breed to be made in Japan was the Akita dog (looks like a mini-wolf), and, I cannot be sure, but think twice it was from the Ainu. If you look at old pictures of towns and so on, to the south, the only dogs are scavengers.

    In China, of course, toy dogs.

    For sure, most of the selective breeding was in Europe. Same with horses.

    As I have said before here, the attempted Mongol invasion did succeed, they did not take over, but the shogunate at the time fell, and populations of the Mongol invasion’s ponies remain.

    Excuse my reply if a little incomprehisive, must sleep.

    Read More
  74. Rurik says: • Website
    @Intelligent Dasein

    I only post it to show how wildly different people can be in their treatment of animals. I’d love to know if it’s strictly cultural, or if there’s something deeper going on. (I suspect so. Everything I know about Western people and culture is that they will expend the cost of the bullet to shoot the lame horse, rather than let it die slowly. And Western man’s love of dogs is legendary).
     
    Western mollycoddling of animals is a distinctly modern, explicitly popular phenomenon. In the history of the West there have been innumerable experiments, mutilations, and vivisections of animals, not to mention all the bear baiting, cockfighting, dog fighting, and sport hunting that went on and still goes on. What any rancher does to de-horn a bull is enough to make a city slicker squirm and puke, and our grandfathers used to drown sacks of kittens without troubled consciences. Agricultural people are distinctly unsentimental when it comes to animals.

    our grandfathers used to drown sacks of kittens without troubled consciences.

    they did so out of compassion. They went to the trouble to kill them so they didn’t starve to death.

    Agricultural people are distinctly unsentimental when it comes to animals.

    I was raised on a farm. I’ve killed and butchered many, many animals, both domesticated and wild. But no one ever had to tell me to make the death as quick and painless as possible. I did so instinctively. Intuitively, because I never wanted the animal to suffer needlessly.

    One of my most edifying experiences growing up was during the season that the yearlings are converted into steers. The sound that these animals make during this process haunts you when you’re a young boy. And it was all just part of animal husbandry, nothing sinister about, (not that the young bull would agree with that I’m betting ; )

    But I’m no Peta type. I get that we eat animals and so forth, but I hate cruelty, in any form.

    I’ll never forget a video I saw of what some of the blacks in Zimbabwe did to the white owned cattle when they were terrorizing the whites off their farms. They hacked the back tendon of the back legs of the animal and it would try to walk but wailed in excruciating pain. This was deliberate, they wanted the animal to suffer in extreme pain, and as all farmers know, cows have a high tolerance for pain. But the waling of those cows in that video, and how they struggled to walk, was a bit much for me.

    You don’t have to be a bleeding heart Peta type to be outraged at the cruelty that humans can visit upon these animals.

    I also think that the worst sin that we humans are doing, is not what we do to each other, but rather what we’re doing to this planet. How we’re mindlessly overpopulating it blinded by our infinite greed, until the point where there will be no more wild animals of any kind for future generations to enjoy.

    Perhaps it’s because I was born on a farm and have enjoyed the wild so much, that I value animals and wild places and their intrinsic value to our lives and the bounty of this earth. To destroy it all utterly is the greatest sin there is. And especially why – greed.

    Infinite greed.

    It seems like it’s often hunters, like Teddy Roosevelt or fishermen like Jacque Cousteau who end up trying to explain to people that wild places and wild animals deserve to exist for their own sake, and that blindly destroying them all is a terrible, unforgivable enormity.

    sorry if this is too far off topic

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    FWIW, the Anglos did always seem to particularly care for animals - recall Scott's doomed Polar expedition because he did not want to "maximize use of dogs" as beast of burden, then meat.

    I personally have a soft spot for animals, but I try not to let it overwhelm me too much.
    , @denk

    sorry if this is too far off topic
     
    Yes its way off, OT !

    BTW, I heard China is gonna ban the annual dog meat festival following a petition signed by tens of million people. [1]

    Just wondering, where's the anti war movement in 'animal loving' anglo sphere ?
    Is dropping MOAB, 'Daisy cutters', D.U., Napalm, 'hellfires' onto humans and their pets on a daily basis,
    any less vile than dog eating in a small town in China ? [2]



    [1]
    Dog eating is hardly a national
    pass time in China , as trumpeted by
    western MSM.

    [2]
    Thats what the western press call the Yulin dog festival , vile, notorious, inhuman blah blah blah
  75. @Rurik

    our grandfathers used to drown sacks of kittens without troubled consciences.
     
    they did so out of compassion. They went to the trouble to kill them so they didn't starve to death.

    Agricultural people are distinctly unsentimental when it comes to animals.
     
    I was raised on a farm. I've killed and butchered many, many animals, both domesticated and wild. But no one ever had to tell me to make the death as quick and painless as possible. I did so instinctively. Intuitively, because I never wanted the animal to suffer needlessly.

    One of my most edifying experiences growing up was during the season that the yearlings are converted into steers. The sound that these animals make during this process haunts you when you're a young boy. And it was all just part of animal husbandry, nothing sinister about, (not that the young bull would agree with that I'm betting ; )

    But I'm no Peta type. I get that we eat animals and so forth, but I hate cruelty, in any form.

    I'll never forget a video I saw of what some of the blacks in Zimbabwe did to the white owned cattle when they were terrorizing the whites off their farms. They hacked the back tendon of the back legs of the animal and it would try to walk but wailed in excruciating pain. This was deliberate, they wanted the animal to suffer in extreme pain, and as all farmers know, cows have a high tolerance for pain. But the waling of those cows in that video, and how they struggled to walk, was a bit much for me.

    You don't have to be a bleeding heart Peta type to be outraged at the cruelty that humans can visit upon these animals.

    I also think that the worst sin that we humans are doing, is not what we do to each other, but rather what we're doing to this planet. How we're mindlessly overpopulating it blinded by our infinite greed, until the point where there will be no more wild animals of any kind for future generations to enjoy.

    Perhaps it's because I was born on a farm and have enjoyed the wild so much, that I value animals and wild places and their intrinsic value to our lives and the bounty of this earth. To destroy it all utterly is the greatest sin there is. And especially why - greed.

    Infinite greed.

    It seems like it's often hunters, like Teddy Roosevelt or fishermen like Jacque Cousteau who end up trying to explain to people that wild places and wild animals deserve to exist for their own sake, and that blindly destroying them all is a terrible, unforgivable enormity.

    sorry if this is too far off topic

    FWIW, the Anglos did always seem to particularly care for animals – recall Scott’s doomed Polar expedition because he did not want to “maximize use of dogs” as beast of burden, then meat.

    I personally have a soft spot for animals, but I try not to let it overwhelm me too much.

    Read More
  76. Don G. says:

    China spends it’s money wisely, with just enough spent on weapons to deter US aggression. Enough nuclear weapons to get at least a few through to the target. And the Brics alliance continues to get bigger and more powerful.

    Read More
  77. denk says:
    @Rurik

    our grandfathers used to drown sacks of kittens without troubled consciences.
     
    they did so out of compassion. They went to the trouble to kill them so they didn't starve to death.

    Agricultural people are distinctly unsentimental when it comes to animals.
     
    I was raised on a farm. I've killed and butchered many, many animals, both domesticated and wild. But no one ever had to tell me to make the death as quick and painless as possible. I did so instinctively. Intuitively, because I never wanted the animal to suffer needlessly.

    One of my most edifying experiences growing up was during the season that the yearlings are converted into steers. The sound that these animals make during this process haunts you when you're a young boy. And it was all just part of animal husbandry, nothing sinister about, (not that the young bull would agree with that I'm betting ; )

    But I'm no Peta type. I get that we eat animals and so forth, but I hate cruelty, in any form.

    I'll never forget a video I saw of what some of the blacks in Zimbabwe did to the white owned cattle when they were terrorizing the whites off their farms. They hacked the back tendon of the back legs of the animal and it would try to walk but wailed in excruciating pain. This was deliberate, they wanted the animal to suffer in extreme pain, and as all farmers know, cows have a high tolerance for pain. But the waling of those cows in that video, and how they struggled to walk, was a bit much for me.

    You don't have to be a bleeding heart Peta type to be outraged at the cruelty that humans can visit upon these animals.

    I also think that the worst sin that we humans are doing, is not what we do to each other, but rather what we're doing to this planet. How we're mindlessly overpopulating it blinded by our infinite greed, until the point where there will be no more wild animals of any kind for future generations to enjoy.

    Perhaps it's because I was born on a farm and have enjoyed the wild so much, that I value animals and wild places and their intrinsic value to our lives and the bounty of this earth. To destroy it all utterly is the greatest sin there is. And especially why - greed.

    Infinite greed.

    It seems like it's often hunters, like Teddy Roosevelt or fishermen like Jacque Cousteau who end up trying to explain to people that wild places and wild animals deserve to exist for their own sake, and that blindly destroying them all is a terrible, unforgivable enormity.

    sorry if this is too far off topic

    sorry if this is too far off topic

    Yes its way off, OT !

    BTW, I heard China is gonna ban the annual dog meat festival following a petition signed by tens of million people. [1]

    Just wondering, where’s the anti war movement in ‘animal loving’ anglo sphere ?
    Is dropping MOAB, ‘Daisy cutters’, D.U., Napalm, ‘hellfires’ onto humans and their pets on a daily basis,
    any less vile than dog eating in a small town in China ? [2]

    [1]
    Dog eating is hardly a national
    pass time in China , as trumpeted by
    western MSM.

    [2]
    Thats what the western press call the Yulin dog festival , vile, notorious, inhuman blah blah blah

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    I think it is normal in the West to be less desensitized toward killing humans versus killing animals. In a way, its somewhat logical - humans are seen as often pretty horrific individuals, while animals are seen as cuddly and harmless.

    I'm sure if there were videos of ISIS kittens getting killed, people would feel pretty bad here.
  78. @denk

    sorry if this is too far off topic
     
    Yes its way off, OT !

    BTW, I heard China is gonna ban the annual dog meat festival following a petition signed by tens of million people. [1]

    Just wondering, where's the anti war movement in 'animal loving' anglo sphere ?
    Is dropping MOAB, 'Daisy cutters', D.U., Napalm, 'hellfires' onto humans and their pets on a daily basis,
    any less vile than dog eating in a small town in China ? [2]



    [1]
    Dog eating is hardly a national
    pass time in China , as trumpeted by
    western MSM.

    [2]
    Thats what the western press call the Yulin dog festival , vile, notorious, inhuman blah blah blah

    I think it is normal in the West to be less desensitized toward killing humans versus killing animals. In a way, its somewhat logical – humans are seen as often pretty horrific individuals, while animals are seen as cuddly and harmless.

    I’m sure if there were videos of ISIS kittens getting killed, people would feel pretty bad here.

    Read More
    • Replies: @denk
    Im not a Chinese citizen but as animal lover myself, cats, dogs, otters, squirrels, .....the lot, Im glad to see there's a massive movement of animal lovers mushrooming in China. They would often buy en mass from dog vendors , even waylaid the vendors vehilcles to save the animals at times.
    the current petition from millions of animal lovers seems to goad the govn to ban dog meat festival in Yulin. [1]

    What impress me is, Chinese activism isnt limit to animal welfare, there'r numerous cases where the govn had to cancel installation of some Chemical processing plants due to mass protest from the locals who'r worried about the environment hazards.

    Western MSM and China baiters like to gloat on the growing protest movements , sometimes violent, in China. They point to this as sign of misrule by CCP and gleefully predict the collapse of CCP.

    The irony is, while the oft derided Chinese 'slaves' are increasingly standing up for their rights and their pets rights, supposedly free spirited westerners are so docile these days they look like the real 'domesticated' ones.

    I keep asking myself where's the anti war movements when every day you see headlines like 'bombs killed dozens./hundreds of civilians in [fill in the blank], including many women and children.

    Er, not exactly headlines, they usually bury these stories at the bottom of page 34. I guess USAF killing women and children aint news any more, its the new normal.
    They often dont even mention the bombers cuz its assumed that we ought to know who'r bombing civilians on a daily basis by now, you bet it isnt China !

    I wonder if the 'story' happens to be 'bombs killed dozens of children in Somalia and their pet dogs', it might, just might galvanize the murkkans to rise up from their slumber and demand ,
    'enough is enough, lets stop the war and killings' ??

    p.s.

    I've nothing against Rurik, I share his pain on cruelty to animals.

    [1]
    I love all animals especially those cute ones like cats, dogs, otters, squirrels, hamsters, pandas....
    But somehow we have always been a 'cat family', the current one is already 17 yrs old, it'd be 119 in human terms. !
    He's getting weak, When he goes, I dont intend to get another one any more, its the pain.
    We've enough human pain all around.
  79. Rurik says: • Website

    humans are seen as often pretty horrific individuals, while animals are seen as cuddly and harmless.

    not so much cuddly and harmless, as innocent

    there is no malice in animals, if only the same could be said for humans

    have you ever heard of ‘trunking’?

    It’s when low-life scumbags, who raise dogs to be hyper-aggressive, and then toss two of them in the trunk of a car, and drive around with the hip-hop blasting away as the terrified dogs fight to the death in the darkness of the trunk. Cool eh?

    Michael Vick type shit.

    but then when I think of Michael Vick, he was just an amateur. Today’s ‘invite the world / invade the world’s’ elite banksters and Zio-scumbags do with humans what Vick did with dogs. And yes, the Michael Vicks in Washington DC and Brussels are far worse than the football ‘hero’.

    Read More
  80. denk says:
    @Daniel Chieh
    I think it is normal in the West to be less desensitized toward killing humans versus killing animals. In a way, its somewhat logical - humans are seen as often pretty horrific individuals, while animals are seen as cuddly and harmless.

    I'm sure if there were videos of ISIS kittens getting killed, people would feel pretty bad here.

    Im not a Chinese citizen but as animal lover myself, cats, dogs, otters, squirrels, …..the lot, Im glad to see there’s a massive movement of animal lovers mushrooming in China. They would often buy en mass from dog vendors , even waylaid the vendors vehilcles to save the animals at times.
    the current petition from millions of animal lovers seems to goad the govn to ban dog meat festival in Yulin. [1]

    What impress me is, Chinese activism isnt limit to animal welfare, there’r numerous cases where the govn had to cancel installation of some Chemical processing plants due to mass protest from the locals who’r worried about the environment hazards.

    Western MSM and China baiters like to gloat on the growing protest movements , sometimes violent, in China. They point to this as sign of misrule by CCP and gleefully predict the collapse of CCP.

    The irony is, while the oft derided Chinese ‘slaves’ are increasingly standing up for their rights and their pets rights, supposedly free spirited westerners are so docile these days they look like the real ‘domesticated‘ ones.

    I keep asking myself where’s the anti war movements when every day you see headlines like ‘bombs killed dozens./hundreds of civilians in [fill in the blank], including many women and children.

    Er, not exactly headlines, they usually bury these stories at the bottom of page 34. I guess USAF killing women and children aint news any more, its the new normal.
    They often dont even mention the bombers cuz its assumed that we ought to know who’r bombing civilians on a daily basis by now, you bet it isnt China !

    I wonder if the ‘story’ happens to be ‘bombs killed dozens of children in Somalia and their pet dogs‘, it might, just might galvanize the murkkans to rise up from their slumber and demand ,
    enough is enough, lets stop the war and killings’ ??

    p.s.

    I’ve nothing against Rurik, I share his pain on cruelty to animals.

    [1]
    I love all animals especially those cute ones like cats, dogs, otters, squirrels, hamsters, pandas….
    But somehow we have always been a ‘cat family’, the current one is already 17 yrs old, it’d be 119 in human terms. !
    He’s getting weak, When he goes, I dont intend to get another one any more, its the pain.
    We’ve enough human pain all around.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    The Chinese people largely don't fit the mold of the typical East Asian as typified by the Japanese or the Koreans, for better or worse. The brutality of the Cultural Revolution has fundamentally changed the personality phenotype, I think. Sadly, not always for the better.

    Its going to be an interesting few decades.

  81. @denk
    Im not a Chinese citizen but as animal lover myself, cats, dogs, otters, squirrels, .....the lot, Im glad to see there's a massive movement of animal lovers mushrooming in China. They would often buy en mass from dog vendors , even waylaid the vendors vehilcles to save the animals at times.
    the current petition from millions of animal lovers seems to goad the govn to ban dog meat festival in Yulin. [1]

    What impress me is, Chinese activism isnt limit to animal welfare, there'r numerous cases where the govn had to cancel installation of some Chemical processing plants due to mass protest from the locals who'r worried about the environment hazards.

    Western MSM and China baiters like to gloat on the growing protest movements , sometimes violent, in China. They point to this as sign of misrule by CCP and gleefully predict the collapse of CCP.

    The irony is, while the oft derided Chinese 'slaves' are increasingly standing up for their rights and their pets rights, supposedly free spirited westerners are so docile these days they look like the real 'domesticated' ones.

    I keep asking myself where's the anti war movements when every day you see headlines like 'bombs killed dozens./hundreds of civilians in [fill in the blank], including many women and children.

    Er, not exactly headlines, they usually bury these stories at the bottom of page 34. I guess USAF killing women and children aint news any more, its the new normal.
    They often dont even mention the bombers cuz its assumed that we ought to know who'r bombing civilians on a daily basis by now, you bet it isnt China !

    I wonder if the 'story' happens to be 'bombs killed dozens of children in Somalia and their pet dogs', it might, just might galvanize the murkkans to rise up from their slumber and demand ,
    'enough is enough, lets stop the war and killings' ??

    p.s.

    I've nothing against Rurik, I share his pain on cruelty to animals.

    [1]
    I love all animals especially those cute ones like cats, dogs, otters, squirrels, hamsters, pandas....
    But somehow we have always been a 'cat family', the current one is already 17 yrs old, it'd be 119 in human terms. !
    He's getting weak, When he goes, I dont intend to get another one any more, its the pain.
    We've enough human pain all around.

    The Chinese people largely don’t fit the mold of the typical East Asian as typified by the Japanese or the Koreans, for better or worse. The brutality of the Cultural Revolution has fundamentally changed the personality phenotype, I think. Sadly, not always for the better.

    Its going to be an interesting few decades.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Erebus

    "There is great disorder under heaven. The situation is excellent."
     
    Mao's goal was to finally bury China's moribund Confucian ethos to allow a new China to rise along different vectors. It seems that at some point, those vectors fell by the wayside as the chaos unfolded and the most primitive passions took over.
    The century of internal conflict preceding Mao's victory played its part. Without that, I doubt a Mao would be possible. And, without Mao, I doubt a Deng would be possible. By that time, China had fallen to the bottom rank of development and wealth. Its millennia of civilization shredded.
    I don't know how "fundamental" the change actually wound up being, as my experience of the China of a century ago comes from sparse readings, but by all accounts much of the baby had gone out with the bathwater.
    At the end of all that 130-ish yrs of upheaval, it (seemingly) took but a few words from a Deng to unleash a China that was almost the antithesis of the old. Only a few remaining "Chinese characteristics" tagged along. In a little more than a generation, it is the envy of the developing world, and the bane of the developed one, but has more than a few social dysfunctions that it has to sort out if it is to become a world leader. I'm not holding my breath, but they're a lot more likely to get there than the Koreans, much less the Japanese.
    , @AaronB
    Perhaps not all is lost. Here is a little film about Chinese becoming hermits in the mountains -

    https://aeon.co/videos/why-some-chinese-millennials-are-taking-up-the-hermit-s-life-in-the-mountains

    One woman says, if life is just money and reproduction, then it is meaningless. Wonderful woman.

    The good news is that the "new" Chinese character, based as it is on a Western model, will inevitably die of the Western disease - despair. China will burn bright for a short time, like the West, and then the inevitable nihilism will set in. Out of the ashes something new will arise.

    However, maybe you don't consider this "good news".

    In the early 20th century we thought we would save ourselves by learning from the East - but instead, the East learned from us how to destroy itself. We thought the East had something special that made it superior to modernity - now we know better. Humans are fallen beings, wherever they are.

    Nothing can withstand the juggernaut of modernity. It must run its course until it exhausts itself.
  82. Erebus says:
    @Daniel Chieh
    The Chinese people largely don't fit the mold of the typical East Asian as typified by the Japanese or the Koreans, for better or worse. The brutality of the Cultural Revolution has fundamentally changed the personality phenotype, I think. Sadly, not always for the better.

    Its going to be an interesting few decades.

    “There is great disorder under heaven. The situation is excellent.”

    Mao’s goal was to finally bury China’s moribund Confucian ethos to allow a new China to rise along different vectors. It seems that at some point, those vectors fell by the wayside as the chaos unfolded and the most primitive passions took over.
    The century of internal conflict preceding Mao’s victory played its part. Without that, I doubt a Mao would be possible. And, without Mao, I doubt a Deng would be possible. By that time, China had fallen to the bottom rank of development and wealth. Its millennia of civilization shredded.
    I don’t know how “fundamental” the change actually wound up being, as my experience of the China of a century ago comes from sparse readings, but by all accounts much of the baby had gone out with the bathwater.
    At the end of all that 130-ish yrs of upheaval, it (seemingly) took but a few words from a Deng to unleash a China that was almost the antithesis of the old. Only a few remaining “Chinese characteristics” tagged along. In a little more than a generation, it is the envy of the developing world, and the bane of the developed one, but has more than a few social dysfunctions that it has to sort out if it is to become a world leader. I’m not holding my breath, but they’re a lot more likely to get there than the Koreans, much less the Japanese.

    Read More
  83. @Erebus

    "There is great disorder under heaven. The situation is excellent."
     
    Mao's goal was to finally bury China's moribund Confucian ethos to allow a new China to rise along different vectors. It seems that at some point, those vectors fell by the wayside as the chaos unfolded and the most primitive passions took over.
    The century of internal conflict preceding Mao's victory played its part. Without that, I doubt a Mao would be possible. And, without Mao, I doubt a Deng would be possible. By that time, China had fallen to the bottom rank of development and wealth. Its millennia of civilization shredded.
    I don't know how "fundamental" the change actually wound up being, as my experience of the China of a century ago comes from sparse readings, but by all accounts much of the baby had gone out with the bathwater.
    At the end of all that 130-ish yrs of upheaval, it (seemingly) took but a few words from a Deng to unleash a China that was almost the antithesis of the old. Only a few remaining "Chinese characteristics" tagged along. In a little more than a generation, it is the envy of the developing world, and the bane of the developed one, but has more than a few social dysfunctions that it has to sort out if it is to become a world leader. I'm not holding my breath, but they're a lot more likely to get there than the Koreans, much less the Japanese.

    That was very well put.

    Read More
  84. utu says:
    @Erebus

    "There is great disorder under heaven. The situation is excellent."
     
    Mao's goal was to finally bury China's moribund Confucian ethos to allow a new China to rise along different vectors. It seems that at some point, those vectors fell by the wayside as the chaos unfolded and the most primitive passions took over.
    The century of internal conflict preceding Mao's victory played its part. Without that, I doubt a Mao would be possible. And, without Mao, I doubt a Deng would be possible. By that time, China had fallen to the bottom rank of development and wealth. Its millennia of civilization shredded.
    I don't know how "fundamental" the change actually wound up being, as my experience of the China of a century ago comes from sparse readings, but by all accounts much of the baby had gone out with the bathwater.
    At the end of all that 130-ish yrs of upheaval, it (seemingly) took but a few words from a Deng to unleash a China that was almost the antithesis of the old. Only a few remaining "Chinese characteristics" tagged along. In a little more than a generation, it is the envy of the developing world, and the bane of the developed one, but has more than a few social dysfunctions that it has to sort out if it is to become a world leader. I'm not holding my breath, but they're a lot more likely to get there than the Koreans, much less the Japanese.

    How do you explain Taiwan?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Erebus
    Sorry, I don't understand the question.
    Is there something about Taiwan that needs to be explained in the context of my post? Or were you just interested in Taiwan and hoped I could "explain" it?
    , @Daniel Chieh
    Taiwan, obviously, did not undergo the Cultural Revolution. At any rate, Taiwan's society and culture is relatively moribund these days.
  85. Erebus says:
    @utu
    How do you explain Taiwan?

    Sorry, I don’t understand the question.
    Is there something about Taiwan that needs to be explained in the context of my post? Or were you just interested in Taiwan and hoped I could “explain” it?

    Read More
  86. @utu
    How do you explain Taiwan?

    Taiwan, obviously, did not undergo the Cultural Revolution. At any rate, Taiwan’s society and culture is relatively moribund these days.

    Read More
  87. AaronB says:
    @Daniel Chieh
    The Chinese people largely don't fit the mold of the typical East Asian as typified by the Japanese or the Koreans, for better or worse. The brutality of the Cultural Revolution has fundamentally changed the personality phenotype, I think. Sadly, not always for the better.

    Its going to be an interesting few decades.

    Perhaps not all is lost. Here is a little film about Chinese becoming hermits in the mountains –

    https://aeon.co/videos/why-some-chinese-millennials-are-taking-up-the-hermit-s-life-in-the-mountains

    One woman says, if life is just money and reproduction, then it is meaningless. Wonderful woman.

    The good news is that the “new” Chinese character, based as it is on a Western model, will inevitably die of the Western disease – despair. China will burn bright for a short time, like the West, and then the inevitable nihilism will set in. Out of the ashes something new will arise.

    However, maybe you don’t consider this “good news”.

    In the early 20th century we thought we would save ourselves by learning from the East – but instead, the East learned from us how to destroy itself. We thought the East had something special that made it superior to modernity – now we know better. Humans are fallen beings, wherever they are.

    Nothing can withstand the juggernaut of modernity. It must run its course until it exhausts itself.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Well, reproduction is important. But yes, the overemphasis on money is tragic overall - what I find most sad about modernity is the lack of anything sacred, the lack of any real meaning or purpose; where every act is for its own sake, without context or a greater picture.

    Hopefully we can emerge from this somehow wiser.
  88. @AaronB
    Perhaps not all is lost. Here is a little film about Chinese becoming hermits in the mountains -

    https://aeon.co/videos/why-some-chinese-millennials-are-taking-up-the-hermit-s-life-in-the-mountains

    One woman says, if life is just money and reproduction, then it is meaningless. Wonderful woman.

    The good news is that the "new" Chinese character, based as it is on a Western model, will inevitably die of the Western disease - despair. China will burn bright for a short time, like the West, and then the inevitable nihilism will set in. Out of the ashes something new will arise.

    However, maybe you don't consider this "good news".

    In the early 20th century we thought we would save ourselves by learning from the East - but instead, the East learned from us how to destroy itself. We thought the East had something special that made it superior to modernity - now we know better. Humans are fallen beings, wherever they are.

    Nothing can withstand the juggernaut of modernity. It must run its course until it exhausts itself.

    Well, reproduction is important. But yes, the overemphasis on money is tragic overall – what I find most sad about modernity is the lack of anything sacred, the lack of any real meaning or purpose; where every act is for its own sake, without context or a greater picture.

    Hopefully we can emerge from this somehow wiser.

    Read More
  89. Erebus says:

    … what I find most sad about modernity is the lack of anything sacred, the lack of any real meaning or purpose; where every act is for its own sake, without context or a greater picture.

    Amen.

    You may find the conversation I am (was?) having at http://www.unz.com/article/international-campaign-is-criminalizing-criticism-of-israel-as-antisemitism/ interesting.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Indeed I have! I very much enjoyed the exposition of how nihilism has become, in many ways, a dominant philosophy. We very much live in the ashes of civilization, at least as far as culture is concerned.
  90. @Erebus

    ... what I find most sad about modernity is the lack of anything sacred, the lack of any real meaning or purpose; where every act is for its own sake, without context or a greater picture.
     
    Amen.

    You may find the conversation I am (was?) having at http://www.unz.com/article/international-campaign-is-criminalizing-criticism-of-israel-as-antisemitism/ interesting.

    Indeed I have! I very much enjoyed the exposition of how nihilism has become, in many ways, a dominant philosophy. We very much live in the ashes of civilization, at least as far as culture is concerned.

    Read More
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