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An Obsolescent Military
Bombing Everything, Gaining Nothing
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What, precisely, is the US military for, and what, precisely, can it do? In practical terms, how powerful is it? On paper, it is formidable, huge, with carrier battle groups, advanced technology, remarkable submarines, satellites, and so on. What does this translate to?

Military power does not exist independently, but only in relation to specific circumstances. Comparing technical specifications of the T-14 to those of the M1A2, or Su-34 to F-15, or numbers of this to numbers of that, is an interesting intellectual exercise. It means little without reference to specific circumstances.

For example, America is vastly superior militarily to North Korea in every category of arms–but the North has nuclear bombs. It can’t deliver them to the US, but probably can to Seoul. Even without nuclear weapons, it has a large army and large numbers of artillery tubes within range of Seoul. It has an unpredictable government. As Gordon Liddy said, if your responses to provocation are wildly out of proportion to those provocations, and unpredictable, nobody will provoke you.

An American attack by air on the North, the only attack possible short of a preemptive nuclear strike, would offer a high probability of a peninsular war, devastation of Seoul, paralysis of an important trading partner–think Samsung–and an uncertain final outcome. The United States hasn’t the means of getting troops to Korea rapidly in any numbers, and the domestic political results of lots of GIs killed by a serious enemy would be politically grave. The probable cost far exceeds any possible benefit. In practical terms, Washington’s military superiority means nothing with regard to North Korea. Pyongyang knows it.

Or consider the Ukraine. On paper, US forces overall are superior to Russian. Locally, they are not. Russia borders on the Ukraine and could overrun it quickly. The US cannot rapidly bring force to bear except a degree of air power. Air power hasn’t worked against defenseless peasants in many countries. Russia is not a defenseless peasant. Europe, usually docile and obedient to America, is unlikely to engage in a shooting war with Moscow for the benefit of Washington. Europeans are aware that Russia borders on Eastern Europe, which borders on Western Europe. For Washington, fighting Russia in the Ukraine would require a huge effort with seaborne logistics and a national mobilization. Serious wars with nuclear powers do not represent the height of judgement.

Again, Washington’s military superiority means nothing.

Or consider Washington’s dispute with China in the Pacific. China cannot begin to match American naval power. It doesn’t have to. Beijing has focused on anti-ship missiles–read “carrier-killer”–such as the JD21 ballistic missile. How well it works I do not know, but the Chinese are not stupid. Is the risk of finding out worth it? Fast, stealthed, sea-skimming cruise missiles are very cheap compared to carriers, and America’s admirals know that lots of them arriving simultaneously would not have a happy ending.

Having a fleet disabled by China would be intolerable to Washington, but its possible responses would be unappealing. Would it start a conventional war with China with the ghastly global economic consequences? This would not generate allies. Cut China’s oil lanes to the Mid-East and push Beijing toward nuclear war? Destroy the Three Gorges Dam and drown god knows how many people? If China used the war as a pretext for annexing bordering counties? What would Russia do?

The consequences both probable and assured make the adventure unattractive, especially since likely pretexts for a war with China–a few rocks in the Pacific, for example–are too trivial to be worth the certain costs and uncertain outcome. Again, military superiority doesn’t mean much.

We live in a military world fundamentally different from that of the last century. All-out wars between major powers, which is to say nuclear powers, are unlikely since they would last about an hour after they became all-out, and everyone knows it. In WWII Germany could convince itself, reasonably and almost correctly, that Russia would fall in a summer, or the Japanese that a Depression-ridden, unarmed America might decide not to fight. Now, no. Threaten something that a nuclear power regards as vital and you risk frying. So nobody does.

At any rate, nobody has. Fools abound in DC and New York.

What then, in today’s world, is the point of huge conventional forces?

The American military is an upgraded World War II military, designed to fight other militarizes like itself in a world like that which existed during World War II. The Soviet Union was that kind of military. Today there are no such militaries for America to fight. We are not in the same world. Washington seems not to have noticed.

A World War II military is intended to destroy point targets of high value—aircraft, ships, factories, tanks—and to capture crucial territory, such as the enemy’s country. When you have destroyed the Wehrmacht’s heavy weaponry and occupied Germany, you have won. This is the sort of war that militaries have always relished, having much sound and fury and clear goals.

It doesn’t work that way today. Since Korea, half-organized peasant militias have baffled the Pentagon by not having targets of high value or crucial territory. In Afghanistan for example goatherds with rifles could simply disperse, providing no point targets at all, and certainly not of high value. No territory was crucial to them. If the US mounted a huge operation to take Province A, the resistance could just fade into the population or move to Province B. The US would always be victorious but never win anything. Sooner or later America would go away. The world understands this.

ORDER IT NOW

Further, the underlying nature of conflict has changed. For most of history until the Soviet Union evaporated, empires expanded by military conquest. In today’s world, countries have not lost their imperial ambitions, but the approach is no longer military. China seems intent on bringing Eurasia under its hegemony, and advances toward doing it, but its approach is economic, not martial. The Chinese are not warm and fuzzy. They are, however, smart. It is much cheaper and safer to expand commercially than militarily, and wiser to sidestep martial confrontation—in a word, to ignore America. More correctly it is sidestepping the Pentagon.

Military and diplomatic power spring from economic power, and China is proving successful economically. Using commercial clout, she is expanding her influence, but in ways not easily bombed. She is pushing the BRICS alliance, from which the US is excluded. She is enlarging the SCO, from which America is excluded. Perhaps most importantly, she has set up the AIIB, the Asia Infrastructure Investment Bank, which does not include the US but includes Washington’s European allies. These organizations will probably trade mostly not in dollars, a serious threat to Washington’s economic hegemony.

What is the relevance of the Pentagon? How do you bomb a trade agreement?

China enjoys solvency, and hegemonizes enthusiastically with it. Thus in Pakistan it has built the Karakoram Highway from Xian Jiang to Karachi, which will increase trade between the two. It is putting in the two power reactors near Karachi. It is investing in Afghan resources, increasing trade with Iran. . When the US finally leaves, China, without firing a shot, will be predominant in the region.

What is the relevance of aircraft carriers?

Beijing is talking seriously about building more rail lines, including high-speed rail, from itself to Europe, accompanied by fiber-optic lines and so on. This is not just talk. China has the money and a very large network of high-speed rail domestically. (The US has not a single mile.) Google “China-Europe Rail lines.”

What is the Pentagon going to do? Bomb the tracks?

As trade and ease of travel from Berlin to Beijing increase, and as China prospers and wants more European goods, European businessmen will want to cuddle up to that fabulously large market—which will loosen Washington’s grip on the throat of Europe. Say it three times slowly: Eur-asia. Eur-asia. Eur-asia. I promise it is what the Chinese are saying.

What is the Pentagon’s trillion-dollar military going to bomb? Europe? Railways across Kazakhstan? BMW plants?

All of which is to say that while the US military looks formidable, it isn’t particularly useful, and aids China by bankrupting the US. Repeatedly it has demonstrated that it cannot defeat campesinos armed with those most formidable weapons, the AK, the RPG, and the IED. The US does not have the land forces to fight a major or semi-major enemy. It could bomb Iran, with unpredictable consequences, but couldn’t possibly conquer it.

The wars in the Mid-East illustrate the principle nicely. Iraq didn’t work. Libya didn’t work. Iran didn’t back down. ISIS and related curiosities? The Pentagon is again bombing an enemy that can’t fight back—its specialty—but that it seems unable defeat.

Wrong military, wrong enemy, wrong war, wrong world.

(Reprinted from Fred on Everything by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: American Military 
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  1. But lots of dough for the elites’ military-industrial high finance economy. What’s not to like for them, other than if it wren’t to continue and escalate indefinitely, as long as there’s no personal downside for them?

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  2. No use at all against terrestrial enemies. Maybe against insufficiently advanced alien invaders?

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  3. Economic power usually translates into military power. But it’s not always proportionate. The prime example of this is US. If, for example Germany had that kind of economic base like US, they would have had the military not to rule the earth, but to rule the solar system.

    When you are not god at something – just throw billions of dollars at it and hope that it will be enough to fix the problem or at least that no one will notice the shortcomings.

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  4. Fred,

    I always thought you meant well, but after your prior sloppy, ill-informed, lazy, hatchet job of an article I cannot take you seriously. It probably doesn’t matter to you, but I am probably not the only one.

    I believe that one can disagree with another on facts or interpretation and still hold them in high regard. It is hard to respect a person who is intelligent and capable, but lazy, sloppy, and opinionated.

    I intended to read the above article, but after thinking about it a second or two, I did not read it. I just skipped to comments. For the above stated reasons, I now feel that your opinion is not worth much – not even the time it takes to read your article.

    Why am I writing this? I hope that your previous article was a gross lapse in ability and judgement in submitting it for publication. Maybe with a reality check you will come around. My guess is that you hold yourself in too high a regard and myself in too low a regard to be swayed by anything I write. Still, I have tried.

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    • Replies: @Tard Beater
    [Choose a single handle and stick with it, or use Anonymous/Anon. Using multiple handles to disguise your identity is prohibited.]

    How do you know it was lazy and sloppy if you didn't read it? Care to point out where Reed has been "sloppy" or "lazy?" Or do you just always launch knee-jerk insults at authors who rain on your neo-con parade?

    The only one here who is sloppy, ill-informed, and lazy is you, you astroturfing, worthless, vile mongoloid.

    Fuck you and your craven worship of the establishment's ideology. Does indirectly working for Soro's pay well? Get caught in a BLM riot and die by the hand of a vibrant, scumbag.
    , @John Jeremiah Smith

    I now feel that your opinion is not worth much – not even the time it takes to read your article.
     
    You're an ignoramus, focused on remaining so. Good riddance.
    , @Rurik
    Hello Scalpel,

    while I accord with your motives, I'd just like to say I think we should give Fred the benefit of the doubt on that last one. Put it down to the same deluded delirium that afflict so many other-wise intelligent folks.

    If Fred feels he needs to force the issue, sans evidence or exculpation, then I'd agree.. but personally I'd tend to error on the side of amelioration on this one, (if that isn't too vapory [sorry])

    JD21 = DF21D ?

    a serious threat to Washington’s economic hegemony.

    What is the relevance of the Pentagon? How do you bomb a trade agreement?
     
    you reduce the countries that are signing it to smoking rubble

    see: Iraq trading oil in Euros or Libya's gold dinar

    not too much of that going on these days

    in fact, I think they've been outfitted with Rothschild central banks by now

    and lets remember, the US is currently engaged in wars all over the place based on less plausible provocations. (getting Osama in Afghanistan, reconstituting the heroin trade in same, imposing hell on earth in Iraq and Libya and Syria are all wars waged with less justification than a trade agreement. At least that's something)
    , @Jonathan Revusky

    after your prior sloppy, ill-informed, lazy, hatchet job of an article I cannot take you seriously. It probably doesn’t matter to you, but I am probably not the only one.
     
    You're definitely not the only one.

    I intended to read the above article, but after thinking about it a second or two, I did not read it.
     
    Well, I did read it and I can summarize it for you. Let's see.... we spend an awful lot of money on the military and it's all for nothing. Actually, it's probably all for less than nothing..... And also, Elvis is still dead.

    Actually, that last piece of information was not in the article, but I thought maybe people needed to be informed of that as well.
    , @Son of Dixie
    I was where you are about two years ago regarding Fred. He is a joke, he wrotes these articles as way of passive aggression, nothing else. He enjoys to rile up Americans still on American soil by denigrating our nation and our racial stock.

    The previous article calling those who doubt the official 911 story conspiracy hacks, as well as the countless other pro-Mexican and anti-Anglo pieces serve as examples.

    Fred is a self hating White man married to a Mexican woman (of Jewish stock) with a few too many miles on her.
    , @renics
    And why you wrote such a long review if you have not read? Then you can write and shorter, so did not read the article but do not agree with and against. Then there is if you are such a smart simple idea. How can you judge something without reading about it?
  5. The point of having a large military at this point is the profits flowing to defense contractors. The United States no longer has any genuine military threats. Yes the Russians and the Chinese have nuclear weapons and the ability to deliver them to the U.S., and yes, the mainteance of a small deterrent (c 1000 weapons) in secure basing modes is a good idea, but the U.S. has no genuine strategic interests at odds with the PRC or Russia that require significant military forces. The U.S. could have the foreign and military policy of a large Switzerland and 98% of Americans would be better off if it did. Unfortunately, the other 2% are in control.

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  6. Fred,
    Spot on!

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    • Replies: @pyrrhus
    Indeed, Fred has even understated the case. The possibility of America bombing distant targets defended by advanced AA systems is ludicrous. Few of our bombers would come back...
  7. @The Scalpel
    Fred,

    I always thought you meant well, but after your prior sloppy, ill-informed, lazy, hatchet job of an article I cannot take you seriously. It probably doesn't matter to you, but I am probably not the only one.

    I believe that one can disagree with another on facts or interpretation and still hold them in high regard. It is hard to respect a person who is intelligent and capable, but lazy, sloppy, and opinionated.

    I intended to read the above article, but after thinking about it a second or two, I did not read it. I just skipped to comments. For the above stated reasons, I now feel that your opinion is not worth much - not even the time it takes to read your article.

    Why am I writing this? I hope that your previous article was a gross lapse in ability and judgement in submitting it for publication. Maybe with a reality check you will come around. My guess is that you hold yourself in too high a regard and myself in too low a regard to be swayed by anything I write. Still, I have tried.

    [Choose a single handle and stick with it, or use Anonymous/Anon. Using multiple handles to disguise your identity is prohibited.]

    How do you know it was lazy and sloppy if you didn’t read it? Care to point out where Reed has been “sloppy” or “lazy?” Or do you just always launch knee-jerk insults at authors who rain on your neo-con parade?

    The only one here who is sloppy, ill-informed, and lazy is you, you astroturfing, worthless, vile mongoloid.

    Fuck you and your craven worship of the establishment’s ideology. Does indirectly working for Soro’s pay well? Get caught in a BLM riot and die by the hand of a vibrant, scumbag.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Scalpel
    [Actually, "Tard Beater" is the commenter improperly employing multiple handles.]

    As far as "single handle" this is my only handle. I think the space I put in between the words "the" and "scalpel" threw off the system.

    As far as "not reading the article," my comments were clearly stated to be referring to the PREVIOUS article not the current article. I did read the previous article "Tinfoil Hats" etc. My comments were referring to that article, not this one. I have no interested in reading this article for the previously stated reasons. I hope this clears things up.
  8. That’s a comforting thought, Fred. The US military is just a waste of money,can’t be used to fight other powerful military states, especially nuclear armed states, it’s good at wasting tax payer money,it’s a drain on the treasury, it can’t win asymmetric wars against under developed countries however it is the basis of a military- centric American economy. In other words, it’s best for the US to to get rid of the military altogether and restructure the whole economy more productively. Good idea but somehow it’s not going to happen,it’s more likely the US military will bring death and destruction to the country and it’s employees.

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    • Replies: @Joe Wong
    The Americans should take responsibility about their nation's violent foreign policy and destructive military adventures around the world, pointing the finger at the 1% and MIC is cowardice and tries to escape their responsibility for all the crimes against humanity committed by their government.

    After all the USA government is elected by the Americans, meanwhile there are no demonstrations by the Americans to voice their disapproval of their government’s reckless behaviour around the world, it demonstrates the USA government and the Americans are in agreement with what the US government has been doing around the world which reverberates the wishes and will of the Americans.
  9. @Tard Beater
    [Choose a single handle and stick with it, or use Anonymous/Anon. Using multiple handles to disguise your identity is prohibited.]

    How do you know it was lazy and sloppy if you didn't read it? Care to point out where Reed has been "sloppy" or "lazy?" Or do you just always launch knee-jerk insults at authors who rain on your neo-con parade?

    The only one here who is sloppy, ill-informed, and lazy is you, you astroturfing, worthless, vile mongoloid.

    Fuck you and your craven worship of the establishment's ideology. Does indirectly working for Soro's pay well? Get caught in a BLM riot and die by the hand of a vibrant, scumbag.

    [Actually, "Tard Beater" is the commenter improperly employing multiple handles.]

    As far as “single handle” this is my only handle. I think the space I put in between the words “the” and “scalpel” threw off the system.

    As far as “not reading the article,” my comments were clearly stated to be referring to the PREVIOUS article not the current article. I did read the previous article “Tinfoil Hats” etc. My comments were referring to that article, not this one. I have no interested in reading this article for the previously stated reasons. I hope this clears things up.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous

    [Actually, "Tard Beater" is the commenter improperly employing multiple handles.]

    As far as “single handle” this is my only handle. I think the space I put in between the words “the” and “scalpel” threw off the system.
     
    It's Ron Unz dropping in with his comment. Unz has a bizarre obsession with sock puppetry. http://harvardlpr.com/2011/02/28/fear-the-sockpuppets/
  10. Nice article- Fred is making sense.

    Double plus moment: http://www.unz.com/gnxp/the-dead-weight-of-culture/

    We have a definite dead weight of our idiot culture moment.

    Trump should basically play this meme and get us out of our international morass.

    WW2 was a long damned time ago- now it is the war of culture and economics.

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  11. >China has the money and a very large network of high-speed rail domestically. (The US has not a single mile.)<

    fred up your game. see acela corridor. also we ain’t densely packed, yet, like china.

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    • Replies: @Avery
    {see acela corridor}

    Yeah.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acela_Express
    [Operating speed 150 mph (240 km/h) maximum[5]
    84 mph (135 km/h) average
    72 mph (116 km/h) average including stops]


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-speed_rail_in_China
    {consisting mainly of newly built passenger-dedicated lines (PDLs)}

    Nevertheless, I wouldn't go near a Chinese one: they are building stuff like there is no tomorrow, but there seems to be no quality control whatsoever.
    E.g. there have been several incidents of defective escalators (!) sucking in a crushing people. Their Longest Glass Bottom Bridge - quite impressive - was closed two weeks after opening.....no reason given, but we can guess.

    China aside, US infrastructure is crumbling, while we, the American taxpayers are wasting $ trillions on our military and 1,000s of bases all over the world. What the heck for ?
    , @Historian
    The Acela Corridor is not high-speed rail. The fact that you think is it shows how far we have fallen.

    The Acela only makes an average speed of 70 mph end-to-end, from Boston to Washington. There are long stretches of track where it travels 60 mph. There are even some segments built in the 19th century that are limited to 45 mph.

    Sure, it has a few miles of 160 mph track, but what good is that? You have to accelerate up to 160 mph, then decelerate back down to your regular speed. What we have done is the equivalent of building 30 miles of four-lane divided highway in the middle of a two-lane dirt road, and calling it an autobahn.

    True high-speed rail is going from Tokyo to Osaka at an average speed of 132 mph. From Paris to Lyon at 140 mph. From Wuhan to Guangzhou at 170 mph. These trains hit maximum speeds of 170 to 220 mph, but these countries upgraded the entire route to high-speed.

    As for population density, the Acela Corridor is denser than Spain.
  12. @newrouter
    >China has the money and a very large network of high-speed rail domestically. (The US has not a single mile.)<

    fred up your game. see acela corridor. also we ain't densely packed, yet, like china.

    {see acela corridor}

    Yeah.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acela_Express

    [Operating speed 150 mph (240 km/h) maximum[5]
    84 mph (135 km/h) average
    72 mph (116 km/h) average including stops]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-speed_rail_in_China

    {consisting mainly of newly built passenger-dedicated lines (PDLs)}

    Nevertheless, I wouldn’t go near a Chinese one: they are building stuff like there is no tomorrow, but there seems to be no quality control whatsoever.
    E.g. there have been several incidents of defective escalators (!) sucking in a crushing people. Their Longest Glass Bottom Bridge – quite impressive – was closed two weeks after opening…..no reason given, but we can guess.

    China aside, US infrastructure is crumbling, while we, the American taxpayers are wasting $ trillions on our military and 1,000s of bases all over the world. What the heck for ?

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  13. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    The point of our gargantuan military is/are the very issues which it moots–which are precisely all the faults Fred finds with it. In other words, no one else wants to wage conventional wars of aggression precisely because we are preeminent in that domain. So, a lot of trouble is preempted because we carry a big stick. And that nothing is worth something.

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    • Replies: @Avery
    {So, a lot of trouble is preempted because we carry a big stick.}

    Nonsense.

    Because US has such a large military, the tendency is to use it aggressively. US has invaded or attacked dozens of countries since WW2, none of which had threatened much less attacked US.

    How did the American taxpayer benefit from the Vietnam war?
    How did the American taxpayer benefit from the Iraq war?
    The list of misuse of American military to benefit foreign interests or the interests of select American corporations/profiteers at the expense American taxpayer blood and treasure is long.

    The notion that any country would attack US preemptively - with about 6,000-7,000 nukes - is ludicrous, even if US had no superior conventional military.

    Pakistan and India are mortal enemies.
    They have occasional military skirmishes, but refrain from a large war, because both know what comes next.

    {So, a lot of trouble is preempted.....}

    So how did the Big Stick prevent the murder of about 3,000 Americans on American soil. Maybe the Big Stick is not so much a protection against trouble, but a source of trouble? (CIA coined a word for that: Blowback).

    , @Joe Wong
    Why can other countries like NK, Iran, Russia or China get away with much less expensive and smaller military and achieved “no one else wants to wage conventional wars of aggression” against them from any other aggressor particular the USA, but USA cannot? Are you saying the American is stupid, incompetent, corrupted or outright ‘God-fearing’ morally defunct evil ‘inquisitor’?
    , @russian bear
    for the sake of gendalf - explain who would want to attack america with conventional forces - so far as you aver that america's gargantuan military prevents such attack? russia? be assured russia does not care a dead rat's tail about attacking whatever on this planet. it is too enormous and self-content and self-sufficien, to begin with. And the most peaceful "empire" thru last thousands of years, by orthodox christian doctrine. Chinks? they only want to be left alone, especially on the part of american hawks that proclaim all the globe is their 'interest'.
  14. @Anonymous
    The point of our gargantuan military is/are the very issues which it moots--which are precisely all the faults Fred finds with it. In other words, no one else wants to wage conventional wars of aggression precisely because we are preeminent in that domain. So, a lot of trouble is preempted because we carry a big stick. And that nothing is worth something.

    {So, a lot of trouble is preempted because we carry a big stick.}

    Nonsense.

    Because US has such a large military, the tendency is to use it aggressively. US has invaded or attacked dozens of countries since WW2, none of which had threatened much less attacked US.

    How did the American taxpayer benefit from the Vietnam war?
    How did the American taxpayer benefit from the Iraq war?
    The list of misuse of American military to benefit foreign interests or the interests of select American corporations/profiteers at the expense American taxpayer blood and treasure is long.

    The notion that any country would attack US preemptively – with about 6,000-7,000 nukes – is ludicrous, even if US had no superior conventional military.

    Pakistan and India are mortal enemies.
    They have occasional military skirmishes, but refrain from a large war, because both know what comes next.

    {So, a lot of trouble is preempted…..}

    So how did the Big Stick prevent the murder of about 3,000 Americans on American soil. Maybe the Big Stick is not so much a protection against trouble, but a source of trouble? (CIA coined a word for that: Blowback).

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    • Replies: @Talha
    Dang Avery - I believe I agree with every point...just wanted to add to the point you are making that it has been said when someone is carrying a hammer, everything looks like a nail. Perhaps our bloated military necessitates the same effect on our psyche - I mean Senator McCain, is there any problem that he thinks can't be solved by the military?

    Peace.
    , @The Alarmist

    "How did the American taxpayer benefit from the Vietnam war?"
     
    Didn't we get Tang or something like that, or was that the War on the Moon?
    , @Wally
    And the latest 40 billion dollars to 'Israel'.
  15. @The Scalpel
    Fred,

    I always thought you meant well, but after your prior sloppy, ill-informed, lazy, hatchet job of an article I cannot take you seriously. It probably doesn't matter to you, but I am probably not the only one.

    I believe that one can disagree with another on facts or interpretation and still hold them in high regard. It is hard to respect a person who is intelligent and capable, but lazy, sloppy, and opinionated.

    I intended to read the above article, but after thinking about it a second or two, I did not read it. I just skipped to comments. For the above stated reasons, I now feel that your opinion is not worth much - not even the time it takes to read your article.

    Why am I writing this? I hope that your previous article was a gross lapse in ability and judgement in submitting it for publication. Maybe with a reality check you will come around. My guess is that you hold yourself in too high a regard and myself in too low a regard to be swayed by anything I write. Still, I have tried.

    I now feel that your opinion is not worth much – not even the time it takes to read your article.

    You’re an ignoramus, focused on remaining so. Good riddance.

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  16. @The Scalpel
    Fred,

    I always thought you meant well, but after your prior sloppy, ill-informed, lazy, hatchet job of an article I cannot take you seriously. It probably doesn't matter to you, but I am probably not the only one.

    I believe that one can disagree with another on facts or interpretation and still hold them in high regard. It is hard to respect a person who is intelligent and capable, but lazy, sloppy, and opinionated.

    I intended to read the above article, but after thinking about it a second or two, I did not read it. I just skipped to comments. For the above stated reasons, I now feel that your opinion is not worth much - not even the time it takes to read your article.

    Why am I writing this? I hope that your previous article was a gross lapse in ability and judgement in submitting it for publication. Maybe with a reality check you will come around. My guess is that you hold yourself in too high a regard and myself in too low a regard to be swayed by anything I write. Still, I have tried.

    Hello Scalpel,

    while I accord with your motives, I’d just like to say I think we should give Fred the benefit of the doubt on that last one. Put it down to the same deluded delirium that afflict so many other-wise intelligent folks.

    If Fred feels he needs to force the issue, sans evidence or exculpation, then I’d agree.. but personally I’d tend to error on the side of amelioration on this one, (if that isn’t too vapory [sorry])

    JD21 = DF21D ?

    a serious threat to Washington’s economic hegemony.

    What is the relevance of the Pentagon? How do you bomb a trade agreement?

    you reduce the countries that are signing it to smoking rubble

    see: Iraq trading oil in Euros or Libya’s gold dinar

    not too much of that going on these days

    in fact, I think they’ve been outfitted with Rothschild central banks by now

    and lets remember, the US is currently engaged in wars all over the place based on less plausible provocations. (getting Osama in Afghanistan, reconstituting the heroin trade in same, imposing hell on earth in Iraq and Libya and Syria are all wars waged with less justification than a trade agreement. At least that’s something)

    Read More
    • Replies: @John Jeremiah Smith
    Mr. Scalpel is guilty of:

    1. Pissing and moaning
    2. Taking Reed to task for THIS article, when
    3. Mr. Scalpel states he did not read THIS article.

    Diagnosis: Irredeemable stupidity.
    , @Jonathan Revusky

    I’d just like to say I think we should give Fred the benefit of the doubt on that last one.
     
    I was half thinking that we should inaugurate a Will Rogers award of the week. "I never met a man I didn't like".

    I guess if somebody you trusted stabbed you in the back, you'd say: "I think we need to give him the benefit of the doubt. Shucks, he didn't really mean it. I figure his hand slipped..."

  17. All of which is to say that while the US military looks formidable, it isn’t particularly useful, and aids China by bankrupting the US.

    and

    (Fred’s)… previous article was a gross lapse in ability and judgement in submitting it for publication. Maybe with a reality check (he) will come around.

    At the risk of raising Fred’s formidable satirical skills from the depths into which they fell in his “Tin Hat” essay, (taking his intellectual integrity with them) I raise the following possible conspiracy theories:

    - his “Tin Hat” essay was either a socio-political experiment, or a provocation (in the Russian sense) that everyone fell for, and
    - that the Chinese & Russians are “acting aggressively”, just so as to give the Pentagon’s requests for outrageous sums maximum credibility and so hasten the process whereby the USM-I complex bankrupts the US financially as surely as it has bankrupted it morally.

    Neither would surprise me, but then, I see conspiracies everywhere.

    Read More
  18. @Avery
    {So, a lot of trouble is preempted because we carry a big stick.}

    Nonsense.

    Because US has such a large military, the tendency is to use it aggressively. US has invaded or attacked dozens of countries since WW2, none of which had threatened much less attacked US.

    How did the American taxpayer benefit from the Vietnam war?
    How did the American taxpayer benefit from the Iraq war?
    The list of misuse of American military to benefit foreign interests or the interests of select American corporations/profiteers at the expense American taxpayer blood and treasure is long.

    The notion that any country would attack US preemptively - with about 6,000-7,000 nukes - is ludicrous, even if US had no superior conventional military.

    Pakistan and India are mortal enemies.
    They have occasional military skirmishes, but refrain from a large war, because both know what comes next.

    {So, a lot of trouble is preempted.....}

    So how did the Big Stick prevent the murder of about 3,000 Americans on American soil. Maybe the Big Stick is not so much a protection against trouble, but a source of trouble? (CIA coined a word for that: Blowback).

    Dang Avery – I believe I agree with every point…just wanted to add to the point you are making that it has been said when someone is carrying a hammer, everything looks like a nail. Perhaps our bloated military necessitates the same effect on our psyche – I mean Senator McCain, is there any problem that he thinks can’t be solved by the military?

    Peace.

    Read More
  19. @Rurik
    Hello Scalpel,

    while I accord with your motives, I'd just like to say I think we should give Fred the benefit of the doubt on that last one. Put it down to the same deluded delirium that afflict so many other-wise intelligent folks.

    If Fred feels he needs to force the issue, sans evidence or exculpation, then I'd agree.. but personally I'd tend to error on the side of amelioration on this one, (if that isn't too vapory [sorry])

    JD21 = DF21D ?

    a serious threat to Washington’s economic hegemony.

    What is the relevance of the Pentagon? How do you bomb a trade agreement?
     
    you reduce the countries that are signing it to smoking rubble

    see: Iraq trading oil in Euros or Libya's gold dinar

    not too much of that going on these days

    in fact, I think they've been outfitted with Rothschild central banks by now

    and lets remember, the US is currently engaged in wars all over the place based on less plausible provocations. (getting Osama in Afghanistan, reconstituting the heroin trade in same, imposing hell on earth in Iraq and Libya and Syria are all wars waged with less justification than a trade agreement. At least that's something)

    Mr. Scalpel is guilty of:

    1. Pissing and moaning
    2. Taking Reed to task for THIS article, when
    3. Mr. Scalpel states he did not read THIS article.

    Diagnosis: Irredeemable stupidity.

    Read More
    • Agree: Realist
    • Replies: @Rurik

    2. Taking Reed to task for THIS article, when
     
    no

    he was taking him to task for his previous (egregious) article
  20. Since China is copying our military at least we can hope to defeat them, not so much with conflict but rather they’ll fall into domestic chaos with endless ineffective expensive military systems maybe?

    Read More
  21. The US has never had to suffer the consequences of the massive destruction of the homeland like Europe, China, Japan and the ME. For this we should be thankful our military was the finest the world has ever fielded on the battlefield. Our military has done more to free mankind from dictatorial and oppressive governments than any other force on earth.

    However, agreeing with this article we failed to pivot after the fall of the Soviet Union. Post this event massive air, land and sea assets really became obsolete. While US Taxpayers spent billions on a bloated war machine to protect the world our allies were more than willing to let us carry the water well they spent on infrastructure and social programs. Post the fall of the SU no force on earth had the capability to truly threaten the Continental United States. Nuclear was not an option then nor is it now. Once instigated nothing would be worth a crap for a thousand years.

    I’m a 24 year Army retiree (1972 to 1996) and proud to have served. That being said, with the benefit of hind sight, have pretty much reasoned that all the threats presented left us with misguided entanglements all over the world that should have never been entered into.

    Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan and the quagmire called the War on Terror starched from Lybia to Afghanistan have all been needless exercises in failed wisdom from failed politicians, corporatist and bankers making money off both sides of the conflict. Name one country today where the citizens even give a damn about the blood we shed in their defense. One short generation and all is forgotten.

    This is where both Democrats and Republicans, Trump included, are incapable of making the necessary changes needed for a 21st Century economic system. Both have set up a leviathan of tax law, used to buy votes and stifle small business through over regulation and excessive compliance cost at the request of corporatist. In all honesty, whether we spend 400 billion or 1 trillion a year on the military it pales in comparison to the cost to run the rest of this failed dog and pony show.

    Read More
    • Replies: @NoseytheDuke
    "Our military has done more to free mankind from dictatorial and oppressive governments than any other force on earth."

    Would you kindly list them for us? Thanks.
    , @dearieme
    "our military was the finest the world has ever fielded on the battlefield": when was that? Your finest hour was towards the end of the Second World War, when the Germans had the finest military, in the sense of the best soldiers. They were undone, thank God, because they were hugely outnumbered, and out-produced.

    A good place to begin discussions is to dump the myths and attend to the facts.
    , @woodNfish
    You have a very poor grasp of history. After the US declared independence we fought several wars with both the British and the French where they invaded our country. And then there was the unconstitutional war of secession by the bloody butcher Lincoln that brought Sherman's march through the South burning and destroying everything in his path. Sure, I know it wasn't of foreign foe, but it was still very destructive. It put the South in a 20 year economic depression that it never really came out of until the invention of air conditioning.

    I’m a 24 year Army retiree (1972 to 1996) and proud to have served.
     
    I don't mean to demean your bravery as a soldier (if you were in combat - REMFs don't count), but you were suckered and used and none of the unconstitutional police actions our military engaged in during that time had anything to do with our national security. I hope you realize that.
    , @Kiza

    Our military has done more to free mankind from dictatorial and oppressive governments than any other force on earth.
     
    I believe you are referring to US on some other planet, not planet Earth, or the planet Earth in an alternative universe.

    Or maybe you are just on powerful hallucinatory drugs or you feet smell too much during your mental episodes of brainwashed retired pride.

    Finally, maybe the explanation is: dumb, dumber, retired US military. Who knows.

  22. @John Jeremiah Smith
    Mr. Scalpel is guilty of:

    1. Pissing and moaning
    2. Taking Reed to task for THIS article, when
    3. Mr. Scalpel states he did not read THIS article.

    Diagnosis: Irredeemable stupidity.

    2. Taking Reed to task for THIS article, when

    no

    he was taking him to task for his previous (egregious) article

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Scalpel
    Thanks for the support. I understand your point about benefit of doubt re: Fred. We all do boneheaded things. It is possible that "Tinfoil Hat" was a "senior moment" for Fred. We will see. For me, he has moved from "trusted source" to something less than that for now anyway.

    Re. JJS. Poor guy spouts off in error twice! Lol. Once as "tard beater" Second time as himself after warning from mods. Just harmless name calling, no real argument, so whatever.....
    , @John Jeremiah Smith

    no

    he was taking him to task for his previous (egregious) article
     
    Nope. Both.
  23. @Rurik

    2. Taking Reed to task for THIS article, when
     
    no

    he was taking him to task for his previous (egregious) article

    Thanks for the support. I understand your point about benefit of doubt re: Fred. We all do boneheaded things. It is possible that “Tinfoil Hat” was a “senior moment” for Fred. We will see. For me, he has moved from “trusted source” to something less than that for now anyway.

    Re. JJS. Poor guy spouts off in error twice! Lol. Once as “tard beater” Second time as himself after warning from mods. Just harmless name calling, no real argument, so whatever…..

    Read More
    • Replies: @John Jeremiah Smith

    Re. JJS. Poor guy spouts off in error twice! Lol. Once as “tard beater” Second time as himself after warning from mods. Just harmless name calling, no real argument, so whatever…..
     
    Dull Blade, you're a conspiracy theorist. You weep and gnash over the failure of other people -- more intelligent and better-informed people -- to entertain and take seriously your various semi-psychotic alarm calls and shouts of whodunit. In the broad sweep of history, you conspiracy theorists are running dead last to the facts as recorded.
    , @Rurik

    a “senior moment” for Fred. We will see.
     
    that's how I'm treating it

    with crossed fingers. I'm hoping that Fred doesn't really want to be ground zero for the whole 911 debate. And that if he decides to hitch his wagon to that particular issue, that he'd eventually regret it.

    Advocating for Mexican immigration (didn't he do that?) while having a readership made of up of 99.99% alt-right type American males, I don't think was the most perspicacious thing Fred has ever done. But then perhaps it was honestly motivated. I really didn't get into that one.

    911 tho is another matter altogether, and I just can't see Fred wanting to act as the human lightning rod for all the feelings (and righteous rage) over that particular issue. IDK
  24. @Chhelo
    The US has never had to suffer the consequences of the massive destruction of the homeland like Europe, China, Japan and the ME. For this we should be thankful our military was the finest the world has ever fielded on the battlefield. Our military has done more to free mankind from dictatorial and oppressive governments than any other force on earth.

    However, agreeing with this article we failed to pivot after the fall of the Soviet Union. Post this event massive air, land and sea assets really became obsolete. While US Taxpayers spent billions on a bloated war machine to protect the world our allies were more than willing to let us carry the water well they spent on infrastructure and social programs. Post the fall of the SU no force on earth had the capability to truly threaten the Continental United States. Nuclear was not an option then nor is it now. Once instigated nothing would be worth a crap for a thousand years.

    I'm a 24 year Army retiree (1972 to 1996) and proud to have served. That being said, with the benefit of hind sight, have pretty much reasoned that all the threats presented left us with misguided entanglements all over the world that should have never been entered into.

    Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan and the quagmire called the War on Terror starched from Lybia to Afghanistan have all been needless exercises in failed wisdom from failed politicians, corporatist and bankers making money off both sides of the conflict. Name one country today where the citizens even give a damn about the blood we shed in their defense. One short generation and all is forgotten.

    This is where both Democrats and Republicans, Trump included, are incapable of making the necessary changes needed for a 21st Century economic system. Both have set up a leviathan of tax law, used to buy votes and stifle small business through over regulation and excessive compliance cost at the request of corporatist. In all honesty, whether we spend 400 billion or 1 trillion a year on the military it pales in comparison to the cost to run the rest of this failed dog and pony show.

    “Our military has done more to free mankind from dictatorial and oppressive governments than any other force on earth.”

    Would you kindly list them for us? Thanks.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Waclaw
    NosytheDuke
    You can't possibly be serious questioning that the US is the only country
    which could be accused of knocking out the evil powers before they became
    a global threat.
    Granted, we are not a stranger to gross misjudgments regarding
    "spreading democracy" in places where the likelihood of even partial success
    didn't exist. Fault the dense politicians inventing loony doctrines for murky
    reasons which were elaborated on above.
    I don't think these failures discredit the good accomplished elsewhere.
  25. Just when you feel like giving up on Fred, after he writes such a stupid piece of mis-logic about 9-11, he writes this truly prescient piece on the utterly, ineffective U.S. military.

    I am pretty sure that we are in for a spanking. Our military will soon suffer a humiliation. What the country will do after such an event will either be humble or try something nuclear, since there will be no other course of action possible.

    As Paul Craig Roberts has said, a few hours ago, the time is now to remove all neo-cons from positions of advice, administration and leadership. Don’t wait.

    As Fred Reed has said, our military can not win a thing, and will not win a thing. Ever.

    Fred. you understand the military, but you don’t understand that 9-11 is literally the sole reason that our military is in the position it is in right now. A shocking blind spot.

    But even the blind can see some things sometimes.

    Read More
  26. We have troops abroad that after the initial major combat are used mainly as a police force which they are badly trained for. At home we have countless local police forces acting as military but not trained as such.
    Incidentally, China just started train service from the Yellow Sea to Afghanistan while the US was hunting the goat herders (with borrowed money?).

    Read More
  27. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    A graphic video from Wednesday night’s turmoil in Charlotte, North Carolina shows a gang of rioters beating up a stranger after he appears to beg for mercy.

    Local photographer Lenard Bennett posted a Facebook video early on Thursday morning of a man cornered by a handful of black men who punch him, knock him to the ground, pull off his pants, and drag him across a parking garage, kicking him while he is down.

    Reed, I hope you read the comments section.
    Sad thing to see our ethnic group, and the country our ethnic group was the main motor of, lay still, dissipating… is it not?

    They kicked one white man in the head while he was on the ground.

    What does that mean they “kicked one white man in the head”? What does kicking somebody in the head mean?
    Is this the first world?
    A jungle?
    A circus of grotesqueries where violence is increasingly allowed?

    I am so tired of this. But still more tired I am of not anyone else being seriously tired of this.
    And yes, the humane feeling of anger reaches to me. But, and this is why I decided to post this out-of-topic comment, I have to tell you, it is anger pointing at the willing victims rather than the willing bullies.

    When a group of people who would easily be able to defend themselves gives it up this way, they deserve to be despised, and bullied more, maybe?
    I have this feeling.

    Hoping to read you on what’s going on, in Charlotte, and many other a place.

    Read More
  28. @Chhelo
    The US has never had to suffer the consequences of the massive destruction of the homeland like Europe, China, Japan and the ME. For this we should be thankful our military was the finest the world has ever fielded on the battlefield. Our military has done more to free mankind from dictatorial and oppressive governments than any other force on earth.

    However, agreeing with this article we failed to pivot after the fall of the Soviet Union. Post this event massive air, land and sea assets really became obsolete. While US Taxpayers spent billions on a bloated war machine to protect the world our allies were more than willing to let us carry the water well they spent on infrastructure and social programs. Post the fall of the SU no force on earth had the capability to truly threaten the Continental United States. Nuclear was not an option then nor is it now. Once instigated nothing would be worth a crap for a thousand years.

    I'm a 24 year Army retiree (1972 to 1996) and proud to have served. That being said, with the benefit of hind sight, have pretty much reasoned that all the threats presented left us with misguided entanglements all over the world that should have never been entered into.

    Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan and the quagmire called the War on Terror starched from Lybia to Afghanistan have all been needless exercises in failed wisdom from failed politicians, corporatist and bankers making money off both sides of the conflict. Name one country today where the citizens even give a damn about the blood we shed in their defense. One short generation and all is forgotten.

    This is where both Democrats and Republicans, Trump included, are incapable of making the necessary changes needed for a 21st Century economic system. Both have set up a leviathan of tax law, used to buy votes and stifle small business through over regulation and excessive compliance cost at the request of corporatist. In all honesty, whether we spend 400 billion or 1 trillion a year on the military it pales in comparison to the cost to run the rest of this failed dog and pony show.

    “our military was the finest the world has ever fielded on the battlefield”: when was that? Your finest hour was towards the end of the Second World War, when the Germans had the finest military, in the sense of the best soldiers. They were undone, thank God, because they were hugely outnumbered, and out-produced.

    A good place to begin discussions is to dump the myths and attend to the facts.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dfordoom

    Your finest hour was towards the end of the Second World War, when the Germans had the finest military, in the sense of the best soldiers.
     
    The German had also suffered massive casualties and they weren't any where near as good as they'd been a couple of years earlier.

    The U.S. not only had the advantages of numbers they also had the even bigger advantage of having the Soviet Union to do most of the hard fighting for them.
  29. The US Military won in Vietnam, despite the rules of engagement set by LBJ and Nixon. Kennedy, McGovern, and Mansfield betrayed them to Hanoi because of the hatred they held for the US. The US Military could have done the same in Iraq or the Rock pile if the ROE were anything reasonable. Criticizing the troops, or Pentagon, if you will, serves no purpose. I know you’re somewhat bitter because of what happened to you in Vietnam, and I don’t blame you a bit, but you’re simply becoming cantankerous, and that isn’t at all useful.

    Both Russia and China are nipping at the edges simply because no one wants war and they have learned the lessons Hitler’s experience taught them Small bites will raise protests, but it won’t get you into a shooting war. Both China and Russia’s neighbors have good reason to be nervous, and eventually, both are going to set off a war (and they know it) that they think they can win. Russia in Ukraine, the Baltics, and at least Georgia, if not Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan.

    Like it or not, the opening moves of WW3 have already been made. How fast it will advance is anyone’s guess, but the war is already here.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Avery
    {The US Military won in Vietnam,...}

    Sure did.

    North Vietnamese and VC evacuating from Hanoi, just before victorious ARVN tanks rolled into Hanoi:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fall_of_Saigon#/media/File:Saigon-hubert-van-es.jpg
    , @Jonathan Revusky

    The US Military won in Vietnam,

    Oh really? What did they win? The plastic toy in the Cracker Jack box?
  30. China has the money and a very large network of high-speed rail domestically. (The US has not a single mile.)

    The Americans who own cars do not need or want high speed rail. The Americans who do not own cars should be kept in the inner city ghettos and far away from anything that allows them to roam the country.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Christian
    You are correct. Rail allows those better kept in the cities to roam the suburbs.. You can't even run a county fair within 20 miles of Washington DC anymore. Unfortunately, the Metro takes the Blacks into and away from the suburbs for easy criminal access to areas with lots of fresh, unsuspecting, well-heeled victims.
  31. It’s a self-serving military-industrial complex that’s behind a bloated and largely useless military set-up. This complex is composed of defense contractors, politicians, and senior military officers, who have an incestuous relationship with one another. That this military set-up is ineffectual is beside the point. And nothing ever changes in this ossified and reactionary regime.

    Read More
    • Agree: Orville H. Larson
    • Replies: @John Jeremiah Smith

    It’s a self-serving military-industrial complex that’s behind a bloated and largely useless military set-up. This complex is composed of defense contractors, politicians, and senior military officers, who have an incestuous relationship with one another.
     
    Enabled entirely by a corrupt Congress that takes its bribes as it cheers the virtues of militarism.
    , @prusmc
    Nothing exemplifies this as the F 35. Huge cost over runs, design flaws, retro-engineering impossibilities, does a few things less effectively than limited purpose aircraft now in stock, is no way an all purpose superior performer. Yet components are produced in 40 of the 57 states. Who is going to slice that pork? Go back to when the great Massachusetts land whale was trying to set up a second production facility for the F 35's under-powered engine at a close to home location to illustrate this debacle even more clearly. Move to the USN and the capture of crying US sailors by the Iranians and then take a look at the LCS tar baby to get further insite into a broken system. Shades of the great rainmaker: RSM and theTFX.
  32. The military is on the right side of history now, I read that there are ~15,000 trans* soldiers, is that division strength? No enemy would have the courage to face that!

    Read More
    • Replies: @SmoothieX12

    The military is on the right side of history now, I read that there are ~15,000 trans* soldiers, is that division strength?
     
    My guess will be that something went really wrong with this project:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gay_bomb

    and some troops accidentally were exposed to the chemical which escaped laboratory.
    , @Talha
    You mean like "Trans"-formers* - more than meets the eye!

    Peace.

    *former-gender, that is
  33. @Quartermaster
    The US Military won in Vietnam, despite the rules of engagement set by LBJ and Nixon. Kennedy, McGovern, and Mansfield betrayed them to Hanoi because of the hatred they held for the US. The US Military could have done the same in Iraq or the Rock pile if the ROE were anything reasonable. Criticizing the troops, or Pentagon, if you will, serves no purpose. I know you're somewhat bitter because of what happened to you in Vietnam, and I don't blame you a bit, but you’re simply becoming cantankerous, and that isn’t at all useful.

    Both Russia and China are nipping at the edges simply because no one wants war and they have learned the lessons Hitler’s experience taught them Small bites will raise protests, but it won’t get you into a shooting war. Both China and Russia’s neighbors have good reason to be nervous, and eventually, both are going to set off a war (and they know it) that they think they can win. Russia in Ukraine, the Baltics, and at least Georgia, if not Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan.

    Like it or not, the opening moves of WW3 have already been made. How fast it will advance is anyone’s guess, but the war is already here.

    {The US Military won in Vietnam,…}

    Sure did.

    North Vietnamese and VC evacuating from Hanoi, just before victorious ARVN tanks rolled into Hanoi:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fall_of_Saigon#/media/File:Saigon-hubert-van-es.jpg

    Read More
  34. @Marcus
    The military is on the right side of history now, I read that there are ~15,000 trans* soldiers, is that division strength? No enemy would have the courage to face that!

    The military is on the right side of history now, I read that there are ~15,000 trans* soldiers, is that division strength?

    My guess will be that something went really wrong with this project:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gay_bomb

    and some troops accidentally were exposed to the chemical which escaped laboratory.

    Read More
  35. @Si1ver1ock
    Whom the Gods would destroy, they first make mad.

    http://news.antiwar.com/2016/09/22/house-panel-reboot-of-us-military-to-cost-1-trillion-over-next-decade/

    “Once we squeeze all we can out of the United States, it can dry up and blow away.”

    ~ Netanyahu

    Read More
  36. @Rurik

    2. Taking Reed to task for THIS article, when
     
    no

    he was taking him to task for his previous (egregious) article

    no

    he was taking him to task for his previous (egregious) article

    Nope. Both.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rurik

    Nope. Both.
     
    you're wrong here

    he was clearly referring to Fred's 'tin foil hat' article and said that because of it, he hadn't even bothered to read the current one. He was (understandably) chastising Fred for his previous article. That was his point. You seem intelligent enough to understand that, perhaps if you read it all again..
  37. @The Scalpel
    Thanks for the support. I understand your point about benefit of doubt re: Fred. We all do boneheaded things. It is possible that "Tinfoil Hat" was a "senior moment" for Fred. We will see. For me, he has moved from "trusted source" to something less than that for now anyway.

    Re. JJS. Poor guy spouts off in error twice! Lol. Once as "tard beater" Second time as himself after warning from mods. Just harmless name calling, no real argument, so whatever.....

    Re. JJS. Poor guy spouts off in error twice! Lol. Once as “tard beater” Second time as himself after warning from mods. Just harmless name calling, no real argument, so whatever…..

    Dull Blade, you’re a conspiracy theorist. You weep and gnash over the failure of other people — more intelligent and better-informed people — to entertain and take seriously your various semi-psychotic alarm calls and shouts of whodunit. In the broad sweep of history, you conspiracy theorists are running dead last to the facts as recorded.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Scalpel
    JJS, Please look at post number 10 in this theead. Clearly, you did not read it. Furthermore, your comprehension of my original post was erroneous. Rurik and everyone but you had no difficulty understanding what I meant. You have now repeated your error three times when a simple re-read or just reading post #10 would have avoided that. Please try to be a little more diligent.

    I am a trained scientist. I believe that claims that seem to violate well established physical laws require a scientifically sound explanations. I am trained in psychology. I know that sometimes people lie and governments are composed of people. In that regard, if you are different than me, it must be because you believe, without question, everything the government tells you. If this does not describe you, then we are both as you say, "conspiracy theorists" and in that case, welcome to the club!
    , @Azote
    So after admitting you are too lazy to read again and being painfully obvious your reading comprehension is below par to put it mildly, you again engage in ad hominems and pathetically give yourself away with your psychological projections

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_projection

    Do us all a favor and abstain from commenting or replying unless you follow the next steps to do so

    1.- Read one more time and check for words you did not understand in a dictionary, write them down

    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/

    2.- Read yet one more time the whole thing

    3.- Read one more time and write a nice summary

    4.- Check that you actually understood the article or comment and the meaning of the words you looked up in the dictionary with some literate adult (a child or teen is okay also as long as he/she is literate)

    5.- With the literate adult's (or child) blessing, you may then proceed to comment/reply

    Otherwise abstain from commenting - stop embarassing yourself and us with your ignorance and crude retardery

    You're welcome

  38. @bigbadwolf
    It's a self-serving military-industrial complex that's behind a bloated and largely useless military set-up. This complex is composed of defense contractors, politicians, and senior military officers, who have an incestuous relationship with one another. That this military set-up is ineffectual is beside the point. And nothing ever changes in this ossified and reactionary regime.

    It’s a self-serving military-industrial complex that’s behind a bloated and largely useless military set-up. This complex is composed of defense contractors, politicians, and senior military officers, who have an incestuous relationship with one another.

    Enabled entirely by a corrupt Congress that takes its bribes as it cheers the virtues of militarism.

    Read More
  39. @The Scalpel
    Thanks for the support. I understand your point about benefit of doubt re: Fred. We all do boneheaded things. It is possible that "Tinfoil Hat" was a "senior moment" for Fred. We will see. For me, he has moved from "trusted source" to something less than that for now anyway.

    Re. JJS. Poor guy spouts off in error twice! Lol. Once as "tard beater" Second time as himself after warning from mods. Just harmless name calling, no real argument, so whatever.....

    a “senior moment” for Fred. We will see.

    that’s how I’m treating it

    with crossed fingers. I’m hoping that Fred doesn’t really want to be ground zero for the whole 911 debate. And that if he decides to hitch his wagon to that particular issue, that he’d eventually regret it.

    Advocating for Mexican immigration (didn’t he do that?) while having a readership made of up of 99.99% alt-right type American males, I don’t think was the most perspicacious thing Fred has ever done. But then perhaps it was honestly motivated. I really didn’t get into that one.

    911 tho is another matter altogether, and I just can’t see Fred wanting to act as the human lightning rod for all the feelings (and righteous rage) over that particular issue. IDK

    Read More
    • Replies: @John Jeremiah Smith

    911 tho is another matter altogether, and I just can’t see Fred wanting to act as the human lightning rod for all the feelings (and righteous rage) over that particular issue. IDK
     
    Why not? Is there a good reason why an honest many shouldn't state his opinion, and expect at the very least for people to acknowledge "Okay, that's your opinion."?

    There's a tendency on the part of a lot of, um, readers(?) to adopt the rather infantile position that some writer or other is a champion of his/her cause, and believes whatever well-supported, or perchance poorly-supported, "evidence" exists for that cause.

    Faith is said to move mountains, but again, I must point out: In the broad sweep of history, you conspiracy theorists are running dead last to the facts as recorded.
  40. @John Jeremiah Smith

    no

    he was taking him to task for his previous (egregious) article
     
    Nope. Both.

    Nope. Both.

    you’re wrong here

    he was clearly referring to Fred’s ‘tin foil hat’ article and said that because of it, he hadn’t even bothered to read the current one. He was (understandably) chastising Fred for his previous article. That was his point. You seem intelligent enough to understand that, perhaps if you read it all again..

    Read More
  41. @Marcus
    The military is on the right side of history now, I read that there are ~15,000 trans* soldiers, is that division strength? No enemy would have the courage to face that!

    You mean like “Trans”-formers* – more than meets the eye!

    Peace.

    *former-gender, that is

    Read More
  42. he was clearly referring to Fred’s ‘tin foil hat’ article and said that because of it, he hadn’t even bothered to read the current one.

    “Tinfoil hat” makes “One”. Then he said he didn’t know if he SHOULD read the current one, onaccounta the tinfoil one being so wrong, ya know. That’s “Two”. In the vernacular, “both”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rurik

    In the vernacular
     
    depending on what "is" means.. I suppose
    , @The Scalpel
    JJS,

    "“Tinfoil hat” makes “One”. Then he said he didn’t know if he SHOULD read the current one, onaccounta the tinfoil one being so wrong, ya know. That’s “Two”. In the vernacular, “both”."

    That is quite a logical stretch, even so far as to directly contradict the primary source, me!

    You really need to be more diligent. My criticism of Fred's "Tinfoil Hat" article was not his point of view, but that the article was "lazy" and "sloppy" and a "hatchet job". As I pointed out in that thread, Fred did not seriously address any of very convincing (to some respected scientists anyway) evidence that things did not occur exactly as we are being told. Instead, he set up several straw man arguments and knocked them down with a big dose of name-calling and his somewhat conceited personal opinion on the liklihood of any alternate explanations. It almost seems like you wrote the article JJS!

    I have read Fred before, and know he is capable of much more. It made me wonder why on earth he would put his name to such trash. Anyway, Rurik probably has the best explanation. I think we have beaten this horse to death.

    I grew up in New York, so I do enjoy arguing with you though JJS. Unfortunately, I have a life outside the Unz Review, so if I don't respond to you right away, please don't take that as any sort of concession on my part. Have a good day!
  43. @Rurik

    a “senior moment” for Fred. We will see.
     
    that's how I'm treating it

    with crossed fingers. I'm hoping that Fred doesn't really want to be ground zero for the whole 911 debate. And that if he decides to hitch his wagon to that particular issue, that he'd eventually regret it.

    Advocating for Mexican immigration (didn't he do that?) while having a readership made of up of 99.99% alt-right type American males, I don't think was the most perspicacious thing Fred has ever done. But then perhaps it was honestly motivated. I really didn't get into that one.

    911 tho is another matter altogether, and I just can't see Fred wanting to act as the human lightning rod for all the feelings (and righteous rage) over that particular issue. IDK

    911 tho is another matter altogether, and I just can’t see Fred wanting to act as the human lightning rod for all the feelings (and righteous rage) over that particular issue. IDK

    Why not? Is there a good reason why an honest many shouldn’t state his opinion, and expect at the very least for people to acknowledge “Okay, that’s your opinion.”?

    There’s a tendency on the part of a lot of, um, readers(?) to adopt the rather infantile position that some writer or other is a champion of his/her cause, and believes whatever well-supported, or perchance poorly-supported, “evidence” exists for that cause.

    Faith is said to move mountains, but again, I must point out: In the broad sweep of history, you conspiracy theorists are running dead last to the facts as recorded.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rurik

    and believes whatever well-supported, or perchance poorly-supported, “evidence” exists for that cause.
     
    everyone has a God given right to an opinion. But if you want to maintain any shred of credibility, then it's always good to bolster your opinions with "evidence" to support it.

    you conspiracy theorists are running dead last to the facts as recorded.
     
    your use of the expression is meaningless, because virtually every single theory offered for what transpired on 911 involves a conspiracy.

    so then the question becomes simply whose conspiracy theory is more credible, when looked at critically - (something not all people do, I realize)

    if you prefer to accept the official account offered to us all in the 911 Commission Report, then that's fine. But it's also telling.

    one is forced to wonder if there are any official theories regarding official government accounts of events that you doubt. Golf of Tonkin perhaps? No? JFK? No? USS Liberty? Benghazi? Any?

    Or do you pick and chose which conspiracy theories are valid and which ones are silly based on some mysterious necromancy we're simply not privy to?

    because I for one like sound, verifiable evidence that can be put to the scientific method to determine the veracity of all things. But that's just me ;)
  44. @John Jeremiah Smith

    Re. JJS. Poor guy spouts off in error twice! Lol. Once as “tard beater” Second time as himself after warning from mods. Just harmless name calling, no real argument, so whatever…..
     
    Dull Blade, you're a conspiracy theorist. You weep and gnash over the failure of other people -- more intelligent and better-informed people -- to entertain and take seriously your various semi-psychotic alarm calls and shouts of whodunit. In the broad sweep of history, you conspiracy theorists are running dead last to the facts as recorded.

    JJS, Please look at post number 10 in this theead. Clearly, you did not read it. Furthermore, your comprehension of my original post was erroneous. Rurik and everyone but you had no difficulty understanding what I meant. You have now repeated your error three times when a simple re-read or just reading post #10 would have avoided that. Please try to be a little more diligent.

    I am a trained scientist. I believe that claims that seem to violate well established physical laws require a scientifically sound explanations. I am trained in psychology. I know that sometimes people lie and governments are composed of people. In that regard, if you are different than me, it must be because you believe, without question, everything the government tells you. If this does not describe you, then we are both as you say, “conspiracy theorists” and in that case, welcome to the club!

    Read More
    • Replies: @John Jeremiah Smith

    JJS, Please look at post number 10 in this theead.
     
    Nah. I would have to scroll waaaaaaay up, and this connection is slow.

    I believe that claims that seem to violate well established physical laws require a scientifically sound explanations.
     
    Dang! Me too, although I would qualify that with "claims based on observed, verified data".

    In that regard, if you are different than me, it must be because you believe, without question, everything the government tells you.
     
    ROFLMAO. Well, ya got me pegged, Scientist! Bye now.
  45. @John Jeremiah Smith

    he was clearly referring to Fred’s ‘tin foil hat’ article and said that because of it, he hadn’t even bothered to read the current one.
     
    "Tinfoil hat" makes "One". Then he said he didn't know if he SHOULD read the current one, onaccounta the tinfoil one being so wrong, ya know. That's "Two". In the vernacular, "both".

    In the vernacular

    depending on what “is” means.. I suppose

    Read More
  46. @John Jeremiah Smith

    911 tho is another matter altogether, and I just can’t see Fred wanting to act as the human lightning rod for all the feelings (and righteous rage) over that particular issue. IDK
     
    Why not? Is there a good reason why an honest many shouldn't state his opinion, and expect at the very least for people to acknowledge "Okay, that's your opinion."?

    There's a tendency on the part of a lot of, um, readers(?) to adopt the rather infantile position that some writer or other is a champion of his/her cause, and believes whatever well-supported, or perchance poorly-supported, "evidence" exists for that cause.

    Faith is said to move mountains, but again, I must point out: In the broad sweep of history, you conspiracy theorists are running dead last to the facts as recorded.

    and believes whatever well-supported, or perchance poorly-supported, “evidence” exists for that cause.

    everyone has a God given right to an opinion. But if you want to maintain any shred of credibility, then it’s always good to bolster your opinions with “evidence” to support it.

    you conspiracy theorists are running dead last to the facts as recorded.

    your use of the expression is meaningless, because virtually every single theory offered for what transpired on 911 involves a conspiracy.

    so then the question becomes simply whose conspiracy theory is more credible, when looked at critically – (something not all people do, I realize)

    if you prefer to accept the official account offered to us all in the 911 Commission Report, then that’s fine. But it’s also telling.

    one is forced to wonder if there are any official theories regarding official government accounts of events that you doubt. Golf of Tonkin perhaps? No? JFK? No? USS Liberty? Benghazi? Any?

    Or do you pick and chose which conspiracy theories are valid and which ones are silly based on some mysterious necromancy we’re simply not privy to?

    because I for one like sound, verifiable evidence that can be put to the scientific method to determine the veracity of all things. But that’s just me ;)

    Read More
    • Replies: @John Jeremiah Smith


    you conspiracy theorists are running dead last to the facts as recorded.
     
    your use of the expression is meaningless, because virtually every single theory offered for what transpired on 911 involves a conspiracy.
     
    Speaking of the meaning of "is", are we? Re-definitionizing "conspiracy", are we now?

    Dead last, and lapped, too.

    All you've got is some difficult-to-explain video of Bldg 7, and NOTHING else. That I do not choose to buy into a theory of massive conspiracy involving a necessity for hundreds, even thousands, of additional and complicit actors, is just me being someone who believes proof does not derive from exclamations of "Oh, lookee!!" If ya got it, trot it out. Otherwise, discussion ended.
  47. @John Jeremiah Smith

    he was clearly referring to Fred’s ‘tin foil hat’ article and said that because of it, he hadn’t even bothered to read the current one.
     
    "Tinfoil hat" makes "One". Then he said he didn't know if he SHOULD read the current one, onaccounta the tinfoil one being so wrong, ya know. That's "Two". In the vernacular, "both".

    JJS,

    ““Tinfoil hat” makes “One”. Then he said he didn’t know if he SHOULD read the current one, onaccounta the tinfoil one being so wrong, ya know. That’s “Two”. In the vernacular, “both”.”

    That is quite a logical stretch, even so far as to directly contradict the primary source, me!

    You really need to be more diligent. My criticism of Fred’s “Tinfoil Hat” article was not his point of view, but that the article was “lazy” and “sloppy” and a “hatchet job”. As I pointed out in that thread, Fred did not seriously address any of very convincing (to some respected scientists anyway) evidence that things did not occur exactly as we are being told. Instead, he set up several straw man arguments and knocked them down with a big dose of name-calling and his somewhat conceited personal opinion on the liklihood of any alternate explanations. It almost seems like you wrote the article JJS!

    I have read Fred before, and know he is capable of much more. It made me wonder why on earth he would put his name to such trash. Anyway, Rurik probably has the best explanation. I think we have beaten this horse to death.

    I grew up in New York, so I do enjoy arguing with you though JJS. Unfortunately, I have a life outside the Unz Review, so if I don’t respond to you right away, please don’t take that as any sort of concession on my part. Have a good day!

    Read More
    • Replies: @John Jeremiah Smith

    As I pointed out in that thread, Fred did not seriously address any of very convincing (to some respected scientists anyway) evidence that things did not occur exactly as we are being told.
     
    True. The literary license runs a bit strong. Point taken. On the other hand, just perzackly how seriously should anybody be taking Fred's justifications -- humor being a central premise among critics of the conspiracy genre?

    I grew up in New York
     
    Gee, no kidding? My condolences. I took the shuttle from National to LaGuardia for some stupid awards banquet in 1999. I escaped with major financial damage and a chintzy quartz trophy, and will never return. The nuclear obliteration of NYC and environs (plus DC, LA, Miami, Philly, Dallas and St. Louis -- to name a few) might give real Americans a chance to have a country again.
    , @Jonathan Revusky

    It made me wonder why on earth he would put his name to such trash.
     
    Well, I guess he thought that most everybody here still believes the official bullshit, so he was going to write some lazy hit piece and sneer at and ridicule the handful of "tinfoil hat" wearers. Have a good laugh....

    And then he ended up discovering something. Probably the majority of his readership no longer believes the official bullshit so he was insulting most of his readers. And there was a real nasty backlash. Especially since, at this point, a lot of people are really really sick and tired of that kind of sneering pseudo-intellectual bullying, just really had enough of it.

    Well, you see, moralizing aside, the key thing about bullying is that you have to know how to choose your target, somebody weak or who is so cowed that they won't fight back.

    So he misjudged and, like most any bully, when that happens, he had to just run away. Incredible loss of face. I look at what happened and see it as a great crystallizing moment on this site.
  48. @The Scalpel
    JJS, Please look at post number 10 in this theead. Clearly, you did not read it. Furthermore, your comprehension of my original post was erroneous. Rurik and everyone but you had no difficulty understanding what I meant. You have now repeated your error three times when a simple re-read or just reading post #10 would have avoided that. Please try to be a little more diligent.

    I am a trained scientist. I believe that claims that seem to violate well established physical laws require a scientifically sound explanations. I am trained in psychology. I know that sometimes people lie and governments are composed of people. In that regard, if you are different than me, it must be because you believe, without question, everything the government tells you. If this does not describe you, then we are both as you say, "conspiracy theorists" and in that case, welcome to the club!

    JJS, Please look at post number 10 in this theead.

    Nah. I would have to scroll waaaaaaay up, and this connection is slow.

    I believe that claims that seem to violate well established physical laws require a scientifically sound explanations.

    Dang! Me too, although I would qualify that with “claims based on observed, verified data”.

    In that regard, if you are different than me, it must be because you believe, without question, everything the government tells you.

    ROFLMAO. Well, ya got me pegged, Scientist! Bye now.

    Read More
  49. @The Scalpel
    JJS,

    "“Tinfoil hat” makes “One”. Then he said he didn’t know if he SHOULD read the current one, onaccounta the tinfoil one being so wrong, ya know. That’s “Two”. In the vernacular, “both”."

    That is quite a logical stretch, even so far as to directly contradict the primary source, me!

    You really need to be more diligent. My criticism of Fred's "Tinfoil Hat" article was not his point of view, but that the article was "lazy" and "sloppy" and a "hatchet job". As I pointed out in that thread, Fred did not seriously address any of very convincing (to some respected scientists anyway) evidence that things did not occur exactly as we are being told. Instead, he set up several straw man arguments and knocked them down with a big dose of name-calling and his somewhat conceited personal opinion on the liklihood of any alternate explanations. It almost seems like you wrote the article JJS!

    I have read Fred before, and know he is capable of much more. It made me wonder why on earth he would put his name to such trash. Anyway, Rurik probably has the best explanation. I think we have beaten this horse to death.

    I grew up in New York, so I do enjoy arguing with you though JJS. Unfortunately, I have a life outside the Unz Review, so if I don't respond to you right away, please don't take that as any sort of concession on my part. Have a good day!

    As I pointed out in that thread, Fred did not seriously address any of very convincing (to some respected scientists anyway) evidence that things did not occur exactly as we are being told.

    True. The literary license runs a bit strong. Point taken. On the other hand, just perzackly how seriously should anybody be taking Fred’s justifications — humor being a central premise among critics of the conspiracy genre?

    I grew up in New York

    Gee, no kidding? My condolences. I took the shuttle from National to LaGuardia for some stupid awards banquet in 1999. I escaped with major financial damage and a chintzy quartz trophy, and will never return. The nuclear obliteration of NYC and environs (plus DC, LA, Miami, Philly, Dallas and St. Louis — to name a few) might give real Americans a chance to have a country again.

    Read More
  50. @Rurik

    and believes whatever well-supported, or perchance poorly-supported, “evidence” exists for that cause.
     
    everyone has a God given right to an opinion. But if you want to maintain any shred of credibility, then it's always good to bolster your opinions with "evidence" to support it.

    you conspiracy theorists are running dead last to the facts as recorded.
     
    your use of the expression is meaningless, because virtually every single theory offered for what transpired on 911 involves a conspiracy.

    so then the question becomes simply whose conspiracy theory is more credible, when looked at critically - (something not all people do, I realize)

    if you prefer to accept the official account offered to us all in the 911 Commission Report, then that's fine. But it's also telling.

    one is forced to wonder if there are any official theories regarding official government accounts of events that you doubt. Golf of Tonkin perhaps? No? JFK? No? USS Liberty? Benghazi? Any?

    Or do you pick and chose which conspiracy theories are valid and which ones are silly based on some mysterious necromancy we're simply not privy to?

    because I for one like sound, verifiable evidence that can be put to the scientific method to determine the veracity of all things. But that's just me ;)

    you conspiracy theorists are running dead last to the facts as recorded.

    your use of the expression is meaningless, because virtually every single theory offered for what transpired on 911 involves a conspiracy.

    Speaking of the meaning of “is”, are we? Re-definitionizing “conspiracy”, are we now?

    Dead last, and lapped, too.

    All you’ve got is some difficult-to-explain video of Bldg 7, and NOTHING else. That I do not choose to buy into a theory of massive conspiracy involving a necessity for hundreds, even thousands, of additional and complicit actors, is just me being someone who believes proof does not derive from exclamations of “Oh, lookee!!” If ya got it, trot it out. Otherwise, discussion ended.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rurik

    If ya got it, trot it out.
     
    OK, no problem.

    what this video represents is absolute, irrefutable, undeniable proof that elements at the highest levels of our media knew that building seven was going to implode

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHFdcPv3XXI

    now please try to wrap your brain around the implications of this video

    if the building had not been wired for a controlled demolition, then it would have been impossible for this news organization (and others) to know before hand that it was going to come down

    ipso facto

    you can try to do mental somersaults all you want to, and say it was a coincidence or some other tortured logic, but the fact remains that this if proof of pre-knowledge of an event that no one could have had pre-knowledge about UNLESS it had been wired for a controlled demolition. OK?

    Now from there you can say it was Osama Bin Laden that wired it, or any other preposterous grasping, but the proof is right that that they knew the building was going to collapse, and that is proof that it was wired to do so.

    Three is no wiggle room on that.

    Now I don't want to make this thread a thread about 911, but since you asked, there is the irrefutable proof.

    The only reason I post it here is because there are a lot of people of good will who realize that from such proof - the official version is a fraud, and so they are trying to discover what really did happen on that day. And when someone of Fred's stature mocks them, I put it down to his (and possibly your) not having considered all the evidence out there. You see?

    And so those of us who have looked into it and do know that obviously they're lying about what happened on that day, need to be patient and forgiving of those like you (and possibly Fred) who have not had the opportunity to see all the proof that they are lying. That's all.
    , @Rurik

    Re-definitionizing “conspiracy”, are we now?
     
    no, based on the definition of conspiracy it means to conspire

    and according to the official version, Osama Bin Laden and his nineteen henchmen conspired to attack the US on 911

    comprende?

    the official version of what happed that day is a 'conspiracy theory' in the very literal definition

    I hope that helps..
  51. @newrouter
    >China has the money and a very large network of high-speed rail domestically. (The US has not a single mile.)<

    fred up your game. see acela corridor. also we ain't densely packed, yet, like china.

    The Acela Corridor is not high-speed rail. The fact that you think is it shows how far we have fallen.

    The Acela only makes an average speed of 70 mph end-to-end, from Boston to Washington. There are long stretches of track where it travels 60 mph. There are even some segments built in the 19th century that are limited to 45 mph.

    Sure, it has a few miles of 160 mph track, but what good is that? You have to accelerate up to 160 mph, then decelerate back down to your regular speed. What we have done is the equivalent of building 30 miles of four-lane divided highway in the middle of a two-lane dirt road, and calling it an autobahn.

    True high-speed rail is going from Tokyo to Osaka at an average speed of 132 mph. From Paris to Lyon at 140 mph. From Wuhan to Guangzhou at 170 mph. These trains hit maximum speeds of 170 to 220 mph, but these countries upgraded the entire route to high-speed.

    As for population density, the Acela Corridor is denser than Spain.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chris Mallory

    As for population density, the Acela Corridor is denser than Spain.
     
    Since Spain is 112th out of 244 nations, there are better things the US can spend money on besides high speed rail.
  52. Military power is the ability to kill people and break their stuff.

    America’s military can do more of that, faster, than anybody else.

    That’s all it means.

    And the Norks can put a nuke in New York harbor on any given day. They don’t need missiles. Nobody does, really. They just stow it aboard a returning garbage barge and light it off when ready.

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    • Replies: @SmoothieX12

    Military power is the ability to kill people and break their stuff.
     
    No, military power is the ability to achieve political objectives of the war "by compelling the enemy to do our will"(c).
  53. @The Grate Deign
    Military power is the ability to kill people and break their stuff.

    America's military can do more of that, faster, than anybody else.

    That's all it means.

    And the Norks can put a nuke in New York harbor on any given day. They don't need missiles. Nobody does, really. They just stow it aboard a returning garbage barge and light it off when ready.

    Military power is the ability to kill people and break their stuff.

    No, military power is the ability to achieve political objectives of the war “by compelling the enemy to do our will”(c).

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Grate Deign
    I'm talking about means. You're talking about ends. Not exactly the same. But in a military and political sense, you'll never achieve your objectives in war unless you can kill more people and break more stuff faster than the enemy.
  54. @Quartermaster
    The US Military won in Vietnam, despite the rules of engagement set by LBJ and Nixon. Kennedy, McGovern, and Mansfield betrayed them to Hanoi because of the hatred they held for the US. The US Military could have done the same in Iraq or the Rock pile if the ROE were anything reasonable. Criticizing the troops, or Pentagon, if you will, serves no purpose. I know you're somewhat bitter because of what happened to you in Vietnam, and I don't blame you a bit, but you’re simply becoming cantankerous, and that isn’t at all useful.

    Both Russia and China are nipping at the edges simply because no one wants war and they have learned the lessons Hitler’s experience taught them Small bites will raise protests, but it won’t get you into a shooting war. Both China and Russia’s neighbors have good reason to be nervous, and eventually, both are going to set off a war (and they know it) that they think they can win. Russia in Ukraine, the Baltics, and at least Georgia, if not Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan.

    Like it or not, the opening moves of WW3 have already been made. How fast it will advance is anyone’s guess, but the war is already here.

    The US Military won in Vietnam,

    Oh really? What did they win? The plastic toy in the Cracker Jack box?

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  55. @Chhelo
    The US has never had to suffer the consequences of the massive destruction of the homeland like Europe, China, Japan and the ME. For this we should be thankful our military was the finest the world has ever fielded on the battlefield. Our military has done more to free mankind from dictatorial and oppressive governments than any other force on earth.

    However, agreeing with this article we failed to pivot after the fall of the Soviet Union. Post this event massive air, land and sea assets really became obsolete. While US Taxpayers spent billions on a bloated war machine to protect the world our allies were more than willing to let us carry the water well they spent on infrastructure and social programs. Post the fall of the SU no force on earth had the capability to truly threaten the Continental United States. Nuclear was not an option then nor is it now. Once instigated nothing would be worth a crap for a thousand years.

    I'm a 24 year Army retiree (1972 to 1996) and proud to have served. That being said, with the benefit of hind sight, have pretty much reasoned that all the threats presented left us with misguided entanglements all over the world that should have never been entered into.

    Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan and the quagmire called the War on Terror starched from Lybia to Afghanistan have all been needless exercises in failed wisdom from failed politicians, corporatist and bankers making money off both sides of the conflict. Name one country today where the citizens even give a damn about the blood we shed in their defense. One short generation and all is forgotten.

    This is where both Democrats and Republicans, Trump included, are incapable of making the necessary changes needed for a 21st Century economic system. Both have set up a leviathan of tax law, used to buy votes and stifle small business through over regulation and excessive compliance cost at the request of corporatist. In all honesty, whether we spend 400 billion or 1 trillion a year on the military it pales in comparison to the cost to run the rest of this failed dog and pony show.

    You have a very poor grasp of history. After the US declared independence we fought several wars with both the British and the French where they invaded our country. And then there was the unconstitutional war of secession by the bloody butcher Lincoln that brought Sherman’s march through the South burning and destroying everything in his path. Sure, I know it wasn’t of foreign foe, but it was still very destructive. It put the South in a 20 year economic depression that it never really came out of until the invention of air conditioning.

    I’m a 24 year Army retiree (1972 to 1996) and proud to have served.

    I don’t mean to demean your bravery as a soldier (if you were in combat – REMFs don’t count), but you were suckered and used and none of the unconstitutional police actions our military engaged in during that time had anything to do with our national security. I hope you realize that.

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    • Replies: @Rich
    I have to disagree with you. We former Chairborne Rangers can certainly have served honorably away from the battlefield. In fact. after my Grandfather, Father, Uncles and older Brother all served in combat, I was advised to choose my MOS carefully, being sure not bleed for Rockefeller, Goldman, Morgan, and the rest of them. The US belongs to them, let them bleed for it.
    , @Jim Christian
    Oooops. I was a flight deck rat. Nimitz, 76-82.A-6's. Ejection seats, Liquid Oxygen, trouble shooting on the fly. Three Med cruises and the Iranian Hostage "Rescue" cruise in the Indian Ocean thrown in for maximum at-sea splendor. Asbestos, jet exhaust, hearing loss, solvents, crashes and so you absorb various and sundry injuries and the rest. I didn't carry a weapon in Baghdad, but it all took a toll.

    And so, to sort out the euphemisms about MOS and rates and so on, I ask: Was I tip of the spear, REMF, or just a kid with a trouble-addiction? Always wondered about that. Besides, it wasn't just a job, it was also $14.00/day, plus $1.35 hazardous duty pay after all. Righteous bucks, no? Free meals, a roof under your feet, a coffin-box to sleep in with 300 other fortunates under the landing area.. Man, that's livin', right?

  56. @John Jeremiah Smith


    you conspiracy theorists are running dead last to the facts as recorded.
     
    your use of the expression is meaningless, because virtually every single theory offered for what transpired on 911 involves a conspiracy.
     
    Speaking of the meaning of "is", are we? Re-definitionizing "conspiracy", are we now?

    Dead last, and lapped, too.

    All you've got is some difficult-to-explain video of Bldg 7, and NOTHING else. That I do not choose to buy into a theory of massive conspiracy involving a necessity for hundreds, even thousands, of additional and complicit actors, is just me being someone who believes proof does not derive from exclamations of "Oh, lookee!!" If ya got it, trot it out. Otherwise, discussion ended.

    If ya got it, trot it out.

    OK, no problem.

    what this video represents is absolute, irrefutable, undeniable proof that elements at the highest levels of our media knew that building seven was going to implode

    now please try to wrap your brain around the implications of this video

    if the building had not been wired for a controlled demolition, then it would have been impossible for this news organization (and others) to know before hand that it was going to come down

    ipso facto

    you can try to do mental somersaults all you want to, and say it was a coincidence or some other tortured logic, but the fact remains that this if proof of pre-knowledge of an event that no one could have had pre-knowledge about UNLESS it had been wired for a controlled demolition. OK?

    Now from there you can say it was Osama Bin Laden that wired it, or any other preposterous grasping, but the proof is right that that they knew the building was going to collapse, and that is proof that it was wired to do so.

    Three is no wiggle room on that.

    Now I don’t want to make this thread a thread about 911, but since you asked, there is the irrefutable proof.

    The only reason I post it here is because there are a lot of people of good will who realize that from such proof – the official version is a fraud, and so they are trying to discover what really did happen on that day. And when someone of Fred’s stature mocks them, I put it down to his (and possibly your) not having considered all the evidence out there. You see?

    And so those of us who have looked into it and do know that obviously they’re lying about what happened on that day, need to be patient and forgiving of those like you (and possibly Fred) who have not had the opportunity to see all the proof that they are lying. That’s all.

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    • Replies: @John Jeremiah Smith
    I'll look at the video when I have a chance -- I gotta run before 6 and it's 5:31.

    I think you're not getting that it doesn't make any effective difference if there was some additional conspiracy. Is the cover-up of the downing of the Shanksville jet -- by F15 out of PAX, and yes I am 100% certain -- a conspiracy? Of course. Point is, how are things changed by any of those presumed facts?
  57. @The Scalpel
    Fred,

    I always thought you meant well, but after your prior sloppy, ill-informed, lazy, hatchet job of an article I cannot take you seriously. It probably doesn't matter to you, but I am probably not the only one.

    I believe that one can disagree with another on facts or interpretation and still hold them in high regard. It is hard to respect a person who is intelligent and capable, but lazy, sloppy, and opinionated.

    I intended to read the above article, but after thinking about it a second or two, I did not read it. I just skipped to comments. For the above stated reasons, I now feel that your opinion is not worth much - not even the time it takes to read your article.

    Why am I writing this? I hope that your previous article was a gross lapse in ability and judgement in submitting it for publication. Maybe with a reality check you will come around. My guess is that you hold yourself in too high a regard and myself in too low a regard to be swayed by anything I write. Still, I have tried.

    after your prior sloppy, ill-informed, lazy, hatchet job of an article I cannot take you seriously. It probably doesn’t matter to you, but I am probably not the only one.

    You’re definitely not the only one.

    I intended to read the above article, but after thinking about it a second or two, I did not read it.

    Well, I did read it and I can summarize it for you. Let’s see…. we spend an awful lot of money on the military and it’s all for nothing. Actually, it’s probably all for less than nothing….. And also, Elvis is still dead.

    Actually, that last piece of information was not in the article, but I thought maybe people needed to be informed of that as well.

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  58. @John Jeremiah Smith


    you conspiracy theorists are running dead last to the facts as recorded.
     
    your use of the expression is meaningless, because virtually every single theory offered for what transpired on 911 involves a conspiracy.
     
    Speaking of the meaning of "is", are we? Re-definitionizing "conspiracy", are we now?

    Dead last, and lapped, too.

    All you've got is some difficult-to-explain video of Bldg 7, and NOTHING else. That I do not choose to buy into a theory of massive conspiracy involving a necessity for hundreds, even thousands, of additional and complicit actors, is just me being someone who believes proof does not derive from exclamations of "Oh, lookee!!" If ya got it, trot it out. Otherwise, discussion ended.

    Re-definitionizing “conspiracy”, are we now?

    no, based on the definition of conspiracy it means to conspire

    and according to the official version, Osama Bin Laden and his nineteen henchmen conspired to attack the US on 911

    comprende?

    the official version of what happed that day is a ‘conspiracy theory’ in the very literal definition

    I hope that helps..

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  59. @Historian
    The Acela Corridor is not high-speed rail. The fact that you think is it shows how far we have fallen.

    The Acela only makes an average speed of 70 mph end-to-end, from Boston to Washington. There are long stretches of track where it travels 60 mph. There are even some segments built in the 19th century that are limited to 45 mph.

    Sure, it has a few miles of 160 mph track, but what good is that? You have to accelerate up to 160 mph, then decelerate back down to your regular speed. What we have done is the equivalent of building 30 miles of four-lane divided highway in the middle of a two-lane dirt road, and calling it an autobahn.

    True high-speed rail is going from Tokyo to Osaka at an average speed of 132 mph. From Paris to Lyon at 140 mph. From Wuhan to Guangzhou at 170 mph. These trains hit maximum speeds of 170 to 220 mph, but these countries upgraded the entire route to high-speed.

    As for population density, the Acela Corridor is denser than Spain.

    As for population density, the Acela Corridor is denser than Spain.

    Since Spain is 112th out of 244 nations, there are better things the US can spend money on besides high speed rail.

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    • Replies: @Historian
    Spain has the fourth-largest high-speed rail network in the world, after China, Japan, and France.
  60. @The Scalpel
    JJS,

    "“Tinfoil hat” makes “One”. Then he said he didn’t know if he SHOULD read the current one, onaccounta the tinfoil one being so wrong, ya know. That’s “Two”. In the vernacular, “both”."

    That is quite a logical stretch, even so far as to directly contradict the primary source, me!

    You really need to be more diligent. My criticism of Fred's "Tinfoil Hat" article was not his point of view, but that the article was "lazy" and "sloppy" and a "hatchet job". As I pointed out in that thread, Fred did not seriously address any of very convincing (to some respected scientists anyway) evidence that things did not occur exactly as we are being told. Instead, he set up several straw man arguments and knocked them down with a big dose of name-calling and his somewhat conceited personal opinion on the liklihood of any alternate explanations. It almost seems like you wrote the article JJS!

    I have read Fred before, and know he is capable of much more. It made me wonder why on earth he would put his name to such trash. Anyway, Rurik probably has the best explanation. I think we have beaten this horse to death.

    I grew up in New York, so I do enjoy arguing with you though JJS. Unfortunately, I have a life outside the Unz Review, so if I don't respond to you right away, please don't take that as any sort of concession on my part. Have a good day!

    It made me wonder why on earth he would put his name to such trash.

    Well, I guess he thought that most everybody here still believes the official bullshit, so he was going to write some lazy hit piece and sneer at and ridicule the handful of “tinfoil hat” wearers. Have a good laugh….

    And then he ended up discovering something. Probably the majority of his readership no longer believes the official bullshit so he was insulting most of his readers. And there was a real nasty backlash. Especially since, at this point, a lot of people are really really sick and tired of that kind of sneering pseudo-intellectual bullying, just really had enough of it.

    Well, you see, moralizing aside, the key thing about bullying is that you have to know how to choose your target, somebody weak or who is so cowed that they won’t fight back.

    So he misjudged and, like most any bully, when that happens, he had to just run away. Incredible loss of face. I look at what happened and see it as a great crystallizing moment on this site.

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  61. @Rurik

    If ya got it, trot it out.
     
    OK, no problem.

    what this video represents is absolute, irrefutable, undeniable proof that elements at the highest levels of our media knew that building seven was going to implode

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHFdcPv3XXI

    now please try to wrap your brain around the implications of this video

    if the building had not been wired for a controlled demolition, then it would have been impossible for this news organization (and others) to know before hand that it was going to come down

    ipso facto

    you can try to do mental somersaults all you want to, and say it was a coincidence or some other tortured logic, but the fact remains that this if proof of pre-knowledge of an event that no one could have had pre-knowledge about UNLESS it had been wired for a controlled demolition. OK?

    Now from there you can say it was Osama Bin Laden that wired it, or any other preposterous grasping, but the proof is right that that they knew the building was going to collapse, and that is proof that it was wired to do so.

    Three is no wiggle room on that.

    Now I don't want to make this thread a thread about 911, but since you asked, there is the irrefutable proof.

    The only reason I post it here is because there are a lot of people of good will who realize that from such proof - the official version is a fraud, and so they are trying to discover what really did happen on that day. And when someone of Fred's stature mocks them, I put it down to his (and possibly your) not having considered all the evidence out there. You see?

    And so those of us who have looked into it and do know that obviously they're lying about what happened on that day, need to be patient and forgiving of those like you (and possibly Fred) who have not had the opportunity to see all the proof that they are lying. That's all.

    I’ll look at the video when I have a chance — I gotta run before 6 and it’s 5:31.

    I think you’re not getting that it doesn’t make any effective difference if there was some additional conspiracy. Is the cover-up of the downing of the Shanksville jet — by F15 out of PAX, and yes I am 100% certain — a conspiracy? Of course. Point is, how are things changed by any of those presumed facts?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rurik

    it doesn’t make any effective difference if there was some additional conspiracy.
     
    are you suggesting that the fact that the controlled demolition of building seven was obviously pulled off by elements within our own government and media - but that the attack on the other two towers was a separately conceived and carried out attack by Osama and his henchmen? - that coincidently happened on the same day as the pre-reported implosion of building seven that was obviously a controlled demolition?

    And that..

    the cover-up of the downing of the Shanksville jet — by F15 out of PAX, and yes I am 100% certain
     
    was yet another, separate conspiracy? That also coincidentally just happened to happen on the same morning?

    And that the 911 Commission Report just sort of winged it, and blended them all together for whatever reason?
    , @The Scalpel
    JJS,

    I'm glad you brought up the Shanksville jet. I completely agree with your point of view. It is impossible for a jet that was supposedly intact when it did a nosedive into the ground, to leave a trail of debris including human body parts for miles.

    "How are things changed by any of those presumed facts?"

    Well I can tell you how similar circumstances changed me. In a sense it changed my world. If others have the same experience and it changes their world, it can change our world.

    I was a true believer. I was an honors graduate from West Point, not at the top of my class, but very close. I was an intelligent but unquestioning automaton programmed to carry out whatever orders I was given. If I used my intelligence for anything, it was to justify ex-post facto, any orders I was given. I provided absolutely no moral counterbalance to our rulers who are sometimes immoral and at times greatly so. On the contrary, I was an engine driving those immoral acts.

    Assuming we want to live in a better world, it is up to each individual to promote, by their actions, that world which they desire. Given that governments program their citizens for unquestioning belief and loyalty, it is very difficult for any particular individual to achieve an awakening so that they may start acting in their own best interest. The incongruities of events surrounding 911 are one opportunity to shake people awake. J Revusky touched on this topic in his article. Still, the "government" or whatever you may call it, actively works to suppress these awakenings. I believe that it is in my best interest and in the best interest of most of humanity to promote these awakenings.

    I believe the only way to change our world is for enough individuals, through their active resistance, to clog up the machinery of greed, violence, coercion, etc. Even if that is an impossible goal, I can at least change my world through my actions.

    I hope this answers your question.

    Regarding building 7, the video that Rurik posted is very compelling. There is another video of the BBC in the same scenario, saying the building was down minutes before it fell, when live video showed it standing in the background. What are the odds that two independant individuals made the same unlikely mistake moments before the actual event vs. they were tipped off?

    If the above video and the building collapsing into its own footprint at freefall speed does not convince one that it was a controlled demolition, how about we add a video of the actual explosions?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uo7uqjxnuPo
  62. @Rurik
    Hello Scalpel,

    while I accord with your motives, I'd just like to say I think we should give Fred the benefit of the doubt on that last one. Put it down to the same deluded delirium that afflict so many other-wise intelligent folks.

    If Fred feels he needs to force the issue, sans evidence or exculpation, then I'd agree.. but personally I'd tend to error on the side of amelioration on this one, (if that isn't too vapory [sorry])

    JD21 = DF21D ?

    a serious threat to Washington’s economic hegemony.

    What is the relevance of the Pentagon? How do you bomb a trade agreement?
     
    you reduce the countries that are signing it to smoking rubble

    see: Iraq trading oil in Euros or Libya's gold dinar

    not too much of that going on these days

    in fact, I think they've been outfitted with Rothschild central banks by now

    and lets remember, the US is currently engaged in wars all over the place based on less plausible provocations. (getting Osama in Afghanistan, reconstituting the heroin trade in same, imposing hell on earth in Iraq and Libya and Syria are all wars waged with less justification than a trade agreement. At least that's something)

    I’d just like to say I think we should give Fred the benefit of the doubt on that last one.

    I was half thinking that we should inaugurate a Will Rogers award of the week. “I never met a man I didn’t like”.

    I guess if somebody you trusted stabbed you in the back, you’d say: “I think we need to give him the benefit of the doubt. Shucks, he didn’t really mean it. I figure his hand slipped…”

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    • Replies: @Rurik

    Will Rogers award of the week
     
    I know people of good will who believe the government account

    I have no proof that Fred is lying or misleading, and I consider it perfectly reasonable to believe that he's in the same camp as so many others I know. Indeed, siblings and so forth.

    I don't rail at them, even if I've given up gently trying to persuade them. Some people are not willing- psychologically- to 'go there'
  63. @John Jeremiah Smith
    I'll look at the video when I have a chance -- I gotta run before 6 and it's 5:31.

    I think you're not getting that it doesn't make any effective difference if there was some additional conspiracy. Is the cover-up of the downing of the Shanksville jet -- by F15 out of PAX, and yes I am 100% certain -- a conspiracy? Of course. Point is, how are things changed by any of those presumed facts?

    it doesn’t make any effective difference if there was some additional conspiracy.

    are you suggesting that the fact that the controlled demolition of building seven was obviously pulled off by elements within our own government and media – but that the attack on the other two towers was a separately conceived and carried out attack by Osama and his henchmen? – that coincidently happened on the same day as the pre-reported implosion of building seven that was obviously a controlled demolition?

    And that..

    the cover-up of the downing of the Shanksville jet — by F15 out of PAX, and yes I am 100% certain

    was yet another, separate conspiracy? That also coincidentally just happened to happen on the same morning?

    And that the 911 Commission Report just sort of winged it, and blended them all together for whatever reason?

    Read More
    • Replies: @John Jeremiah Smith

    are you suggesting that the fact that the controlled demolition of building seven was obviously pulled off by elements within our own government and media – but that the attack on the other two towers was a separately conceived and carried out attack by Osama and his henchmen? – that coincidently happened on the same day as the pre-reported implosion of building seven that was obviously a controlled demolition?
     
    No, I'm asking what difference it makes? Is this a situation where brave, bold, forensic adventurers uncover the dastardly plot, the massive conspiracy extending across the globe, this insidious evil of evildoers? Then, the people of the United States rise up in righteous wrath, punish the guilty, and see to it that no evil conspiracy ever happens again?

    Or some other scenario, perhaps? Like what?
  64. @Jonathan Revusky

    I’d just like to say I think we should give Fred the benefit of the doubt on that last one.
     
    I was half thinking that we should inaugurate a Will Rogers award of the week. "I never met a man I didn't like".

    I guess if somebody you trusted stabbed you in the back, you'd say: "I think we need to give him the benefit of the doubt. Shucks, he didn't really mean it. I figure his hand slipped..."

    Will Rogers award of the week

    I know people of good will who believe the government account

    I have no proof that Fred is lying or misleading, and I consider it perfectly reasonable to believe that he’s in the same camp as so many others I know. Indeed, siblings and so forth.

    I don’t rail at them, even if I’ve given up gently trying to persuade them. Some people are not willing- psychologically- to ‘go there’

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jonathan Revusky
    Rurik, I meant the quip about the "Will Rogers award" as good-natured ribbing mostly.

    But there is a serious side to it. I don't think it really is practical to give people endless benefit of the doubt.


    I don’t rail at them, even if I’ve given up gently trying to persuade them.
     
    Well, this is really a separate matter, all the HIQI types that one had to get along with in daily life -- family, friends, colleagues.... One should try to stand up for the truth, but when there isn't even the slightest hope and also there's huge social cost, the only thing to do is to let the matter slide.

    And at least none of these friends and family you're alluding to are here preening as public intellectuals and writing articles representing that they have knowledge of things that they don't know screw-all about.

    So it's a completely different situation.

  65. Hey, old guy, it’s “Ukraine,” not “the Ukraine.” Also, Austria and Hungary have replaced “Austria-Hungary.”

    I agree that we could slash a lot of our military budget and get along just fine. E.g., the entire Army, for starters. Personally, I’d rather keep the Navy than the Army. And I’m not at all in favor of our “invade the world invite the world” regime.

    On the other hand, building machines for the military is one of the last redoubts of American manufacturing and technical know-how. Why don’t we privatize education instead? Plenty of fat to trim in the NEA. Then there’s the fact that the huge numbers of gov’t employees get the benefit of unions, when they’ve gone the way of the do-do for most Americans. Let’s get rid of unions for gov’t employees. Seems too much like double-dipping to me. It should be a choice: union or gov’t job, not both.

    Also, one thing that never gets discussed in this context is bang-for-buck. We get a lot more bang-for-buck building the number of ships we do, than we would from building fewer ships. Dollars-to-product here is not at all a linear relationship.

    I suppose my position is, if we’re going to stop invading the world, we should stop inviting it first. Inviting the world is absolutely disastrous, while invading it (or at least, being muscular enough to) is a mixed bag, with some up-sides. So stopping the invading, while allowing the inviting to continue, would be even worse than what we have now.

    What is the relevance of aircraft carriers?

    Ask China, they’re putting one to sea soon, AFAIK.

    This is not just talk. China has the money and a very large network of high-speed rail domestically. (The US has not a single mile.)

    High-speed rail makes a lot more sense in China (the habitable parts of China are about as densely-populated as the Netherlands) than it does in America. We have much lower population density, and much greater saturation of automobiles.

    The “muh ha-spayd rail” “muh tawlest building” talk doesn’t get less lame with repetition.

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  66. The point of our gargantuan military is/are the very issues which it moots–which are precisely all the faults Fred finds with it. In other words, no one else wants to wage conventional wars of aggression precisely because we are preeminent in that domain. So, a lot of trouble is preempted because we carry a big stick. And that nothing is worth something.

    There is a lot of truth to this, though nuclear missiles do tend to substantially mitigate it.

    Both Russia and China are nipping at the edges

    I don’t see Russia as nipping at the edges (I reserve judgement on China, because I don’t pay any attention to that sphere). More like, pursuing the same strategic goals they’ve long pursued. Russia is not going to allow US to flip the Caucasus, or Crimea (Caucasus is Russia’s natural southern border, and they’re not going to tolerate any other state of affairs). I suppose there is truth to the idea that they only moved on Syria because of a perceived vacuum left by Hussein’s administration.

    I dunno about Russia starting a war in Ukraine. They seem to have them over a barrel with the energy situation, inter alia. What’s Ukraine’s big economic draw? Nice soil? Does Russia still have problems feeding herself? Russia seems better off without Ukraine to manage.

    It’s a self-serving military-industrial complex that’s behind a bloated and largely useless military set-up. This complex is composed of defense contractors, politicians, and senior military officers, who have an incestuous relationship with one another. That this military set-up is ineffectual is beside the point. And nothing ever changes in this ossified and reactionary regime.

    Same is true of Russia, of course. I know at one point they were appointing arms industry heads to MoD.

    Sure did.

    North Vietnamese and VC evacuating from Hanoi, just before victorious ARVN tanks rolled into Hanoi:

    Still a political loss, not a military one. Or, we got tired of killing gooks and left. Same difference, really.

    The Acela Corridor is not high-speed rail. The fact that you think is it shows how far we have fallen.

    The Acela only makes an average speed of 70 mph end-to-end, from Boston to Washington. There are long stretches of track where it travels 60 mph. There are even some segments built in the 19th century that are limited to 45 mph.

    Are we talking about Amtrack? Because Amtrack is a money pit. I doubt very much an overhaul would change that. Nobody uses it because everyone has a car, or access to a plane.

    As for population density, the Acela Corridor is denser than Spain.

    Spain has a big ass desert in the middle of it.

    No, military power is the ability to achieve political objectives of the war “by compelling the enemy to do our will”(c).

    Mmm, not necessarily. E.g., if I go into your country and destroy your military and your infrastructure, I may not give a shit what you do with your will.

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  67. @John Jeremiah Smith
    I'll look at the video when I have a chance -- I gotta run before 6 and it's 5:31.

    I think you're not getting that it doesn't make any effective difference if there was some additional conspiracy. Is the cover-up of the downing of the Shanksville jet -- by F15 out of PAX, and yes I am 100% certain -- a conspiracy? Of course. Point is, how are things changed by any of those presumed facts?

    JJS,

    I’m glad you brought up the Shanksville jet. I completely agree with your point of view. It is impossible for a jet that was supposedly intact when it did a nosedive into the ground, to leave a trail of debris including human body parts for miles.

    “How are things changed by any of those presumed facts?”

    Well I can tell you how similar circumstances changed me. In a sense it changed my world. If others have the same experience and it changes their world, it can change our world.

    I was a true believer. I was an honors graduate from West Point, not at the top of my class, but very close. I was an intelligent but unquestioning automaton programmed to carry out whatever orders I was given. If I used my intelligence for anything, it was to justify ex-post facto, any orders I was given. I provided absolutely no moral counterbalance to our rulers who are sometimes immoral and at times greatly so. On the contrary, I was an engine driving those immoral acts.

    Assuming we want to live in a better world, it is up to each individual to promote, by their actions, that world which they desire. Given that governments program their citizens for unquestioning belief and loyalty, it is very difficult for any particular individual to achieve an awakening so that they may start acting in their own best interest. The incongruities of events surrounding 911 are one opportunity to shake people awake. J Revusky touched on this topic in his article. Still, the “government” or whatever you may call it, actively works to suppress these awakenings. I believe that it is in my best interest and in the best interest of most of humanity to promote these awakenings.

    I believe the only way to change our world is for enough individuals, through their active resistance, to clog up the machinery of greed, violence, coercion, etc. Even if that is an impossible goal, I can at least change my world through my actions.

    I hope this answers your question.

    Regarding building 7, the video that Rurik posted is very compelling. There is another video of the BBC in the same scenario, saying the building was down minutes before it fell, when live video showed it standing in the background. What are the odds that two independant individuals made the same unlikely mistake moments before the actual event vs. they were tipped off?

    If the above video and the building collapsing into its own footprint at freefall speed does not convince one that it was a controlled demolition, how about we add a video of the actual explosions?

    Read More
    • Replies: @John Jeremiah Smith

    I believe the only way to change our world is for enough individuals, through their active resistance, to clog up the machinery of greed, violence, coercion, etc. Even if that is an impossible goal, I can at least change my world through my actions.
     
    I see. Personally, I don't believe that approach will change anything, anything at all. While I would like to give you a hearty "Attaboy!", I am more inclined to the opinion that well-planned, well-organized, well-executed revolt is the only solution.
    , @Anonymous Smith
    Hey, Scalpel!

    I haven't read any of the other comments in this thread, but I spotted the video in your post and thought I'd check it out. WOW...fantastic find, Scalpel! This is THE most important WTC 7 video out there. More IRREFUTABLE proof of controlled demolition on 9/11. Thank you for bringing it to our attention!
  68. @Rurik

    it doesn’t make any effective difference if there was some additional conspiracy.
     
    are you suggesting that the fact that the controlled demolition of building seven was obviously pulled off by elements within our own government and media - but that the attack on the other two towers was a separately conceived and carried out attack by Osama and his henchmen? - that coincidently happened on the same day as the pre-reported implosion of building seven that was obviously a controlled demolition?

    And that..

    the cover-up of the downing of the Shanksville jet — by F15 out of PAX, and yes I am 100% certain
     
    was yet another, separate conspiracy? That also coincidentally just happened to happen on the same morning?

    And that the 911 Commission Report just sort of winged it, and blended them all together for whatever reason?

    are you suggesting that the fact that the controlled demolition of building seven was obviously pulled off by elements within our own government and media – but that the attack on the other two towers was a separately conceived and carried out attack by Osama and his henchmen? – that coincidently happened on the same day as the pre-reported implosion of building seven that was obviously a controlled demolition?

    No, I’m asking what difference it makes? Is this a situation where brave, bold, forensic adventurers uncover the dastardly plot, the massive conspiracy extending across the globe, this insidious evil of evildoers? Then, the people of the United States rise up in righteous wrath, punish the guilty, and see to it that no evil conspiracy ever happens again?

    Or some other scenario, perhaps? Like what?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rurik

    the people of the United States rise up in righteous wrath
     
    when all the fuss was being made about Obama's birth certificate, I was of a mind that it didn't really make any difference. It wasn't like they were going to annul the election. The regime would find a way to simply move on, perhaps simply by ignoring it all, or have congress rubber stamp some bullshit temporary whatever. So the whole thing bored me.

    I’m asking what difference it makes?
     
    But this is different. Here are a few snippets from a recent Saker article:

    what primarily explains the collective blindness of quite literally all the US elites about 9/11: just like everybody now knows that Kennedy was not killed by a lone gunman, most people by now suspect that the official 9/11 conspiracy theory is a stupid load of hogwash – but they just don’t see what difference it makes for them and the world they live in. Combine a silent majority and a ruling elite acting in lockstep to deny the obvious, and you have today’s apparent defeat of the 9/11 Truth movement.

    [my emphasis]

    Of course, the stakes are sky-high: if 9/11 was an inside job, then the US government is not only absolutely illegitimate, it is in fact an occupation government controlled by either foreign elements, or traitors or both. And there are those who will deliberately stick their head in the sand as deep as possible to avoid having to contemplate the mind-blowing consequences of the undeniable fact that the so-called “land of the brave” is run by an occupation government which has reduced the so-called “brave” to a serf-like status and that several thousands of US Americans have been deliberately sacrificed to induce a mindless patriotic hysteria (with Chinese-made flags and all) to make it possible to use the poorest US Americans as cannon fodder in genocidal wars all over the planet. Yes, that is, indeed, a very painful realization

    all those whose livelihood, reputation or personal self-image directly depends on the “respectability” of the system we are living in, including journalists and bloggers”, have a huge interest in rejecting reality and upholding an absurd narrative simply because their own well-being is directly affected by the “system”. In that sense yes, the 9/11 Truth movement is composed of “fringe” elements, of people who have deliberately given up on official “respectability” and being seen as “serious” and who have chosen to say “the Emperor is naked” even if they get sneered at (but rarely debated!) by the millions of volunteer sycophants which form the real power base of the regime in control of Washington, DC.

    9/11 was the seminal event which ushered in our current era and, just for that reason only, it is probably also the single most important event in our recent history.


    The Empire has already given up on actively defending its ridiculous conspiracy theory and it now only counts on the indifference and passivity of its serfs to keep the 9/11 Truth movement as officially ignored

    >>><<<

    I'm a student of history and of human behavior. If you understand human history, you understand that it has been one long stream of tyrannical misery of a tiny elite lording it over the masses. Slavery was the norm, and cruelty the daily bread. From the temples built to human sacrifice on the Yucatan peninsula to the Andes of Peru. Mankind expressed the nature of the Gods he worshiped and created in his image. European feudal life was one of ownership, of the many by the few. And when the lord decided your maiden daughter was ripe, he simply sent his goons to take her. And that was it. Torture, dungeons, slavery, the whip and a brutal life of death and toil were the norm. For the elites of Greece or Rome, they had it well, for the slaves, not so much. And on and on. It wasn't until the Renaissance and Age of Enlightenment that things began to change. When heroic men would not be slaves any longer, and by force of blood and sword, nascent gropings for human freedom that are represented by the Magna Carta were forged. From there we got the Declaration of Independence and the Déclaration des droits de l'homme et du citoyen.

    And that is our heritage and inheritance.

    but today we are not made of the same stuff those men and women were made of. Today we're a pasty, weak, whiney, greedy, self-absorbed, shallow, materialistic, bovine, sheep-like shadow of the men and women who have bequeathed us the hard won miracle of human freedom- purchased with veritable rivers of the blood by moral and spiritual and indomitable giants. Who would not be slaves, but would sacrifice their lives to grant their progeny freedom. The most sacred, precious and threatened possession we have.

    911 was perpetrated to end all that. 911 was intended to create the kind of world were the lord$ and masters do with us and our children as they please. Where torture and mass-murder and atrocities galore are the order of the day. Where the state police can knock in your door at four in the morning, shoot your dog, rifle butt your son, slap you daughter down (or just kill the whole lot) and black bag you to be renditioned off-shore and never heard from again. Based on secret 'evidence' anonymously given without charges or any right to counsel by nameless officials for reasons of "national security". That this is the realty today is a direct consequence of 911 (as it was intended to be). So is the complete evisceration of all of our Constitutional rights, starting with the right not to be arbitrarily assassinated (even by drone) without cause or investigation. That also is a direct consequence of 911. Ehud Barak perhaps said it best when he said nothing was ever going to be the same. And that the 'war on terror' was now going to be global in scope and from now on, getting on a plane was going to be virtually like being treated like a terrorist. Like a Palestinian. Which is, simply put, exactly what they have in mind for us all.

    Now this has gotten waaayyyy too long, as is my wont.

    But I just wanted to touch base on your assertion of "what difference it makes"

    Orwell understood human nature to the core. And he tried to warn us. Too bad we were/are too cowardly and stupid to listen.
  69. @NoseytheDuke
    "Our military has done more to free mankind from dictatorial and oppressive governments than any other force on earth."

    Would you kindly list them for us? Thanks.

    NosytheDuke
    You can’t possibly be serious questioning that the US is the only country
    which could be accused of knocking out the evil powers before they became
    a global threat.
    Granted, we are not a stranger to gross misjudgments regarding
    “spreading democracy” in places where the likelihood of even partial success
    didn’t exist. Fault the dense politicians inventing loony doctrines for murky
    reasons which were elaborated on above.
    I don’t think these failures discredit the good accomplished elsewhere.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jonathan Revusky

    You can’t possibly be serious questioning that the US is the only country
    which could be accused of knocking out the evil powers before they became
    a global threat.
     
    The evil powers, eh? Now, who gets to judge who is evil and who is not?

    Oh, never mind... just a rhetorical question... we know the answer...

    It gets pretty circular, doesn't it? Any country that the U.S. government defines as an enemy is portrayed as "evil" and then the mainstream media parrots that 24/7.

    Granted, we are not a stranger to gross misjudgments regarding
    “spreading democracy”
     
    "Misjudgments", eh? The destruction of Iraq, Libya, Syria,.... all just an honest mistake. The US can't be evil. It's whatever country that the US defines as evil that is evil...
    , @Konga
    A list!
  70. @The Scalpel
    JJS,

    I'm glad you brought up the Shanksville jet. I completely agree with your point of view. It is impossible for a jet that was supposedly intact when it did a nosedive into the ground, to leave a trail of debris including human body parts for miles.

    "How are things changed by any of those presumed facts?"

    Well I can tell you how similar circumstances changed me. In a sense it changed my world. If others have the same experience and it changes their world, it can change our world.

    I was a true believer. I was an honors graduate from West Point, not at the top of my class, but very close. I was an intelligent but unquestioning automaton programmed to carry out whatever orders I was given. If I used my intelligence for anything, it was to justify ex-post facto, any orders I was given. I provided absolutely no moral counterbalance to our rulers who are sometimes immoral and at times greatly so. On the contrary, I was an engine driving those immoral acts.

    Assuming we want to live in a better world, it is up to each individual to promote, by their actions, that world which they desire. Given that governments program their citizens for unquestioning belief and loyalty, it is very difficult for any particular individual to achieve an awakening so that they may start acting in their own best interest. The incongruities of events surrounding 911 are one opportunity to shake people awake. J Revusky touched on this topic in his article. Still, the "government" or whatever you may call it, actively works to suppress these awakenings. I believe that it is in my best interest and in the best interest of most of humanity to promote these awakenings.

    I believe the only way to change our world is for enough individuals, through their active resistance, to clog up the machinery of greed, violence, coercion, etc. Even if that is an impossible goal, I can at least change my world through my actions.

    I hope this answers your question.

    Regarding building 7, the video that Rurik posted is very compelling. There is another video of the BBC in the same scenario, saying the building was down minutes before it fell, when live video showed it standing in the background. What are the odds that two independant individuals made the same unlikely mistake moments before the actual event vs. they were tipped off?

    If the above video and the building collapsing into its own footprint at freefall speed does not convince one that it was a controlled demolition, how about we add a video of the actual explosions?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uo7uqjxnuPo

    I believe the only way to change our world is for enough individuals, through their active resistance, to clog up the machinery of greed, violence, coercion, etc. Even if that is an impossible goal, I can at least change my world through my actions.

    I see. Personally, I don’t believe that approach will change anything, anything at all. While I would like to give you a hearty “Attaboy!”, I am more inclined to the opinion that well-planned, well-organized, well-executed revolt is the only solution.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Scalpel
    JJS,

    "Personally, I don't believe that approach will change anything, anything at all."

    It is a basic philosophical difference. I am more of an individualist, I guess. But I think you may have missed my point. My approach does change something for sure. It changes my world, and that is the world I have to live in. Every individual has the power to change their world.

    All men are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights. Among these are life liberty and the pursuit of happiness. - Or something like that.

    I will concede that there is a logical leap between many individuals changing their own individual world and systemic changes on a large scale. That is a weakness of my philosophy. I believe the change does happen on a large scale, but it is on a different time frame and would be referred to possibly as cultural changes.

    Your philosophy also requires a logical leap. One cannot just assume that the government created by your well organized, well executed revolt will be any better than the government it replaced. If history is any guide, the odds are against it. Then again, Thomas Jefferson was on your side. Liberty must at intervals be nourished with the blood of tyrants or something like that. Same guy wrote both things! Funny that.

    Anyway, I think we are both working toward the same goal. Perhaps there is more than one pathway to get there.
  71. @John Jeremiah Smith

    I believe the only way to change our world is for enough individuals, through their active resistance, to clog up the machinery of greed, violence, coercion, etc. Even if that is an impossible goal, I can at least change my world through my actions.
     
    I see. Personally, I don't believe that approach will change anything, anything at all. While I would like to give you a hearty "Attaboy!", I am more inclined to the opinion that well-planned, well-organized, well-executed revolt is the only solution.

    JJS,

    “Personally, I don’t believe that approach will change anything, anything at all.”

    It is a basic philosophical difference. I am more of an individualist, I guess. But I think you may have missed my point. My approach does change something for sure. It changes my world, and that is the world I have to live in. Every individual has the power to change their world.

    All men are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights. Among these are life liberty and the pursuit of happiness. – Or something like that.

    I will concede that there is a logical leap between many individuals changing their own individual world and systemic changes on a large scale. That is a weakness of my philosophy. I believe the change does happen on a large scale, but it is on a different time frame and would be referred to possibly as cultural changes.

    Your philosophy also requires a logical leap. One cannot just assume that the government created by your well organized, well executed revolt will be any better than the government it replaced. If history is any guide, the odds are against it. Then again, Thomas Jefferson was on your side. Liberty must at intervals be nourished with the blood of tyrants or something like that. Same guy wrote both things! Funny that.

    Anyway, I think we are both working toward the same goal. Perhaps there is more than one pathway to get there.

    Read More
  72. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    I am aware that someone will respond to this comment with “But a 757 (whatever) isn’t a Piper Cub”.

    Anyway, although I am a 9/11 skeptic/truther, I will add one small observation about plane wreckage. The Pennsylvania plane may not have had to have left a mile long debris field. I once witnessed a Cessna crash into a farmer’s field. It must have done a nose dive because there wasn’t enough stuff above ground to fill a bread basket and I was on the spot within minutes.

    Again, I’m a truther, but if a jet were to hit the ground at a near vertical angle and at high speed, I wouldn’t imagine that there would be much visible above ground. Wouldn’t the fuselage crumple like a giant beer can? And the engines plant themselves into the ground?

    Anyone with more experience care to comment?

    Read More
    • Disagree: Rurik
    • Replies: @The Scalpel
    "The Pennsylvania plane may not have had to have left a mile long debris field."

    You are missing the point. Multiple local news sources documented a debris field stretching over a mile from the crash of the Shanksvile plane. The debris field was along the course prior to the crash of what remained. This means that the plane broke up prior to crashing, it did not simply do a nose dive ino the ground. The plane did not fall apart spontaneously. It must have been shot down, exploded, struck by lightning! Exploded would have stopped the forward progress of the plane, so shot down is the only reasonable explanation.
  73. @John Jeremiah Smith

    are you suggesting that the fact that the controlled demolition of building seven was obviously pulled off by elements within our own government and media – but that the attack on the other two towers was a separately conceived and carried out attack by Osama and his henchmen? – that coincidently happened on the same day as the pre-reported implosion of building seven that was obviously a controlled demolition?
     
    No, I'm asking what difference it makes? Is this a situation where brave, bold, forensic adventurers uncover the dastardly plot, the massive conspiracy extending across the globe, this insidious evil of evildoers? Then, the people of the United States rise up in righteous wrath, punish the guilty, and see to it that no evil conspiracy ever happens again?

    Or some other scenario, perhaps? Like what?

    the people of the United States rise up in righteous wrath

    when all the fuss was being made about Obama’s birth certificate, I was of a mind that it didn’t really make any difference. It wasn’t like they were going to annul the election. The regime would find a way to simply move on, perhaps simply by ignoring it all, or have congress rubber stamp some bullshit temporary whatever. So the whole thing bored me.

    I’m asking what difference it makes?

    But this is different. Here are a few snippets from a recent Saker article:

    what primarily explains the collective blindness of quite literally all the US elites about 9/11: just like everybody now knows that Kennedy was not killed by a lone gunman, most people by now suspect that the official 9/11 conspiracy theory is a stupid load of hogwash – but they just don’t see what difference it makes for them and the world they live in. Combine a silent majority and a ruling elite acting in lockstep to deny the obvious, and you have today’s apparent defeat of the 9/11 Truth movement.

    [my emphasis]

    Of course, the stakes are sky-high: if 9/11 was an inside job, then the US government is not only absolutely illegitimate, it is in fact an occupation government controlled by either foreign elements, or traitors or both. And there are those who will deliberately stick their head in the sand as deep as possible to avoid having to contemplate the mind-blowing consequences of the undeniable fact that the so-called “land of the brave” is run by an occupation government which has reduced the so-called “brave” to a serf-like status and that several thousands of US Americans have been deliberately sacrificed to induce a mindless patriotic hysteria (with Chinese-made flags and all) to make it possible to use the poorest US Americans as cannon fodder in genocidal wars all over the planet. Yes, that is, indeed, a very painful realization

    all those whose livelihood, reputation or personal self-image directly depends on the “respectability” of the system we are living in, including journalists and bloggers”, have a huge interest in rejecting reality and upholding an absurd narrative simply because their own well-being is directly affected by the “system”. In that sense yes, the 9/11 Truth movement is composed of “fringe” elements, of people who have deliberately given up on official “respectability” and being seen as “serious” and who have chosen to say “the Emperor is naked” even if they get sneered at (but rarely debated!) by the millions of volunteer sycophants which form the real power base of the regime in control of Washington, DC.

    9/11 was the seminal event which ushered in our current era and, just for that reason only, it is probably also the single most important event in our recent history.

    The Empire has already given up on actively defending its ridiculous conspiracy theory and it now only counts on the indifference and passivity of its serfs to keep the 9/11 Truth movement as officially ignored

    >>><<<

    I'm a student of history and of human behavior. If you understand human history, you understand that it has been one long stream of tyrannical misery of a tiny elite lording it over the masses. Slavery was the norm, and cruelty the daily bread. From the temples built to human sacrifice on the Yucatan peninsula to the Andes of Peru. Mankind expressed the nature of the Gods he worshiped and created in his image. European feudal life was one of ownership, of the many by the few. And when the lord decided your maiden daughter was ripe, he simply sent his goons to take her. And that was it. Torture, dungeons, slavery, the whip and a brutal life of death and toil were the norm. For the elites of Greece or Rome, they had it well, for the slaves, not so much. And on and on. It wasn't until the Renaissance and Age of Enlightenment that things began to change. When heroic men would not be slaves any longer, and by force of blood and sword, nascent gropings for human freedom that are represented by the Magna Carta were forged. From there we got the Declaration of Independence and the Déclaration des droits de l'homme et du citoyen.

    And that is our heritage and inheritance.

    but today we are not made of the same stuff those men and women were made of. Today we're a pasty, weak, whiney, greedy, self-absorbed, shallow, materialistic, bovine, sheep-like shadow of the men and women who have bequeathed us the hard won miracle of human freedom- purchased with veritable rivers of the blood by moral and spiritual and indomitable giants. Who would not be slaves, but would sacrifice their lives to grant their progeny freedom. The most sacred, precious and threatened possession we have.

    911 was perpetrated to end all that. 911 was intended to create the kind of world were the lord$ and masters do with us and our children as they please. Where torture and mass-murder and atrocities galore are the order of the day. Where the state police can knock in your door at four in the morning, shoot your dog, rifle butt your son, slap you daughter down (or just kill the whole lot) and black bag you to be renditioned off-shore and never heard from again. Based on secret 'evidence' anonymously given without charges or any right to counsel by nameless officials for reasons of "national security". That this is the realty today is a direct consequence of 911 (as it was intended to be). So is the complete evisceration of all of our Constitutional rights, starting with the right not to be arbitrarily assassinated (even by drone) without cause or investigation. That also is a direct consequence of 911. Ehud Barak perhaps said it best when he said nothing was ever going to be the same. And that the 'war on terror' was now going to be global in scope and from now on, getting on a plane was going to be virtually like being treated like a terrorist. Like a Palestinian. Which is, simply put, exactly what they have in mind for us all.

    Now this has gotten waaayyyy too long, as is my wont.

    But I just wanted to touch base on your assertion of "what difference it makes"

    Orwell understood human nature to the core. And he tried to warn us. Too bad we were/are too cowardly and stupid to listen.

    Read More
    • Replies: @John Jeremiah Smith
    Mmm...what snippets to quote ... ?

    If you understand human history, you understand that it has been one long stream of tyrannical misery of a tiny elite lording it over the masses. Slavery was the norm, and cruelty the daily bread.
     
    Very much so.

    It wasn't until the Renaissance and Age of Enlightenment that things began to change. When heroic men would not be slaves any longer, and by force of blood and sword, nascent gropings for human freedom that are represented by the Magna Carta were forged. From there we got the Declaration of Independence and the Déclaration des droits de l'homme et du citoyen.
     
    Locke, JS Mill, Berkeley, Hume, Voltaire, etc. Yup.

    And that is our heritage and inheritance.
     
    Well, no, unfortunately. Heritage, yes. Inheritance, no.

    but today we are not made of the same stuff those men and women were made of. Today we're a pasty, weak, whiney, greedy, self-absorbed, shallow, materialistic, bovine, sheep-like shadow of the men and women who have bequeathed us the hard won miracle of human freedom
     
    Bingo. We are not those people, or perhaps we are not the 30% - 40% who believed it and made it happen, made it work.

    Don't get me wrong ... yes, I believe in all those principles of freedom and the rights of Man. That age, founded on those principles, produced the greatest gains in science and philosophy in the entire history of the human race. Produced the greatest gains in economic improvements of the human condition. For 200 years, the graph went asymptotic.

    And now it's gone. Well, hell, turns out that eternal vigilance really is the price of freedom after all, but we have failed to turn the vigilant eye inward, to our governmental systems (and to ourselves), where corruption has destroyed the essential framework. In my opinion, it's a done deal -- we're finished as a nation of free men governed by Constitutional principles.

    It's not all that surprising. The dynastic cycle in China, over a period of 4000 years, averaged out at about 200 years each, sometimes less, never more than 250. And that was a system that simply provided a consistent set of rules within everything worked -- not like it was fair and just -- but everyone knew his entitlements, be they great or meager.

    So, here we sit at the cusp of the cycle. With any luck, Hegel's premise of an ascending spiral of civilization will hold true; we will punctuate the equilibrium, revolt, destroy the oppressors, swear fealty to every noble principle we can think of, and establish a new order of our own -- some small improvement on previous documentation possible, perhaps. It's not like the Constitution even approaches perfection. ;-)

    I'm old; I'm done with revolution; did my share. Give me my 5-foot mower, tiller and box-scraper; I've got landscaping plans. Can I write revolutionary pamphlets? Oh, hell yeah -- right up until the NSA knocks on the door and tells me to stop, or else.

    There's a line in Heinlein's old novel, "Have Spacesuit, Will Travel", where the time-shifted Roman soldier tells the protagonist: "Alright, boy! I'll knock 'em down -- you cut their throats!" Fine sentiments indeed. Then he hurls his javelin, draws short-sword and charges the alien gallery. A tractor beam picks him up, transports him back to his gilded cage in the zoo that doesn't look like a zoo.

    Sometimes I wonder if the Galactics are waiting patiently for us to demonstrate true evolution by becoming truly civilized.
  74. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @The Scalpel
    [Actually, "Tard Beater" is the commenter improperly employing multiple handles.]

    As far as "single handle" this is my only handle. I think the space I put in between the words "the" and "scalpel" threw off the system.

    As far as "not reading the article," my comments were clearly stated to be referring to the PREVIOUS article not the current article. I did read the previous article "Tinfoil Hats" etc. My comments were referring to that article, not this one. I have no interested in reading this article for the previously stated reasons. I hope this clears things up.

    [Actually, "Tard Beater" is the commenter improperly employing multiple handles.]

    As far as “single handle” this is my only handle. I think the space I put in between the words “the” and “scalpel” threw off the system.

    It’s Ron Unz dropping in with his comment. Unz has a bizarre obsession with sock puppetry. http://harvardlpr.com/2011/02/28/fear-the-sockpuppets/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jonathan Revusky

    Unz has a bizarre obsession with sock puppetry.
     
    It's not at all a "bizarre obsession". A single person who represents that he is multiple people is intentionally subverting your normal cues for judging information.

    Typically, in normal, non-virtual life, somebody cannot represent that he is more than one person and if different people tell you something, you start attaching far more credibility to it.

    The ancient Chinese proverb "Three men make a tiger" is probably the most succint expression of this concept.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_men_make_a_tiger
  75. @The Scalpel
    Fred,

    I always thought you meant well, but after your prior sloppy, ill-informed, lazy, hatchet job of an article I cannot take you seriously. It probably doesn't matter to you, but I am probably not the only one.

    I believe that one can disagree with another on facts or interpretation and still hold them in high regard. It is hard to respect a person who is intelligent and capable, but lazy, sloppy, and opinionated.

    I intended to read the above article, but after thinking about it a second or two, I did not read it. I just skipped to comments. For the above stated reasons, I now feel that your opinion is not worth much - not even the time it takes to read your article.

    Why am I writing this? I hope that your previous article was a gross lapse in ability and judgement in submitting it for publication. Maybe with a reality check you will come around. My guess is that you hold yourself in too high a regard and myself in too low a regard to be swayed by anything I write. Still, I have tried.

    I was where you are about two years ago regarding Fred. He is a joke, he wrotes these articles as way of passive aggression, nothing else. He enjoys to rile up Americans still on American soil by denigrating our nation and our racial stock.

    The previous article calling those who doubt the official 911 story conspiracy hacks, as well as the countless other pro-Mexican and anti-Anglo pieces serve as examples.

    Fred is a self hating White man married to a Mexican woman (of Jewish stock) with a few too many miles on her.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jonathan Revusky

    Fred is a self hating White man married to a Mexican woman (of Jewish stock)
     
    Excuse me, I would like to request that you cease and desist this dirtbag stuff now.

    You know the preamble to the U.S. declaration of independence, the bit about where they hold "certain truths to be self-evident"?

    Let me add one here:

    A man can marry whoever the hell he wants and he can live wherever the hell he wants.

    Along these lines, John Derbyshire is a writer whose work I just don't like very much. However, I would not, in a million years, criticize him for marrying a Chinese lady. I just wouldn't. And if, for whatever reasons, he chose to go live in China or Mexico or wherever and write his columns from there, I would never criticize him for that.

    That's just total bullshit.

    Why are you guys getting on with this crap? Are you just morons or is this some sort of deliberate agent provocateur type stuff? It's like you're trying to portray the people who are criticizing Fred over that egregious article he wrote as a bunch of assholes.

    Well, I certainly am not stupid enough to take the bait. I dissociate myself from such bullshit and I condemn it.
    , @Neil Templeton
    First Rule of Debate: Never insult a man's wife, except when the wife is a man. Your ad hominem BS signals a lack of cognitive mastery. Could you restate your argument?
  76. I don’t see America having the appetite for total war, do you? Most political energy seem to be spent in domestic affairs, partisanship, social issues etc. If there is to be a huge bloody war, it may well be a civil war in the west, driven by desperation over demographic changes.

    And it’s Xinjiang, not Xian Jiang.

    Read More
  77. @Anonymous
    I am aware that someone will respond to this comment with "But a 757 (whatever) isn't a Piper Cub".

    Anyway, although I am a 9/11 skeptic/truther, I will add one small observation about plane wreckage. The Pennsylvania plane may not have had to have left a mile long debris field. I once witnessed a Cessna crash into a farmer's field. It must have done a nose dive because there wasn't enough stuff above ground to fill a bread basket and I was on the spot within minutes.

    Again, I'm a truther, but if a jet were to hit the ground at a near vertical angle and at high speed, I wouldn't imagine that there would be much visible above ground. Wouldn't the fuselage crumple like a giant beer can? And the engines plant themselves into the ground?

    Anyone with more experience care to comment?

    “The Pennsylvania plane may not have had to have left a mile long debris field.”

    You are missing the point. Multiple local news sources documented a debris field stretching over a mile from the crash of the Shanksvile plane. The debris field was along the course prior to the crash of what remained. This means that the plane broke up prior to crashing, it did not simply do a nose dive ino the ground. The plane did not fall apart spontaneously. It must have been shot down, exploded, struck by lightning! Exploded would have stopped the forward progress of the plane, so shot down is the only reasonable explanation.

    Read More
  78. @Rurik

    Will Rogers award of the week
     
    I know people of good will who believe the government account

    I have no proof that Fred is lying or misleading, and I consider it perfectly reasonable to believe that he's in the same camp as so many others I know. Indeed, siblings and so forth.

    I don't rail at them, even if I've given up gently trying to persuade them. Some people are not willing- psychologically- to 'go there'

    Rurik, I meant the quip about the “Will Rogers award” as good-natured ribbing mostly.

    But there is a serious side to it. I don’t think it really is practical to give people endless benefit of the doubt.

    I don’t rail at them, even if I’ve given up gently trying to persuade them.

    Well, this is really a separate matter, all the HIQI types that one had to get along with in daily life — family, friends, colleagues…. One should try to stand up for the truth, but when there isn’t even the slightest hope and also there’s huge social cost, the only thing to do is to let the matter slide.

    And at least none of these friends and family you’re alluding to are here preening as public intellectuals and writing articles representing that they have knowledge of things that they don’t know screw-all about.

    So it’s a completely different situation.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rurik

    preening as public intellectuals and writing articles representing that they have knowledge of things that they don’t know screw-all about.
     
    well, I suspect a quote from the Saker article I provided above does a far more damaging job of holding the assorted 'respectable' bloggers feet to the fire. To wit..

    all those whose livelihood, reputation or personal self-image directly depends on the “respectability” of the system we are living in, including journalists and bloggers”, have a huge interest in rejecting reality and upholding an absurd narrative simply because their own well-being is directly affected by the “system”. In that sense yes, the 9/11 Truth movement is composed of “fringe” elements, of people who have deliberately given up on official “respectability” and being seen as “serious” and who have chosen to say “the Emperor is naked” even if they get sneered at (but rarely debated!) by the millions of volunteer sycophants which form the real power base of the regime in control of Washington, DC.

    hard to be more harsh than that

    I'm not suggesting Fred made a calculated decision to deceive. But rather Fred, like most of the legions of professionals and journalists and assorted well-appointed apparatchiks keeping the official version afloat, are doing so out of an instinctive and intuitive realization at the gut level- that for the narrative surrounding the events of 911 to have been something other than what we've all been carefully assured... is creating a sort of somber and creeping sense of discord in their otherwise insouciant (to use a PCRism) outlook and lives. They simply *don't want* for 911 to have been an inside job, so they construct their reality around that (crumbling) foundation. Fred's column was sort of a (vested in the system) writer's version of a guy out there with a bucket of mortar and a trowel, patching up the cracks of his world view and the status quo.

    - That not only his, but for millions upon millions of professionals and established figures and contented people everywhere- who have every reason in the world for not wanting the apple cart (their well-being) overturned; depend.
    .
    .

    (is that the correct usage of a semicolon?)
  79. Actually, all we’d need to do to bring China to heel is to repudiate our debts to them completely, and refuse to buy more junk from them. Their current illusory prosperity is entirely based on selling us stuff.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Actually, all we’d need to do to bring China to heel is to repudiate our debts to them completely, and refuse to buy more junk from them. Their current illusory prosperity is entirely based on selling us stuff.
     
    And our illusory prosperity?? A Madoff financialized economy with a fiat currency and trillions of dollars of obligations and increasingly increasing spending? It's gotta collapse. No telling what'll will trigger it. But when it does, it's Humpty Dumpty time, with breakdown of social order to follow, quickly. You don't want to be living near urban areas or densely-populated areas when this does. The great multicultural experiment will end badly when the prosperity goes.
  80. @Chris Mallory

    As for population density, the Acela Corridor is denser than Spain.
     
    Since Spain is 112th out of 244 nations, there are better things the US can spend money on besides high speed rail.

    Spain has the fourth-largest high-speed rail network in the world, after China, Japan, and France.

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    • Replies: @Chris Mallory
    And the US should waste money on a high speed rail because? Spain did it? Spain has been an also ran for over 120 years.
  81. @Chhelo
    The US has never had to suffer the consequences of the massive destruction of the homeland like Europe, China, Japan and the ME. For this we should be thankful our military was the finest the world has ever fielded on the battlefield. Our military has done more to free mankind from dictatorial and oppressive governments than any other force on earth.

    However, agreeing with this article we failed to pivot after the fall of the Soviet Union. Post this event massive air, land and sea assets really became obsolete. While US Taxpayers spent billions on a bloated war machine to protect the world our allies were more than willing to let us carry the water well they spent on infrastructure and social programs. Post the fall of the SU no force on earth had the capability to truly threaten the Continental United States. Nuclear was not an option then nor is it now. Once instigated nothing would be worth a crap for a thousand years.

    I'm a 24 year Army retiree (1972 to 1996) and proud to have served. That being said, with the benefit of hind sight, have pretty much reasoned that all the threats presented left us with misguided entanglements all over the world that should have never been entered into.

    Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan and the quagmire called the War on Terror starched from Lybia to Afghanistan have all been needless exercises in failed wisdom from failed politicians, corporatist and bankers making money off both sides of the conflict. Name one country today where the citizens even give a damn about the blood we shed in their defense. One short generation and all is forgotten.

    This is where both Democrats and Republicans, Trump included, are incapable of making the necessary changes needed for a 21st Century economic system. Both have set up a leviathan of tax law, used to buy votes and stifle small business through over regulation and excessive compliance cost at the request of corporatist. In all honesty, whether we spend 400 billion or 1 trillion a year on the military it pales in comparison to the cost to run the rest of this failed dog and pony show.

    Our military has done more to free mankind from dictatorial and oppressive governments than any other force on earth.

    I believe you are referring to US on some other planet, not planet Earth, or the planet Earth in an alternative universe.

    Or maybe you are just on powerful hallucinatory drugs or you feet smell too much during your mental episodes of brainwashed retired pride.

    Finally, maybe the explanation is: dumb, dumber, retired US military. Who knows.

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  82. Regarding the US military, first please read this: http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-09-23/caught-tape-did-us-target-syrian-aid-convoy-hellfire-missile

    Then regarding the US society please see the map in this: http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-09-23/its-official-america-not-greatest-country-earth-its-28th

    It is just my general observation that the trend on unz.com is a declining quality of commentary because many of the original commenters have moved away. Now we have to put up with idiots who put negative comments here about some other article they read before. The Crapist would be a better handle for The Scalpel who has no respect for the comments section because mugs such as this deliberately pollute the debate with their excrement.

    I have nothing good to contribute to this discussion, it is simply not worth reading (the article is ok). I have been a commenter at unz from its day one, but I may leave it to The Crapists and the brainwashed retired US military types with smelly feet from now on.

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    • Disagree: Jonathan Revusky
    • Replies: @Rurik

    the trend on unz.com is a declining quality of commentary because many of the original commenters have moved away. Now we have to put up with idiots who put negative comments here about some other article they read before.
     
    You're right that this article of Fred's is a fine and well written piece. Worth the read for sure, as Fred always is.

    but you're wrong (IMHO) if you consider our interest in 911 as dismissive

    that event (and the super-criminals who perpetrated it) is directly responsible for all the things you so sardonically and cleverly rail about here Kiza. Every bit of it. (At least as far as I can see. Tho I've only been here for a year or so now). The wars, the assorted atrocities, the refugees, and mindless suffering and looting and horrors. And those of us who want (demand) a new investigation (because we want to return sanity to the planet), are sort of lingering around Fred because he just wrote an article mocking us all as ridicules fools. Perhaps he's right, but we all feel that an aloof attitude of intellectual superiority and moral sanctimony are not sufficient to convince us.

    as for the good commenters leaving, I suppose you're referring to guys like RTW, who followed me around from post to post intermittently calling me a faggot and a hasbara. Nevertheless, I wish he were still here (were there others?). His intelligence and occasionally scintillating commentary was often worth the read. But there are a lot of people who can't see beyond their own sneering tribal hatreds and vitriol. That's a shame, because the world is not really like the cartoon narrative of pure good and pure evil we're all supposed to act like it is. It's simpler that way- if you can always consider (especially white) Americans as all fundamentally evil, but the truth is more nuanced than that, alas. America has its faults to be sure, and today acting as it is as a kind of 'monster' to the Zionist 'id', terrorizing the planet and so forth, is all something that all of us people of good will are trying to put an end to. And the best (only) way we see to do that is by discovering and speaking out about the truth of what actually happened on 911.
  83. @Avery
    {So, a lot of trouble is preempted because we carry a big stick.}

    Nonsense.

    Because US has such a large military, the tendency is to use it aggressively. US has invaded or attacked dozens of countries since WW2, none of which had threatened much less attacked US.

    How did the American taxpayer benefit from the Vietnam war?
    How did the American taxpayer benefit from the Iraq war?
    The list of misuse of American military to benefit foreign interests or the interests of select American corporations/profiteers at the expense American taxpayer blood and treasure is long.

    The notion that any country would attack US preemptively - with about 6,000-7,000 nukes - is ludicrous, even if US had no superior conventional military.

    Pakistan and India are mortal enemies.
    They have occasional military skirmishes, but refrain from a large war, because both know what comes next.

    {So, a lot of trouble is preempted.....}

    So how did the Big Stick prevent the murder of about 3,000 Americans on American soil. Maybe the Big Stick is not so much a protection against trouble, but a source of trouble? (CIA coined a word for that: Blowback).

    “How did the American taxpayer benefit from the Vietnam war?”

    Didn’t we get Tang or something like that, or was that the War on the Moon?

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    • Replies: @Reactionary Utopian
    Apparently, I don't comment here quite often enough to be allowed to LOL by just clicking the button. Can't allow just anybody to LOL by using the LOL button. I see that, of course.

    Anyway: LOL. Thank God we won the War on the Moon.
  84. The probable cost far exceeds any possible benefit. In practical terms, Washington’s military superiority means nothing with regard to North Korea. Pyongyang knows it.

    But it’s vital to recognise that this is an inherently subjective calculation, not an objective one. The question is always who pays the costs versus who reaps the benefits, as well as how great the said costs and benefits are relative to each other. In the case of Korea most of the costs would be born by Koreans and others in the vicinity, and by the US military (provided the politicians in the US can evade blame for starting the war by finding a suitable pretext and using the usual media propaganda blitz to manufacture popular consent for it, which has not proved too difficult in the past and seems unlikely to be difficult with an enemy as comprehensively pre-demonised as the North Korean government).

    What this means in the case of Korea is that the calculation might well change dramatically depending upon political changes in the US.

    We live in a military world fundamentally different from that of the last century. All-out wars between major powers, which is to say nuclear powers, are unlikely since they would last about an hour after they became all-out, and everyone knows it.

    Yes, we live in the shade of the nuclear peace (though that does not yet apply to North Korea, until they have a nuclear arsenal capable of delivery to the US itself, and preferably some kind of second strike capability).

    But that doesn’t mean there aren’t reckless voices keen to gamble at the edges of provoking a nuclear war, such as the US regime figures pushing confrontation of Russia, especially in Ukraine and in Syria.

    China seems intent on bringing Eurasia under its hegemony, and advances toward doing it, but its approach is economic, not martial. The Chinese are not warm and fuzzy. They are, however, smart. It is much cheaper and safer to expand commercially than militarily, and wiser to sidestep martial confrontation—in a word, to ignore America. More correctly it is sidestepping the Pentagon.

    Hugely assisted by the US regime, which seems to collectively think an aggressively confrontational approach to Russia thereby driving it into China’s arms is a sensible response to the rise of China as a rival.

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  85. Good article. Fred writes a lot better about war and military policy than he does about physics and metaphysics!

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  86. What’s all this crap about how America sucks because it doesn’t have high speed rail?

    We have cleaner air and nice wide highways in which we drive our cars just as fast between cities as the whole process of high speed rail takes. America could easily have high speed rail too, but we are not about to rip up and disrupt the lives of large numbers of people just so you can go from New York to Boston 25 minutes faster by rail. That includes private property rights, which the Chinese don’t have, which is why they all want to park their money in the USA and send their children here.

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    • Replies: @Talha
    You make some solid points here - the extent of private property rights of citizens have few parallels in the rest of the world.

    Peace.
    , @denk
    *America could easily have high speed rail too, but we are not about to rip up and disrupt the lives of large numbers of people just so you can go from New York to Boston 25 minutes faster by rail. That includes private property rights, which the Chinese don’t have,*


    Yet you have no qualm kicking out the whole lots of Chagosians from their ancestral homes, exiled the poor sods 3 thousands miles away to some god forsaken foreign ghettos.
    So that you could turn it into a god damned military base to bomb the craps outta third world peasants.

    You guys sure get your priorities right !

    hehehehe

    http://www.andyworthington.co.uk/images/chagosislanders.jpg

    http://tinyurl.com/h3x4ks3
    , @Jonathan Revusky

    in which we drive our cars just as fast between cities as the whole process of high speed rail takes.
     
    You can drive from Manhattan to the downtown center of Boston at an average speed of over 150 mph? If so, you're a better man than I, Gunga Dinn.

    America could easily have high speed rail too, but we are not about to rip up and disrupt the lives of large numbers of people
     
    Oh, that's the reason. The U.S. government, that's just really nice folks who won't disrupt the lives of large numbers of people....

    But look, in the context of this conversation, the point is not high speed rail per se. You could replace "high speed rail" with "building new schools" or "new university campuses" or "new airports" or "public parks" or a whole host of things.

    The point is that ANY civilian spending in the U.S. will provide benefits to citizenry, while the military spending simply does not. For example, having some huge military base in Bagram, Aghanistan or any of the other 800 odd military bases, this does not provide any benefit to the American people.

    All that money could be spent at home. That's the point. Not high speed rail specifically.
  87. @Historian
    Spain has the fourth-largest high-speed rail network in the world, after China, Japan, and France.

    And the US should waste money on a high speed rail because? Spain did it? Spain has been an also ran for over 120 years.

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    • Replies: @bluedog
    Your right who in their right mind would advocate wasting money on high speed rail, when they can sit in their cars for endless hours waiting in a traffic jam or an accident shutting down the freeways and thruways when IF this country had any kind of rail system they could be sitting home having a cold beer,we are the most backassed country in the world all for big business and the profit.!!!!
    , @John Jeremiah Smith

    And the US should waste money on a high speed rail because?
     
    Efficiency and de-congestion. High speed rail links between metropolises only. Inside metropolises, trolley systems only (free), no private vehicles allowed.
    , @Historian
    If Spain is an also-ran, what does that make us? A third-rate power?

    The Acela Corridor is also denser than Germany.
  88. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Technomad
    Actually, all we'd need to do to bring China to heel is to repudiate our debts to them completely, and refuse to buy more junk from them. Their current illusory prosperity is entirely based on selling us stuff.

    Actually, all we’d need to do to bring China to heel is to repudiate our debts to them completely, and refuse to buy more junk from them. Their current illusory prosperity is entirely based on selling us stuff.

    And our illusory prosperity?? A Madoff financialized economy with a fiat currency and trillions of dollars of obligations and increasingly increasing spending? It’s gotta collapse. No telling what’ll will trigger it. But when it does, it’s Humpty Dumpty time, with breakdown of social order to follow, quickly. You don’t want to be living near urban areas or densely-populated areas when this does. The great multicultural experiment will end badly when the prosperity goes.

    Read More
  89. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    The US military are basically a huge tax money drain and a source of enrichment for politicians and lobbyists. The military industrial complex is an end in itself. win wars is not the most relevant.

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  90. @Chris Mallory
    And the US should waste money on a high speed rail because? Spain did it? Spain has been an also ran for over 120 years.

    Your right who in their right mind would advocate wasting money on high speed rail, when they can sit in their cars for endless hours waiting in a traffic jam or an accident shutting down the freeways and thruways when IF this country had any kind of rail system they could be sitting home having a cold beer,we are the most backassed country in the world all for big business and the profit.!!!!

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    • Replies: @Chris Mallory
    Who would give up the freedom and independence of a car in favor of government run transportation? I saw that movie, it didn't turn out very well for the people without cars.
    , @NoseytheDuke
    Nobody is saying you can't have a car. With an advanced rail system in place there would be choices and less congestion/pollution. Win-win.
  91. @Waclaw
    NosytheDuke
    You can't possibly be serious questioning that the US is the only country
    which could be accused of knocking out the evil powers before they became
    a global threat.
    Granted, we are not a stranger to gross misjudgments regarding
    "spreading democracy" in places where the likelihood of even partial success
    didn't exist. Fault the dense politicians inventing loony doctrines for murky
    reasons which were elaborated on above.
    I don't think these failures discredit the good accomplished elsewhere.

    You can’t possibly be serious questioning that the US is the only country
    which could be accused of knocking out the evil powers before they became
    a global threat.

    The evil powers, eh? Now, who gets to judge who is evil and who is not?

    Oh, never mind… just a rhetorical question… we know the answer…

    It gets pretty circular, doesn’t it? Any country that the U.S. government defines as an enemy is portrayed as “evil” and then the mainstream media parrots that 24/7.

    Granted, we are not a stranger to gross misjudgments regarding
    “spreading democracy”

    “Misjudgments”, eh? The destruction of Iraq, Libya, Syria,…. all just an honest mistake. The US can’t be evil. It’s whatever country that the US defines as evil that is evil…

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  92. @bluedog
    Your right who in their right mind would advocate wasting money on high speed rail, when they can sit in their cars for endless hours waiting in a traffic jam or an accident shutting down the freeways and thruways when IF this country had any kind of rail system they could be sitting home having a cold beer,we are the most backassed country in the world all for big business and the profit.!!!!

    Who would give up the freedom and independence of a car in favor of government run transportation? I saw that movie, it didn’t turn out very well for the people without cars.

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    • Replies: @bluedog
    Maybe you watch to many movies,as for me living in N.Y. and taking 21 hrs single driver to reach Fla. when I could do it in 7-7 1/2 hrs makes little to no sense and don't bother about freedom and independence drivil for that was given up years ago with out a whimper.!!!!
  93. @bigbadwolf
    It's a self-serving military-industrial complex that's behind a bloated and largely useless military set-up. This complex is composed of defense contractors, politicians, and senior military officers, who have an incestuous relationship with one another. That this military set-up is ineffectual is beside the point. And nothing ever changes in this ossified and reactionary regime.

    Nothing exemplifies this as the F 35. Huge cost over runs, design flaws, retro-engineering impossibilities, does a few things less effectively than limited purpose aircraft now in stock, is no way an all purpose superior performer. Yet components are produced in 40 of the 57 states. Who is going to slice that pork? Go back to when the great Massachusetts land whale was trying to set up a second production facility for the F 35′s under-powered engine at a close to home location to illustrate this debacle even more clearly. Move to the USN and the capture of crying US sailors by the Iranians and then take a look at the LCS tar baby to get further insite into a broken system. Shades of the great rainmaker: RSM and theTFX.

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    • Replies: @Jim Christian

    the great Massachusetts land whale was trying to set up a second production facility
     
    All whales in Massachusetts are obligated to GE after all. Are you referring to Tip O'Neil, or Teddy Kennedy? They were both a biscuit or two beyond obese, which points out how long has the F-35 debacle stretched on. It is likely the first plane to be made obsolete without ever having fired a shot in anger because we're already doing carrier quals (aircraft carriers themselves likely obsolete) with a drone fighter/bomber, are we not? The B-47X or some such. It can land, it can take off, it can taxi in tight quarters. It can also pull G's unmatched by any manned plane, too, a useful feature in a dogfight.

    The F/A-35. From the factory straight to the boneyard. I want my money back.

  94. @Avery
    {So, a lot of trouble is preempted because we carry a big stick.}

    Nonsense.

    Because US has such a large military, the tendency is to use it aggressively. US has invaded or attacked dozens of countries since WW2, none of which had threatened much less attacked US.

    How did the American taxpayer benefit from the Vietnam war?
    How did the American taxpayer benefit from the Iraq war?
    The list of misuse of American military to benefit foreign interests or the interests of select American corporations/profiteers at the expense American taxpayer blood and treasure is long.

    The notion that any country would attack US preemptively - with about 6,000-7,000 nukes - is ludicrous, even if US had no superior conventional military.

    Pakistan and India are mortal enemies.
    They have occasional military skirmishes, but refrain from a large war, because both know what comes next.

    {So, a lot of trouble is preempted.....}

    So how did the Big Stick prevent the murder of about 3,000 Americans on American soil. Maybe the Big Stick is not so much a protection against trouble, but a source of trouble? (CIA coined a word for that: Blowback).

    And the latest 40 billion dollars to ‘Israel’.

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    • Replies: @John Jeremiah Smith

    And the latest 40 billion dollars to ‘Israel’.
     
    Now, now, it's only $38Billion. After the cost overruns it will be $75Billion, and the profiting oligarchs will donate half that to AIPAC.
  95. @Lot
    What's all this crap about how America sucks because it doesn't have high speed rail?

    We have cleaner air and nice wide highways in which we drive our cars just as fast between cities as the whole process of high speed rail takes. America could easily have high speed rail too, but we are not about to rip up and disrupt the lives of large numbers of people just so you can go from New York to Boston 25 minutes faster by rail. That includes private property rights, which the Chinese don't have, which is why they all want to park their money in the USA and send their children here.

    You make some solid points here – the extent of private property rights of citizens have few parallels in the rest of the world.

    Peace.

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    • Replies: @pogohere
    Civil forfeiture? Heard of that? Put that kool aide down, that's your wallet the cop has seized.
  96. I don’t think Fred reed, Andrew bacevich or others can really appreciate the formation of the military industrial complex and its role in our present situation, until they acknowledge the role that WWII has played. Yeah, we defeated the nazis and Japan — the result? A much more powerful USSR (thanks in large part to the massive aid we provided) and, four years later, the PRC. What a great outcome.

    And here in the USA we got a huge standing military, the origins of our present MIC. Prior to that we had the 17th largest military in the world and got along fine. But we must not challenge the rationale that got us involved in war deuce or the logic of same.

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  97. Well said. Of course, as others have pointed out, the military provides lots of profits for the right people. Nothing allows waste and profiteering quite like a military operation…

    In some ways we seem to be slipping into Orwell’s 1984, where the major powers did not dare attack each other because of nuclear weapons, but maintained permanent proxy wars. Consider now that we are allied with Al Qaeda. (!). Oceania has always been at war with Eurasia…

    But as far as conventional militaries defeating peasants, yes they can. It’s how the Americans beat the remaining Indians after the end of the civil war. You use conventional forces to drive the enemy civilian population into isolated, impoverished reserves, and let lack of resources eventually limit their numbers, and replace them with your own settlers (read Montesquieu). A few guerrilla fighters hiding in the mountains will eventually die off if their women are a thousand miles away. No I’m not saying we should do that. I am saying a conventional military CAN beat poorly armed peasants, if it really wants to…

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  98. @Lot
    What's all this crap about how America sucks because it doesn't have high speed rail?

    We have cleaner air and nice wide highways in which we drive our cars just as fast between cities as the whole process of high speed rail takes. America could easily have high speed rail too, but we are not about to rip up and disrupt the lives of large numbers of people just so you can go from New York to Boston 25 minutes faster by rail. That includes private property rights, which the Chinese don't have, which is why they all want to park their money in the USA and send their children here.

    *America could easily have high speed rail too, but we are not about to rip up and disrupt the lives of large numbers of people just so you can go from New York to Boston 25 minutes faster by rail. That includes private property rights, which the Chinese don’t have,*

    Yet you have no qualm kicking out the whole lots of Chagosians from their ancestral homes, exiled the poor sods 3 thousands miles away to some god forsaken foreign ghettos.
    So that you could turn it into a god damned military base to bomb the craps outta third world peasants.

    You guys sure get your priorities right !

    hehehehe

    http://www.andyworthington.co.uk/images/chagosislanders.jpg

    http://tinyurl.com/h3x4ks3

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    • Replies: @denk
    On that wonderful private property rights.....

    Uncle scam wanted another military base at China's doorstep to menace the dragon.
    So it turned another UNESCO certified natural treasure , the Jeju island, into a god damned concrete nightmare. thousands of villagers had to vacate their ancestral lands, thrown out by brute force.

    *Perhaps more tragic than the loss of their farmland and environmental treasures has been the destruction of the village’s social fabric. Activists explained that the South Korean Navy, having been firmly rebuffed by two other villages approached as potential sites of the naval base, resorted to stealth, bribery and deception to obtain the consent of a key group of Gangjeong villagers for the construction of the naval base.

    As a result, many families have been torn apart over the issue; there are parents and children who no longer speak to each other; longtime friends who turn the other way when they pass each other on the streets. The issue of the naval base has also divided the village haenyo, the women divers who set out in boats each day to collect the day’s catch of seafood (Jeju island has a matriarchal society, embodied by these strong, mostly middle-aged women who are the breadwinners of their families) and who once were a tightly-knit social group.*

    Murkkans are so blessed , with all that 'inalienable property rights'.
    Try telling that to the poor Jeju islanders tho, this is no way to treat a buddy.
    Or is SK a lapdog !
    God damn Murkkan exceptionalism !

    https://consortiumnews.com/2015/01/08/resisting-a-navy-base-on-chinas-periphery/
  99. @John Jeremiah Smith

    Re. JJS. Poor guy spouts off in error twice! Lol. Once as “tard beater” Second time as himself after warning from mods. Just harmless name calling, no real argument, so whatever…..
     
    Dull Blade, you're a conspiracy theorist. You weep and gnash over the failure of other people -- more intelligent and better-informed people -- to entertain and take seriously your various semi-psychotic alarm calls and shouts of whodunit. In the broad sweep of history, you conspiracy theorists are running dead last to the facts as recorded.

    So after admitting you are too lazy to read again and being painfully obvious your reading comprehension is below par to put it mildly, you again engage in ad hominems and pathetically give yourself away with your psychological projections

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_projection

    Do us all a favor and abstain from commenting or replying unless you follow the next steps to do so

    1.- Read one more time and check for words you did not understand in a dictionary, write them down

    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/

    2.- Read yet one more time the whole thing

    3.- Read one more time and write a nice summary

    4.- Check that you actually understood the article or comment and the meaning of the words you looked up in the dictionary with some literate adult (a child or teen is okay also as long as he/she is literate)

    5.- With the literate adult’s (or child) blessing, you may then proceed to comment/reply

    Otherwise abstain from commenting – stop embarassing yourself and us with your ignorance and crude retardery

    You’re welcome

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    • Replies: @John Jeremiah Smith

    So after admitting you are too lazy to read again and being painfully obvious your reading comprehension is below par to put it mildly, you again engage in ad hominems and pathetically give yourself away with your psychological projections
     
    Azzzie, I'm sure that technique works well among your Millennial peer group; however, I am an adult. Go away, kid.
  100. @Rurik

    the people of the United States rise up in righteous wrath
     
    when all the fuss was being made about Obama's birth certificate, I was of a mind that it didn't really make any difference. It wasn't like they were going to annul the election. The regime would find a way to simply move on, perhaps simply by ignoring it all, or have congress rubber stamp some bullshit temporary whatever. So the whole thing bored me.

    I’m asking what difference it makes?
     
    But this is different. Here are a few snippets from a recent Saker article:

    what primarily explains the collective blindness of quite literally all the US elites about 9/11: just like everybody now knows that Kennedy was not killed by a lone gunman, most people by now suspect that the official 9/11 conspiracy theory is a stupid load of hogwash – but they just don’t see what difference it makes for them and the world they live in. Combine a silent majority and a ruling elite acting in lockstep to deny the obvious, and you have today’s apparent defeat of the 9/11 Truth movement.

    [my emphasis]

    Of course, the stakes are sky-high: if 9/11 was an inside job, then the US government is not only absolutely illegitimate, it is in fact an occupation government controlled by either foreign elements, or traitors or both. And there are those who will deliberately stick their head in the sand as deep as possible to avoid having to contemplate the mind-blowing consequences of the undeniable fact that the so-called “land of the brave” is run by an occupation government which has reduced the so-called “brave” to a serf-like status and that several thousands of US Americans have been deliberately sacrificed to induce a mindless patriotic hysteria (with Chinese-made flags and all) to make it possible to use the poorest US Americans as cannon fodder in genocidal wars all over the planet. Yes, that is, indeed, a very painful realization

    all those whose livelihood, reputation or personal self-image directly depends on the “respectability” of the system we are living in, including journalists and bloggers”, have a huge interest in rejecting reality and upholding an absurd narrative simply because their own well-being is directly affected by the “system”. In that sense yes, the 9/11 Truth movement is composed of “fringe” elements, of people who have deliberately given up on official “respectability” and being seen as “serious” and who have chosen to say “the Emperor is naked” even if they get sneered at (but rarely debated!) by the millions of volunteer sycophants which form the real power base of the regime in control of Washington, DC.

    9/11 was the seminal event which ushered in our current era and, just for that reason only, it is probably also the single most important event in our recent history.


    The Empire has already given up on actively defending its ridiculous conspiracy theory and it now only counts on the indifference and passivity of its serfs to keep the 9/11 Truth movement as officially ignored

    >>><<<

    I'm a student of history and of human behavior. If you understand human history, you understand that it has been one long stream of tyrannical misery of a tiny elite lording it over the masses. Slavery was the norm, and cruelty the daily bread. From the temples built to human sacrifice on the Yucatan peninsula to the Andes of Peru. Mankind expressed the nature of the Gods he worshiped and created in his image. European feudal life was one of ownership, of the many by the few. And when the lord decided your maiden daughter was ripe, he simply sent his goons to take her. And that was it. Torture, dungeons, slavery, the whip and a brutal life of death and toil were the norm. For the elites of Greece or Rome, they had it well, for the slaves, not so much. And on and on. It wasn't until the Renaissance and Age of Enlightenment that things began to change. When heroic men would not be slaves any longer, and by force of blood and sword, nascent gropings for human freedom that are represented by the Magna Carta were forged. From there we got the Declaration of Independence and the Déclaration des droits de l'homme et du citoyen.

    And that is our heritage and inheritance.

    but today we are not made of the same stuff those men and women were made of. Today we're a pasty, weak, whiney, greedy, self-absorbed, shallow, materialistic, bovine, sheep-like shadow of the men and women who have bequeathed us the hard won miracle of human freedom- purchased with veritable rivers of the blood by moral and spiritual and indomitable giants. Who would not be slaves, but would sacrifice their lives to grant their progeny freedom. The most sacred, precious and threatened possession we have.

    911 was perpetrated to end all that. 911 was intended to create the kind of world were the lord$ and masters do with us and our children as they please. Where torture and mass-murder and atrocities galore are the order of the day. Where the state police can knock in your door at four in the morning, shoot your dog, rifle butt your son, slap you daughter down (or just kill the whole lot) and black bag you to be renditioned off-shore and never heard from again. Based on secret 'evidence' anonymously given without charges or any right to counsel by nameless officials for reasons of "national security". That this is the realty today is a direct consequence of 911 (as it was intended to be). So is the complete evisceration of all of our Constitutional rights, starting with the right not to be arbitrarily assassinated (even by drone) without cause or investigation. That also is a direct consequence of 911. Ehud Barak perhaps said it best when he said nothing was ever going to be the same. And that the 'war on terror' was now going to be global in scope and from now on, getting on a plane was going to be virtually like being treated like a terrorist. Like a Palestinian. Which is, simply put, exactly what they have in mind for us all.

    Now this has gotten waaayyyy too long, as is my wont.

    But I just wanted to touch base on your assertion of "what difference it makes"

    Orwell understood human nature to the core. And he tried to warn us. Too bad we were/are too cowardly and stupid to listen.

    Mmm…what snippets to quote … ?

    If you understand human history, you understand that it has been one long stream of tyrannical misery of a tiny elite lording it over the masses. Slavery was the norm, and cruelty the daily bread.

    Very much so.

    It wasn’t until the Renaissance and Age of Enlightenment that things began to change. When heroic men would not be slaves any longer, and by force of blood and sword, nascent gropings for human freedom that are represented by the Magna Carta were forged. From there we got the Declaration of Independence and the Déclaration des droits de l’homme et du citoyen.

    Locke, JS Mill, Berkeley, Hume, Voltaire, etc. Yup.

    And that is our heritage and inheritance.

    Well, no, unfortunately. Heritage, yes. Inheritance, no.

    but today we are not made of the same stuff those men and women were made of. Today we’re a pasty, weak, whiney, greedy, self-absorbed, shallow, materialistic, bovine, sheep-like shadow of the men and women who have bequeathed us the hard won miracle of human freedom

    Bingo. We are not those people, or perhaps we are not the 30% – 40% who believed it and made it happen, made it work.

    Don’t get me wrong … yes, I believe in all those principles of freedom and the rights of Man. That age, founded on those principles, produced the greatest gains in science and philosophy in the entire history of the human race. Produced the greatest gains in economic improvements of the human condition. For 200 years, the graph went asymptotic.

    And now it’s gone. Well, hell, turns out that eternal vigilance really is the price of freedom after all, but we have failed to turn the vigilant eye inward, to our governmental systems (and to ourselves), where corruption has destroyed the essential framework. In my opinion, it’s a done deal — we’re finished as a nation of free men governed by Constitutional principles.

    It’s not all that surprising. The dynastic cycle in China, over a period of 4000 years, averaged out at about 200 years each, sometimes less, never more than 250. And that was a system that simply provided a consistent set of rules within everything worked — not like it was fair and just — but everyone knew his entitlements, be they great or meager.

    So, here we sit at the cusp of the cycle. With any luck, Hegel’s premise of an ascending spiral of civilization will hold true; we will punctuate the equilibrium, revolt, destroy the oppressors, swear fealty to every noble principle we can think of, and establish a new order of our own — some small improvement on previous documentation possible, perhaps. It’s not like the Constitution even approaches perfection. ;-)

    I’m old; I’m done with revolution; did my share. Give me my 5-foot mower, tiller and box-scraper; I’ve got landscaping plans. Can I write revolutionary pamphlets? Oh, hell yeah — right up until the NSA knocks on the door and tells me to stop, or else.

    There’s a line in Heinlein’s old novel, “Have Spacesuit, Will Travel”, where the time-shifted Roman soldier tells the protagonist: “Alright, boy! I’ll knock ‘em down — you cut their throats!” Fine sentiments indeed. Then he hurls his javelin, draws short-sword and charges the alien gallery. A tractor beam picks him up, transports him back to his gilded cage in the zoo that doesn’t look like a zoo.

    Sometimes I wonder if the Galactics are waiting patiently for us to demonstrate true evolution by becoming truly civilized.

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    • Replies: @Rurik
    Excellent post sir

    That age, founded on those principles, produced the greatest gains in science and philosophy in the entire history of the human race. Produced the greatest gains in economic improvements of the human condition. For 200 years, the graph went asymptotic.
     
    asymptotic: from virtually zero human freedom - to nearly perfect, infinite human freedom; where you could speak, do, achieve, accomplish anything up to and including infinity~ if that's what your capabilities were. Yep.

    And now it’s gone. Well, hell, turns out that eternal vigilance really is the price of freedom after all, but we have failed to turn the vigilant eye inward, to our governmental systems (and to ourselves), where corruption has destroyed the essential framework. In my opinion, it’s a done deal — we’re finished as a nation of free men governed by Constitutional principles.
     
    very well said

    So, here we sit at the cusp of the cycle.
     
    and here I sit, once again pondering the ponderable, thanks to the Unz Review

    With any luck, Hegel’s premise of an ascending spiral of civilization will hold true; we will punctuate the equilibrium, revolt, destroy the oppressors, swear fealty to every noble principle we can think of, and establish a new order of our own
     
    or we'll descend into an Orwellian dystopia of that famous 'boot, stamping on a human face, forever'.

    We are indeed on a cusp. Exponentially exploding technology is cleaving its own destiny, and it will be guided by either one of two possible outcomes. Huxley vs. Orwell. AI will either serve us, or enslave us. I'm not optimistic. Virtually every advance of information technology is being put to use for the military or the police state. Follow the money.

    “Alright, boy! I’ll knock ‘em down — you cut their throats!” Fine sentiments indeed.
     
    speaks to something, doesn't it?

    if the Galactics are waiting patiently for us to demonstrate true evolution by becoming truly civilized.
     
    wishful thinking I suspect, but then *something* blew up that Israeli satellite now didn't it?
  101. @Azote
    So after admitting you are too lazy to read again and being painfully obvious your reading comprehension is below par to put it mildly, you again engage in ad hominems and pathetically give yourself away with your psychological projections

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_projection

    Do us all a favor and abstain from commenting or replying unless you follow the next steps to do so

    1.- Read one more time and check for words you did not understand in a dictionary, write them down

    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/

    2.- Read yet one more time the whole thing

    3.- Read one more time and write a nice summary

    4.- Check that you actually understood the article or comment and the meaning of the words you looked up in the dictionary with some literate adult (a child or teen is okay also as long as he/she is literate)

    5.- With the literate adult's (or child) blessing, you may then proceed to comment/reply

    Otherwise abstain from commenting - stop embarassing yourself and us with your ignorance and crude retardery

    You're welcome

    So after admitting you are too lazy to read again and being painfully obvious your reading comprehension is below par to put it mildly, you again engage in ad hominems and pathetically give yourself away with your psychological projections

    Azzzie, I’m sure that technique works well among your Millennial peer group; however, I am an adult. Go away, kid.

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  102. @Wally
    And the latest 40 billion dollars to 'Israel'.

    And the latest 40 billion dollars to ‘Israel’.

    Now, now, it’s only $38Billion. After the cost overruns it will be $75Billion, and the profiting oligarchs will donate half that to AIPAC.

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  103. @Chris Mallory
    And the US should waste money on a high speed rail because? Spain did it? Spain has been an also ran for over 120 years.

    And the US should waste money on a high speed rail because?

    Efficiency and de-congestion. High speed rail links between metropolises only. Inside metropolises, trolley systems only (free), no private vehicles allowed.

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  104. @Jonathan Revusky
    Rurik, I meant the quip about the "Will Rogers award" as good-natured ribbing mostly.

    But there is a serious side to it. I don't think it really is practical to give people endless benefit of the doubt.


    I don’t rail at them, even if I’ve given up gently trying to persuade them.
     
    Well, this is really a separate matter, all the HIQI types that one had to get along with in daily life -- family, friends, colleagues.... One should try to stand up for the truth, but when there isn't even the slightest hope and also there's huge social cost, the only thing to do is to let the matter slide.

    And at least none of these friends and family you're alluding to are here preening as public intellectuals and writing articles representing that they have knowledge of things that they don't know screw-all about.

    So it's a completely different situation.

    preening as public intellectuals and writing articles representing that they have knowledge of things that they don’t know screw-all about.

    well, I suspect a quote from the Saker article I provided above does a far more damaging job of holding the assorted ‘respectable’ bloggers feet to the fire. To wit..

    all those whose livelihood, reputation or personal self-image directly depends on the “respectability” of the system we are living in, including journalists and bloggers”, have a huge interest in rejecting reality and upholding an absurd narrative simply because their own well-being is directly affected by the “system”. In that sense yes, the 9/11 Truth movement is composed of “fringe” elements, of people who have deliberately given up on official “respectability” and being seen as “serious” and who have chosen to say “the Emperor is naked” even if they get sneered at (but rarely debated!) by the millions of volunteer sycophants which form the real power base of the regime in control of Washington, DC.

    hard to be more harsh than that

    I’m not suggesting Fred made a calculated decision to deceive. But rather Fred, like most of the legions of professionals and journalists and assorted well-appointed apparatchiks keeping the official version afloat, are doing so out of an instinctive and intuitive realization at the gut level- that for the narrative surrounding the events of 911 to have been something other than what we’ve all been carefully assured… is creating a sort of somber and creeping sense of discord in their otherwise insouciant (to use a PCRism) outlook and lives. They simply *don’t want* for 911 to have been an inside job, so they construct their reality around that (crumbling) foundation. Fred’s column was sort of a (vested in the system) writer’s version of a guy out there with a bucket of mortar and a trowel, patching up the cracks of his world view and the status quo.

    - That not only his, but for millions upon millions of professionals and established figures and contented people everywhere- who have every reason in the world for not wanting the apple cart (their well-being) overturned; depend.
    .
    .

    (is that the correct usage of a semicolon?)

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  105. @Anonymous

    [Actually, "Tard Beater" is the commenter improperly employing multiple handles.]

    As far as “single handle” this is my only handle. I think the space I put in between the words “the” and “scalpel” threw off the system.
     
    It's Ron Unz dropping in with his comment. Unz has a bizarre obsession with sock puppetry. http://harvardlpr.com/2011/02/28/fear-the-sockpuppets/

    Unz has a bizarre obsession with sock puppetry.

    It’s not at all a “bizarre obsession”. A single person who represents that he is multiple people is intentionally subverting your normal cues for judging information.

    Typically, in normal, non-virtual life, somebody cannot represent that he is more than one person and if different people tell you something, you start attaching far more credibility to it.

    The ancient Chinese proverb “Three men make a tiger” is probably the most succint expression of this concept.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_men_make_a_tiger

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  106. @denk
    *America could easily have high speed rail too, but we are not about to rip up and disrupt the lives of large numbers of people just so you can go from New York to Boston 25 minutes faster by rail. That includes private property rights, which the Chinese don’t have,*


    Yet you have no qualm kicking out the whole lots of Chagosians from their ancestral homes, exiled the poor sods 3 thousands miles away to some god forsaken foreign ghettos.
    So that you could turn it into a god damned military base to bomb the craps outta third world peasants.

    You guys sure get your priorities right !

    hehehehe

    http://www.andyworthington.co.uk/images/chagosislanders.jpg

    http://tinyurl.com/h3x4ks3

    On that wonderful private property rights…..

    Uncle scam wanted another military base at China’s doorstep to menace the dragon.
    So it turned another UNESCO certified natural treasure , the Jeju island, into a god damned concrete nightmare. thousands of villagers had to vacate their ancestral lands, thrown out by brute force.

    *Perhaps more tragic than the loss of their farmland and environmental treasures has been the destruction of the village’s social fabric. Activists explained that the South Korean Navy, having been firmly rebuffed by two other villages approached as potential sites of the naval base, resorted to stealth, bribery and deception to obtain the consent of a key group of Gangjeong villagers for the construction of the naval base.

    As a result, many families have been torn apart over the issue; there are parents and children who no longer speak to each other; longtime friends who turn the other way when they pass each other on the streets. The issue of the naval base has also divided the village haenyo, the women divers who set out in boats each day to collect the day’s catch of seafood (Jeju island has a matriarchal society, embodied by these strong, mostly middle-aged women who are the breadwinners of their families) and who once were a tightly-knit social group.*

    Murkkans are so blessed , with all that ‘inalienable property rights’.
    Try telling that to the poor Jeju islanders tho, this is no way to treat a buddy.
    Or is SK a lapdog !
    God damn Murkkan exceptionalism !

    https://consortiumnews.com/2015/01/08/resisting-a-navy-base-on-chinas-periphery/

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    • Replies: @denk
    Private property rights are sacrosanct in the 'land of the free' or so I heard, but not all men are born equal.

    These Jeju islanders ancestral homes got bulldozed [1], courtesy of uncle scam.
    cuz pentagon wanted another naval base at China's doorstep, much like pointing a dagger at the dragon's heart. [2]

    God bless America. [3]

    [1]
    http://www.telesurtv.net/__export/1433038664819/sites/telesur/img/2015/05/30/jeju_island_protests.jpg_1718483346.jpg

    [2]
    http://www.globalresearch.ca/articlePictures/jeju.bmp
  107. this is a very commonsensical article, but one little point in it is quite wrong. “In WWII the Japanese could convince themselves, reasonably and almost correctly, that a Depression-ridden, unarmed America might decide not to fight.” In fact, by the summer of 1941 the US was rearming as rapidly as possible; there was a massive US military presence in the Philippines; the US had imposed a tight embargo against Japan’s indispensable oil imports; and the US had defined any Japanese attempt to gain access to the petroleum reserves of Royal Dutch Shell in the Dutch colonial empire of Indonesia as *casus belli*. In that situation, despite Yamamoto’s desperate pleas, the Japanese High Command, “reasonably and almost correctly,” concluded that it had no option other than to attack first–and so played right into the hands of Roosevelt and Stimson.

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  108. @Kiza
    Regarding the US military, first please read this: http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-09-23/caught-tape-did-us-target-syrian-aid-convoy-hellfire-missile

    Then regarding the US society please see the map in this: http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-09-23/its-official-america-not-greatest-country-earth-its-28th

    It is just my general observation that the trend on unz.com is a declining quality of commentary because many of the original commenters have moved away. Now we have to put up with idiots who put negative comments here about some other article they read before. The Crapist would be a better handle for The Scalpel who has no respect for the comments section because mugs such as this deliberately pollute the debate with their excrement.

    I have nothing good to contribute to this discussion, it is simply not worth reading (the article is ok). I have been a commenter at unz from its day one, but I may leave it to The Crapists and the brainwashed retired US military types with smelly feet from now on.

    the trend on unz.com is a declining quality of commentary because many of the original commenters have moved away. Now we have to put up with idiots who put negative comments here about some other article they read before.

    You’re right that this article of Fred’s is a fine and well written piece. Worth the read for sure, as Fred always is.

    but you’re wrong (IMHO) if you consider our interest in 911 as dismissive

    that event (and the super-criminals who perpetrated it) is directly responsible for all the things you so sardonically and cleverly rail about here Kiza. Every bit of it. (At least as far as I can see. Tho I’ve only been here for a year or so now). The wars, the assorted atrocities, the refugees, and mindless suffering and looting and horrors. And those of us who want (demand) a new investigation (because we want to return sanity to the planet), are sort of lingering around Fred because he just wrote an article mocking us all as ridicules fools. Perhaps he’s right, but we all feel that an aloof attitude of intellectual superiority and moral sanctimony are not sufficient to convince us.

    as for the good commenters leaving, I suppose you’re referring to guys like RTW, who followed me around from post to post intermittently calling me a faggot and a hasbara. Nevertheless, I wish he were still here (were there others?). His intelligence and occasionally scintillating commentary was often worth the read. But there are a lot of people who can’t see beyond their own sneering tribal hatreds and vitriol. That’s a shame, because the world is not really like the cartoon narrative of pure good and pure evil we’re all supposed to act like it is. It’s simpler that way- if you can always consider (especially white) Americans as all fundamentally evil, but the truth is more nuanced than that, alas. America has its faults to be sure, and today acting as it is as a kind of ‘monster’ to the Zionist ‘id’, terrorizing the planet and so forth, is all something that all of us people of good will are trying to put an end to. And the best (only) way we see to do that is by discovering and speaking out about the truth of what actually happened on 911.

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  109. @Lot
    What's all this crap about how America sucks because it doesn't have high speed rail?

    We have cleaner air and nice wide highways in which we drive our cars just as fast between cities as the whole process of high speed rail takes. America could easily have high speed rail too, but we are not about to rip up and disrupt the lives of large numbers of people just so you can go from New York to Boston 25 minutes faster by rail. That includes private property rights, which the Chinese don't have, which is why they all want to park their money in the USA and send their children here.

    in which we drive our cars just as fast between cities as the whole process of high speed rail takes.

    You can drive from Manhattan to the downtown center of Boston at an average speed of over 150 mph? If so, you’re a better man than I, Gunga Dinn.

    America could easily have high speed rail too, but we are not about to rip up and disrupt the lives of large numbers of people

    Oh, that’s the reason. The U.S. government, that’s just really nice folks who won’t disrupt the lives of large numbers of people….

    But look, in the context of this conversation, the point is not high speed rail per se. You could replace “high speed rail” with “building new schools” or “new university campuses” or “new airports” or “public parks” or a whole host of things.

    The point is that ANY civilian spending in the U.S. will provide benefits to citizenry, while the military spending simply does not. For example, having some huge military base in Bagram, Aghanistan or any of the other 800 odd military bases, this does not provide any benefit to the American people.

    All that money could be spent at home. That’s the point. Not high speed rail specifically.

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    • Replies: @Rurik

    . For example, having some huge military base in Bagram, Aghanistan or any of the other 800 odd military bases, this does not provide any benefit to the American people.
     
    we're fighting them over there, so we don't have to fight them over here!

    the military is protecting our freedoms!

    Oh, that’s the reason. The U.S. government, that’s just really nice folks who won’t disrupt the lives of large numbers of people….
     
    I think this goes to the heart of why so many people around the world are so (understandably) disgusted with Americans in general. That self-absorbed conceit that somehow we're so exceptional that the destruction of entire countries and the slaughter of millions the world over are "worth it", when compared to the importance of our politically and morally solipsistic world view.

    I sort of hate them too at times ;)
    , @Talha
    JJS is on point. Basically, let's look at Russia - who the hell would want to attack them? And yet that deterrence was achieved for about 12-15% of our military expenditures. Most of the military spending is for retaining 'expeditionary' capability - which of course results in blow-back which results in more 'expeditionary' which...ad infinitum.

    We must break the cycle.

    Peace.
    , @Lot

    You can drive from Manhattan to the downtown center of Boston at an average speed of over 150 mph? If so, you’re a better man than I, Gunga Dinn.
     
    High speed rail does not do that to when you factor in getting to and from the rail stations. Also, the vast majority of NYC to Boston trip are not from central Manhattan to downtown.
  110. @John Jeremiah Smith
    Mmm...what snippets to quote ... ?

    If you understand human history, you understand that it has been one long stream of tyrannical misery of a tiny elite lording it over the masses. Slavery was the norm, and cruelty the daily bread.
     
    Very much so.

    It wasn't until the Renaissance and Age of Enlightenment that things began to change. When heroic men would not be slaves any longer, and by force of blood and sword, nascent gropings for human freedom that are represented by the Magna Carta were forged. From there we got the Declaration of Independence and the Déclaration des droits de l'homme et du citoyen.
     
    Locke, JS Mill, Berkeley, Hume, Voltaire, etc. Yup.

    And that is our heritage and inheritance.
     
    Well, no, unfortunately. Heritage, yes. Inheritance, no.

    but today we are not made of the same stuff those men and women were made of. Today we're a pasty, weak, whiney, greedy, self-absorbed, shallow, materialistic, bovine, sheep-like shadow of the men and women who have bequeathed us the hard won miracle of human freedom
     
    Bingo. We are not those people, or perhaps we are not the 30% - 40% who believed it and made it happen, made it work.

    Don't get me wrong ... yes, I believe in all those principles of freedom and the rights of Man. That age, founded on those principles, produced the greatest gains in science and philosophy in the entire history of the human race. Produced the greatest gains in economic improvements of the human condition. For 200 years, the graph went asymptotic.

    And now it's gone. Well, hell, turns out that eternal vigilance really is the price of freedom after all, but we have failed to turn the vigilant eye inward, to our governmental systems (and to ourselves), where corruption has destroyed the essential framework. In my opinion, it's a done deal -- we're finished as a nation of free men governed by Constitutional principles.

    It's not all that surprising. The dynastic cycle in China, over a period of 4000 years, averaged out at about 200 years each, sometimes less, never more than 250. And that was a system that simply provided a consistent set of rules within everything worked -- not like it was fair and just -- but everyone knew his entitlements, be they great or meager.

    So, here we sit at the cusp of the cycle. With any luck, Hegel's premise of an ascending spiral of civilization will hold true; we will punctuate the equilibrium, revolt, destroy the oppressors, swear fealty to every noble principle we can think of, and establish a new order of our own -- some small improvement on previous documentation possible, perhaps. It's not like the Constitution even approaches perfection. ;-)

    I'm old; I'm done with revolution; did my share. Give me my 5-foot mower, tiller and box-scraper; I've got landscaping plans. Can I write revolutionary pamphlets? Oh, hell yeah -- right up until the NSA knocks on the door and tells me to stop, or else.

    There's a line in Heinlein's old novel, "Have Spacesuit, Will Travel", where the time-shifted Roman soldier tells the protagonist: "Alright, boy! I'll knock 'em down -- you cut their throats!" Fine sentiments indeed. Then he hurls his javelin, draws short-sword and charges the alien gallery. A tractor beam picks him up, transports him back to his gilded cage in the zoo that doesn't look like a zoo.

    Sometimes I wonder if the Galactics are waiting patiently for us to demonstrate true evolution by becoming truly civilized.

    Excellent post sir

    That age, founded on those principles, produced the greatest gains in science and philosophy in the entire history of the human race. Produced the greatest gains in economic improvements of the human condition. For 200 years, the graph went asymptotic.

    asymptotic: from virtually zero human freedom – to nearly perfect, infinite human freedom; where you could speak, do, achieve, accomplish anything up to and including infinity~ if that’s what your capabilities were. Yep.

    And now it’s gone. Well, hell, turns out that eternal vigilance really is the price of freedom after all, but we have failed to turn the vigilant eye inward, to our governmental systems (and to ourselves), where corruption has destroyed the essential framework. In my opinion, it’s a done deal — we’re finished as a nation of free men governed by Constitutional principles.

    very well said

    So, here we sit at the cusp of the cycle.

    and here I sit, once again pondering the ponderable, thanks to the Unz Review

    With any luck, Hegel’s premise of an ascending spiral of civilization will hold true; we will punctuate the equilibrium, revolt, destroy the oppressors, swear fealty to every noble principle we can think of, and establish a new order of our own

    or we’ll descend into an Orwellian dystopia of that famous ‘boot, stamping on a human face, forever’.

    We are indeed on a cusp. Exponentially exploding technology is cleaving its own destiny, and it will be guided by either one of two possible outcomes. Huxley vs. Orwell. AI will either serve us, or enslave us. I’m not optimistic. Virtually every advance of information technology is being put to use for the military or the police state. Follow the money.

    “Alright, boy! I’ll knock ‘em down — you cut their throats!” Fine sentiments indeed.

    speaks to something, doesn’t it?

    if the Galactics are waiting patiently for us to demonstrate true evolution by becoming truly civilized.

    wishful thinking I suspect, but then *something* blew up that Israeli satellite now didn’t it?

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    • Replies: @John Jeremiah Smith
    I've got to get something done today -- anything! So, until 8PM or so, let's go with a generalized "Ayup!" ;-)
    , @Talha
    Hey Rurik,

    Virtually every advance of information technology is being put to use for the military or the police state.
     
    This is for two solid reasons:
    1) One is found in the excellent book Technopoly:
    "Technopoly: a society that no longer merely uses technology as a support system but instead is shaped by it--with radical consequences for the meanings of politics, art, education, intelligence, and truth."
    https://www.amazon.com/Technopoly-Surrender-Technology-Neil-Postman/dp/0679745408
    2) The state is able to shield itself legally from the repercussions of its actions, thus it can do whatever it wants whereas the private sector must fear from private law suits. The government can also be sued, but guess what - it pays out its penance from your taxes - so sue yourself all you want! If there was any culpability or liability at all, it would have resulted in (at least) demotions of those who prosecuted the Iraq War that almost everybody agrees was a massive failure. Instead, they are running for president or have otherwise been promoted.

    Peace.
  111. @Son of Dixie
    I was where you are about two years ago regarding Fred. He is a joke, he wrotes these articles as way of passive aggression, nothing else. He enjoys to rile up Americans still on American soil by denigrating our nation and our racial stock.

    The previous article calling those who doubt the official 911 story conspiracy hacks, as well as the countless other pro-Mexican and anti-Anglo pieces serve as examples.

    Fred is a self hating White man married to a Mexican woman (of Jewish stock) with a few too many miles on her.

    Fred is a self hating White man married to a Mexican woman (of Jewish stock)

    Excuse me, I would like to request that you cease and desist this dirtbag stuff now.

    You know the preamble to the U.S. declaration of independence, the bit about where they hold “certain truths to be self-evident”?

    Let me add one here:

    A man can marry whoever the hell he wants and he can live wherever the hell he wants.

    Along these lines, John Derbyshire is a writer whose work I just don’t like very much. However, I would not, in a million years, criticize him for marrying a Chinese lady. I just wouldn’t. And if, for whatever reasons, he chose to go live in China or Mexico or wherever and write his columns from there, I would never criticize him for that.

    That’s just total bullshit.

    Why are you guys getting on with this crap? Are you just morons or is this some sort of deliberate agent provocateur type stuff? It’s like you’re trying to portray the people who are criticizing Fred over that egregious article he wrote as a bunch of assholes.

    Well, I certainly am not stupid enough to take the bait. I dissociate myself from such bullshit and I condemn it.

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  112. conventional weapons are only useful against small countries, except the ones with nuke.

    thought we all know this, at least the ones who reads sites like unz review?

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  113. @Jonathan Revusky

    in which we drive our cars just as fast between cities as the whole process of high speed rail takes.
     
    You can drive from Manhattan to the downtown center of Boston at an average speed of over 150 mph? If so, you're a better man than I, Gunga Dinn.

    America could easily have high speed rail too, but we are not about to rip up and disrupt the lives of large numbers of people
     
    Oh, that's the reason. The U.S. government, that's just really nice folks who won't disrupt the lives of large numbers of people....

    But look, in the context of this conversation, the point is not high speed rail per se. You could replace "high speed rail" with "building new schools" or "new university campuses" or "new airports" or "public parks" or a whole host of things.

    The point is that ANY civilian spending in the U.S. will provide benefits to citizenry, while the military spending simply does not. For example, having some huge military base in Bagram, Aghanistan or any of the other 800 odd military bases, this does not provide any benefit to the American people.

    All that money could be spent at home. That's the point. Not high speed rail specifically.

    . For example, having some huge military base in Bagram, Aghanistan or any of the other 800 odd military bases, this does not provide any benefit to the American people.

    we’re fighting them over there, so we don’t have to fight them over here!

    the military is protecting our freedoms!

    Oh, that’s the reason. The U.S. government, that’s just really nice folks who won’t disrupt the lives of large numbers of people….

    I think this goes to the heart of why so many people around the world are so (understandably) disgusted with Americans in general. That self-absorbed conceit that somehow we’re so exceptional that the destruction of entire countries and the slaughter of millions the world over are “worth it”, when compared to the importance of our politically and morally solipsistic world view.

    I sort of hate them too at times ;)

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  114. @Jonathan Revusky

    in which we drive our cars just as fast between cities as the whole process of high speed rail takes.
     
    You can drive from Manhattan to the downtown center of Boston at an average speed of over 150 mph? If so, you're a better man than I, Gunga Dinn.

    America could easily have high speed rail too, but we are not about to rip up and disrupt the lives of large numbers of people
     
    Oh, that's the reason. The U.S. government, that's just really nice folks who won't disrupt the lives of large numbers of people....

    But look, in the context of this conversation, the point is not high speed rail per se. You could replace "high speed rail" with "building new schools" or "new university campuses" or "new airports" or "public parks" or a whole host of things.

    The point is that ANY civilian spending in the U.S. will provide benefits to citizenry, while the military spending simply does not. For example, having some huge military base in Bagram, Aghanistan or any of the other 800 odd military bases, this does not provide any benefit to the American people.

    All that money could be spent at home. That's the point. Not high speed rail specifically.

    JJS is on point. Basically, let’s look at Russia – who the hell would want to attack them? And yet that deterrence was achieved for about 12-15% of our military expenditures. Most of the military spending is for retaining ‘expeditionary’ capability – which of course results in blow-back which results in more ‘expeditionary’ which…ad infinitum.

    We must break the cycle.

    Peace.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Talha
    Oops! This was obviously a mistake on my part - kudos to JR for some excellent points - getting right down to the crux of the whole matter! Details simply distract from this core message.

    Peace.
    , @fosforos
    I don't know if SHE (or even HER neocon cohort) "wants" to attack them, but if I were Russian I would not be indifferent to the fact that the prospective US president is campaigning, with inflammatory Cold-War rhetoric, on a program calling for full scale, implicitly including military, confrontation with my country.
  115. @Rurik
    Excellent post sir

    That age, founded on those principles, produced the greatest gains in science and philosophy in the entire history of the human race. Produced the greatest gains in economic improvements of the human condition. For 200 years, the graph went asymptotic.
     
    asymptotic: from virtually zero human freedom - to nearly perfect, infinite human freedom; where you could speak, do, achieve, accomplish anything up to and including infinity~ if that's what your capabilities were. Yep.

    And now it’s gone. Well, hell, turns out that eternal vigilance really is the price of freedom after all, but we have failed to turn the vigilant eye inward, to our governmental systems (and to ourselves), where corruption has destroyed the essential framework. In my opinion, it’s a done deal — we’re finished as a nation of free men governed by Constitutional principles.
     
    very well said

    So, here we sit at the cusp of the cycle.
     
    and here I sit, once again pondering the ponderable, thanks to the Unz Review

    With any luck, Hegel’s premise of an ascending spiral of civilization will hold true; we will punctuate the equilibrium, revolt, destroy the oppressors, swear fealty to every noble principle we can think of, and establish a new order of our own
     
    or we'll descend into an Orwellian dystopia of that famous 'boot, stamping on a human face, forever'.

    We are indeed on a cusp. Exponentially exploding technology is cleaving its own destiny, and it will be guided by either one of two possible outcomes. Huxley vs. Orwell. AI will either serve us, or enslave us. I'm not optimistic. Virtually every advance of information technology is being put to use for the military or the police state. Follow the money.

    “Alright, boy! I’ll knock ‘em down — you cut their throats!” Fine sentiments indeed.
     
    speaks to something, doesn't it?

    if the Galactics are waiting patiently for us to demonstrate true evolution by becoming truly civilized.
     
    wishful thinking I suspect, but then *something* blew up that Israeli satellite now didn't it?

    I’ve got to get something done today — anything! So, until 8PM or so, let’s go with a generalized “Ayup!” ;-)

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  116. @Rurik
    Excellent post sir

    That age, founded on those principles, produced the greatest gains in science and philosophy in the entire history of the human race. Produced the greatest gains in economic improvements of the human condition. For 200 years, the graph went asymptotic.
     
    asymptotic: from virtually zero human freedom - to nearly perfect, infinite human freedom; where you could speak, do, achieve, accomplish anything up to and including infinity~ if that's what your capabilities were. Yep.

    And now it’s gone. Well, hell, turns out that eternal vigilance really is the price of freedom after all, but we have failed to turn the vigilant eye inward, to our governmental systems (and to ourselves), where corruption has destroyed the essential framework. In my opinion, it’s a done deal — we’re finished as a nation of free men governed by Constitutional principles.
     
    very well said

    So, here we sit at the cusp of the cycle.
     
    and here I sit, once again pondering the ponderable, thanks to the Unz Review

    With any luck, Hegel’s premise of an ascending spiral of civilization will hold true; we will punctuate the equilibrium, revolt, destroy the oppressors, swear fealty to every noble principle we can think of, and establish a new order of our own
     
    or we'll descend into an Orwellian dystopia of that famous 'boot, stamping on a human face, forever'.

    We are indeed on a cusp. Exponentially exploding technology is cleaving its own destiny, and it will be guided by either one of two possible outcomes. Huxley vs. Orwell. AI will either serve us, or enslave us. I'm not optimistic. Virtually every advance of information technology is being put to use for the military or the police state. Follow the money.

    “Alright, boy! I’ll knock ‘em down — you cut their throats!” Fine sentiments indeed.
     
    speaks to something, doesn't it?

    if the Galactics are waiting patiently for us to demonstrate true evolution by becoming truly civilized.
     
    wishful thinking I suspect, but then *something* blew up that Israeli satellite now didn't it?

    Hey Rurik,

    Virtually every advance of information technology is being put to use for the military or the police state.

    This is for two solid reasons:
    1) One is found in the excellent book Technopoly:
    “Technopoly: a society that no longer merely uses technology as a support system but instead is shaped by it–with radical consequences for the meanings of politics, art, education, intelligence, and truth.”

    https://www.amazon.com/Technopoly-Surrender-Technology-Neil-Postman/dp/0679745408

    2) The state is able to shield itself legally from the repercussions of its actions, thus it can do whatever it wants whereas the private sector must fear from private law suits. The government can also be sued, but guess what – it pays out its penance from your taxes – so sue yourself all you want! If there was any culpability or liability at all, it would have resulted in (at least) demotions of those who prosecuted the Iraq War that almost everybody agrees was a massive failure. Instead, they are running for president or have otherwise been promoted.

    Peace.

    Read More
  117. @Talha
    JJS is on point. Basically, let's look at Russia - who the hell would want to attack them? And yet that deterrence was achieved for about 12-15% of our military expenditures. Most of the military spending is for retaining 'expeditionary' capability - which of course results in blow-back which results in more 'expeditionary' which...ad infinitum.

    We must break the cycle.

    Peace.

    Oops! This was obviously a mistake on my part – kudos to JR for some excellent points – getting right down to the crux of the whole matter! Details simply distract from this core message.

    Peace.

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  118. What is the Pentagon going to do? Bomb the tracks?

    That’s exactly what it’ll do. Not in the one-dimensional way of sending out a strike fighter or drone but by activating its jihadis in whatever jack-f***-istan country the tracks are going to run through.

    After all stability is a major prerequisite for economic expansion. Train and pipe lines across Eurasia are long and protecting all of it is an impossibility.

    The weaponization of Islam is more focused on containing Chinese economic ambitions throughout central Asia then to create havoc for Russia. Jihad-in-a-box is the new craze.

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  119. @The Scalpel
    JJS,

    I'm glad you brought up the Shanksville jet. I completely agree with your point of view. It is impossible for a jet that was supposedly intact when it did a nosedive into the ground, to leave a trail of debris including human body parts for miles.

    "How are things changed by any of those presumed facts?"

    Well I can tell you how similar circumstances changed me. In a sense it changed my world. If others have the same experience and it changes their world, it can change our world.

    I was a true believer. I was an honors graduate from West Point, not at the top of my class, but very close. I was an intelligent but unquestioning automaton programmed to carry out whatever orders I was given. If I used my intelligence for anything, it was to justify ex-post facto, any orders I was given. I provided absolutely no moral counterbalance to our rulers who are sometimes immoral and at times greatly so. On the contrary, I was an engine driving those immoral acts.

    Assuming we want to live in a better world, it is up to each individual to promote, by their actions, that world which they desire. Given that governments program their citizens for unquestioning belief and loyalty, it is very difficult for any particular individual to achieve an awakening so that they may start acting in their own best interest. The incongruities of events surrounding 911 are one opportunity to shake people awake. J Revusky touched on this topic in his article. Still, the "government" or whatever you may call it, actively works to suppress these awakenings. I believe that it is in my best interest and in the best interest of most of humanity to promote these awakenings.

    I believe the only way to change our world is for enough individuals, through their active resistance, to clog up the machinery of greed, violence, coercion, etc. Even if that is an impossible goal, I can at least change my world through my actions.

    I hope this answers your question.

    Regarding building 7, the video that Rurik posted is very compelling. There is another video of the BBC in the same scenario, saying the building was down minutes before it fell, when live video showed it standing in the background. What are the odds that two independant individuals made the same unlikely mistake moments before the actual event vs. they were tipped off?

    If the above video and the building collapsing into its own footprint at freefall speed does not convince one that it was a controlled demolition, how about we add a video of the actual explosions?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uo7uqjxnuPo

    Hey, Scalpel!

    I haven’t read any of the other comments in this thread, but I spotted the video in your post and thought I’d check it out. WOW…fantastic find, Scalpel! This is THE most important WTC 7 video out there. More IRREFUTABLE proof of controlled demolition on 9/11. Thank you for bringing it to our attention!

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  120. @Jonathan Revusky

    in which we drive our cars just as fast between cities as the whole process of high speed rail takes.
     
    You can drive from Manhattan to the downtown center of Boston at an average speed of over 150 mph? If so, you're a better man than I, Gunga Dinn.

    America could easily have high speed rail too, but we are not about to rip up and disrupt the lives of large numbers of people
     
    Oh, that's the reason. The U.S. government, that's just really nice folks who won't disrupt the lives of large numbers of people....

    But look, in the context of this conversation, the point is not high speed rail per se. You could replace "high speed rail" with "building new schools" or "new university campuses" or "new airports" or "public parks" or a whole host of things.

    The point is that ANY civilian spending in the U.S. will provide benefits to citizenry, while the military spending simply does not. For example, having some huge military base in Bagram, Aghanistan or any of the other 800 odd military bases, this does not provide any benefit to the American people.

    All that money could be spent at home. That's the point. Not high speed rail specifically.

    You can drive from Manhattan to the downtown center of Boston at an average speed of over 150 mph? If so, you’re a better man than I, Gunga Dinn.

    High speed rail does not do that to when you factor in getting to and from the rail stations. Also, the vast majority of NYC to Boston trip are not from central Manhattan to downtown.

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  121. @woodNfish
    You have a very poor grasp of history. After the US declared independence we fought several wars with both the British and the French where they invaded our country. And then there was the unconstitutional war of secession by the bloody butcher Lincoln that brought Sherman's march through the South burning and destroying everything in his path. Sure, I know it wasn't of foreign foe, but it was still very destructive. It put the South in a 20 year economic depression that it never really came out of until the invention of air conditioning.

    I’m a 24 year Army retiree (1972 to 1996) and proud to have served.
     
    I don't mean to demean your bravery as a soldier (if you were in combat - REMFs don't count), but you were suckered and used and none of the unconstitutional police actions our military engaged in during that time had anything to do with our national security. I hope you realize that.

    I have to disagree with you. We former Chairborne Rangers can certainly have served honorably away from the battlefield. In fact. after my Grandfather, Father, Uncles and older Brother all served in combat, I was advised to choose my MOS carefully, being sure not bleed for Rockefeller, Goldman, Morgan, and the rest of them. The US belongs to them, let them bleed for it.

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    • Replies: @woodNfish

    I was advised to choose my MOS carefully, being sure not bleed for Rockefeller, Goldman, Morgan, and the rest of them. The US belongs to them, let them bleed for it.
     
    Seems to me that not only you, but your family agrees with me as well. The problem is that most of them probably didn't believe it when they were young and gung ho and joined up.
  122. @charlemagne
    Fred,
    Spot on!

    Indeed, Fred has even understated the case. The possibility of America bombing distant targets defended by advanced AA systems is ludicrous. Few of our bombers would come back…

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  123. Waste of time to comment so late, but it’s obvious that the USA & Western Europe are stuck here because today’s descendants of the Energy Oligarchs who own Shell, BP, etc. are moving Heaven & Earth to maintain their stranglehold on the liquid that makes the modern world run.

    All geopolitical games clearly are naught but a contest to cripple any competitive threat to their hegemony.

    We citizens are mere pawns & dupes as control of the world plays out behind the scenes.

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  124. @Talha
    JJS is on point. Basically, let's look at Russia - who the hell would want to attack them? And yet that deterrence was achieved for about 12-15% of our military expenditures. Most of the military spending is for retaining 'expeditionary' capability - which of course results in blow-back which results in more 'expeditionary' which...ad infinitum.

    We must break the cycle.

    Peace.

    I don’t know if SHE (or even HER neocon cohort) “wants” to attack them, but if I were Russian I would not be indifferent to the fact that the prospective US president is campaigning, with inflammatory Cold-War rhetoric, on a program calling for full scale, implicitly including military, confrontation with my country.

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  125. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    IMHO, the real problem with train speed in the NE is that it stops every few miles. Find me a train that goes from NYC to Boston with no stops. Good luck…

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  126. I don’t understand why so many people hate on the 9/11 article by fred. that is just his opinion. his opinion was that it was too big and have way too many involved to be a cover up. in my opinion, that is perfectly reasonable for fred because that is just his opinion. http://911myths.com/index.php?title=Comparing_costs when I looked at silverstein’s insurance money and the 9/11 commission budget, I consider that opinion of fred’s to be extremely stupid. I see nothing wrong with an author expressing his opinion, like I have nothing against your opinions, like how I am expressing my opinions.

    you can certain criticize his opinions, but why attack his person? especially since fred is one of the few well rounded journalists. he writes about everything and everyone. or do you guys prefer him to be another stooge that revealed themselves to be propaganda machines in this election cycle?

    anyway, this is great article.

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  127. I quickly read through this opinion piece and I’m not impressed. The opinions of these types of bloggers are mostly irrelevant as they only give their “analysis” of the things that are presented to them through the MSM (most “alternative” media is also controlled by the same people who control the MSM). In other words, they are analyzing, and commenting on, the fairytales that are spoon-fed to the American sheople, through the MSM. Not exactly hard-hitting journalism.

    Mr. Reed just can’t figure out why the US has such a massive military (he fails to mention the 760+ military bases the US has and maintains all over the globe). It’s all a big mystery to him…and to anyone else foolish enough to follow him. As a Conspiracy Factualist, the very first question I ask myself when I’m thinking about these types of issues, is: cui bono…who benefits?

    Who benefits from this massive, and horrendously expensive, military machine? Defense contractors for sure…anyone else? How about the private equity firm Carlyle Group – with it’s extensive ties into the American Deep State – would they benefit? How about the international banking cartels, like the Rothschild’s, the Warburg’s, and the Rockefeller’s, do they benefit?

    Do the people behind such groups as the CFR, the Bilderberg Group, and the Bohemian Grove, have agendas that could be advanced by way of a huge military force? I think they do…

    “We are grateful to the Washington Post, the New York Times, Time Magazine and other great publications whose directors have attended our meetings and respected their promises of discretion for almost forty years…It would have been impossible for us to develop our plan for the world if we had been subjected to the lights of publicity during those years. But, the world is more sophisticated and prepared to march towards a world government. The supranational sovereignty of an intellectual elite and world bankers is surely preferable to the national autodetermination practiced in past centuries.” — David Rockefeller, Speaking at the June, 1991 Bilderberger meeting in Baden, Germany.

    Yeah, they would definitely benefit from having a massive military machine! Anyone who stands in the way of their “plans for the world”, gets it. It’s obvious, to anyone with eyes, that the moves that are being made by the US government, domestically and abroad, aren’t beneficial to the American people…therefore there must be other forces who are calling the shots, for their own purposes. It simply cannot be any other way.

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  128. @Chris Mallory
    Who would give up the freedom and independence of a car in favor of government run transportation? I saw that movie, it didn't turn out very well for the people without cars.

    Maybe you watch to many movies,as for me living in N.Y. and taking 21 hrs single driver to reach Fla. when I could do it in 7-7 1/2 hrs makes little to no sense and don’t bother about freedom and independence drivil for that was given up years ago with out a whimper.!!!!

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    • Replies: @Chris Mallory

    don’t bother about freedom and independence drivil for that was given up years ago with out a whimper.!!!!
     
    Some of us still live it, no matter if you have turned belly up like a whipped dog.

    as for me living in N.Y.
     
    Found your problem right there.


    taking 21 hrs single driver to reach Fla.

     

    Please stay up North. We already have mosquitoes and ticks in the South. We don't need Yankee trash.
  129. Talking about perception and reality in the military, the pre WW2 British admiralty had an unfounded confidence in HMS Hood, and were shocked when it was sunk by the technologically superior German battleship Bismark.

    Equally the British Imperial officer class in Singapore had an unfounded confidence in their ability to defeat Japanese Orientals until the city was attacked and they were quickly overrun.

    So perhaps the idea of MAD (Mutually Assured Destruction) may also have passed its sell-by date in a digital age with sophisticated weaponry. In a conflict between perception and reality, what are the odds that an unpalatable suggestion of this type will be suppressed (rather than evaluated) by a self satisfied and complacent military bureaucracy?

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  130. @SmoothieX12

    Military power is the ability to kill people and break their stuff.
     
    No, military power is the ability to achieve political objectives of the war "by compelling the enemy to do our will"(c).

    I’m talking about means. You’re talking about ends. Not exactly the same. But in a military and political sense, you’ll never achieve your objectives in war unless you can kill more people and break more stuff faster than the enemy.

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  131. You can drive from Manhattan to the downtown center of Boston at an average speed of over 150 mph? If so, you’re a better man than I, Gunga Dinn.

    Dim as usual. He made it clear in his comment that he was referring to “total time.” E.g., the time you spend traveling to the station full of dindus and morons, the time you spend buying your ticket, boarding, waiting, disembarking, traveling from the second station full of dindus and morons to your actual destination, etc.

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  132. Maybe you watch to many movies,as for me living in N.Y. and taking 21 hrs single driver to reach Fla. when I could do it in 7-7 1/2 hrs makes little to no sense and don’t bother about freedom and independence drivil for that was given up years ago with out a whimper.!!!!

    Maybe you watch too few. We have air travel now. Do it in…what? 2 hours? 3?

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  133. Update: average flight time from NYC to Miami seems to be around 3 hours.

    JJS is on point. Basically, let’s look at Russia – who the hell would want to attack them? And yet that deterrence was achieved for about 12-15% of our military expenditures. Most of the military spending is for retaining ‘expeditionary’ capability – which of course results in blow-back which results in more ‘expeditionary’ which…ad infinitum.

    We must break the cycle.

    Peace.

    A hell of a lot of the expenditure is down to wages. They’re much higher here.

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    • Replies: @Talha
    Hey Svigor,

    Good point, but 8 times higher?

    Peace.
  134. And I would much rather have my tax dollars going to servicemen than to layabout dindus and dindu sinecures.

    Let’s cut the latter first, and close the borders. Then I’ll be much more amenable to trimming the military budget.

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  135. @Talha
    You make some solid points here - the extent of private property rights of citizens have few parallels in the rest of the world.

    Peace.

    Civil forfeiture? Heard of that? Put that kool aide down, that’s your wallet the cop has seized.

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    • Replies: @Talha
    Bro, of course I have - I said "rest of the world" - trust me, though it could use improvement, we don't have it that bad here. I've lived in Pakistan and traveled other places in the world. A general transparency and protection of property rights (and low prevalence of graft) is what allows people to invest in the US markets without as much fear as they would in other countries.

    http://www.transparency.org/cpi2015?gclid=CKqz9aCMqc8CFUlrfgodVocB3A#map-container

    We aren't Finland, but we ain't Angola either.

    Peace.

  136. @Svigor
    Update: average flight time from NYC to Miami seems to be around 3 hours.

    JJS is on point. Basically, let’s look at Russia – who the hell would want to attack them? And yet that deterrence was achieved for about 12-15% of our military expenditures. Most of the military spending is for retaining ‘expeditionary’ capability – which of course results in blow-back which results in more ‘expeditionary’ which…ad infinitum.

    We must break the cycle.

    Peace.
     
    A hell of a lot of the expenditure is down to wages. They're much higher here.

    Hey Svigor,

    Good point, but 8 times higher?

    Peace.

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  137. @pogohere
    Civil forfeiture? Heard of that? Put that kool aide down, that's your wallet the cop has seized.

    Bro, of course I have – I said “rest of the world” – trust me, though it could use improvement, we don’t have it that bad here. I’ve lived in Pakistan and traveled other places in the world. A general transparency and protection of property rights (and low prevalence of graft) is what allows people to invest in the US markets without as much fear as they would in other countries.

    http://www.transparency.org/cpi2015?gclid=CKqz9aCMqc8CFUlrfgodVocB3A#map-container

    We aren’t Finland, but we ain’t Angola either.

    Peace.

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  138. @bluedog
    Maybe you watch to many movies,as for me living in N.Y. and taking 21 hrs single driver to reach Fla. when I could do it in 7-7 1/2 hrs makes little to no sense and don't bother about freedom and independence drivil for that was given up years ago with out a whimper.!!!!

    don’t bother about freedom and independence drivil for that was given up years ago with out a whimper.!!!!

    Some of us still live it, no matter if you have turned belly up like a whipped dog.

    as for me living in N.Y.

    Found your problem right there.

    taking 21 hrs single driver to reach Fla.

    Please stay up North. We already have mosquitoes and ticks in the South. We don’t need Yankee trash.

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  139. The US is “The Truman Show.” It’s fun til the sponsors cancel it. Can’t perceive the sound stage we live in? Try this for a start: “The Century of the Self: ”

    Episode One: Happiness Machines

    The story of the relationship between Sigmund Freud and his American nephew, Edward Bernays. Bernays invented the public relations profession in the 1920s and was the first person to take Freud’s ideas to manipulate the masses. He showed American corporations how they could make people want things they didn’t need by systematically linking mass-produced goods to their unconscious desires.

    Bernays was one of the main architects of the modern techniques of mass-consumer persuasion, using every trick in the book, from celebrity endorsement and outrageous PR stunts, to eroticizing the motorcar. His most notorious coup was breaking the taboo on women smoking by persuading them that cigarettes were a symbol of independence and freedom. But Bernays was convinced that this was more than just a way of selling consumer goods. It was a new political idea of how to control the masses. By satisfying the inner irrational desires that his uncle had identified, people could be made happy and thus docile.

    It was the start of the all-consuming self which has come to dominate today’s world.

    https://freedocumentaries.org/documentary/bbc-the-century-of-the-self-happiness-machines-season-1-episode-1

    Full documentary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJ3RzGoQC4s

    Read More
    • Replies: @Max Payne
    The problem is Adam Curtis at times censors himself which make his documentaries, while still very informative, also incomplete.
  140. @pogohere
    The US is "The Truman Show." It's fun til the sponsors cancel it. Can't perceive the sound stage we live in? Try this for a start: "The Century of the Self: "

    Episode One: Happiness Machines

    The story of the relationship between Sigmund Freud and his American nephew, Edward Bernays. Bernays invented the public relations profession in the 1920s and was the first person to take Freud's ideas to manipulate the masses. He showed American corporations how they could make people want things they didn't need by systematically linking mass-produced goods to their unconscious desires.

    Bernays was one of the main architects of the modern techniques of mass-consumer persuasion, using every trick in the book, from celebrity endorsement and outrageous PR stunts, to eroticizing the motorcar. His most notorious coup was breaking the taboo on women smoking by persuading them that cigarettes were a symbol of independence and freedom. But Bernays was convinced that this was more than just a way of selling consumer goods. It was a new political idea of how to control the masses. By satisfying the inner irrational desires that his uncle had identified, people could be made happy and thus docile.

    It was the start of the all-consuming self which has come to dominate today's world.

    https://freedocumentaries.org/documentary/bbc-the-century-of-the-self-happiness-machines-season-1-episode-1
     
    Full documentary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJ3RzGoQC4s

    The problem is Adam Curtis at times censors himself which make his documentaries, while still very informative, also incomplete.

    Read More
  141. I censor myself, don’t you?

    You have a problem with The Century of the Self ?

    What is it about that documentary you object to? What would make it more complete?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Max Payne
    Why censor yourself? If you have people around you that you need to hold your tongue for then perhaps they're not worth keeping as company.

    As for the documentary….it's been years since I've watched the Adam Curtis set, he's got tons of documentaries (his latest about Saudi Arabia is the finest example of self-censorship). I just noticed that in some (most if not all) of his documentaries he self-censors, even though he gets REALLY close to the truth. Closer than any other MSM documentary I've ever encountered but still after providing so much information he refuses to give a solid conclusion as to why these things are happening or who would benefit.

    If I remember correctly The Century of the Self: Adam Curtis basically states that consumerism and commercialism was necessary to change the West from a need-based society to a want-based society (using psychology and human behavior to manipulate masses) but he never really explains what the end goal of this is or who would benefit. I understand its an MSM (BBC) documentary but still...

    He explains certain techniques which are used to manipulate end users/consumers but I'm just flabbergasted at the fact he can get so many things right and yet stop himself at concluding who is pulling the levers. And more importantly WHY they're doing what they're doing (which Adam Curtis refuses to even hypothesize about; everyone wants power but what is the power meant to achieve?).

    I’m running off memory here (like 10+ years) but the majority of the documentaries (four episodes) was based on consumerism and how the masses were manipulated. He rarely if ever relates it to real life geopolitical events or who the so called “elites” or “people in power” are.

    Yeah yeah I get that he hints that "we have become slaves to the system including those on the top" (much like Ted Kaczynski and his manifesto "Industrial Society and Its Future") but again he censors himself stopping short of naming who is truly in control or for what reason.

    At least Ted Kaczynski stated it was slavery to the technology, which makes humans into machines for the sake of technology/industry itself. Adam Curtis just leaves it in the air as if consumerism was going to be the natural byproduct of an advanced society.

    On a side note I’d recommend actually replying to my post as opposed to just posting the next thread. I’m just saying it makes things easier.

    Shoot... now I have to rewatch the series to make sure I'm correct....
  142. @The Alarmist

    "How did the American taxpayer benefit from the Vietnam war?"
     
    Didn't we get Tang or something like that, or was that the War on the Moon?

    Apparently, I don’t comment here quite often enough to be allowed to LOL by just clicking the button. Can’t allow just anybody to LOL by using the LOL button. I see that, of course.

    Anyway: LOL. Thank God we won the War on the Moon.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Alarmist

    "Thank God we won the War on the Moon."
     
    Shame that Race to Poverty thing didn't work out as well.
  143. @Son of Dixie
    I was where you are about two years ago regarding Fred. He is a joke, he wrotes these articles as way of passive aggression, nothing else. He enjoys to rile up Americans still on American soil by denigrating our nation and our racial stock.

    The previous article calling those who doubt the official 911 story conspiracy hacks, as well as the countless other pro-Mexican and anti-Anglo pieces serve as examples.

    Fred is a self hating White man married to a Mexican woman (of Jewish stock) with a few too many miles on her.

    First Rule of Debate: Never insult a man’s wife, except when the wife is a man. Your ad hominem BS signals a lack of cognitive mastery. Could you restate your argument?

    Read More
  144. @pogohere
    I censor myself, don't you?

    You have a problem with The Century of the Self ?

    What is it about that documentary you object to? What would make it more complete?

    Why censor yourself? If you have people around you that you need to hold your tongue for then perhaps they’re not worth keeping as company.

    As for the documentary….it’s been years since I’ve watched the Adam Curtis set, he’s got tons of documentaries (his latest about Saudi Arabia is the finest example of self-censorship). I just noticed that in some (most if not all) of his documentaries he self-censors, even though he gets REALLY close to the truth. Closer than any other MSM documentary I’ve ever encountered but still after providing so much information he refuses to give a solid conclusion as to why these things are happening or who would benefit.

    If I remember correctly The Century of the Self: Adam Curtis basically states that consumerism and commercialism was necessary to change the West from a need-based society to a want-based society (using psychology and human behavior to manipulate masses) but he never really explains what the end goal of this is or who would benefit. I understand its an MSM (BBC) documentary but still…

    He explains certain techniques which are used to manipulate end users/consumers but I’m just flabbergasted at the fact he can get so many things right and yet stop himself at concluding who is pulling the levers. And more importantly WHY they’re doing what they’re doing (which Adam Curtis refuses to even hypothesize about; everyone wants power but what is the power meant to achieve?).

    I’m running off memory here (like 10+ years) but the majority of the documentaries (four episodes) was based on consumerism and how the masses were manipulated. He rarely if ever relates it to real life geopolitical events or who the so called “elites” or “people in power” are.

    Yeah yeah I get that he hints that “we have become slaves to the system including those on the top” (much like Ted Kaczynski and his manifesto “Industrial Society and Its Future”) but again he censors himself stopping short of naming who is truly in control or for what reason.

    At least Ted Kaczynski stated it was slavery to the technology, which makes humans into machines for the sake of technology/industry itself. Adam Curtis just leaves it in the air as if consumerism was going to be the natural byproduct of an advanced society.

    On a side note I’d recommend actually replying to my post as opposed to just posting the next thread. I’m just saying it makes things easier.

    Shoot… now I have to rewatch the series to make sure I’m correct….

    Read More
  145. @denk
    On that wonderful private property rights.....

    Uncle scam wanted another military base at China's doorstep to menace the dragon.
    So it turned another UNESCO certified natural treasure , the Jeju island, into a god damned concrete nightmare. thousands of villagers had to vacate their ancestral lands, thrown out by brute force.

    *Perhaps more tragic than the loss of their farmland and environmental treasures has been the destruction of the village’s social fabric. Activists explained that the South Korean Navy, having been firmly rebuffed by two other villages approached as potential sites of the naval base, resorted to stealth, bribery and deception to obtain the consent of a key group of Gangjeong villagers for the construction of the naval base.

    As a result, many families have been torn apart over the issue; there are parents and children who no longer speak to each other; longtime friends who turn the other way when they pass each other on the streets. The issue of the naval base has also divided the village haenyo, the women divers who set out in boats each day to collect the day’s catch of seafood (Jeju island has a matriarchal society, embodied by these strong, mostly middle-aged women who are the breadwinners of their families) and who once were a tightly-knit social group.*

    Murkkans are so blessed , with all that 'inalienable property rights'.
    Try telling that to the poor Jeju islanders tho, this is no way to treat a buddy.
    Or is SK a lapdog !
    God damn Murkkan exceptionalism !

    https://consortiumnews.com/2015/01/08/resisting-a-navy-base-on-chinas-periphery/

    Private property rights are sacrosanct in the ‘land of the free’ or so I heard, but not all men are born equal.

    These Jeju islanders ancestral homes got bulldozed [1], courtesy of uncle scam.
    cuz pentagon wanted another naval base at China’s doorstep, much like pointing a dagger at the dragon’s heart. [2]

    God bless America. [3]

    [1]

    http://www.telesurtv.net/__export/1433038664819/sites/telesur/img/2015/05/30/jeju_island_protests.jpg_1718483346.jpg

    [2]

    http://www.globalresearch.ca/articlePictures/jeju.bmp

    Read More
    • Replies: @denk
    One fine afternoon sixty yrs ago, an Murkkan admiral with his entourage landed on the Bikini island. His men rounded up the bemused islanders for a meeting.

    The Murkkan told the assembly that they'd have to vacate their homeland pronto cuz uncle scam wanted their island for some 'higher purpose'. The poor sods had only hours to pack their belongings before they were herded on Murkkan warships and packed off to
    some ghettos far away from home. never did they know that they'd never see their homeland again !

    What happened next was summed up by Bob Hope thus,
    *We located the one spot on Earth that hadn’t been touched by the war and blew it to hell,

    *From 1946 to 1958, the United States conducted 67 tests in the Marshall Islands. If their combined explosive power was parceled evenly over that 12-year period, it would equal 1.6 Hiroshima-size explosions per day.*

    Last yr the remnants of the Marshall islanders tried to sue the Unitedsnake in the ICC but uncle scam flatly rejected its jurisdiction, just like what Wahsington did in 1984 when Nicaragua sued it at the ICC for state terrorism. Murkka found guilty as charged but Washington showed the ICC its middle finger.
    The islanders brought the case to a Murkkan court, the judge threw it out point blank.

    No property rights, no human rights for the Marshall islanders.


    *Washington — and this is just my personal opinion — I think they’re going out of their way to wash their hands of the Marshalls,” says Jack Niedenthal, a Pennsylvanian who arrived in the islands with the Peace Corps in 1981 and eventually became one of their unofficial representatives to the United States. “You look at what they spend on Iraq and Afghanistan, and it’s billions upon billions. For four bullets into a tree in Iraq, they could fix this entire place.*

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/national/2015/11/27/a-ground-zero-forgotten/
  146. @denk
    Private property rights are sacrosanct in the 'land of the free' or so I heard, but not all men are born equal.

    These Jeju islanders ancestral homes got bulldozed [1], courtesy of uncle scam.
    cuz pentagon wanted another naval base at China's doorstep, much like pointing a dagger at the dragon's heart. [2]

    God bless America. [3]

    [1]
    http://www.telesurtv.net/__export/1433038664819/sites/telesur/img/2015/05/30/jeju_island_protests.jpg_1718483346.jpg

    [2]
    http://www.globalresearch.ca/articlePictures/jeju.bmp

    One fine afternoon sixty yrs ago, an Murkkan admiral with his entourage landed on the Bikini island. His men rounded up the bemused islanders for a meeting.

    The Murkkan told the assembly that they’d have to vacate their homeland pronto cuz uncle scam wanted their island for some ‘higher purpose’. The poor sods had only hours to pack their belongings before they were herded on Murkkan warships and packed off to
    some ghettos far away from home. never did they know that they’d never see their homeland again !

    What happened next was summed up by Bob Hope thus,
    *We located the one spot on Earth that hadn’t been touched by the war and blew it to hell,

    *From 1946 to 1958, the United States conducted 67 tests in the Marshall Islands. If their combined explosive power was parceled evenly over that 12-year period, it would equal 1.6 Hiroshima-size explosions per day.*

    Last yr the remnants of the Marshall islanders tried to sue the Unitedsnake in the ICC but uncle scam flatly rejected its jurisdiction, just like what Wahsington did in 1984 when Nicaragua sued it at the ICC for state terrorism. Murkka found guilty as charged but Washington showed the ICC its middle finger.
    The islanders brought the case to a Murkkan court, the judge threw it out point blank.

    No property rights, no human rights for the Marshall islanders.

    *Washington — and this is just my personal opinion — I think they’re going out of their way to wash their hands of the Marshalls,” says Jack Niedenthal, a Pennsylvanian who arrived in the islands with the Peace Corps in 1981 and eventually became one of their unofficial representatives to the United States. “You look at what they spend on Iraq and Afghanistan, and it’s billions upon billions. For four bullets into a tree in Iraq, they could fix this entire place.*

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/national/2015/11/27/a-ground-zero-forgotten/

    Read More
    • Replies: @denk
    Okinawa has been under Murkkan jackboots since 1945, thats more than 70 yrs of hell. !
    The Murkkans forced the Okinawans to vacate their ancestral homes at gun point, many granpas grandmas who resisted were shot point blank, their grand daughters would become the targets of preying sex maniacs...until this very day. [1]

    Uncle scam wanted those lands to build its forward base in Asia to menace China.
    The spy plane which provoked the 2001 confrontaton over Hainan that killed a Chinese pilot took off from Okinawa.
    Like Diego Garcia, Okinawa is another base to launch air attacks on Iraq, afpak,....

    The Rev. Taira says the islanders have had enough.
    "The soldiers get drunk and crash their cars. There are four accidents a day; two rapes a month. Almost every person on Okinawa has a family member who has been assaulted. Then the soldiers go off to kill poor people in Iraq and Afghanistan. It makes my blood boil."
    [2]

    [1]
    https://img.rt.com/files/oldfiles/news/japan-us-rape-okinawa-763/tokyo-rape-official-protest.si.jpg

    http://www.islamicinvitationturkey.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/amin20130301083630943.jpeg

    [2]
    http://apjjf.org/-David-McNeill/1768/article.html
  147. @bluedog
    Your right who in their right mind would advocate wasting money on high speed rail, when they can sit in their cars for endless hours waiting in a traffic jam or an accident shutting down the freeways and thruways when IF this country had any kind of rail system they could be sitting home having a cold beer,we are the most backassed country in the world all for big business and the profit.!!!!

    Nobody is saying you can’t have a car. With an advanced rail system in place there would be choices and less congestion/pollution. Win-win.

    Read More
  148. @Waclaw
    NosytheDuke
    You can't possibly be serious questioning that the US is the only country
    which could be accused of knocking out the evil powers before they became
    a global threat.
    Granted, we are not a stranger to gross misjudgments regarding
    "spreading democracy" in places where the likelihood of even partial success
    didn't exist. Fault the dense politicians inventing loony doctrines for murky
    reasons which were elaborated on above.
    I don't think these failures discredit the good accomplished elsewhere.

    A list!

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  149. @Chris Mallory

    China has the money and a very large network of high-speed rail domestically. (The US has not a single mile.)
     
    The Americans who own cars do not need or want high speed rail. The Americans who do not own cars should be kept in the inner city ghettos and far away from anything that allows them to roam the country.

    You are correct. Rail allows those better kept in the cities to roam the suburbs.. You can’t even run a county fair within 20 miles of Washington DC anymore. Unfortunately, the Metro takes the Blacks into and away from the suburbs for easy criminal access to areas with lots of fresh, unsuspecting, well-heeled victims.

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  150. @prusmc
    Nothing exemplifies this as the F 35. Huge cost over runs, design flaws, retro-engineering impossibilities, does a few things less effectively than limited purpose aircraft now in stock, is no way an all purpose superior performer. Yet components are produced in 40 of the 57 states. Who is going to slice that pork? Go back to when the great Massachusetts land whale was trying to set up a second production facility for the F 35's under-powered engine at a close to home location to illustrate this debacle even more clearly. Move to the USN and the capture of crying US sailors by the Iranians and then take a look at the LCS tar baby to get further insite into a broken system. Shades of the great rainmaker: RSM and theTFX.

    the great Massachusetts land whale was trying to set up a second production facility

    All whales in Massachusetts are obligated to GE after all. Are you referring to Tip O’Neil, or Teddy Kennedy? They were both a biscuit or two beyond obese, which points out how long has the F-35 debacle stretched on. It is likely the first plane to be made obsolete without ever having fired a shot in anger because we’re already doing carrier quals (aircraft carriers themselves likely obsolete) with a drone fighter/bomber, are we not? The B-47X or some such. It can land, it can take off, it can taxi in tight quarters. It can also pull G’s unmatched by any manned plane, too, a useful feature in a dogfight.

    The F/A-35. From the factory straight to the boneyard. I want my money back.

    Read More
  151. @Rich
    I have to disagree with you. We former Chairborne Rangers can certainly have served honorably away from the battlefield. In fact. after my Grandfather, Father, Uncles and older Brother all served in combat, I was advised to choose my MOS carefully, being sure not bleed for Rockefeller, Goldman, Morgan, and the rest of them. The US belongs to them, let them bleed for it.

    I was advised to choose my MOS carefully, being sure not bleed for Rockefeller, Goldman, Morgan, and the rest of them. The US belongs to them, let them bleed for it.

    Seems to me that not only you, but your family agrees with me as well. The problem is that most of them probably didn’t believe it when they were young and gung ho and joined up.

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  152. @woodNfish
    You have a very poor grasp of history. After the US declared independence we fought several wars with both the British and the French where they invaded our country. And then there was the unconstitutional war of secession by the bloody butcher Lincoln that brought Sherman's march through the South burning and destroying everything in his path. Sure, I know it wasn't of foreign foe, but it was still very destructive. It put the South in a 20 year economic depression that it never really came out of until the invention of air conditioning.

    I’m a 24 year Army retiree (1972 to 1996) and proud to have served.
     
    I don't mean to demean your bravery as a soldier (if you were in combat - REMFs don't count), but you were suckered and used and none of the unconstitutional police actions our military engaged in during that time had anything to do with our national security. I hope you realize that.

    Oooops. I was a flight deck rat. Nimitz, 76-82.A-6′s. Ejection seats, Liquid Oxygen, trouble shooting on the fly. Three Med cruises and the Iranian Hostage “Rescue” cruise in the Indian Ocean thrown in for maximum at-sea splendor. Asbestos, jet exhaust, hearing loss, solvents, crashes and so you absorb various and sundry injuries and the rest. I didn’t carry a weapon in Baghdad, but it all took a toll.

    And so, to sort out the euphemisms about MOS and rates and so on, I ask: Was I tip of the spear, REMF, or just a kid with a trouble-addiction? Always wondered about that. Besides, it wasn’t just a job, it was also $14.00/day, plus $1.35 hazardous duty pay after all. Righteous bucks, no? Free meals, a roof under your feet, a coffin-box to sleep in with 300 other fortunates under the landing area.. Man, that’s livin’, right?

    Read More
    • Replies: @woodNfish
    Jim, you were out there in close support, you were not a REMF.
  153. @Jim Christian
    Oooops. I was a flight deck rat. Nimitz, 76-82.A-6's. Ejection seats, Liquid Oxygen, trouble shooting on the fly. Three Med cruises and the Iranian Hostage "Rescue" cruise in the Indian Ocean thrown in for maximum at-sea splendor. Asbestos, jet exhaust, hearing loss, solvents, crashes and so you absorb various and sundry injuries and the rest. I didn't carry a weapon in Baghdad, but it all took a toll.

    And so, to sort out the euphemisms about MOS and rates and so on, I ask: Was I tip of the spear, REMF, or just a kid with a trouble-addiction? Always wondered about that. Besides, it wasn't just a job, it was also $14.00/day, plus $1.35 hazardous duty pay after all. Righteous bucks, no? Free meals, a roof under your feet, a coffin-box to sleep in with 300 other fortunates under the landing area.. Man, that's livin', right?

    Jim, you were out there in close support, you were not a REMF.

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  154. @Reactionary Utopian
    Apparently, I don't comment here quite often enough to be allowed to LOL by just clicking the button. Can't allow just anybody to LOL by using the LOL button. I see that, of course.

    Anyway: LOL. Thank God we won the War on the Moon.

    “Thank God we won the War on the Moon.”

    Shame that Race to Poverty thing didn’t work out as well.

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  155. @Diogenes
    That's a comforting thought, Fred. The US military is just a waste of money,can't be used to fight other powerful military states, especially nuclear armed states, it's good at wasting tax payer money,it's a drain on the treasury, it can't win asymmetric wars against under developed countries however it is the basis of a military- centric American economy. In other words, it's best for the US to to get rid of the military altogether and restructure the whole economy more productively. Good idea but somehow it's not going to happen,it's more likely the US military will bring death and destruction to the country and it's employees.

    The Americans should take responsibility about their nation’s violent foreign policy and destructive military adventures around the world, pointing the finger at the 1% and MIC is cowardice and tries to escape their responsibility for all the crimes against humanity committed by their government.

    After all the USA government is elected by the Americans, meanwhile there are no demonstrations by the Americans to voice their disapproval of their government’s reckless behaviour around the world, it demonstrates the USA government and the Americans are in agreement with what the US government has been doing around the world which reverberates the wishes and will of the Americans.

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  156. @Anonymous
    The point of our gargantuan military is/are the very issues which it moots--which are precisely all the faults Fred finds with it. In other words, no one else wants to wage conventional wars of aggression precisely because we are preeminent in that domain. So, a lot of trouble is preempted because we carry a big stick. And that nothing is worth something.

    Why can other countries like NK, Iran, Russia or China get away with much less expensive and smaller military and achieved “no one else wants to wage conventional wars of aggression” against them from any other aggressor particular the USA, but USA cannot? Are you saying the American is stupid, incompetent, corrupted or outright ‘God-fearing’ morally defunct evil ‘inquisitor’?

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  157. “After all the USA government is elected by the Americans, meanwhile there are no demonstrations by the Americans to voice their disapproval of their government’s reckless behaviour around the world, it demonstrates the USA government and the Americans are in agreement with what the US government has been doing around the world which reverberates the wishes and will of the Americans.”

    The hippies are pensioners now and the rest are playing video games or are on Facebook.

    Read More
  158. Good point, but 8 times higher?

    I dunno. IIRC, the Russian military employs more people, so, probably not.

    Hey dink, are you guys still murdering and oppressing Tibetans and Uighurs? How about mutilating women’s feet, or cutting of men’s peepees? Shooting protestors? Trafficking in women and children? Get back to me.

    Nobody is saying you can’t have a car. With an advanced rail system in place there would be choices and less congestion/pollution. Win-win.

    The zillions of people whose pockets will be robbed to pay for it aside, all we’re doing is explaining why Big Rail isn’t a priority here: because it really isn’t needed, or wanted. Where I live, it would be swarmed with dindus, who repel everyone else, and would never come close to paying for it, much less making it profitable. In my area, I’m actively opposed.

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  159. Yes, drones are probably going to replace a Hell of a lot of human-operated military equipment. I can easily see most of the personnel on, say, an aircraft carrier being replaced with off-site drone operators, with only a skeleton crew of damage control, repair mechanics, and a few officers replacing the current complement. Heck, submariners might take over a bunch of the work via comm buoys. The pilots will only be the first to go. Helicopter pilots will probably hang on in the Navy way longer than fighter pilots will.

    Why can other countries like NK, Iran, Russia or China get away with much less expensive and smaller military and achieved “no one else wants to wage conventional wars of aggression” against them from any other aggressor particular the USA, but USA cannot? Are you saying the American is stupid, incompetent, corrupted or outright ‘God-fearing’ morally defunct evil ‘inquisitor’?

    Is that a joke? North Korea has one of the biggest armies in the world. It’s the only game in town in NK. It’s probably the biggest army, per capita, in the world, if not in absolute numbers. China’s military is huge, too.

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  160. @Chris Mallory
    And the US should waste money on a high speed rail because? Spain did it? Spain has been an also ran for over 120 years.

    If Spain is an also-ran, what does that make us? A third-rate power?

    The Acela Corridor is also denser than Germany.

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  161. @denk
    One fine afternoon sixty yrs ago, an Murkkan admiral with his entourage landed on the Bikini island. His men rounded up the bemused islanders for a meeting.

    The Murkkan told the assembly that they'd have to vacate their homeland pronto cuz uncle scam wanted their island for some 'higher purpose'. The poor sods had only hours to pack their belongings before they were herded on Murkkan warships and packed off to
    some ghettos far away from home. never did they know that they'd never see their homeland again !

    What happened next was summed up by Bob Hope thus,
    *We located the one spot on Earth that hadn’t been touched by the war and blew it to hell,

    *From 1946 to 1958, the United States conducted 67 tests in the Marshall Islands. If their combined explosive power was parceled evenly over that 12-year period, it would equal 1.6 Hiroshima-size explosions per day.*

    Last yr the remnants of the Marshall islanders tried to sue the Unitedsnake in the ICC but uncle scam flatly rejected its jurisdiction, just like what Wahsington did in 1984 when Nicaragua sued it at the ICC for state terrorism. Murkka found guilty as charged but Washington showed the ICC its middle finger.
    The islanders brought the case to a Murkkan court, the judge threw it out point blank.

    No property rights, no human rights for the Marshall islanders.


    *Washington — and this is just my personal opinion — I think they’re going out of their way to wash their hands of the Marshalls,” says Jack Niedenthal, a Pennsylvanian who arrived in the islands with the Peace Corps in 1981 and eventually became one of their unofficial representatives to the United States. “You look at what they spend on Iraq and Afghanistan, and it’s billions upon billions. For four bullets into a tree in Iraq, they could fix this entire place.*

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/national/2015/11/27/a-ground-zero-forgotten/

    Okinawa has been under Murkkan jackboots since 1945, thats more than 70 yrs of hell. !
    The Murkkans forced the Okinawans to vacate their ancestral homes at gun point, many granpas grandmas who resisted were shot point blank, their grand daughters would become the targets of preying sex maniacs…until this very day. [1]

    Uncle scam wanted those lands to build its forward base in Asia to menace China.
    The spy plane which provoked the 2001 confrontaton over Hainan that killed a Chinese pilot took off from Okinawa.
    Like Diego Garcia, Okinawa is another base to launch air attacks on Iraq, afpak,….

    The Rev. Taira says the islanders have had enough.
    The soldiers get drunk and crash their cars. There are four accidents a day; two rapes a month. Almost every person on Okinawa has a family member who has been assaulted. Then the soldiers go off to kill poor people in Iraq and Afghanistan. It makes my blood boil.
    [2]

    [1]

    https://img.rt.com/files/oldfiles/news/japan-us-rape-okinawa-763/tokyo-rape-official-protest.si.jpg

    http://www.islamicinvitationturkey.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/amin20130301083630943.jpeg

    [2]

    http://apjjf.org/-David-McNeill/1768/article.html

    Read More
    • Replies: @denk
    Not satisfied with defiling Jeju, a UNESCO certified natural treasure, uncle scam turned its slimy paws to another idyllic SK village . It wanna deploy thaad, the socalled 'anti missile defence shield' there ostensibly 'to defend Sk against NK missile attack'. [1]

    BUt nothing uncle scam has done since 1875 was about 'defence' , THAAD is in fact unitedsnake's coup de grace to check mate China, a vital piece of the psychopaths nuclear first strike strategy. [2]
    The mad men in Washington figure that THAAD is the answer to the MAD stalemate [3] since the 80'.
    Nuclear war is not only thinkable to these crazies, its now winnable.
    When unitedsnake sneak a nuclear first strike on China, THAAD would neutralise any retaliatory attack from the remnants of the Chinese ICBM.
    What if some slip thru the shield and vaporise LA , you ask ?
    The cold blooded assholes would prolly answer,
    'Hell, for putting the Chicoms back to stone age,
    the price is worth it ' !

    [1]
    http://space4peace.blogspot.com/2016/07/citizens-revolt-in-south-korea.html#links

    [2]
    http://www.globalresearch.ca/no-wonder-china-is-nervous-as-obama-pivots/5312523

    [3]
    Mutually Assured Destruction.
  162. An excellent analysis of how overstretch and tactical and strategic oversights can render a military machine useless. Never forget that the Vietnamese shot down helicopters with bows and arrows. They laid on their backs in the rice paddy and, holding the bow up with their feet, would fire an arrow with twine attached up into the rotors of slow flying and hovering helicopters.
    When you have no legitimate right to be in another country the indigenous people can be very resourceful in their defence.

    Read More
  163. @denk
    Okinawa has been under Murkkan jackboots since 1945, thats more than 70 yrs of hell. !
    The Murkkans forced the Okinawans to vacate their ancestral homes at gun point, many granpas grandmas who resisted were shot point blank, their grand daughters would become the targets of preying sex maniacs...until this very day. [1]

    Uncle scam wanted those lands to build its forward base in Asia to menace China.
    The spy plane which provoked the 2001 confrontaton over Hainan that killed a Chinese pilot took off from Okinawa.
    Like Diego Garcia, Okinawa is another base to launch air attacks on Iraq, afpak,....

    The Rev. Taira says the islanders have had enough.
    "The soldiers get drunk and crash their cars. There are four accidents a day; two rapes a month. Almost every person on Okinawa has a family member who has been assaulted. Then the soldiers go off to kill poor people in Iraq and Afghanistan. It makes my blood boil."
    [2]

    [1]
    https://img.rt.com/files/oldfiles/news/japan-us-rape-okinawa-763/tokyo-rape-official-protest.si.jpg

    http://www.islamicinvitationturkey.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/amin20130301083630943.jpeg

    [2]
    http://apjjf.org/-David-McNeill/1768/article.html

    Not satisfied with defiling Jeju, a UNESCO certified natural treasure, uncle scam turned its slimy paws to another idyllic SK village . It wanna deploy thaad, the socalled ‘anti missile defence shield’ there ostensibly ‘to defend Sk against NK missile attack’. [1]

    BUt nothing uncle scam has done since 1875 was about ‘defence’ , THAAD is in fact unitedsnake’s coup de grace to check mate China, a vital piece of the psychopaths nuclear first strike strategy. [2]
    The mad men in Washington figure that THAAD is the answer to the MAD stalemate [3] since the 80′.
    Nuclear war is not only thinkable to these crazies, its now winnable.
    When unitedsnake sneak a nuclear first strike on China, THAAD would neutralise any retaliatory attack from the remnants of the Chinese ICBM.
    What if some slip thru the shield and vaporise LA , you ask ?
    The cold blooded assholes would prolly answer,
    ‘Hell, for putting the Chicoms back to stone age,
    the price is worth it ‘ !

    [1]

    http://space4peace.blogspot.com/2016/07/citizens-revolt-in-south-korea.html#links

    [2]

    http://www.globalresearch.ca/no-wonder-china-is-nervous-as-obama-pivots/5312523

    [3]
    Mutually Assured Destruction.

    Read More
    • Replies: @denk
    Okinawa, [0]
    Jeju, Marshall island, Diego Garcia....
    Guam, [1]
    Vicenza, [2]
    Vieques, [3]
    Puerto Rico, [4]
    Kosovo,
    hawaii, Iraq, Afpak, somalia, yemen, libya, syria..............


    There's no place on earth thats untouched by uncle sham's gruppy paws. !!

    is Murkka a.....

    a] virus,
    b] plague,
    c] cancer, ?
    d] all of the above ???


    [1]
    http://theinsularempire.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/chamoru_protest_closeup.jpg
    [2]
    http://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/02/2003577245-300x0.jpg
    [3]
    http://cpcml.ca/images2014/LatAmCaribbean/PuertoRico/File/030113-PuertoRicoVieques.jpg
    [4]
    http://puertorico.media.indypgh.org/uploads/2008/01/fuckfbi.jpgmid.jpg
  164. @denk
    Not satisfied with defiling Jeju, a UNESCO certified natural treasure, uncle scam turned its slimy paws to another idyllic SK village . It wanna deploy thaad, the socalled 'anti missile defence shield' there ostensibly 'to defend Sk against NK missile attack'. [1]

    BUt nothing uncle scam has done since 1875 was about 'defence' , THAAD is in fact unitedsnake's coup de grace to check mate China, a vital piece of the psychopaths nuclear first strike strategy. [2]
    The mad men in Washington figure that THAAD is the answer to the MAD stalemate [3] since the 80'.
    Nuclear war is not only thinkable to these crazies, its now winnable.
    When unitedsnake sneak a nuclear first strike on China, THAAD would neutralise any retaliatory attack from the remnants of the Chinese ICBM.
    What if some slip thru the shield and vaporise LA , you ask ?
    The cold blooded assholes would prolly answer,
    'Hell, for putting the Chicoms back to stone age,
    the price is worth it ' !

    [1]
    http://space4peace.blogspot.com/2016/07/citizens-revolt-in-south-korea.html#links

    [2]
    http://www.globalresearch.ca/no-wonder-china-is-nervous-as-obama-pivots/5312523

    [3]
    Mutually Assured Destruction.

    Okinawa, [0]
    Jeju, Marshall island, Diego Garcia….
    Guam, [1]
    Vicenza, [2]
    Vieques, [3]
    Puerto Rico, [4]
    Kosovo,
    hawaii, Iraq, Afpak, somalia, yemen, libya, syria…………..

    There’s no place on earth thats untouched by uncle sham’s gruppy paws. !!

    is Murkka a…..

    a] virus,
    b] plague,
    c] cancer, ?
    d] all of the above ???

    [1]

    http://theinsularempire.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/chamoru_protest_closeup.jpg

    [2]

    http://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/02/2003577245-300×0.jpg

    [3]

    http://cpcml.ca/images2014/LatAmCaribbean/PuertoRico/File/030113-PuertoRicoVieques.jpg

    [4]

    http://puertorico.media.indypgh.org/uploads/2008/01/fuckfbi.jpgmid.jpg

    Read More
    • Replies: @denk
    Looks like deliverance is at hand !

    *In a change of focus, the ICC said on Thursday it would also prioritise crimes that result in the “destruction of the environment”, “exploitation of natural resources” and the “illegal dispossession” of land. It also included an explicit reference to land-grabbing.* [1]

    Land grab and environment destruction for commercial, industrial purpose is bad enough,
    Appropriating foreign lands to wage wars is downright despicable.

    Okinawa, Jeju, Diego Garcia, Marshall island, Guam, .......immediately come to mind.
    The Okinawans have been protesting for the past 70 yrs, written to Mdm Dowager Killary, went to Washington to plead their case, each time they were given the short shrift .
    The ICC's new mantra is a god send to these unpeople, the Chagosians might finally get to
    go back to their homeland ?

    Dont hold your breath !

    Turns out that the very first case on the table is about.....Cambodia !

    Why , Cambodia alleged transgressions are just child's play when compared to all the above industrial scale land grab by the USN ??

    Hmm,
    In the recent Asean summit, Cambodia practically single-handedly thwarted uncle scam's machination to forge an anti China united front.
    Now we've this Murkkan law firm taking up the cudgel for some Cambodian villagers at the ICC !
    Rings a bell ?

    Must be just a coincidence !
    hehehehe

    [1]
    https://www.theguardian.com/global/2016/sep/15/hague-court-widens-remit-to-include-environmental-destruction-cases
  165. @denk
    Okinawa, [0]
    Jeju, Marshall island, Diego Garcia....
    Guam, [1]
    Vicenza, [2]
    Vieques, [3]
    Puerto Rico, [4]
    Kosovo,
    hawaii, Iraq, Afpak, somalia, yemen, libya, syria..............


    There's no place on earth thats untouched by uncle sham's gruppy paws. !!

    is Murkka a.....

    a] virus,
    b] plague,
    c] cancer, ?
    d] all of the above ???


    [1]
    http://theinsularempire.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/chamoru_protest_closeup.jpg
    [2]
    http://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/02/2003577245-300x0.jpg
    [3]
    http://cpcml.ca/images2014/LatAmCaribbean/PuertoRico/File/030113-PuertoRicoVieques.jpg
    [4]
    http://puertorico.media.indypgh.org/uploads/2008/01/fuckfbi.jpgmid.jpg

    Looks like deliverance is at hand !

    *In a change of focus, the ICC said on Thursday it would also prioritise crimes that result in the “destruction of the environment”, “exploitation of natural resources” and the “illegal dispossession” of land. It also included an explicit reference to land-grabbing.* [1]

    Land grab and environment destruction for commercial, industrial purpose is bad enough,
    Appropriating foreign lands to wage wars is downright despicable.

    Okinawa, Jeju, Diego Garcia, Marshall island, Guam, …….immediately come to mind.
    The Okinawans have been protesting for the past 70 yrs, written to Mdm Dowager Killary, went to Washington to plead their case, each time they were given the short shrift .
    The ICC’s new mantra is a god send to these unpeople, the Chagosians might finally get to
    go back to their homeland ?

    Dont hold your breath !

    Turns out that the very first case on the table is about…..Cambodia !

    Why , Cambodia alleged transgressions are just child’s play when compared to all the above industrial scale land grab by the USN ??

    Hmm,
    In the recent Asean summit, Cambodia practically single-handedly thwarted uncle scam’s machination to forge an anti China united front.
    Now we’ve this Murkkan law firm taking up the cudgel for some Cambodian villagers at the ICC !
    Rings a bell ?

    Must be just a coincidence !
    hehehehe

    [1]

    https://www.theguardian.com/global/2016/sep/15/hague-court-widens-remit-to-include-environmental-destruction-cases

    Read More
  166. Our gigantic military’s main purpose is to secure pipeline routes and sea lanes for import of foreign oil/gas. We might be able to transition to an almost totally self-sufficient, renewable energy nation in near future (like Germany is doing), but no aircraft carrier or Abrams tank will ever be powered by solar panels or a wind turbine. Our modern military is the world’s biggest gas hog. Hence the Moebius strip we’re trapped in:

    We need the military to secure foreign oil — because foreign oil is indispensable to the military.

    Read More
  167. @dearieme
    "our military was the finest the world has ever fielded on the battlefield": when was that? Your finest hour was towards the end of the Second World War, when the Germans had the finest military, in the sense of the best soldiers. They were undone, thank God, because they were hugely outnumbered, and out-produced.

    A good place to begin discussions is to dump the myths and attend to the facts.

    Your finest hour was towards the end of the Second World War, when the Germans had the finest military, in the sense of the best soldiers.

    The German had also suffered massive casualties and they weren’t any where near as good as they’d been a couple of years earlier.

    The U.S. not only had the advantages of numbers they also had the even bigger advantage of having the Soviet Union to do most of the hard fighting for them.

    Read More
  168. @The Scalpel
    Fred,

    I always thought you meant well, but after your prior sloppy, ill-informed, lazy, hatchet job of an article I cannot take you seriously. It probably doesn't matter to you, but I am probably not the only one.

    I believe that one can disagree with another on facts or interpretation and still hold them in high regard. It is hard to respect a person who is intelligent and capable, but lazy, sloppy, and opinionated.

    I intended to read the above article, but after thinking about it a second or two, I did not read it. I just skipped to comments. For the above stated reasons, I now feel that your opinion is not worth much - not even the time it takes to read your article.

    Why am I writing this? I hope that your previous article was a gross lapse in ability and judgement in submitting it for publication. Maybe with a reality check you will come around. My guess is that you hold yourself in too high a regard and myself in too low a regard to be swayed by anything I write. Still, I have tried.

    And why you wrote such a long review if you have not read? Then you can write and shorter, so did not read the article but do not agree with and against. Then there is if you are such a smart simple idea. How can you judge something without reading about it?

    Read More
  169. […] Vojna sila ne postoji samostalno nego samo u odnosu na specifične okolnosti. Upoređivanje tehničkih specifikacija T-14 sa onima M1A2, ili Su-34 sa F-15, ili brojeve ovoga sa brojevima onoga jeste zanimljiva intelektualna vježba. To ne predstavlja puno s obzirom na specifične okolnosti, piše unz.com […]

    Read More
  170. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Russian scientists have tested unique weapons which neutralize aircraft and high-precision weapons by a directed energy beam.

    YEREVAN (Sputnik) — Russia has developed first radio-electronic weapons system based on so-called new physical principles, a United Instrument Manufacturing Corporation (UIMC) spokesperson told RIA Novosti on Thursday. “Real models of these weapons have been already developed and proven their effectiveness. This is a completely new type of weapon that has no equals either in this country or, we won’t be afraid to say, in the world,” the spokesperson said at the ArmHitec arms and defense technologies exhibition in Armenia.

    Would this be happening, and at this pace, without the U.S. eager indirect contribution (i.e.: proactive bullying)?

    Read More
  171. […] Рид (Fred Reed) Источник: thesaker Оригинал публикации: «An Obsolescent Military» Перевод: […]

    Read More
  172. […] Vojna sila ne postoji samostalno nego samo u odnosu na specifične okolnosti. Upoređivanje tehničkih specifikacija T-14 sa onima M1A2, ili Su-34 sa F-15, ili brojeve ovoga sa brojevima onoga jeste zanimljiva intelektualna vježba. To ne predstavlja puno s obzirom na specifične okolnosti, piše unz.com […]

    Read More
  173. @Anonymous
    The point of our gargantuan military is/are the very issues which it moots--which are precisely all the faults Fred finds with it. In other words, no one else wants to wage conventional wars of aggression precisely because we are preeminent in that domain. So, a lot of trouble is preempted because we carry a big stick. And that nothing is worth something.

    for the sake of gendalf – explain who would want to attack america with conventional forces – so far as you aver that america’s gargantuan military prevents such attack? russia? be assured russia does not care a dead rat’s tail about attacking whatever on this planet. it is too enormous and self-content and self-sufficien, to begin with. And the most peaceful “empire” thru last thousands of years, by orthodox christian doctrine. Chinks? they only want to be left alone, especially on the part of american hawks that proclaim all the globe is their ‘interest’.

    Read More
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