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Barack Obama is the first American president to stand up to the Israel lobby since Dwight Eisenhower ordered Israel to withdraw from Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula in 1956-57.

Freed of re-election concerns and the need for vast amounts of cash, President Obama finally made the decision to put America’s strategic interests ahead of those of Israel by making peace with Iran. This was a huge accomplishment: the United States has waged economic and political warfare against the Islamic Republic since its creation in 1979.

Iran now looks likely to join Cuba in getting paroled from prison. Both refused to bow to Washington and paid a very heavy price that left them semi-crippled economically and isolated.

Unless the Israel lobby and its yes-men in Congress manage to block the nuclear agreement between Iran and major world powers, Tehran will be re-integrated into the world economic system and reassert its regional power. Iran is the world’s fourth largest producer of oil and a principal supplier to China and Japan.

Iran’s gradual return to unrestrained oil exporting may well spook markets that are already facing a severe glut of inventory that has driven down energy prices everywhere. So much for fears of “peak oil.”

It’s now time to begin dispelling the miasma of lies about Iran promoted by neoconservatives and their house media.

First, Iran has never had nuclear weapons, though polls show many Americans believe they did. The same fib factory that spread lies about Iraq’s non-existent nuclear weapons has churned out a steady stream of disinformation about Iran that was as shameless as it was false. Back in 2007, combined US intelligence concluded that Iran was NOT working on a nuclear weapons program. Israel’s intelligence services came to the same conclusion.

But this did not stop Israel’s bombastic prime minister, Bibi Netanyahu, from waging a hysterical, doomsday campaign claiming that Iran was determined to destroy Israel with nuclear weapons – Holocaust II. Americans, and particularly Jewish Americans, swallowed this nonsense promoted by Netanyahu and much of the US media – the same liars who marketed the US war against Iraq.

If Iran indeed had a few nuclear weapons and all-important delivery systems why would it attack Israel? Israel has an indestructible nuclear triad: missiles, aircraft, and most lately German-supplied submarines with nuclear-armed missiles on station in the Arabian and Red Seas. If Iran attacked Israel, its nuclear forces would wipe Iran’s 70 million people off the map.

The idea promoted by Israel that fanatical mullahs in Tehran would commit nuclear hara-kiri just to attack Israel is absurd. The real fanatics with nuclear weapons are more likely found on the outer fringes of Israel’s coalition government who believe God has given them Biblical Israel that they must expand.

As this writer has long said, the real conflict between Israel and Iran was not over nuclear weapons, which Iran does not have, but Palestine. Iran championed the Palestinian cause and demanded Israel quit the occupied West Bank and return the Golan Heights to Syria.

Israel’s foes, Syria and Iraq, had been crushed by American power, as Israel cheered from the sidelines. Egypt had long ago been bought and is now run by a brutal military dictator who is secretly allied to Israel. So too the Saudis, who are petrified their people might ask for the same semi-democratic government that Iran has. Iranians sneer at Saudis as “ignorant Bedouin.”

That leaves Iran as the last significant supporter of a Palestinian state. If Netanyahu could have convinced the US to attack and crush Iran, Israel’s last impediment to annexing the West Bank and Golan, and perhaps expanding into Syria, would have been removed.

We will now see gambling mogul Sheldon Adelson’s fully-owned Republican Party and its media allies, like Fox News, the Wall Street Journal, mount a noisy campaign to block the Vienna deal with Iran. Americans will again be deluged with apocalyptic nonsense about secret Iranian nukes.

Remember George W. Bush’s ludicrous claims about the dangers of supposed Iraqi “drones of death?” Well, here we go again. The same fools who thundered about the dangers of an Iraqi nuclear attack on the US will be trotted out again. A new crop of rented know-nothing Congressmen will warn of the wicked Iranians. Sheldon Adelson’s billions will work wonders.

No one will stop to consider that the oft-cited but rarely read Non-Proliferation Treaty of 1968 that called for the rapid elimination of ALL nuclear weapons in exchange for allowing a few nations to retain nuclear arms for a short period.

Today, the US, Russia, France, Britain and China are all in violation of the NPT for failing to scrap their nuclear weapons. Israel, India, Pakistan and North Korea rejected the NPT.

The Arab states and Iran have long been under NPT inspection. Israel, whose secret nuclear program was begun with help from France and aided by technology and uranium stolen from the United States, has the chutzpah to warn the world about Iran, which has so far only a civilian nuclear energy program. Israel is believed to have 80-100 nuclear warheads – why so many remains an interesting mystery.

US law calls for cutting off aid to any nations that develop nuclear weapons. Congress has, of course, ignored its own law.

When UN nuclear inspectors went into Iraq, over half were believed to be agents from the US and Israel. That’s a primary reason why Iran is resisting inspections of its military sites. Interestingly, Iran was believed to be the leading target of UN nuclear inspectors. In fact, Japan is of even higher interest than Iran. More on this in another column.

ORDER IT NOW

The Vienna deal may well reshuffle the Mideast deck. A return by Iran to economic life will aid and stabilize the region. As America found during the Nixon era, Iran is a natural US ally (or policeman). Washington needs Iran to help stop ISIS, which has the Saudis petrified. Syria is another natural ally for the US. Washington’s self-interest is to shore up the Damascus government rather than trying to destroy it.

Iran is not a supporter of “terrorism,” as Israel’s allies claim. It backs Lebanon’s resistance movement, Hezbollah, that was created, as I witnessed, by Israel’s 1982 invasion of Lebanon. Hamas is no more a terrorist movement than was Israel’s self-defense forces in 1948. Iran’s current role in war-torn Yemen is minor.

Burying the hatchet with Iran is one of the Obama administration’s most sensible moves. The Mideast today is a horrifying mess. The Vienna agreement is hopefully a first step in correcting the monumental errors made by the Bush administration and restoring some sanity to the tortured Mideast.

(Republished from EricMargolis.com by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: Iran, Israel, Israel Lobby 
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  1. Giraldi’s piece on the Neocons from a couple of years ago is worth a read every few months.

    http://original.antiwar.com/giraldi/2013/05/01/kristol-clear/

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  2. Tom_R says:

    IT IS ALL FOR THE JEWISH LOBBY AND ISRAEL.
    WHY DID THE JEWISH LOBBY ALLOW HIM TO APPROVE A DEAL WITH IRAN?

    Obama is owned and operated by his Jewish masters. He is just a Manchurian President. They have his Kenyan birth certificate, ready to bring it out if he strays.

    He appointed Judaists to his cabinet immediately upon winning election, appointed a totally unqualified Judaist (Kagan) to the Supreme Court, to keep destroying the goyim for decades to come (which she did, by lying there is a “right” to “gay marriage”, when there is no such thing) and another to the Fed and paid back his owners and operators a trillion dollars in bailouts and another trillion in (whatever it was called) and helped arms ISIS.

    The openly call him the first Jewish President.

    What he did, I am sure, is approved by his Jewish owners and operators. It may not be what Bibi wanted, but the other Judaists okay’d it, or they may have another trick up their sleeve. Maybe they decided that war with Iran won’t be practical, etc.

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  3. Margolis is Canadian so he may not understand the dynamic of a black guy strutting around with his thumbs in his belt bragging up the deal he got on a Caddy Cimmaron with the mauve trim. As should be obvious by now Obama couldn’t give 2 craps about America’s interest — Iran however is a good bidness opportunity for the globo-capitalist elite. Anyway this post can only increase in unintentional-humor value in the near future

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Eric Margolis is a proud American. As such I'm sure he does fully understand the dynamic of racists like you.
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  4. denk says:

    are we supposed to be popping the champaign even if this is true ?

    whenever the unitedsnake *acts for murkkan interest*, someone, somewhere are gonna suffer. !

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  5. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “As America found during the Nixon era, Iran is a natural US ally (or policeman)… Syria is another natural ally for the US”

    The western world (including its little biatch in the ME) is clearly an ill-wisher of the Muslim world. So if these two countries are natural allies of the west, what does it say about their true faith?

    And, the scum who are ruling in Egpyt, SA, Jordon, etc. Oh, man!!

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  6. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @fast fashion
    Margolis is Canadian so he may not understand the dynamic of a black guy strutting around with his thumbs in his belt bragging up the deal he got on a Caddy Cimmaron with the mauve trim. As should be obvious by now Obama couldn't give 2 craps about America's interest -- Iran however is a good bidness opportunity for the globo-capitalist elite. Anyway this post can only increase in unintentional-humor value in the near future

    Eric Margolis is a proud American. As such I’m sure he does fully understand the dynamic of racists like you.

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  7. eah says:

    In everything he/his administration does?

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  8. 1017286

    .. this was in reply to Tom_R, I might have messed up my first attempt – not aimed at the original author, my apologies if he thought it was.

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  9. Maj. Kong says:

    The deal is designed to aid the Democrats in the next election, nothing more. The GOP has tied itself in knots, because the only option they consider is war. A US-Russia deal to allow the annexation of Crimea in exchange for inspections of sites like Parchin, is unthinkable.

    The Iranians worked with North Korea to put a nuclear reactor in Syria, that is confirmed. I cannot understand why one thinks the Iranians are trustworthy, just because they view the Israelis as the main destabilizing force.

    Iran the “natural ally”, Latins the “Natural Republicans”

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    • Replies: @SolontoCroesus

    The Iranians worked with North Korea to put a nuclear reactor in Syria, that is confirmed.
     
    Show us the docs and evidence.

    Put up or shut up.
    , @Cloak And Dagger

    The Iranians worked with North Korea to put a nuclear reactor in Syria, that is confirmed. I cannot understand why one thinks the Iranians are trustworthy, just because they view the Israelis as the main destabilizing force.
     
    Notwithstanding your unsupported assertion about Iran/North Korea, Obama made clear that this deal was not about "trust", but based on "verification" - so your point about the trustworthiness f Iran is moot. Moreover, trust is relative - and compared to our own trustworthiness and that of Israel, Iran would appear to walk on water.
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  10. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Good article, but Margolis is mistaken about Iranian support for Palestine, as its slogans against America , so has been Iranian support for Palestine, verbal. That’s for the Muslim audience, to win them over. It brands it’s competition as agents of US-Israel, while clandestinely it has relationship with borh.
    Iran wants to be the surrogate for the US in the Mideast. That’s what bothers Israel, who wants be the only interlocutor for the US and regional bully. A sibling rivalry. Obama is smarter than the Republicans and has noted Iran’s collaboration in the occupation of Afghabistan and Iraq. US and Iranian interests intersect in the Middle East which is to squash independent Islamic ambitions.

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  11. I’m eagerly awaiting the next column on the inspections of the Japanese nuclear power program. Given the current state of the Far East, I’d be very disappointed in the Japanese if they didn’t have a secret nuclear weapons program.

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  12. BO has finally earned his Nobel peace prize.

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    • Replies: @Pseudonymic Handle
    Obama opened relations with Myanmar, Cuba and Iran despite stiff opposition. I'll give him that. Whoever will follow him in 2017 will kowtow to Israel.
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  13. ERIC MARGOLIS –is Israel born citizen not Canadian or American.
    USA wants to put Russia out of gas oil business. Iran pipeline to EU. Israel knows this and are just playing the bad cop scene.
    Re : Barack Obama is the first American president to stand up to the Israel lobby
    Pure baloney Iran is being set up to be bombed with the knowledge of Israel. Has Morg forgotten–give the Israel mean dog a bone by Obama– to kneel, more military hardware to Israel as a gift?
    FYI: Iran Libya Syria made deals with USA–remove defenses and Uncle Sam will be nice and trade. It don’t take long Bombs away.

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    • Replies: @Cloak And Dagger
    There is reason to believe that you have a point there, and our government, beholden as it is to Zionist powers, is not to be trusted as it does not have a will of its own. The article at this link argues that the deal is a ploy for a future sabotage:

    http://tinyurl.com/ojl33cf

    If you read the deal, you can't help but come to the conclusion that this deal is bad for Iran. What they get back is the money that was stolen from them in the first place, while subjecting them to intrusive espionage to ensure that they do not have the capability to resist an armed intrusion by US/Israel. I think it is a mistake for Iran to sign this deal. They should have just held their ground, as the sanctions are falling apart all by themselves. Now, like Iraq and Libya, they have disarmed themselves, and exposed their underbelly to attack.

    It is a pity that a noble civilization that has existed for millennia, and has not attacked anyone in my lifetime, while having to lose lives and treasure defending itself from Iraq, whom we instigated to attack them, and whose democratic leader we deposed to replace with our zio-friendly Shah, must finally fall by our sword wielded by the hateful state of Israel. However, unlike Iraq and Libya, Iran is no walkover, and there is a good chance that Israel will go down with it - nukes or no nukes.

    Some geopolitical analysts have over-emphasized Brzezinski’s role in recent US foreign policy gambits, even today portraying him as the ‘master strategist’ behind the Obama presidency. This effort appears designed to assist disinformation intended to shift attention and focus from Israel and US-based Jewish Zionists who are the driving force, and indeed the ideological godfathers, behind neoconservatism itself.[24] While Brzezinski and other US foreign policy “realists” are contemptible in their own right, the ever more adventurous and militant Jewish-Zionist faction of the elite appears to have sidelined the likes of Brzezinski and other “traditional” US imperialist types. The analysts who do this should perhaps be scrutinized for undisclosed sympathies with Israel and Zionism.

    All in all, it is incontestable that the US and Israel are the foremost belligerents, aggressors and destabilizers throughout the world. These imperial forces relentlessly target countries like Iran that simply seeks to exercise its right to self-determination. This self-evident truth is plainly discernable and hidden in open view if one took the care to read through the hubristic musings of imperial-oriented think tanks that have set the West on an endless warpath towards Armageddon.
     
    An ancient Chinese curse: may you live in interesting times.
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  14. I’ve been rude about Mr Margolis’s loose journos’ pub talk in the past but I think he’s pretty sound here if not necessarily perfectly correct about motives.

    And I’m not so sure about Iran not seeking to make nuclear weapons because it makes good sense for them to have them in the light of local geography and history – including US and Russian (or Soviet) actions in their neighbourhood.

    As someone has pointed out Iran may be no particular friend of the Palestinians but Iran is now probably the most potent opposition to Israel’s complete takeover of the whole of the original mandated Palestine (though Israel must still be wondering if it can get back to pre-Erdogan relations with Turkey). At all events it looks as though Netanyahu’s fury may have something to do both with the West Bank and the Golan Heights. On tour in Israel hearing someone significantly representative say “I don’t call them settlements: I call them Israeli towns” and also “there will only be peace when the Palestinians are defeated and accept that they have been defeated” means that I have reason to suppose there is a large constituency in Israel for something like a one state with Bantustans solution if Palestinians can’t be totally expelled: possibly about the 30 something per cent that voted Hitler, Allende and, for that matter, a lot of more respectable leaders into office. So yes, I am willing to believe that Netanyahu’s major objections may have to do with Palestine. Tbc

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  15. War for Blair Mountain [AKA "Great Battle for Blair Mountain"] says:

    The Kenyan Foriegner does not work on behalf of NATIVE BORN WHITE AMERICAN racial interests.

    The $$$$$$$$$$ and other resources that would have been used to destroy Iran are now going to be used to go to war with Russia.

    If Israel attacks Russia….massive disruption of Middle East energy production. Europe will depend on Russian energy supplies…Russia wins!!!!!

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    • Replies: @Janos Sandor
    Are you clueless? Russia is one of Israel's closest partners and Russia only seldomly condems it; there are also over 1 million Russian-born, Russian-speaking Israelis and Israel just increased exports to Russia as a result of the sanctions. Russia also has a very large ammount of jewish oligarchs aligned with Putin such as Fradikov or Abramovich).
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  16. Hrw-500 says:

    Seems then Michael Snyder is more pessimist about that from what I read on his blog. http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/why-israel-is-going-to-bomb-iran (As I wrote seems then his site is down, however his blog post is also reposted on Infowars and BeforeIt’sNews)

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  17. The biggest problem Israel has with Iran is that Iran supports Syria and Hezbollah. Which in turn prevents Lebanon from being invaded by Israel. Which prior to 2008 occurred on a routine basis as (more or less) realistic military exercises under live fire. But ever since Iran effectively trained and armed Hezbollah defense forces, Israel is no longer able to invade Lebanon on a whelm without suffering major casualties that Israelis will not support. As was made evident by the weeping, wailing, and gnashing of teeth among Israelis following the pell-mell retreat of IDF forces out of Lebanon after being defeated by Hezbollah defense forces in 2008.

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    • Replies: @Cloak And Dagger
    I would argue that the biggest problem Israel has with Iran is that it threatens its hegemony in the Middle East. Should Iran acquire nukes (unlikely that they desire this), it would neuter Israel's only leverage of being the sole nuclear power in the region with constant threats of the Sampson option (a veritable sword of Damocles, hanging over those who wield nukes).

    An equally large (perhaps even larger threat, now that I think about it) is the fact that they risk losing the monogamous relationship with the US that has allowed them to invade their neighbors with impunity, safe in the knowledge that the US would dispense its own blood and treasure to defend Israel should those adventures misfire. It is a lot like the dipshit with no strength of their own, who swaggers through bars talking trash, with the expectation that their big brother will defend them if their behavior causes retaliation.

    The only real-life war training Israel's armed forces get are against unarmed Palestinian civilians, and as a consequence, their estimation of their military might (conventional) is grossly over rated. Their much-vaunted Merkava tanks were decimated in the Lebanon war, and their troops sent scurrying back with their tail between their legs, fighting Hezbollah's guerrilla forces. The latter is now reputed to have enhanced their fighting capabilities even more and has 80,000 missiles trained on Tel Aviv - enough to melt that city into glass, should Israel attack Lebanon again.

    Israel depends on the US to fight its wars. With the rapprochement with Iran, that option goes away. This is Israel's scariest nightmare, and explains the desperation with which they are resisting the deal.

    Now that the UN Security Council has endorsed the deal, the real fireworks are about to begin.
    , @Carroll Price
    http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/07/21/us-sanctions-hezbollah-idUSKCN0PV25J20150721
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  18. schmenz says:

    It seems to me that one of the winners in this con game is Mr Netanyahu. Since the USA knows that Iran has no intention whatsoever to produce nuclear weapons, and since Israel (via its intelligence agencies) knows the same thing, this agreement calls for Iran to stop doing what it never intended on doing.

    But Mr Netanyahu screams and foams at the mouth and tears his hair out over Iran anyway, even though he is perfectly aware Iran is not suicidal and would never attack nuclear-armed Israel with weapons it has no intention of creating. The Netanyahu screamfest is therefore a ruse, in my opinion, designed to extract even more billions out of the wallets of US taxpayers and – sure enough – Mr Obama is rushing to assure him that dollars and weapons will be showered upon Israel if they will kindly accept the phony deal.

    There is a legal term for that sort of Israeli behavior.

    Contra Mr Margolis, I don’t see this as Obama acting in America’s interests. Israel’s, yes; America’s, I doubt it.

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    • Replies: @Carroll Price
    You are correct. The US is already falling all over itself to provide Israel with the latest and greatest weapons available to anyone. So, Netanyahu's temper tantrums may be nothing more than a ploy to extract additional treasure from the American taxpayer. The below linked article states that the weapons will be "sold" to Israel, but you and I both know they will be delivered on-time and free of charge.
    http://www.jpost.com/Israel-News/US-approves-munitions-sale-to-Israel-worth-187b-403706
    , @Wizard of Oz
    "Knows" is a big word when you say the US "knows" Iran has no intention of producing nuclear weapons. Two points.

    When you decide to act on what you think you know you are really, if rational and worldly, acting only on your best assessment of the probabilities and weighing the consequences of being wrong.

    Second, you need to factor in the good reasons why Iran should want to have or be able to produce nuclear weapons. Those reasons don't disappear because Israel could wipe the country off the map if Iran scared it enough.
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  19. Moi says:

    Margolis: “Iran now looks likely to join Cuba in getting paroled from prison. Both refused to bow to Washington and paid a very heavy price that left them semi-crippled economically and isolated.”

    We strong-armed Iran like a bully. We would not have gotten away with it if Russia and China had vetoed the sanction in the UNSC. I would hope both those countries are wiser now that the US is tightening the military noose around them.

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  20. KA says:

    Eric is trying hard to see some silver linings ,to receive some genuine honest good tidings.
    But it is difficult to believe American politics . It is not impossible to think that in 6 years when Putin is gone and Iran’s elites are bought and paid through the new entanglements made possible by this deal, both countries would be ready for picking and ripping apart.
    Saudis are also buying time only for few more years. Once Iran is gone ,it will be dealt with the way Syria,Iraq,Libya were . The plan is in the original bookshelf owned by Wolfowitz and is in the power point slides in Pentagon. Islam also like Christianity will be decoupled from social,ethical.moral,responsibilities and would be asked to get divided on sex and punishment or gender change to remain visible .

    As Saddam was charged for gassing Kurds some 16 yrs after the knowledge , so would be Saudis for sponsoring terrorism years after those had become known .

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  21. @george Archers
    ERIC MARGOLIS --is Israel born citizen not Canadian or American.
    USA wants to put Russia out of gas oil business. Iran pipeline to EU. Israel knows this and are just playing the bad cop scene.
    Re : Barack Obama is the first American president to stand up to the Israel lobby
    Pure baloney Iran is being set up to be bombed with the knowledge of Israel. Has Morg forgotten--give the Israel mean dog a bone by Obama-- to kneel, more military hardware to Israel as a gift?
    FYI: Iran Libya Syria made deals with USA--remove defenses and Uncle Sam will be nice and trade. It don't take long Bombs away.

    There is reason to believe that you have a point there, and our government, beholden as it is to Zionist powers, is not to be trusted as it does not have a will of its own. The article at this link argues that the deal is a ploy for a future sabotage:

    http://tinyurl.com/ojl33cf

    If you read the deal, you can’t help but come to the conclusion that this deal is bad for Iran. What they get back is the money that was stolen from them in the first place, while subjecting them to intrusive espionage to ensure that they do not have the capability to resist an armed intrusion by US/Israel. I think it is a mistake for Iran to sign this deal. They should have just held their ground, as the sanctions are falling apart all by themselves. Now, like Iraq and Libya, they have disarmed themselves, and exposed their underbelly to attack.

    It is a pity that a noble civilization that has existed for millennia, and has not attacked anyone in my lifetime, while having to lose lives and treasure defending itself from Iraq, whom we instigated to attack them, and whose democratic leader we deposed to replace with our zio-friendly Shah, must finally fall by our sword wielded by the hateful state of Israel. However, unlike Iraq and Libya, Iran is no walkover, and there is a good chance that Israel will go down with it – nukes or no nukes.

    Some geopolitical analysts have over-emphasized Brzezinski’s role in recent US foreign policy gambits, even today portraying him as the ‘master strategist’ behind the Obama presidency. This effort appears designed to assist disinformation intended to shift attention and focus from Israel and US-based Jewish Zionists who are the driving force, and indeed the ideological godfathers, behind neoconservatism itself.[24] While Brzezinski and other US foreign policy “realists” are contemptible in their own right, the ever more adventurous and militant Jewish-Zionist faction of the elite appears to have sidelined the likes of Brzezinski and other “traditional” US imperialist types. The analysts who do this should perhaps be scrutinized for undisclosed sympathies with Israel and Zionism.

    All in all, it is incontestable that the US and Israel are the foremost belligerents, aggressors and destabilizers throughout the world. These imperial forces relentlessly target countries like Iran that simply seeks to exercise its right to self-determination. This self-evident truth is plainly discernable and hidden in open view if one took the care to read through the hubristic musings of imperial-oriented think tanks that have set the West on an endless warpath towards Armageddon.

    An ancient Chinese curse: may you live in interesting times.

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    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
    Rhetoric about "a noble civilisation that has existed for millenia [and is identified as the one which] hasn't attacked anyone in my lifetime" is a pity because such unmitigated nonsense (I mean the civilisation, singular, which is noble and existed for millenia) destroys the authority of your point of view and the strength of your argument.
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  22. Assuming nothing very alarming or damaging to peace occurs in the next few months the biggest change could be in the supply of oil. It’strange that neither Margolis nor a Commenter has mentioned this. Given the already low price of oil by the standards of recent years when fracking became viable the effects of Iranian production and exports could be huge at the margin.

    Who the winners and losers will be is probably as important as anything else resulting from the deal with Iran. Any reasoned opinions?

    My guess is that it will be particularly good for India but also generally good for world economic growth and trade. It may finally put an end to Venezuela’s leftist regime….

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  23. @Carroll Price
    The biggest problem Israel has with Iran is that Iran supports Syria and Hezbollah. Which in turn prevents Lebanon from being invaded by Israel. Which prior to 2008 occurred on a routine basis as (more or less) realistic military exercises under live fire. But ever since Iran effectively trained and armed Hezbollah defense forces, Israel is no longer able to invade Lebanon on a whelm without suffering major casualties that Israelis will not support. As was made evident by the weeping, wailing, and gnashing of teeth among Israelis following the pell-mell retreat of IDF forces out of Lebanon after being defeated by Hezbollah defense forces in 2008.

    I would argue that the biggest problem Israel has with Iran is that it threatens its hegemony in the Middle East. Should Iran acquire nukes (unlikely that they desire this), it would neuter Israel’s only leverage of being the sole nuclear power in the region with constant threats of the Sampson option (a veritable sword of Damocles, hanging over those who wield nukes).

    An equally large (perhaps even larger threat, now that I think about it) is the fact that they risk losing the monogamous relationship with the US that has allowed them to invade their neighbors with impunity, safe in the knowledge that the US would dispense its own blood and treasure to defend Israel should those adventures misfire. It is a lot like the dipshit with no strength of their own, who swaggers through bars talking trash, with the expectation that their big brother will defend them if their behavior causes retaliation.

    The only real-life war training Israel’s armed forces get are against unarmed Palestinian civilians, and as a consequence, their estimation of their military might (conventional) is grossly over rated. Their much-vaunted Merkava tanks were decimated in the Lebanon war, and their troops sent scurrying back with their tail between their legs, fighting Hezbollah’s guerrilla forces. The latter is now reputed to have enhanced their fighting capabilities even more and has 80,000 missiles trained on Tel Aviv – enough to melt that city into glass, should Israel attack Lebanon again.

    Israel depends on the US to fight its wars. With the rapprochement with Iran, that option goes away. This is Israel’s scariest nightmare, and explains the desperation with which they are resisting the deal.

    Now that the UN Security Council has endorsed the deal, the real fireworks are about to begin.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SolontoCroesus
    Right on the cMark, Cloak and Dagger.

    Netanyahu's continued braying about the "windfall" Iranians would receive as a result of sanctions relief convinced me that Israelis are less interested in poking their noses into Iran's military business than they are scared out of their dress-up soldier-panties that Iran will fortify Hezbollah and Hamas.

    (nb. the "windfall" to Iran, which Israelis and their minions frame as if it is some US taxpayer gift similar to those that Israel extorts from US, is in reality Iran's own money that US & EU have conspired to hold back from Iran.)

    I was sure that the "intrusive inspections" clauses were sops to Israelis who are inveterate spies and had been accustomed to unfettered access to Iran's financial, military and weapons procurement affairs.

    It remains a deep concern that Iran will remain under the gun of US predatory capitalists; and that the IAEA has been subverted to serve the interests of the banksters -- Yukiya Amano is tucked securely into US pockets.

    In a reprise of its World War II - era German and Japanese Village project in the Utah desert at Dugway,


    The US government built "a secret replica of Iran’s nuclear facilities" deep in the forests of Tennessee to gain an edge in its negotiations with Iran, reports The New York Times.

    This "Manhattan Project in reverse" is situated on the grounds of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It uses placeholder centrifuges meant to represent Iranian equipment — an assembly that including centrifuges once belonging to Libya's disbanded nuclear program.
    http://www.businessinsider.com/the-us-built-a-secret-replica-of-irans-nuclear-facilities-to-help-gain-an-edge-in-nuclear-talks-2015-4#ixzz3gSC4gLlC
     

    It appears that the IAEA leaked "volumes of documents" to enable the construction of that Iranian replica facility --

    without, but presuming upon, Dr. Dan Joyner's permission, here's the entire posting he made on his website, armscontrollaw.com, on March 17, 2015:


    " LA Times Reports the IAEA is Unlawfully Sharing Safeguards Information with the U.S. Government

    Posted: March 17, 2015 | Author: Dan Joyner | Filed under: Nuclear |2 Comments
    I saw this story in the LA Times from yesterday, entitled “Top-Secret U.S. Replica of Iran Nuclear Sites Key to Weapons Deal.” After talking with friends, the paragraph that strikes me most in this story is this one, with my added emphasis:


    U.S. officials won’t comment on the classified research, which is being conducted at an undisclosed location in the United States. But former officials and private analysts say American agencies have constructed models of the Iranian facilities, relying on informants in Iran, information from foreign governments and voluminous data about Iran’s program collected by the International Atomic Energy Agency, or IAEA, the United Nations’ nuclear watchdog.
     
    So to cut to the chase, this new replica enrichment facility – which I can’t help thinking of as a Madurodam* for US nuclear engineers (“Bill, look at the little Iranian nuclear scientist, he’s going into the centrifuge hall. And look, there’s a little Mossad figure on a motorcycle outside, waiting to kill him when he goes home from work.”). Ok, that got too tangential and too weird to continue. Let’s start that sentence again.

    So to cut to the chase, this new replica enrichment facility that the US has built, was based inter alia on “voluminous data” that the US obtained from the IAEA. What?!? But Article 5(b) of the Iran’s comprehensive safeguards agreement with the IAEA provides that:


    The Agency shall not publish or communicate to any State, organization or person any information obtained by it in connection with the implementation of this Agreement . . .
     
    So how did the US government get this “voluminous data” from the IAEA? And isn’t it not OK that this happened?

    This isn’t the first time that concerns have been raised about the IAEA’s inability to keep confidential information obtained through safeguards implementation in Iran. Iranian officials have complained of exactly this sort of thing happening before. And, coincidentally, the IAEA just today released a statement by Iran communicated to the agency, which on page 3 contains an entire section devoted to expressing Iran’s concerns about the IAEA’s inability to keep information gained through safeguards implementation confidential.

    But while it isn’t the first time these concerns have been raised by Iran, it is the first time I know of that a major news outlet has reported this inappropriate information sharing by the IAEA as a fact.

    If what the LA Times has reported is accurate, then it’s hard to see how this isn’t a serious violation by the IAEA of its safeguards agreement with Iran. Maybe there are other explanations for how the US government got this information from the IAEA, that don’t involve bad faith by the IAEA. I don’t know. But I can’t think of any off the top of my head.

    Suspicions of arms control inspection agencies being used as tools of Western espionage are not new. Allegations of this type are basically what killed UNSCOM, the first incarnation of the UN’s arms control inspection agency in Iraq after the first gulf war.

    It is an absolute imperative for the IAEA to be seen as above reproach when it comes to its ability to keep confidential information obtained through safeguards implementation. If it is not so perceived, its credibility as an independent monitoring and verification body, and its effectiveness in performing this role, will be seriously undermined. [emphasis added] "
     

    ---
    , @Wizard of Oz
    Sorry to quibble again but words matter. How can you justify the word "hegemony" in describing Israel's actual or potential place or role in the Middle East?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  24. @Maj. Kong
    The deal is designed to aid the Democrats in the next election, nothing more. The GOP has tied itself in knots, because the only option they consider is war. A US-Russia deal to allow the annexation of Crimea in exchange for inspections of sites like Parchin, is unthinkable.

    The Iranians worked with North Korea to put a nuclear reactor in Syria, that is confirmed. I cannot understand why one thinks the Iranians are trustworthy, just because they view the Israelis as the main destabilizing force.

    Iran the "natural ally", Latins the "Natural Republicans"

    The Iranians worked with North Korea to put a nuclear reactor in Syria, that is confirmed.

    Show us the docs and evidence.

    Put up or shut up.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cloak And Dagger

    Show us the docs and evidence.
     
    Exactly. This is a common hasbara ploy to shotgun a set of assertions and then argue some point premised on that. I have seen this on so many sites, and every time someone challenges the source of the assertion, there is seldom a response, or when there is one, it is often a citation to someone else making the same unsupported assertion.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  25. @SolontoCroesus

    The Iranians worked with North Korea to put a nuclear reactor in Syria, that is confirmed.
     
    Show us the docs and evidence.

    Put up or shut up.

    Show us the docs and evidence.

    Exactly. This is a common hasbara ploy to shotgun a set of assertions and then argue some point premised on that. I have seen this on so many sites, and every time someone challenges the source of the assertion, there is seldom a response, or when there is one, it is often a citation to someone else making the same unsupported assertion.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  26. @Maj. Kong
    The deal is designed to aid the Democrats in the next election, nothing more. The GOP has tied itself in knots, because the only option they consider is war. A US-Russia deal to allow the annexation of Crimea in exchange for inspections of sites like Parchin, is unthinkable.

    The Iranians worked with North Korea to put a nuclear reactor in Syria, that is confirmed. I cannot understand why one thinks the Iranians are trustworthy, just because they view the Israelis as the main destabilizing force.

    Iran the "natural ally", Latins the "Natural Republicans"

    The Iranians worked with North Korea to put a nuclear reactor in Syria, that is confirmed. I cannot understand why one thinks the Iranians are trustworthy, just because they view the Israelis as the main destabilizing force.

    Notwithstanding your unsupported assertion about Iran/North Korea, Obama made clear that this deal was not about “trust”, but based on “verification” – so your point about the trustworthiness f Iran is moot. Moreover, trust is relative – and compared to our own trustworthiness and that of Israel, Iran would appear to walk on water.

    Read More
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  27. @Cloak And Dagger
    I would argue that the biggest problem Israel has with Iran is that it threatens its hegemony in the Middle East. Should Iran acquire nukes (unlikely that they desire this), it would neuter Israel's only leverage of being the sole nuclear power in the region with constant threats of the Sampson option (a veritable sword of Damocles, hanging over those who wield nukes).

    An equally large (perhaps even larger threat, now that I think about it) is the fact that they risk losing the monogamous relationship with the US that has allowed them to invade their neighbors with impunity, safe in the knowledge that the US would dispense its own blood and treasure to defend Israel should those adventures misfire. It is a lot like the dipshit with no strength of their own, who swaggers through bars talking trash, with the expectation that their big brother will defend them if their behavior causes retaliation.

    The only real-life war training Israel's armed forces get are against unarmed Palestinian civilians, and as a consequence, their estimation of their military might (conventional) is grossly over rated. Their much-vaunted Merkava tanks were decimated in the Lebanon war, and their troops sent scurrying back with their tail between their legs, fighting Hezbollah's guerrilla forces. The latter is now reputed to have enhanced their fighting capabilities even more and has 80,000 missiles trained on Tel Aviv - enough to melt that city into glass, should Israel attack Lebanon again.

    Israel depends on the US to fight its wars. With the rapprochement with Iran, that option goes away. This is Israel's scariest nightmare, and explains the desperation with which they are resisting the deal.

    Now that the UN Security Council has endorsed the deal, the real fireworks are about to begin.

    Right on the cMark, Cloak and Dagger.

    Netanyahu’s continued braying about the “windfall” Iranians would receive as a result of sanctions relief convinced me that Israelis are less interested in poking their noses into Iran’s military business than they are scared out of their dress-up soldier-panties that Iran will fortify Hezbollah and Hamas.

    (nb. the “windfall” to Iran, which Israelis and their minions frame as if it is some US taxpayer gift similar to those that Israel extorts from US, is in reality Iran’s own money that US & EU have conspired to hold back from Iran.)

    I was sure that the “intrusive inspections” clauses were sops to Israelis who are inveterate spies and had been accustomed to unfettered access to Iran’s financial, military and weapons procurement affairs.

    It remains a deep concern that Iran will remain under the gun of US predatory capitalists; and that the IAEA has been subverted to serve the interests of the banksters — Yukiya Amano is tucked securely into US pockets.

    In a reprise of its World War II – era German and Japanese Village project in the Utah desert at Dugway,

    The US government built “a secret replica of Iran’s nuclear facilities” deep in the forests of Tennessee to gain an edge in its negotiations with Iran, reports The New York Times.

    This “Manhattan Project in reverse” is situated on the grounds of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It uses placeholder centrifuges meant to represent Iranian equipment — an assembly that including centrifuges once belonging to Libya’s disbanded nuclear program.

    http://www.businessinsider.com/the-us-built-a-secret-replica-of-irans-nuclear-facilities-to-help-gain-an-edge-in-nuclear-talks-2015-4#ixzz3gSC4gLlC

    It appears that the IAEA leaked “volumes of documents” to enable the construction of that Iranian replica facility –

    without, but presuming upon, Dr. Dan Joyner’s permission, here’s the entire posting he made on his website, armscontrollaw.com, on March 17, 2015:

    LA Times Reports the IAEA is Unlawfully Sharing Safeguards Information with the U.S. Government

    Posted: March 17, 2015 | Author: Dan Joyner | Filed under: Nuclear |2 Comments
    I saw this story in the LA Times from yesterday, entitled “Top-Secret U.S. Replica of Iran Nuclear Sites Key to Weapons Deal.” After talking with friends, the paragraph that strikes me most in this story is this one, with my added emphasis:

    U.S. officials won’t comment on the classified research, which is being conducted at an undisclosed location in the United States. But former officials and private analysts say American agencies have constructed models of the Iranian facilities, relying on informants in Iran, information from foreign governments and voluminous data about Iran’s program collected by the International Atomic Energy Agency, or IAEA, the United Nations’ nuclear watchdog.

    So to cut to the chase, this new replica enrichment facility – which I can’t help thinking of as a Madurodam* for US nuclear engineers (“Bill, look at the little Iranian nuclear scientist, he’s going into the centrifuge hall. And look, there’s a little Mossad figure on a motorcycle outside, waiting to kill him when he goes home from work.”). Ok, that got too tangential and too weird to continue. Let’s start that sentence again.

    So to cut to the chase, this new replica enrichment facility that the US has built, was based inter alia on “voluminous data” that the US obtained from the IAEA. What?!? But Article 5(b) of the Iran’s comprehensive safeguards agreement with the IAEA provides that:

    The Agency shall not publish or communicate to any State, organization or person any information obtained by it in connection with the implementation of this Agreement . . .

    So how did the US government get this “voluminous data” from the IAEA? And isn’t it not OK that this happened?

    This isn’t the first time that concerns have been raised about the IAEA’s inability to keep confidential information obtained through safeguards implementation in Iran. Iranian officials have complained of exactly this sort of thing happening before. And, coincidentally, the IAEA just today released a statement by Iran communicated to the agency, which on page 3 contains an entire section devoted to expressing Iran’s concerns about the IAEA’s inability to keep information gained through safeguards implementation confidential.

    But while it isn’t the first time these concerns have been raised by Iran, it is the first time I know of that a major news outlet has reported this inappropriate information sharing by the IAEA as a fact.

    If what the LA Times has reported is accurate, then it’s hard to see how this isn’t a serious violation by the IAEA of its safeguards agreement with Iran. Maybe there are other explanations for how the US government got this information from the IAEA, that don’t involve bad faith by the IAEA. I don’t know. But I can’t think of any off the top of my head.

    Suspicions of arms control inspection agencies being used as tools of Western espionage are not new. Allegations of this type are basically what killed UNSCOM, the first incarnation of the UN’s arms control inspection agency in Iraq after the first gulf war.

    It is an absolute imperative for the IAEA to be seen as above reproach when it comes to its ability to keep confidential information obtained through safeguards implementation. If it is not so perceived, its credibility as an independent monitoring and verification body, and its effectiveness in performing this role, will be seriously undermined. [emphasis added] “

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cloak And Dagger
    An excellent point and a reason to distrust the IAEA as another spying front. In recent memory, the Stuxnet virus unleashed on Iranian reactors required someone to physically insert a USB thumb drive into the control computers in order to unleash the virus. This had to have happened by Mossad/CIA personnel who had access to the site - most likely under cover of the IAEA, who would be one of the rare foreign individuals that could inspect the reactors. Is it a surprise, then, that IAEA access to Iranian sites, specifically military ones, are regarded with suspicion?

    Incidentally, the jury is still out as to whether the Fukushima reactors were accidentally infected by the Stuxnet virus.
    , @Carroll Price
    "But while it isn’t the first time these concerns have been raised by Iran, it is the first time I know of that a major news outlet has reported this inappropriate information sharing by the IAEA as a fact."

    You make several excellent points. With your above quoted statement perhaps going a long way in explaining why two of the rogue nations (Israel and N. Korea) who clandestinely developed nuclear weapons never bothered signing on to the non-proliferation agreement, which would have opened them to IAEA inspectors.

    , @Wizard of Oz
    It would be disappointing for civis Americanus if his Emperor's soothsayers and readers of entrails didn't know what the IAEA knew but to brag about it: that's incompetence.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  28. @schmenz
    It seems to me that one of the winners in this con game is Mr Netanyahu. Since the USA knows that Iran has no intention whatsoever to produce nuclear weapons, and since Israel (via its intelligence agencies) knows the same thing, this agreement calls for Iran to stop doing what it never intended on doing.

    But Mr Netanyahu screams and foams at the mouth and tears his hair out over Iran anyway, even though he is perfectly aware Iran is not suicidal and would never attack nuclear-armed Israel with weapons it has no intention of creating. The Netanyahu screamfest is therefore a ruse, in my opinion, designed to extract even more billions out of the wallets of US taxpayers and - sure enough - Mr Obama is rushing to assure him that dollars and weapons will be showered upon Israel if they will kindly accept the phony deal.

    There is a legal term for that sort of Israeli behavior.

    Contra Mr Margolis, I don't see this as Obama acting in America's interests. Israel's, yes; America's, I doubt it.

    You are correct. The US is already falling all over itself to provide Israel with the latest and greatest weapons available to anyone. So, Netanyahu’s temper tantrums may be nothing more than a ploy to extract additional treasure from the American taxpayer. The below linked article states that the weapons will be “sold” to Israel, but you and I both know they will be delivered on-time and free of charge.

    http://www.jpost.com/Israel-News/US-approves-munitions-sale-to-Israel-worth-187b-403706

    Read More
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  29. @SolontoCroesus
    Right on the cMark, Cloak and Dagger.

    Netanyahu's continued braying about the "windfall" Iranians would receive as a result of sanctions relief convinced me that Israelis are less interested in poking their noses into Iran's military business than they are scared out of their dress-up soldier-panties that Iran will fortify Hezbollah and Hamas.

    (nb. the "windfall" to Iran, which Israelis and their minions frame as if it is some US taxpayer gift similar to those that Israel extorts from US, is in reality Iran's own money that US & EU have conspired to hold back from Iran.)

    I was sure that the "intrusive inspections" clauses were sops to Israelis who are inveterate spies and had been accustomed to unfettered access to Iran's financial, military and weapons procurement affairs.

    It remains a deep concern that Iran will remain under the gun of US predatory capitalists; and that the IAEA has been subverted to serve the interests of the banksters -- Yukiya Amano is tucked securely into US pockets.

    In a reprise of its World War II - era German and Japanese Village project in the Utah desert at Dugway,


    The US government built "a secret replica of Iran’s nuclear facilities" deep in the forests of Tennessee to gain an edge in its negotiations with Iran, reports The New York Times.

    This "Manhattan Project in reverse" is situated on the grounds of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It uses placeholder centrifuges meant to represent Iranian equipment — an assembly that including centrifuges once belonging to Libya's disbanded nuclear program.
    http://www.businessinsider.com/the-us-built-a-secret-replica-of-irans-nuclear-facilities-to-help-gain-an-edge-in-nuclear-talks-2015-4#ixzz3gSC4gLlC
     

    It appears that the IAEA leaked "volumes of documents" to enable the construction of that Iranian replica facility --

    without, but presuming upon, Dr. Dan Joyner's permission, here's the entire posting he made on his website, armscontrollaw.com, on March 17, 2015:


    " LA Times Reports the IAEA is Unlawfully Sharing Safeguards Information with the U.S. Government

    Posted: March 17, 2015 | Author: Dan Joyner | Filed under: Nuclear |2 Comments
    I saw this story in the LA Times from yesterday, entitled “Top-Secret U.S. Replica of Iran Nuclear Sites Key to Weapons Deal.” After talking with friends, the paragraph that strikes me most in this story is this one, with my added emphasis:


    U.S. officials won’t comment on the classified research, which is being conducted at an undisclosed location in the United States. But former officials and private analysts say American agencies have constructed models of the Iranian facilities, relying on informants in Iran, information from foreign governments and voluminous data about Iran’s program collected by the International Atomic Energy Agency, or IAEA, the United Nations’ nuclear watchdog.
     
    So to cut to the chase, this new replica enrichment facility – which I can’t help thinking of as a Madurodam* for US nuclear engineers (“Bill, look at the little Iranian nuclear scientist, he’s going into the centrifuge hall. And look, there’s a little Mossad figure on a motorcycle outside, waiting to kill him when he goes home from work.”). Ok, that got too tangential and too weird to continue. Let’s start that sentence again.

    So to cut to the chase, this new replica enrichment facility that the US has built, was based inter alia on “voluminous data” that the US obtained from the IAEA. What?!? But Article 5(b) of the Iran’s comprehensive safeguards agreement with the IAEA provides that:


    The Agency shall not publish or communicate to any State, organization or person any information obtained by it in connection with the implementation of this Agreement . . .
     
    So how did the US government get this “voluminous data” from the IAEA? And isn’t it not OK that this happened?

    This isn’t the first time that concerns have been raised about the IAEA’s inability to keep confidential information obtained through safeguards implementation in Iran. Iranian officials have complained of exactly this sort of thing happening before. And, coincidentally, the IAEA just today released a statement by Iran communicated to the agency, which on page 3 contains an entire section devoted to expressing Iran’s concerns about the IAEA’s inability to keep information gained through safeguards implementation confidential.

    But while it isn’t the first time these concerns have been raised by Iran, it is the first time I know of that a major news outlet has reported this inappropriate information sharing by the IAEA as a fact.

    If what the LA Times has reported is accurate, then it’s hard to see how this isn’t a serious violation by the IAEA of its safeguards agreement with Iran. Maybe there are other explanations for how the US government got this information from the IAEA, that don’t involve bad faith by the IAEA. I don’t know. But I can’t think of any off the top of my head.

    Suspicions of arms control inspection agencies being used as tools of Western espionage are not new. Allegations of this type are basically what killed UNSCOM, the first incarnation of the UN’s arms control inspection agency in Iraq after the first gulf war.

    It is an absolute imperative for the IAEA to be seen as above reproach when it comes to its ability to keep confidential information obtained through safeguards implementation. If it is not so perceived, its credibility as an independent monitoring and verification body, and its effectiveness in performing this role, will be seriously undermined. [emphasis added] "
     

    ---

    An excellent point and a reason to distrust the IAEA as another spying front. In recent memory, the Stuxnet virus unleashed on Iranian reactors required someone to physically insert a USB thumb drive into the control computers in order to unleash the virus. This had to have happened by Mossad/CIA personnel who had access to the site – most likely under cover of the IAEA, who would be one of the rare foreign individuals that could inspect the reactors. Is it a surprise, then, that IAEA access to Iranian sites, specifically military ones, are regarded with suspicion?

    Incidentally, the jury is still out as to whether the Fukushima reactors were accidentally infected by the Stuxnet virus.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
    Never heard of the Stuxnet/Fukushima rumour. Where does that come from. It seems unlikely that anything requiring the disciplined brainpower of the Stuxnet operation would suffer such egregious accidents in an irrelevant and distant company coincidentally with an unprecedented earthquake.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  30. @SolontoCroesus
    Right on the cMark, Cloak and Dagger.

    Netanyahu's continued braying about the "windfall" Iranians would receive as a result of sanctions relief convinced me that Israelis are less interested in poking their noses into Iran's military business than they are scared out of their dress-up soldier-panties that Iran will fortify Hezbollah and Hamas.

    (nb. the "windfall" to Iran, which Israelis and their minions frame as if it is some US taxpayer gift similar to those that Israel extorts from US, is in reality Iran's own money that US & EU have conspired to hold back from Iran.)

    I was sure that the "intrusive inspections" clauses were sops to Israelis who are inveterate spies and had been accustomed to unfettered access to Iran's financial, military and weapons procurement affairs.

    It remains a deep concern that Iran will remain under the gun of US predatory capitalists; and that the IAEA has been subverted to serve the interests of the banksters -- Yukiya Amano is tucked securely into US pockets.

    In a reprise of its World War II - era German and Japanese Village project in the Utah desert at Dugway,


    The US government built "a secret replica of Iran’s nuclear facilities" deep in the forests of Tennessee to gain an edge in its negotiations with Iran, reports The New York Times.

    This "Manhattan Project in reverse" is situated on the grounds of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It uses placeholder centrifuges meant to represent Iranian equipment — an assembly that including centrifuges once belonging to Libya's disbanded nuclear program.
    http://www.businessinsider.com/the-us-built-a-secret-replica-of-irans-nuclear-facilities-to-help-gain-an-edge-in-nuclear-talks-2015-4#ixzz3gSC4gLlC
     

    It appears that the IAEA leaked "volumes of documents" to enable the construction of that Iranian replica facility --

    without, but presuming upon, Dr. Dan Joyner's permission, here's the entire posting he made on his website, armscontrollaw.com, on March 17, 2015:


    " LA Times Reports the IAEA is Unlawfully Sharing Safeguards Information with the U.S. Government

    Posted: March 17, 2015 | Author: Dan Joyner | Filed under: Nuclear |2 Comments
    I saw this story in the LA Times from yesterday, entitled “Top-Secret U.S. Replica of Iran Nuclear Sites Key to Weapons Deal.” After talking with friends, the paragraph that strikes me most in this story is this one, with my added emphasis:


    U.S. officials won’t comment on the classified research, which is being conducted at an undisclosed location in the United States. But former officials and private analysts say American agencies have constructed models of the Iranian facilities, relying on informants in Iran, information from foreign governments and voluminous data about Iran’s program collected by the International Atomic Energy Agency, or IAEA, the United Nations’ nuclear watchdog.
     
    So to cut to the chase, this new replica enrichment facility – which I can’t help thinking of as a Madurodam* for US nuclear engineers (“Bill, look at the little Iranian nuclear scientist, he’s going into the centrifuge hall. And look, there’s a little Mossad figure on a motorcycle outside, waiting to kill him when he goes home from work.”). Ok, that got too tangential and too weird to continue. Let’s start that sentence again.

    So to cut to the chase, this new replica enrichment facility that the US has built, was based inter alia on “voluminous data” that the US obtained from the IAEA. What?!? But Article 5(b) of the Iran’s comprehensive safeguards agreement with the IAEA provides that:


    The Agency shall not publish or communicate to any State, organization or person any information obtained by it in connection with the implementation of this Agreement . . .
     
    So how did the US government get this “voluminous data” from the IAEA? And isn’t it not OK that this happened?

    This isn’t the first time that concerns have been raised about the IAEA’s inability to keep confidential information obtained through safeguards implementation in Iran. Iranian officials have complained of exactly this sort of thing happening before. And, coincidentally, the IAEA just today released a statement by Iran communicated to the agency, which on page 3 contains an entire section devoted to expressing Iran’s concerns about the IAEA’s inability to keep information gained through safeguards implementation confidential.

    But while it isn’t the first time these concerns have been raised by Iran, it is the first time I know of that a major news outlet has reported this inappropriate information sharing by the IAEA as a fact.

    If what the LA Times has reported is accurate, then it’s hard to see how this isn’t a serious violation by the IAEA of its safeguards agreement with Iran. Maybe there are other explanations for how the US government got this information from the IAEA, that don’t involve bad faith by the IAEA. I don’t know. But I can’t think of any off the top of my head.

    Suspicions of arms control inspection agencies being used as tools of Western espionage are not new. Allegations of this type are basically what killed UNSCOM, the first incarnation of the UN’s arms control inspection agency in Iraq after the first gulf war.

    It is an absolute imperative for the IAEA to be seen as above reproach when it comes to its ability to keep confidential information obtained through safeguards implementation. If it is not so perceived, its credibility as an independent monitoring and verification body, and its effectiveness in performing this role, will be seriously undermined. [emphasis added] "
     

    ---

    “But while it isn’t the first time these concerns have been raised by Iran, it is the first time I know of that a major news outlet has reported this inappropriate information sharing by the IAEA as a fact.”

    You make several excellent points. With your above quoted statement perhaps going a long way in explaining why two of the rogue nations (Israel and N. Korea) who clandestinely developed nuclear weapons never bothered signing on to the non-proliferation agreement, which would have opened them to IAEA inspectors.

    Read More
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  31. The more I think about this article, its premise and its title, the less I like it.

    No, Mr. Margolis, Obama did NOT act for “American” interests.

    More pertinently, the US negotiations were not a reflection of American values — at least the values some of us hold.

    A negotiation in which duress and bully-tactics are employed do not reflect the behavior of a self-confident, powerful people, they reflect the posture of a two-bit thug (aka Israel).

    I’m embarrassed by this deal.

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    • Replies: @Cloak And Dagger
    No reason for us to be embarrassed by this deal. What we should be embarrassed about is that year after year, we reelect the same people into government, knowing full well that these are just venal and corrupt politicians for whom the interests of this country are secondary to their own personal profits. It doesn't hurt that the system is rigged to make that happen.
    , @Aurelius
    The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane. – Marcus Aurelius

    I couldn't agree with you more. Being blinded by Jew hatred leads to several nasty and irrational consequences.

    , @Wizard of Oz
    You are embarrassed by the deal because??? I infer that you are saying it is because
    (a) it was achieved by thuggish duress, and
    (b) it was not done to suit America but to suit Israel despite Netanyahu's tantrums???

    But what about the other five powers involved in imposing sanctions years ago and maintaining them to this day? Have you thought through the implications of their involment and its compatibility with your limited area of focus?
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  32. @hammersmith
    BO has finally earned his Nobel peace prize.

    Obama opened relations with Myanmar, Cuba and Iran despite stiff opposition. I’ll give him that. Whoever will follow him in 2017 will kowtow to Israel.

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    • Replies: @Karl
    >>> Obama opened relations with Myanmar, Cuba and Iran despite stiff opposition.


    Raise your hand if you imagine that 5 ppm of Democrat voters know that Myanmar exists. Pop quiz: how many Unz readers can (without cheating) tell me the countries which have a border with Myanmar?

    Raise your other hand if you can show me a shred of evidence that Obama had to give up ANY political capital or goodwill, to do the rapproachment with Havana.
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  33. “Back in 2007, combined US intelligence concluded that Iran was NOT working on a nuclear weapons program”

    Yeah, when they didn’t even know the Fordo nuclear site existed. You can get 90% of an article right and screw the entire thing with getting 10% of it wrong and that’s what Margolis does here, which makes him only equal to the morons running the CIA.

    One only need have a look at Stephen Kappes record in relation to the Tinner/Khan nuclear black market…

    http://ronaldthomaswest.com/2014/11/22/reorganizing-murder-inc/

    …to know trusting our intelligence apparatus is only equal to asking Barack Obama to pass a constitutional law exam and reconcile correct answers with his record (can’t be done.)

    Call your trolls on over Margolis, I don’t give a shit that you’re chickenshit -

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  34. @SolontoCroesus
    The more I think about this article, its premise and its title, the less I like it.

    No, Mr. Margolis, Obama did NOT act for "American" interests.

    More pertinently, the US negotiations were not a reflection of American values -- at least the values some of us hold.

    A negotiation in which duress and bully-tactics are employed do not reflect the behavior of a self-confident, powerful people, they reflect the posture of a two-bit thug (aka Israel).

    I'm embarrassed by this deal.

    No reason for us to be embarrassed by this deal. What we should be embarrassed about is that year after year, we reelect the same people into government, knowing full well that these are just venal and corrupt politicians for whom the interests of this country are secondary to their own personal profits. It doesn’t hurt that the system is rigged to make that happen.

    Read More
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  35. Aurelius says:

    Iran the innocent. Hilareous.

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  36. Aurelius says:
    @SolontoCroesus
    The more I think about this article, its premise and its title, the less I like it.

    No, Mr. Margolis, Obama did NOT act for "American" interests.

    More pertinently, the US negotiations were not a reflection of American values -- at least the values some of us hold.

    A negotiation in which duress and bully-tactics are employed do not reflect the behavior of a self-confident, powerful people, they reflect the posture of a two-bit thug (aka Israel).

    I'm embarrassed by this deal.

    The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane. – Marcus Aurelius

    I couldn’t agree with you more. Being blinded by Jew hatred leads to several nasty and irrational consequences.

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    • Replies: @anonymouse
    Do keep in mind that Mr. Margolis also writes for that bastion of conservative thought, the Huffington Post, also for Dawn, an English language Pakistani newspaper, the Gulf Times in Qatar, and the Khaleej Times in Dubai.

    Referring to Obama's election as president, Mr. Margolis wrote:

    Americans did not "liberate" Iraq, but they certainly liberated their own nation last week by sweeping the Republican Party from power. One prays America's long nightmare of foreign aggressions, fear, religious extremism, and flirting with neo-fascism is finally at an end.

    Mr. Margolis also believes that the U.S. government may have been behind the attacks on 9/11. He despises the Tea Party. And, last, but not least, his mother, Nexhmie Zaimi, was a well know advocate for Palestinians.

    No bias here at all.

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  37. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    I seem to remember similar arguments being made about North Korea during the Clinton administration.

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  38. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Playing the devil’s advocate here, if I were Israel I would say screw the U.S.. Some ally. Israelis should pursue their own interests and do whatever is necessary for their own survival. They cannot rely on a two-bit, Africanized hybrid, community organizer. Cut your losses and move on.

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    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    Yeah why doesn't Israel attack Iran on their own? Then they can both finish each other off. Isn't that called win-win?
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  39. Karl says:

    Sorry, Muslim-Rohingya genocidees – Margolis can’t worry about your plight – there’s no Jew angle in it.

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  40. Karl says:
    @Pseudonymic Handle
    Obama opened relations with Myanmar, Cuba and Iran despite stiff opposition. I'll give him that. Whoever will follow him in 2017 will kowtow to Israel.

    >>> Obama opened relations with Myanmar, Cuba and Iran despite stiff opposition.

    Raise your hand if you imagine that 5 ppm of Democrat voters know that Myanmar exists. Pop quiz: how many Unz readers can (without cheating) tell me the countries which have a border with Myanmar?

    Raise your other hand if you can show me a shred of evidence that Obama had to give up ANY political capital or goodwill, to do the rapproachment with Havana.

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    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
    Well this will make sure everyone knows when you put me right but here is my unresearched answer: India, China, Thailand, Bangladesh, probably not Bhutan or Cambodia (I was going to say Laos but I think Cambodia has a border with China which would rule out Laos).
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  41. @Aurelius
    The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane. – Marcus Aurelius

    I couldn't agree with you more. Being blinded by Jew hatred leads to several nasty and irrational consequences.

    Do keep in mind that Mr. Margolis also writes for that bastion of conservative thought, the Huffington Post, also for Dawn, an English language Pakistani newspaper, the Gulf Times in Qatar, and the Khaleej Times in Dubai.

    Referring to Obama’s election as president, Mr. Margolis wrote:

    Americans did not “liberate” Iraq, but they certainly liberated their own nation last week by sweeping the Republican Party from power. One prays America’s long nightmare of foreign aggressions, fear, religious extremism, and flirting with neo-fascism is finally at an end.

    Mr. Margolis also believes that the U.S. government may have been behind the attacks on 9/11. He despises the Tea Party. And, last, but not least, his mother, Nexhmie Zaimi, was a well know advocate for Palestinians.

    No bias here at all.

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    • Replies: @Aurelius
    My position is that the Islamic nations are not and never have been a friend of the West. They are historical enemies of the West. We, as the children of Japheth, have much more in common with the children of Isaac than those of Ishmael. We will rue the day we allowed them to colonise our nations.
    , @KA
    He writes in those for many reasons. One of the reason is the same that didn't allow M & W publish ,ISRAELI LOBBY AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY in USA . Its the same reason Donald Neff couldn't get a review of his books in NYT Review of Books or Prof at University of Buffalo couldn't get his piece on MY PROMISED LAND by Shavitz get published ,or J Sorbone was fired for . There are many who made to the list.

    Mother of Margolis is Palestine advocate!
    Lets see - can we ask NYT who covers Israel and what relations she/ he has with IDF,settlers,and mayor of Tl Aviv?
    What about Rubin of WaPo?
    What about those male and female voices in NPR?
    Did Blitzer work for AIPAC?
    What bout Chait of WaPo?
    From Commentray magazine to Tablet to MSM in US to Jerusalem Post - the thread goes right back to Israel.
    , @DNA
    Cmon lay off the facts, don't want to confuse the LIV
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  42. MarkinLA says:
    @Anonymous
    Playing the devil's advocate here, if I were Israel I would say screw the U.S.. Some ally. Israelis should pursue their own interests and do whatever is necessary for their own survival. They cannot rely on a two-bit, Africanized hybrid, community organizer. Cut your losses and move on.

    Yeah why doesn’t Israel attack Iran on their own? Then they can both finish each other off. Isn’t that called win-win?

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  43. @War for Blair Mountain
    The Kenyan Foriegner does not work on behalf of NATIVE BORN WHITE AMERICAN racial interests.

    The $$$$$$$$$$ and other resources that would have been used to destroy Iran are now going to be used to go to war with Russia.

    If Israel attacks Russia....massive disruption of Middle East energy production. Europe will depend on Russian energy supplies...Russia wins!!!!!

    Are you clueless? Russia is one of Israel’s closest partners and Russia only seldomly condems it; there are also over 1 million Russian-born, Russian-speaking Israelis and Israel just increased exports to Russia as a result of the sanctions. Russia also has a very large ammount of jewish oligarchs aligned with Putin such as Fradikov or Abramovich).

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    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
    Some on these threads would say this had some complicating aspects for an Anglo-Zionist-neocon reconciliation of theory and practice and advocacy. Can someone elaborate on that for the confused?
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  44. Aurelius says:
    @anonymouse
    Do keep in mind that Mr. Margolis also writes for that bastion of conservative thought, the Huffington Post, also for Dawn, an English language Pakistani newspaper, the Gulf Times in Qatar, and the Khaleej Times in Dubai.

    Referring to Obama's election as president, Mr. Margolis wrote:

    Americans did not "liberate" Iraq, but they certainly liberated their own nation last week by sweeping the Republican Party from power. One prays America's long nightmare of foreign aggressions, fear, religious extremism, and flirting with neo-fascism is finally at an end.

    Mr. Margolis also believes that the U.S. government may have been behind the attacks on 9/11. He despises the Tea Party. And, last, but not least, his mother, Nexhmie Zaimi, was a well know advocate for Palestinians.

    No bias here at all.

    My position is that the Islamic nations are not and never have been a friend of the West. They are historical enemies of the West. We, as the children of Japheth, have much more in common with the children of Isaac than those of Ishmael. We will rue the day we allowed them to colonise our nations.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Carroll Price
    Islamic nations may not have exactly been friends of the West, but they were never enemies until after the children of Japheth purchased the US and British governments, bribed it's lawmakers into granting them the land Palestine, ethnically cleansed the land it of it's native population, then went about terrorizing neighbors on every side. Over the past 5,000 years, the children of Isaac have compiled a record of butchery that any sociopath would envy.
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  45. @schmenz
    It seems to me that one of the winners in this con game is Mr Netanyahu. Since the USA knows that Iran has no intention whatsoever to produce nuclear weapons, and since Israel (via its intelligence agencies) knows the same thing, this agreement calls for Iran to stop doing what it never intended on doing.

    But Mr Netanyahu screams and foams at the mouth and tears his hair out over Iran anyway, even though he is perfectly aware Iran is not suicidal and would never attack nuclear-armed Israel with weapons it has no intention of creating. The Netanyahu screamfest is therefore a ruse, in my opinion, designed to extract even more billions out of the wallets of US taxpayers and - sure enough - Mr Obama is rushing to assure him that dollars and weapons will be showered upon Israel if they will kindly accept the phony deal.

    There is a legal term for that sort of Israeli behavior.

    Contra Mr Margolis, I don't see this as Obama acting in America's interests. Israel's, yes; America's, I doubt it.

    “Knows” is a big word when you say the US “knows” Iran has no intention of producing nuclear weapons. Two points.

    When you decide to act on what you think you know you are really, if rational and worldly, acting only on your best assessment of the probabilities and weighing the consequences of being wrong.

    Second, you need to factor in the good reasons why Iran should want to have or be able to produce nuclear weapons. Those reasons don’t disappear because Israel could wipe the country off the map if Iran scared it enough.

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  46. @Cloak And Dagger
    There is reason to believe that you have a point there, and our government, beholden as it is to Zionist powers, is not to be trusted as it does not have a will of its own. The article at this link argues that the deal is a ploy for a future sabotage:

    http://tinyurl.com/ojl33cf

    If you read the deal, you can't help but come to the conclusion that this deal is bad for Iran. What they get back is the money that was stolen from them in the first place, while subjecting them to intrusive espionage to ensure that they do not have the capability to resist an armed intrusion by US/Israel. I think it is a mistake for Iran to sign this deal. They should have just held their ground, as the sanctions are falling apart all by themselves. Now, like Iraq and Libya, they have disarmed themselves, and exposed their underbelly to attack.

    It is a pity that a noble civilization that has existed for millennia, and has not attacked anyone in my lifetime, while having to lose lives and treasure defending itself from Iraq, whom we instigated to attack them, and whose democratic leader we deposed to replace with our zio-friendly Shah, must finally fall by our sword wielded by the hateful state of Israel. However, unlike Iraq and Libya, Iran is no walkover, and there is a good chance that Israel will go down with it - nukes or no nukes.

    Some geopolitical analysts have over-emphasized Brzezinski’s role in recent US foreign policy gambits, even today portraying him as the ‘master strategist’ behind the Obama presidency. This effort appears designed to assist disinformation intended to shift attention and focus from Israel and US-based Jewish Zionists who are the driving force, and indeed the ideological godfathers, behind neoconservatism itself.[24] While Brzezinski and other US foreign policy “realists” are contemptible in their own right, the ever more adventurous and militant Jewish-Zionist faction of the elite appears to have sidelined the likes of Brzezinski and other “traditional” US imperialist types. The analysts who do this should perhaps be scrutinized for undisclosed sympathies with Israel and Zionism.

    All in all, it is incontestable that the US and Israel are the foremost belligerents, aggressors and destabilizers throughout the world. These imperial forces relentlessly target countries like Iran that simply seeks to exercise its right to self-determination. This self-evident truth is plainly discernable and hidden in open view if one took the care to read through the hubristic musings of imperial-oriented think tanks that have set the West on an endless warpath towards Armageddon.
     
    An ancient Chinese curse: may you live in interesting times.

    Rhetoric about “a noble civilisation that has existed for millenia [and is identified as the one which] hasn’t attacked anyone in my lifetime” is a pity because such unmitigated nonsense (I mean the civilisation, singular, which is noble and existed for millenia) destroys the authority of your point of view and the strength of your argument.

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    • Replies: @Cloak And Dagger

    such unmitigated nonsense
     
    Really? Perhaps your education is lacking. Can you back up your assertions to counter the claims of the Persian civilization and its absence of having attacked anyone in my lifetime, or is it your intention to just have others run around and do your research for you (a known hasbara ploy)?
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  47. @Cloak And Dagger
    I would argue that the biggest problem Israel has with Iran is that it threatens its hegemony in the Middle East. Should Iran acquire nukes (unlikely that they desire this), it would neuter Israel's only leverage of being the sole nuclear power in the region with constant threats of the Sampson option (a veritable sword of Damocles, hanging over those who wield nukes).

    An equally large (perhaps even larger threat, now that I think about it) is the fact that they risk losing the monogamous relationship with the US that has allowed them to invade their neighbors with impunity, safe in the knowledge that the US would dispense its own blood and treasure to defend Israel should those adventures misfire. It is a lot like the dipshit with no strength of their own, who swaggers through bars talking trash, with the expectation that their big brother will defend them if their behavior causes retaliation.

    The only real-life war training Israel's armed forces get are against unarmed Palestinian civilians, and as a consequence, their estimation of their military might (conventional) is grossly over rated. Their much-vaunted Merkava tanks were decimated in the Lebanon war, and their troops sent scurrying back with their tail between their legs, fighting Hezbollah's guerrilla forces. The latter is now reputed to have enhanced their fighting capabilities even more and has 80,000 missiles trained on Tel Aviv - enough to melt that city into glass, should Israel attack Lebanon again.

    Israel depends on the US to fight its wars. With the rapprochement with Iran, that option goes away. This is Israel's scariest nightmare, and explains the desperation with which they are resisting the deal.

    Now that the UN Security Council has endorsed the deal, the real fireworks are about to begin.

    Sorry to quibble again but words matter. How can you justify the word “hegemony” in describing Israel’s actual or potential place or role in the Middle East?

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  48. @SolontoCroesus
    Right on the cMark, Cloak and Dagger.

    Netanyahu's continued braying about the "windfall" Iranians would receive as a result of sanctions relief convinced me that Israelis are less interested in poking their noses into Iran's military business than they are scared out of their dress-up soldier-panties that Iran will fortify Hezbollah and Hamas.

    (nb. the "windfall" to Iran, which Israelis and their minions frame as if it is some US taxpayer gift similar to those that Israel extorts from US, is in reality Iran's own money that US & EU have conspired to hold back from Iran.)

    I was sure that the "intrusive inspections" clauses were sops to Israelis who are inveterate spies and had been accustomed to unfettered access to Iran's financial, military and weapons procurement affairs.

    It remains a deep concern that Iran will remain under the gun of US predatory capitalists; and that the IAEA has been subverted to serve the interests of the banksters -- Yukiya Amano is tucked securely into US pockets.

    In a reprise of its World War II - era German and Japanese Village project in the Utah desert at Dugway,


    The US government built "a secret replica of Iran’s nuclear facilities" deep in the forests of Tennessee to gain an edge in its negotiations with Iran, reports The New York Times.

    This "Manhattan Project in reverse" is situated on the grounds of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It uses placeholder centrifuges meant to represent Iranian equipment — an assembly that including centrifuges once belonging to Libya's disbanded nuclear program.
    http://www.businessinsider.com/the-us-built-a-secret-replica-of-irans-nuclear-facilities-to-help-gain-an-edge-in-nuclear-talks-2015-4#ixzz3gSC4gLlC
     

    It appears that the IAEA leaked "volumes of documents" to enable the construction of that Iranian replica facility --

    without, but presuming upon, Dr. Dan Joyner's permission, here's the entire posting he made on his website, armscontrollaw.com, on March 17, 2015:


    " LA Times Reports the IAEA is Unlawfully Sharing Safeguards Information with the U.S. Government

    Posted: March 17, 2015 | Author: Dan Joyner | Filed under: Nuclear |2 Comments
    I saw this story in the LA Times from yesterday, entitled “Top-Secret U.S. Replica of Iran Nuclear Sites Key to Weapons Deal.” After talking with friends, the paragraph that strikes me most in this story is this one, with my added emphasis:


    U.S. officials won’t comment on the classified research, which is being conducted at an undisclosed location in the United States. But former officials and private analysts say American agencies have constructed models of the Iranian facilities, relying on informants in Iran, information from foreign governments and voluminous data about Iran’s program collected by the International Atomic Energy Agency, or IAEA, the United Nations’ nuclear watchdog.
     
    So to cut to the chase, this new replica enrichment facility – which I can’t help thinking of as a Madurodam* for US nuclear engineers (“Bill, look at the little Iranian nuclear scientist, he’s going into the centrifuge hall. And look, there’s a little Mossad figure on a motorcycle outside, waiting to kill him when he goes home from work.”). Ok, that got too tangential and too weird to continue. Let’s start that sentence again.

    So to cut to the chase, this new replica enrichment facility that the US has built, was based inter alia on “voluminous data” that the US obtained from the IAEA. What?!? But Article 5(b) of the Iran’s comprehensive safeguards agreement with the IAEA provides that:


    The Agency shall not publish or communicate to any State, organization or person any information obtained by it in connection with the implementation of this Agreement . . .
     
    So how did the US government get this “voluminous data” from the IAEA? And isn’t it not OK that this happened?

    This isn’t the first time that concerns have been raised about the IAEA’s inability to keep confidential information obtained through safeguards implementation in Iran. Iranian officials have complained of exactly this sort of thing happening before. And, coincidentally, the IAEA just today released a statement by Iran communicated to the agency, which on page 3 contains an entire section devoted to expressing Iran’s concerns about the IAEA’s inability to keep information gained through safeguards implementation confidential.

    But while it isn’t the first time these concerns have been raised by Iran, it is the first time I know of that a major news outlet has reported this inappropriate information sharing by the IAEA as a fact.

    If what the LA Times has reported is accurate, then it’s hard to see how this isn’t a serious violation by the IAEA of its safeguards agreement with Iran. Maybe there are other explanations for how the US government got this information from the IAEA, that don’t involve bad faith by the IAEA. I don’t know. But I can’t think of any off the top of my head.

    Suspicions of arms control inspection agencies being used as tools of Western espionage are not new. Allegations of this type are basically what killed UNSCOM, the first incarnation of the UN’s arms control inspection agency in Iraq after the first gulf war.

    It is an absolute imperative for the IAEA to be seen as above reproach when it comes to its ability to keep confidential information obtained through safeguards implementation. If it is not so perceived, its credibility as an independent monitoring and verification body, and its effectiveness in performing this role, will be seriously undermined. [emphasis added] "
     

    ---

    It would be disappointing for civis Americanus if his Emperor’s soothsayers and readers of entrails didn’t know what the IAEA knew but to brag about it: that’s incompetence.

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  49. @Cloak And Dagger
    An excellent point and a reason to distrust the IAEA as another spying front. In recent memory, the Stuxnet virus unleashed on Iranian reactors required someone to physically insert a USB thumb drive into the control computers in order to unleash the virus. This had to have happened by Mossad/CIA personnel who had access to the site - most likely under cover of the IAEA, who would be one of the rare foreign individuals that could inspect the reactors. Is it a surprise, then, that IAEA access to Iranian sites, specifically military ones, are regarded with suspicion?

    Incidentally, the jury is still out as to whether the Fukushima reactors were accidentally infected by the Stuxnet virus.

    Never heard of the Stuxnet/Fukushima rumour. Where does that come from. It seems unlikely that anything requiring the disciplined brainpower of the Stuxnet operation would suffer such egregious accidents in an irrelevant and distant company coincidentally with an unprecedented earthquake.

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    • Replies: @Cloak And Dagger

    Never heard of the Stuxnet/Fukushima rumour. Where does that come from.
     
    It was all over the Internet for a while. This is one example of the rumor, which claims that it was deliberate, including the claim that the earthquake was artificial:

    http://beforeitsnews.com/japan-earthquake/2014/01/fukushima-sabotage-2445230.html

    Another rumor claims that Fukushima on 3/11 is linked to 9/11 and 7/7, again disputing the earthquake as being a natural one, and also its magnitude not being 9.0:

    https://311truth.wordpress.com/

    So, we have hypotheses and speculations, not scholarly facts, hence my labeling them as "rumors". A google search with "Stuxnet Fukushima" will give you hundreds more.

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  50. @SolontoCroesus
    The more I think about this article, its premise and its title, the less I like it.

    No, Mr. Margolis, Obama did NOT act for "American" interests.

    More pertinently, the US negotiations were not a reflection of American values -- at least the values some of us hold.

    A negotiation in which duress and bully-tactics are employed do not reflect the behavior of a self-confident, powerful people, they reflect the posture of a two-bit thug (aka Israel).

    I'm embarrassed by this deal.

    You are embarrassed by the deal because??? I infer that you are saying it is because
    (a) it was achieved by thuggish duress, and
    (b) it was not done to suit America but to suit Israel despite Netanyahu’s tantrums???

    But what about the other five powers involved in imposing sanctions years ago and maintaining them to this day? Have you thought through the implications of their involment and its compatibility with your limited area of focus?

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  51. @Karl
    >>> Obama opened relations with Myanmar, Cuba and Iran despite stiff opposition.


    Raise your hand if you imagine that 5 ppm of Democrat voters know that Myanmar exists. Pop quiz: how many Unz readers can (without cheating) tell me the countries which have a border with Myanmar?

    Raise your other hand if you can show me a shred of evidence that Obama had to give up ANY political capital or goodwill, to do the rapproachment with Havana.

    Well this will make sure everyone knows when you put me right but here is my unresearched answer: India, China, Thailand, Bangladesh, probably not Bhutan or Cambodia (I was going to say Laos but I think Cambodia has a border with China which would rule out Laos).

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  52. @Janos Sandor
    Are you clueless? Russia is one of Israel's closest partners and Russia only seldomly condems it; there are also over 1 million Russian-born, Russian-speaking Israelis and Israel just increased exports to Russia as a result of the sanctions. Russia also has a very large ammount of jewish oligarchs aligned with Putin such as Fradikov or Abramovich).

    Some on these threads would say this had some complicating aspects for an Anglo-Zionist-neocon reconciliation of theory and practice and advocacy. Can someone elaborate on that for the confused?

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  53. @Wizard of Oz
    Never heard of the Stuxnet/Fukushima rumour. Where does that come from. It seems unlikely that anything requiring the disciplined brainpower of the Stuxnet operation would suffer such egregious accidents in an irrelevant and distant company coincidentally with an unprecedented earthquake.

    Never heard of the Stuxnet/Fukushima rumour. Where does that come from.

    It was all over the Internet for a while. This is one example of the rumor, which claims that it was deliberate, including the claim that the earthquake was artificial:

    http://beforeitsnews.com/japan-earthquake/2014/01/fukushima-sabotage-2445230.html

    Another rumor claims that Fukushima on 3/11 is linked to 9/11 and 7/7, again disputing the earthquake as being a natural one, and also its magnitude not being 9.0:

    https://311truth.wordpress.com/

    So, we have hypotheses and speculations, not scholarly facts, hence my labeling them as “rumors”. A google search with “Stuxnet Fukushima” will give you hundreds more.

    Read More
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  54. @Wizard of Oz
    Rhetoric about "a noble civilisation that has existed for millenia [and is identified as the one which] hasn't attacked anyone in my lifetime" is a pity because such unmitigated nonsense (I mean the civilisation, singular, which is noble and existed for millenia) destroys the authority of your point of view and the strength of your argument.

    such unmitigated nonsense

    Really? Perhaps your education is lacking. Can you back up your assertions to counter the claims of the Persian civilization and its absence of having attacked anyone in my lifetime, or is it your intention to just have others run around and do your research for you (a known hasbara ploy)?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
    "the Persian civilisation" for G sake. Not only is your education apparently lacking but your understanding of language is a bit dodgy too. Surely you can grasp that a series of civilisations extending from (at least) Cyrus, Darius and Xerxes through Hellenism under Alexander and successors, the Parthians, and just up to the Sasanids is hardly a single civilisation. And, as I was looking up the spelling of the lastmentioned I can quote the following to help you a bit in case you have forgotten about Islam being a bit different from other cultural/civilizational influences:

    "After 3 centuries, the Arab Muslims attacked the empire, at a time when incompetent kings were in power, and defeated the Sasanids. They spread Islam to Persia, which was well accepted as a better religion, but apart from Islam, the other things Arabs did to Persians were a disaster. [NB - not so "noble" apparently]

    "After that many kingdoms were created in this area, but they were never as powerful as the ancient (pre-Islam) empires, the Mongols, the Turks and some other people ransacked the land. Until now Persia (now Iran) has never become as powerful as it once was."

    So when did the nobility start that you are writing of?

    And do you know how many different ethnic groups are in what you like to think of at the Persian area of civilisation?

    , @Wizard of Oz
    You use the word "rumors" as if you had labelled the Fukushima nonsense as such. Indeed you even put quotes around "rumors" as if that was what you had said. In fact you said that the "jury [was] still out" which implies that there was a serious case to be answered. As for the notion that it was not such a big earthquake and/or that it was really a manmade effect, spare me! I have Japanese relations, including an engineer with a doctorate and a TV journalist. I think I might have heard if there were even the slightest credibility in such mad stories.
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  55. Sorry to quibble again but words matter. How can you justify the word “hegemony” in describing Israel’s actual or potential place or role in the Middle East?

    Again, your inability to do simple research is astounding. Google is your friend. Israeli hegemony (backed by the US) is an oft discussed topic using exactly those words. Here are samples using “Israel hegemony”, and there are 100s (in future do your own research):

    http://www.wrmea.org/1997-october-november/u.s.-israeli-plans-for-hegemony-in-the-middle-east-those-who-refuse-to-help-themselves.html

    U.S.-Israeli Plans for Hegemony in the Middle East; Those Who Refuse to Help Themselves

    https://www.middleeastmonitor.com/blogs/politics/6383-time-to-ditch-the-israels-hegemonic-rhetoric

    Time to ditch Israel’s hegemonic rhetoric – Middle East Monitor

    http://journal-neo.org/2014/12/09/israel-in-quest-for-uncontested-hegemony/

    Israel: In Quest for Uncontested Hegemony

    The search brought up 1,110,000 hits. So yes, words matter, and I stand by mine.

    Read More
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  56. Well AIPAC are not pleased.

    http://www.timesofisrael.com/aipac-girds-for-rare-high-noon-showdown-with-white-house/

    Could be theatre but I don’t think so.

    Iran is adamant there will be no inspections, whatever the claims made by the sellers of the agreement. 25 of their nuclear scientists have been murdered – the names of the current group have been kept strictly under wraps. It will be a cold day in hell before the Iranians release them.

    I think Obomber is finally realising the winds of change are blowing a lot of the chaff away and the Israeli fiefdom can no longer control the narrative: the slaughter in Gaza has put the victim cant in its rightful place – contempt.

    People have had enough of the lies, violence, hypocrisy – including a growing number of Israelis themselves. Perhaps we are witnessing a changing of the (corrupt) guard.

    I sure hope so.

    Read More
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  57. @Cloak And Dagger

    such unmitigated nonsense
     
    Really? Perhaps your education is lacking. Can you back up your assertions to counter the claims of the Persian civilization and its absence of having attacked anyone in my lifetime, or is it your intention to just have others run around and do your research for you (a known hasbara ploy)?

    “the Persian civilisation” for G sake. Not only is your education apparently lacking but your understanding of language is a bit dodgy too. Surely you can grasp that a series of civilisations extending from (at least) Cyrus, Darius and Xerxes through Hellenism under Alexander and successors, the Parthians, and just up to the Sasanids is hardly a single civilisation. And, as I was looking up the spelling of the lastmentioned I can quote the following to help you a bit in case you have forgotten about Islam being a bit different from other cultural/civilizational influences:

    “After 3 centuries, the Arab Muslims attacked the empire, at a time when incompetent kings were in power, and defeated the Sasanids. They spread Islam to Persia, which was well accepted as a better religion, but apart from Islam, the other things Arabs did to Persians were a disaster. [NB - not so "noble" apparently]

    “After that many kingdoms were created in this area, but they were never as powerful as the ancient (pre-Islam) empires, the Mongols, the Turks and some other people ransacked the land. Until now Persia (now Iran) has never become as powerful as it once was.”

    So when did the nobility start that you are writing of?

    And do you know how many different ethnic groups are in what you like to think of at the Persian area of civilisation?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cloak And Dagger
    You are beginning to annoy me with your propensity for shotgun assertions without spending any time doing the most basic of research and wasting my time doing your work for you. You are scarcely in a position to assail my education or command of the language when the most trivial of research would uncover widespread use of the phrase “Persian civilization”.


    series of civilisations extending from (at least) Cyrus, Darius and Xerxes through Hellenism under Alexander and successors, the Parthians, and just up to the Sasanids is hardly a single civilisation.

     

    What you describe is a series of Persian empires, which spans the history of the Persian Civilization.

    From the dictionary:
    Civilization [siv-uh-luh-zey-shuh n]
    an advanced state of human society, in which a high level of culture, science, industry, and government has been reached.

    At the risk of being drawn into a pointless debate with an ignoramous on an issue tangential to the point being discussed (another hasbara ploy), and waste my time and that of other readers, here are a few references to scholarly usage of the term “Persian Civilization”, with the last one being a University course parenthetically equating “Persian civilization” and “Iranian civilization”.

    http://www.persepolis.nu/timeline.htm


    The Sassanids, second only to the Achaemenids in their service to Persia were also a major defining feature of Persian culture and identity. They considered themselves the direct descendants of the Achaemenids, and obviously sought to preserve Persian culture and identity while serving their nation. They took a great role in advancing the foundations of Persian civilization in many different aspects.

     

    http://www.middleeastpdx.org/resources/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/AncientPersianCivilization.pdf


    Ancient Persian Civilization - Dr. Anousha Sedighi, Associate Professor of Persian

     

    http://www.colorado.edu/catalog/2012-13/courses/arsc/b-arsc/1011-introduction-persian-civilization


    FRSI-1011 (3) Introduction to Persian Civilization
    An introduction to the history, literature and art of Iranian (Persian) civilization with a focus on the social and cultural aspects of contemporary Iran. Taught in English.

     

    Now, please go away.
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  58. @Cloak And Dagger

    such unmitigated nonsense
     
    Really? Perhaps your education is lacking. Can you back up your assertions to counter the claims of the Persian civilization and its absence of having attacked anyone in my lifetime, or is it your intention to just have others run around and do your research for you (a known hasbara ploy)?

    You use the word “rumors” as if you had labelled the Fukushima nonsense as such. Indeed you even put quotes around “rumors” as if that was what you had said. In fact you said that the “jury [was] still out” which implies that there was a serious case to be answered. As for the notion that it was not such a big earthquake and/or that it was really a manmade effect, spare me! I have Japanese relations, including an engineer with a doctorate and a TV journalist. I think I might have heard if there were even the slightest credibility in such mad stories.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cloak And Dagger

    I have Japanese relations, including an engineer with a doctorate and a TV journalist. I think I might have heard if there were even the slightest credibility in such mad stories.

     

    Are you for real? Either cite me some scholarly documentation or go peddle your unsupported assertions elsewhere. This is like Sarah Palin claiming foreign policy credentials since "she can see Russia from her front yard". Well, at least you are good for a laugh if nothing more.
    , @Cloak And Dagger
    It was you who used the word “rumour” not me, and the text is still up there for everyone to see. I later quoted it as “rumor” to highlight the American spelling that I had converted it to:


    Never heard of the Stuxnet/Fukushima rumour. Where does that come from. [sic]

     

    My original statement was:


    the jury is still out as to whether the Fukushima reactors were accidentally infected by the Stuxnet virus

     

    Perhaps you are not familiar with the idiom “the jury is still out”, as you appear to be unfamiliar with other phrases that you are quizzical about. Here is some free education that may inspire you to go crack open a book:

    From the urban dictionary:


    an expression implying that a conclusion about someone or something has yet to be reached.

     

    From the Cambridge dictionary:
    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/british/the-jury-is-still-out


    if the jury is (still) out on a subject, people do not yet know the answer or have not yet decided if it is good or bad: The jury's still out on the safety of irradiated food.

     

    None of these pass judgment on whether the issue is nonsensical or rational. It is a statement of the fact that certain hypotheses have been presented for consideration and no conclusions have been reached.

    It is not just the conspiracy theorists who draw attention to Fukushima as a deliberate act. Even the respected “Foreign Policy” magazine drew parallels with the Stuxnet attack on Iranian reactors:

    http://foreignpolicy.com/2011/03/17/where-fukushima-meets-stuxnet-the-growing-threat-of-cyber-war/
    Where Fukushima meets Stuxnet: The growing threat of cyber war – David Rothkopf


    The way to look at this story is to link in your mind the Stuxnetrevelations about the reportedly U.S. and Israeli-led cyber attacks on the Iranian nuclear enrichment facility at Natanz and the calamities at the Fukushima power facilities over the past week. While seemingly unconnected, the stories together speak to the before and after of what cyber conflict may look like. Enemies will be able to target one another’s critical infrastructure as was done by the U.S. and Israeli team (likely working with British and German assistance) targeting the Iranian program and burrowing into their operating systems, they will seek to produce malfunctions that bring economies to their knees, put societies in the dark, or undercut national defenses.

     

    As to your claim: It seems unlikely that anything requiring the disciplined brainpower of the Stuxnet operation would suffer such egregious accidents in an irrelevant and distant company:

    From the Washington Blog:
    http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2013/11/america-and-israel-created-a-monster-computer-virus-which-now-threatens-nuclear-reactors-worldwide.html
    America and Israel Created a Monster Computer Virus Which Now Threatens Nuclear Reactors Worldwide


    The virus appears to have spread to other countries.
    One of the world’s top computer security experts – Eugene Kaspersky – said this week that the virus has attacked a Russian nuclear reactor. As The Register notes:
    The infamous Stuxnet malware thought to have been developed by the US and Israel to disrupt Iran’s nuclear facilities, also managed to cause chaos at a Russian nuclear plant, according to Eugene Kaspersky.
    The revelation came during a Q&A session after a speech at Australia’s National Press Club last week, in which he argued that those spooks responsible for “offensive technologies” don’t realise the unintended consequences of releasing malware into the wild.
    “Everything you do is a boomerang,” he added. “It will get back to you.”

    :
    Other security experts agree.
    As British security website V3 – in an article entitled “Stuxnet: UK and US nuclear plants at risk as malware spreads outside Russia” – reports:
    Experts from FireEye [background] and F-Secure [background] told V3 the nature of Stuxnet means it is likely many power plants have fallen victim to the malware ….

     

    So much for your “disciplined brainpower”. Ha! Accidental infection of Fukushima does not sound quite as nonsensical now, does it?

    As for your laughable claim about being related to a Japanese journalist and yet never having heard of this:

    http://www.veteranstoday.com/2011/10/30/fukushima-sabotage-japanese-journalist-accuses-israel/
    Fukushima Sabotage – Japanese Journalist Accuses Israel


    A leading Japanese journalist recently made two incredible claims about the Fukushima power plant that suffered a nuclear meltdown in March 2011, sending shockwaves around the world.
    First, the former editor of a national newspaper in Japan says the U.S. and Israel knew Fukushima had weapons-grade uranium and plutonium that were exposed to the atmosphere after a massive tsunami wave hit the reactor.
    Second, he contends that Israeli intelligence sabotaged the reactor in retaliation for Japan’s support of an independent Palestinian state.
    According to Yoishi Shimatsu, a former editor of Japan Times Weekly, these nuclear materials were shipped to the plant in 2007 on the orders of Dick Cheney and George W. Bush, with the connivance of Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert.

     

    I guess your Japanese relative must not be such a good journalist, huh?

    I could go on and on with citation after citation (of which you have yet to provide one), but your ignorance has bored me to sleep.
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  59. @Wizard of Oz
    "the Persian civilisation" for G sake. Not only is your education apparently lacking but your understanding of language is a bit dodgy too. Surely you can grasp that a series of civilisations extending from (at least) Cyrus, Darius and Xerxes through Hellenism under Alexander and successors, the Parthians, and just up to the Sasanids is hardly a single civilisation. And, as I was looking up the spelling of the lastmentioned I can quote the following to help you a bit in case you have forgotten about Islam being a bit different from other cultural/civilizational influences:

    "After 3 centuries, the Arab Muslims attacked the empire, at a time when incompetent kings were in power, and defeated the Sasanids. They spread Islam to Persia, which was well accepted as a better religion, but apart from Islam, the other things Arabs did to Persians were a disaster. [NB - not so "noble" apparently]

    "After that many kingdoms were created in this area, but they were never as powerful as the ancient (pre-Islam) empires, the Mongols, the Turks and some other people ransacked the land. Until now Persia (now Iran) has never become as powerful as it once was."

    So when did the nobility start that you are writing of?

    And do you know how many different ethnic groups are in what you like to think of at the Persian area of civilisation?

    You are beginning to annoy me with your propensity for shotgun assertions without spending any time doing the most basic of research and wasting my time doing your work for you. You are scarcely in a position to assail my education or command of the language when the most trivial of research would uncover widespread use of the phrase “Persian civilization”.

    series of civilisations extending from (at least) Cyrus, Darius and Xerxes through Hellenism under Alexander and successors, the Parthians, and just up to the Sasanids is hardly a single civilisation.

    What you describe is a series of Persian empires, which spans the history of the Persian Civilization.

    From the dictionary:
    Civilization [siv-uh-luh-zey-shuh n]
    an advanced state of human society, in which a high level of culture, science, industry, and government has been reached.

    At the risk of being drawn into a pointless debate with an ignoramous on an issue tangential to the point being discussed (another hasbara ploy), and waste my time and that of other readers, here are a few references to scholarly usage of the term “Persian Civilization”, with the last one being a University course parenthetically equating “Persian civilization” and “Iranian civilization”.

    http://www.persepolis.nu/timeline.htm

    The Sassanids, second only to the Achaemenids in their service to Persia were also a major defining feature of Persian culture and identity. They considered themselves the direct descendants of the Achaemenids, and obviously sought to preserve Persian culture and identity while serving their nation. They took a great role in advancing the foundations of Persian civilization in many different aspects.

    http://www.middleeastpdx.org/resources/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/AncientPersianCivilization.pdf

    Ancient Persian Civilization – Dr. Anousha Sedighi, Associate Professor of Persian

    http://www.colorado.edu/catalog/2012-13/courses/arsc/b-arsc/1011-introduction-persian-civilization

    FRSI-1011 (3) Introduction to Persian Civilization
    An introduction to the history, literature and art of Iranian (Persian) civilization with a focus on the social and cultural aspects of contemporary Iran. Taught in English.

    Now, please go away.

    Read More
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  60. @Wizard of Oz
    You use the word "rumors" as if you had labelled the Fukushima nonsense as such. Indeed you even put quotes around "rumors" as if that was what you had said. In fact you said that the "jury [was] still out" which implies that there was a serious case to be answered. As for the notion that it was not such a big earthquake and/or that it was really a manmade effect, spare me! I have Japanese relations, including an engineer with a doctorate and a TV journalist. I think I might have heard if there were even the slightest credibility in such mad stories.

    I have Japanese relations, including an engineer with a doctorate and a TV journalist. I think I might have heard if there were even the slightest credibility in such mad stories.

    Are you for real? Either cite me some scholarly documentation or go peddle your unsupported assertions elsewhere. This is like Sarah Palin claiming foreign policy credentials since “she can see Russia from her front yard”. Well, at least you are good for a laugh if nothing more.

    Read More
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  61. @Wizard of Oz
    You use the word "rumors" as if you had labelled the Fukushima nonsense as such. Indeed you even put quotes around "rumors" as if that was what you had said. In fact you said that the "jury [was] still out" which implies that there was a serious case to be answered. As for the notion that it was not such a big earthquake and/or that it was really a manmade effect, spare me! I have Japanese relations, including an engineer with a doctorate and a TV journalist. I think I might have heard if there were even the slightest credibility in such mad stories.

    It was you who used the word “rumour” not me, and the text is still up there for everyone to see. I later quoted it as “rumor” to highlight the American spelling that I had converted it to:

    Never heard of the Stuxnet/Fukushima rumour. Where does that come from. [sic]

    My original statement was:

    the jury is still out as to whether the Fukushima reactors were accidentally infected by the Stuxnet virus

    Perhaps you are not familiar with the idiom “the jury is still out”, as you appear to be unfamiliar with other phrases that you are quizzical about. Here is some free education that may inspire you to go crack open a book:

    From the urban dictionary:

    an expression implying that a conclusion about someone or something has yet to be reached.

    From the Cambridge dictionary:

    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/british/the-jury-is-still-out

    if the jury is (still) out on a subject, people do not yet know the answer or have not yet decided if it is good or bad: The jury’s still out on the safety of irradiated food.

    None of these pass judgment on whether the issue is nonsensical or rational. It is a statement of the fact that certain hypotheses have been presented for consideration and no conclusions have been reached.

    It is not just the conspiracy theorists who draw attention to Fukushima as a deliberate act. Even the respected “Foreign Policy” magazine drew parallels with the Stuxnet attack on Iranian reactors:

    http://foreignpolicy.com/2011/03/17/where-fukushima-meets-stuxnet-the-growing-threat-of-cyber-war/

    Where Fukushima meets Stuxnet: The growing threat of cyber war – David Rothkopf

    The way to look at this story is to link in your mind the Stuxnetrevelations about the reportedly U.S. and Israeli-led cyber attacks on the Iranian nuclear enrichment facility at Natanz and the calamities at the Fukushima power facilities over the past week. While seemingly unconnected, the stories together speak to the before and after of what cyber conflict may look like. Enemies will be able to target one another’s critical infrastructure as was done by the U.S. and Israeli team (likely working with British and German assistance) targeting the Iranian program and burrowing into their operating systems, they will seek to produce malfunctions that bring economies to their knees, put societies in the dark, or undercut national defenses.

    As to your claim: It seems unlikely that anything requiring the disciplined brainpower of the Stuxnet operation would suffer such egregious accidents in an irrelevant and distant company:

    From the Washington Blog:

    http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2013/11/america-and-israel-created-a-monster-computer-virus-which-now-threatens-nuclear-reactors-worldwide.html

    America and Israel Created a Monster Computer Virus Which Now Threatens Nuclear Reactors Worldwide

    The virus appears to have spread to other countries.
    One of the world’s top computer security experts – Eugene Kaspersky – said this week that the virus has attacked a Russian nuclear reactor. As The Register notes:
    The infamous Stuxnet malware thought to have been developed by the US and Israel to disrupt Iran’s nuclear facilities, also managed to cause chaos at a Russian nuclear plant, according to Eugene Kaspersky.
    The revelation came during a Q&A session after a speech at Australia’s National Press Club last week, in which he argued that those spooks responsible for “offensive technologies” don’t realise the unintended consequences of releasing malware into the wild.
    “Everything you do is a boomerang,” he added. “It will get back to you.”

    :
    Other security experts agree.
    As British security website V3 – in an article entitled “Stuxnet: UK and US nuclear plants at risk as malware spreads outside Russia” – reports:
    Experts from FireEye [background] and F-Secure [background] told V3 the nature of Stuxnet means it is likely many power plants have fallen victim to the malware ….

    So much for your “disciplined brainpower”. Ha! Accidental infection of Fukushima does not sound quite as nonsensical now, does it?

    As for your laughable claim about being related to a Japanese journalist and yet never having heard of this:

    http://www.veteranstoday.com/2011/10/30/fukushima-sabotage-japanese-journalist-accuses-israel/

    Fukushima Sabotage – Japanese Journalist Accuses Israel

    A leading Japanese journalist recently made two incredible claims about the Fukushima power plant that suffered a nuclear meltdown in March 2011, sending shockwaves around the world.
    First, the former editor of a national newspaper in Japan says the U.S. and Israel knew Fukushima had weapons-grade uranium and plutonium that were exposed to the atmosphere after a massive tsunami wave hit the reactor.
    Second, he contends that Israeli intelligence sabotaged the reactor in retaliation for Japan’s support of an independent Palestinian state.
    According to Yoishi Shimatsu, a former editor of Japan Times Weekly, these nuclear materials were shipped to the plant in 2007 on the orders of Dick Cheney and George W. Bush, with the connivance of Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert.

    I guess your Japanese relative must not be such a good journalist, huh?

    I could go on and on with citation after citation (of which you have yet to provide one), but your ignorance has bored me to sleep.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Carroll Price
    Cloak and Dagger,
    I appreciate your efforts, but you're wasting your time. Hasbara trolls like Wizard who clutter up the board with silly and pointless comments, are apparently being compensated according to the number of responses they make.
    , @Wizard of Oz
    Haven't you got a sensible wife to say "there there dear don't get so excited and just stop digging: what you say or anyone thinks of you really isn't all that important - and remember not to answer questions without your lawyer or at least your editor present. You know how bad you are on picking up the detail".

    Your links are absurd. Even the nutters in Veterans Today (am I getting this right "a magazine for the clandestine community"?) start their 2011 story (nothing recent?) by calling it incredible in the first par. Then you cite something from Foreign Policy which doesn't even get you off the ground with a serious suggestion that the Stuxnet virus, or any other, may have actually caused any of the disastrous Fukushima problems. (BTW my distinguished Japanese engineer relation was an electrical engineer and senior manager with a power company and confirms that, as far as he's concerned your fantasy is total crap in the nicest polite Japanese way).

    I know I'm being rude and impatient and maybe it's got to do with the outstanding New Zealand pinot noir** I was served at lunch courtesy of a communications entrepreneur who was feeling expansive but really you do illustrate why ordinary amateurs who litigate need lawyers and novice pols need PR professionals. If you can't see what a mess you've got into trying to establish that you originally used a pejorative term such as "rumor" and suggesting
    (a) that "the jury is out" conveyed the same meaning as "rumor", and
    (b) that perhaps I didn't understand the expression
    then you should get friendly help.
    As it happens I am very familiar with just about every expression in which the word "jury" is commonly used because of, for example, having the 9th Juror part in an eight night run of "Twelve Angry Men " for charity within the last two years, and, 20 years ago being the lead author of a research report for government on major aspects of jury law and jury service which took us, inter alia, to the OJ trial when the jury was, quite literally, "out" to interview with Eric Holder on the federal jury system and contrasting experiences in Canada, Hong Kong and Ireland inter alia. So you can see why I am not only familiar with the terminology and usage pertaining to juries but in a position to point out that, by saying "the jury is out" you are saying that the responsible decisionmakers have before them evidence (not "rumor" which would be inadmissable hearsay) which passes the test of a prima facie case on which the jury could find that the charge was proved. (For a proper fee I will provide you with some inconsequential quibbles you can voice if you are really desperate but the above is basically slam dunk). So isn't a pity that you didn't just say first up tout court "I didn't and don't mean to imply that there was serious reason to believe that there was anything but natural disaster and human error and arse covering involved at Fukushima" instead of adding silly links to prove that you are indeed really muddleheaded?

    As for your "noble" Persian civilisation [don't forget the "noble" which you now clearly want to apply to everyone from Cyrus to Ayatollah Khameni and his Iranian Revolutionary Guards] I won't embarrass you by actually demanding that you try and make sense of your meaning but you might like to reflect on how you would delineate Persian Civilisation by reference to the categories customarily used in describing the much more familiar concept of Western Civilisation. (Think rule of law, the Renaissance and Reformation, Enlightenment, personal liberty for just some clues to get you thinking. Come to think of it capital punishment in the old fashioned Middle Eastern way could be your idea of "noble" I suppose - quick and bloody as against long drawn out chemical torture...)

    What some third party chooses to call his course isn't persuasive on the issue of substance. Likewise the fact that someone (in Humpty Dumpty style: I trust you know the reference) tendentiously says that Israel is seeking hegemony or is hegomonic in the Middle East doesn't make it anything but an assault on a useful word which has well established precise meaning when discussing, for example, Germany's unification under Prussian hegemony. Even "As the only large healthy economy Germany is threatening to become a hegemonic power in Europe" would show a proper grasp of the regular usage which is required for effective unambiguous communication.

    **I won't tease: the outstanding pinot noir was an Amifield - 2013 (from memory). I think its from a newish vineyard on a hill country sheep property in the South Island.
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  62. @Aurelius
    My position is that the Islamic nations are not and never have been a friend of the West. They are historical enemies of the West. We, as the children of Japheth, have much more in common with the children of Isaac than those of Ishmael. We will rue the day we allowed them to colonise our nations.

    Islamic nations may not have exactly been friends of the West, but they were never enemies until after the children of Japheth purchased the US and British governments, bribed it’s lawmakers into granting them the land Palestine, ethnically cleansed the land it of it’s native population, then went about terrorizing neighbors on every side. Over the past 5,000 years, the children of Isaac have compiled a record of butchery that any sociopath would envy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @DNA
    Oh my gosh. So the "religion of peace" website is just a big lie. It's THE JOOOS!!!!!!!!!!

    Too much
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  63. @Cloak And Dagger
    It was you who used the word “rumour” not me, and the text is still up there for everyone to see. I later quoted it as “rumor” to highlight the American spelling that I had converted it to:


    Never heard of the Stuxnet/Fukushima rumour. Where does that come from. [sic]

     

    My original statement was:


    the jury is still out as to whether the Fukushima reactors were accidentally infected by the Stuxnet virus

     

    Perhaps you are not familiar with the idiom “the jury is still out”, as you appear to be unfamiliar with other phrases that you are quizzical about. Here is some free education that may inspire you to go crack open a book:

    From the urban dictionary:


    an expression implying that a conclusion about someone or something has yet to be reached.

     

    From the Cambridge dictionary:
    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/british/the-jury-is-still-out


    if the jury is (still) out on a subject, people do not yet know the answer or have not yet decided if it is good or bad: The jury's still out on the safety of irradiated food.

     

    None of these pass judgment on whether the issue is nonsensical or rational. It is a statement of the fact that certain hypotheses have been presented for consideration and no conclusions have been reached.

    It is not just the conspiracy theorists who draw attention to Fukushima as a deliberate act. Even the respected “Foreign Policy” magazine drew parallels with the Stuxnet attack on Iranian reactors:

    http://foreignpolicy.com/2011/03/17/where-fukushima-meets-stuxnet-the-growing-threat-of-cyber-war/
    Where Fukushima meets Stuxnet: The growing threat of cyber war – David Rothkopf


    The way to look at this story is to link in your mind the Stuxnetrevelations about the reportedly U.S. and Israeli-led cyber attacks on the Iranian nuclear enrichment facility at Natanz and the calamities at the Fukushima power facilities over the past week. While seemingly unconnected, the stories together speak to the before and after of what cyber conflict may look like. Enemies will be able to target one another’s critical infrastructure as was done by the U.S. and Israeli team (likely working with British and German assistance) targeting the Iranian program and burrowing into their operating systems, they will seek to produce malfunctions that bring economies to their knees, put societies in the dark, or undercut national defenses.

     

    As to your claim: It seems unlikely that anything requiring the disciplined brainpower of the Stuxnet operation would suffer such egregious accidents in an irrelevant and distant company:

    From the Washington Blog:
    http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2013/11/america-and-israel-created-a-monster-computer-virus-which-now-threatens-nuclear-reactors-worldwide.html
    America and Israel Created a Monster Computer Virus Which Now Threatens Nuclear Reactors Worldwide


    The virus appears to have spread to other countries.
    One of the world’s top computer security experts – Eugene Kaspersky – said this week that the virus has attacked a Russian nuclear reactor. As The Register notes:
    The infamous Stuxnet malware thought to have been developed by the US and Israel to disrupt Iran’s nuclear facilities, also managed to cause chaos at a Russian nuclear plant, according to Eugene Kaspersky.
    The revelation came during a Q&A session after a speech at Australia’s National Press Club last week, in which he argued that those spooks responsible for “offensive technologies” don’t realise the unintended consequences of releasing malware into the wild.
    “Everything you do is a boomerang,” he added. “It will get back to you.”

    :
    Other security experts agree.
    As British security website V3 – in an article entitled “Stuxnet: UK and US nuclear plants at risk as malware spreads outside Russia” – reports:
    Experts from FireEye [background] and F-Secure [background] told V3 the nature of Stuxnet means it is likely many power plants have fallen victim to the malware ….

     

    So much for your “disciplined brainpower”. Ha! Accidental infection of Fukushima does not sound quite as nonsensical now, does it?

    As for your laughable claim about being related to a Japanese journalist and yet never having heard of this:

    http://www.veteranstoday.com/2011/10/30/fukushima-sabotage-japanese-journalist-accuses-israel/
    Fukushima Sabotage – Japanese Journalist Accuses Israel


    A leading Japanese journalist recently made two incredible claims about the Fukushima power plant that suffered a nuclear meltdown in March 2011, sending shockwaves around the world.
    First, the former editor of a national newspaper in Japan says the U.S. and Israel knew Fukushima had weapons-grade uranium and plutonium that were exposed to the atmosphere after a massive tsunami wave hit the reactor.
    Second, he contends that Israeli intelligence sabotaged the reactor in retaliation for Japan’s support of an independent Palestinian state.
    According to Yoishi Shimatsu, a former editor of Japan Times Weekly, these nuclear materials were shipped to the plant in 2007 on the orders of Dick Cheney and George W. Bush, with the connivance of Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert.

     

    I guess your Japanese relative must not be such a good journalist, huh?

    I could go on and on with citation after citation (of which you have yet to provide one), but your ignorance has bored me to sleep.

    Cloak and Dagger,
    I appreciate your efforts, but you’re wasting your time. Hasbara trolls like Wizard who clutter up the board with silly and pointless comments, are apparently being compensated according to the number of responses they make.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cloak And Dagger
    Thanks Carroll - I am quite familiar with these hasbrats, and it is frequently frustrating to debate them.

    Mark Twain is reputed to have said (probably an urban myth): Don’t argue with idiots because they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.

    What motivates me to do it, however, and not just on this site, is that innocent bystanders may read their assertions and leave with the wrong impression. It bugs the hell out of me to let them leave their assertions unchallenged for that reason. As you rightly point out, they are paid per response. Their goal is to distract and move discussions critical of Israel into rat holes.

    Those of us in the know, which includes you and others on this blog, have a responsibility to educate our fellow citizens - even if it requires engaging in futile discussions with fools. We are armed with facts, and in the end, they cannot prevail. They count on our frustration making us give up the battle.

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  64. @Carroll Price
    Cloak and Dagger,
    I appreciate your efforts, but you're wasting your time. Hasbara trolls like Wizard who clutter up the board with silly and pointless comments, are apparently being compensated according to the number of responses they make.

    Thanks Carroll – I am quite familiar with these hasbrats, and it is frequently frustrating to debate them.

    Mark Twain is reputed to have said (probably an urban myth): Don’t argue with idiots because they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.

    What motivates me to do it, however, and not just on this site, is that innocent bystanders may read their assertions and leave with the wrong impression. It bugs the hell out of me to let them leave their assertions unchallenged for that reason. As you rightly point out, they are paid per response. Their goal is to distract and move discussions critical of Israel into rat holes.

    Those of us in the know, which includes you and others on this blog, have a responsibility to educate our fellow citizens – even if it requires engaging in futile discussions with fools. We are armed with facts, and in the end, they cannot prevail. They count on our frustration making us give up the battle.

    Read More
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  65. denk says:

    so does it means that the unitedsnake is freeing itself from the m.e.
    to take on russia, china full time , is this something to celebrate ?
    when murkka *acts on its own interest*, run for your life !

    *But vital national interests are involved here.
    And what might those be? Corporate profits, multiple military bases, repayment of debts incurred by the wealthy and repaid on the backs of the poor*

    https://zcomm.org/zcommentary/wars-no-more-by-blas-bonpane/

    Read More
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  66. @Cloak And Dagger
    It was you who used the word “rumour” not me, and the text is still up there for everyone to see. I later quoted it as “rumor” to highlight the American spelling that I had converted it to:


    Never heard of the Stuxnet/Fukushima rumour. Where does that come from. [sic]

     

    My original statement was:


    the jury is still out as to whether the Fukushima reactors were accidentally infected by the Stuxnet virus

     

    Perhaps you are not familiar with the idiom “the jury is still out”, as you appear to be unfamiliar with other phrases that you are quizzical about. Here is some free education that may inspire you to go crack open a book:

    From the urban dictionary:


    an expression implying that a conclusion about someone or something has yet to be reached.

     

    From the Cambridge dictionary:
    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/british/the-jury-is-still-out


    if the jury is (still) out on a subject, people do not yet know the answer or have not yet decided if it is good or bad: The jury's still out on the safety of irradiated food.

     

    None of these pass judgment on whether the issue is nonsensical or rational. It is a statement of the fact that certain hypotheses have been presented for consideration and no conclusions have been reached.

    It is not just the conspiracy theorists who draw attention to Fukushima as a deliberate act. Even the respected “Foreign Policy” magazine drew parallels with the Stuxnet attack on Iranian reactors:

    http://foreignpolicy.com/2011/03/17/where-fukushima-meets-stuxnet-the-growing-threat-of-cyber-war/
    Where Fukushima meets Stuxnet: The growing threat of cyber war – David Rothkopf


    The way to look at this story is to link in your mind the Stuxnetrevelations about the reportedly U.S. and Israeli-led cyber attacks on the Iranian nuclear enrichment facility at Natanz and the calamities at the Fukushima power facilities over the past week. While seemingly unconnected, the stories together speak to the before and after of what cyber conflict may look like. Enemies will be able to target one another’s critical infrastructure as was done by the U.S. and Israeli team (likely working with British and German assistance) targeting the Iranian program and burrowing into their operating systems, they will seek to produce malfunctions that bring economies to their knees, put societies in the dark, or undercut national defenses.

     

    As to your claim: It seems unlikely that anything requiring the disciplined brainpower of the Stuxnet operation would suffer such egregious accidents in an irrelevant and distant company:

    From the Washington Blog:
    http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2013/11/america-and-israel-created-a-monster-computer-virus-which-now-threatens-nuclear-reactors-worldwide.html
    America and Israel Created a Monster Computer Virus Which Now Threatens Nuclear Reactors Worldwide


    The virus appears to have spread to other countries.
    One of the world’s top computer security experts – Eugene Kaspersky – said this week that the virus has attacked a Russian nuclear reactor. As The Register notes:
    The infamous Stuxnet malware thought to have been developed by the US and Israel to disrupt Iran’s nuclear facilities, also managed to cause chaos at a Russian nuclear plant, according to Eugene Kaspersky.
    The revelation came during a Q&A session after a speech at Australia’s National Press Club last week, in which he argued that those spooks responsible for “offensive technologies” don’t realise the unintended consequences of releasing malware into the wild.
    “Everything you do is a boomerang,” he added. “It will get back to you.”

    :
    Other security experts agree.
    As British security website V3 – in an article entitled “Stuxnet: UK and US nuclear plants at risk as malware spreads outside Russia” – reports:
    Experts from FireEye [background] and F-Secure [background] told V3 the nature of Stuxnet means it is likely many power plants have fallen victim to the malware ….

     

    So much for your “disciplined brainpower”. Ha! Accidental infection of Fukushima does not sound quite as nonsensical now, does it?

    As for your laughable claim about being related to a Japanese journalist and yet never having heard of this:

    http://www.veteranstoday.com/2011/10/30/fukushima-sabotage-japanese-journalist-accuses-israel/
    Fukushima Sabotage – Japanese Journalist Accuses Israel


    A leading Japanese journalist recently made two incredible claims about the Fukushima power plant that suffered a nuclear meltdown in March 2011, sending shockwaves around the world.
    First, the former editor of a national newspaper in Japan says the U.S. and Israel knew Fukushima had weapons-grade uranium and plutonium that were exposed to the atmosphere after a massive tsunami wave hit the reactor.
    Second, he contends that Israeli intelligence sabotaged the reactor in retaliation for Japan’s support of an independent Palestinian state.
    According to Yoishi Shimatsu, a former editor of Japan Times Weekly, these nuclear materials were shipped to the plant in 2007 on the orders of Dick Cheney and George W. Bush, with the connivance of Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert.

     

    I guess your Japanese relative must not be such a good journalist, huh?

    I could go on and on with citation after citation (of which you have yet to provide one), but your ignorance has bored me to sleep.

    Haven’t you got a sensible wife to say “there there dear don’t get so excited and just stop digging: what you say or anyone thinks of you really isn’t all that important – and remember not to answer questions without your lawyer or at least your editor present. You know how bad you are on picking up the detail”.

    Your links are absurd. Even the nutters in Veterans Today (am I getting this right “a magazine for the clandestine community”?) start their 2011 story (nothing recent?) by calling it incredible in the first par. Then you cite something from Foreign Policy which doesn’t even get you off the ground with a serious suggestion that the Stuxnet virus, or any other, may have actually caused any of the disastrous Fukushima problems. (BTW my distinguished Japanese engineer relation was an electrical engineer and senior manager with a power company and confirms that, as far as he’s concerned your fantasy is total crap in the nicest polite Japanese way).

    I know I’m being rude and impatient and maybe it’s got to do with the outstanding New Zealand pinot noir** I was served at lunch courtesy of a communications entrepreneur who was feeling expansive but really you do illustrate why ordinary amateurs who litigate need lawyers and novice pols need PR professionals. If you can’t see what a mess you’ve got into trying to establish that you originally used a pejorative term such as “rumor” and suggesting
    (a) that “the jury is out” conveyed the same meaning as “rumor”, and
    (b) that perhaps I didn’t understand the expression
    then you should get friendly help.
    As it happens I am very familiar with just about every expression in which the word “jury” is commonly used because of, for example, having the 9th Juror part in an eight night run of “Twelve Angry Men ” for charity within the last two years, and, 20 years ago being the lead author of a research report for government on major aspects of jury law and jury service which took us, inter alia, to the OJ trial when the jury was, quite literally, “out” to interview with Eric Holder on the federal jury system and contrasting experiences in Canada, Hong Kong and Ireland inter alia. So you can see why I am not only familiar with the terminology and usage pertaining to juries but in a position to point out that, by saying “the jury is out” you are saying that the responsible decisionmakers have before them evidence (not “rumor” which would be inadmissable hearsay) which passes the test of a prima facie case on which the jury could find that the charge was proved. (For a proper fee I will provide you with some inconsequential quibbles you can voice if you are really desperate but the above is basically slam dunk). So isn’t a pity that you didn’t just say first up tout court “I didn’t and don’t mean to imply that there was serious reason to believe that there was anything but natural disaster and human error and arse covering involved at Fukushima” instead of adding silly links to prove that you are indeed really muddleheaded?

    As for your “noble” Persian civilisation [don't forget the "noble" which you now clearly want to apply to everyone from Cyrus to Ayatollah Khameni and his Iranian Revolutionary Guards] I won’t embarrass you by actually demanding that you try and make sense of your meaning but you might like to reflect on how you would delineate Persian Civilisation by reference to the categories customarily used in describing the much more familiar concept of Western Civilisation. (Think rule of law, the Renaissance and Reformation, Enlightenment, personal liberty for just some clues to get you thinking. Come to think of it capital punishment in the old fashioned Middle Eastern way could be your idea of “noble” I suppose – quick and bloody as against long drawn out chemical torture…)

    What some third party chooses to call his course isn’t persuasive on the issue of substance. Likewise the fact that someone (in Humpty Dumpty style: I trust you know the reference) tendentiously says that Israel is seeking hegemony or is hegomonic in the Middle East doesn’t make it anything but an assault on a useful word which has well established precise meaning when discussing, for example, Germany’s unification under Prussian hegemony. Even “As the only large healthy economy Germany is threatening to become a hegemonic power in Europe” would show a proper grasp of the regular usage which is required for effective unambiguous communication.

    **I won’t tease: the outstanding pinot noir was an Amifield – 2013 (from memory). I think its from a newish vineyard on a hill country sheep property in the South Island.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
    Sorry if you think your mate CP maybe baying in my direction to good effect. I've blocked his Comments and don't propose to unblock.
    , @Cloak And Dagger
    I guess I was wrong in thinking that Hasbara central paid you all in the number of responses. It appears that they pay you by the word count since you have spent the whole day just to come up with a veritable diarrhea of verbiage, and as the bard said "full of sound and fury, signifying nothing" (go look it up, I am sure Hasbara central has a library somewhere).

    But it is also clear that Hasbara central must be spread thin as more people wake up, since they are now sending their dimmest bulbs this way. Run along now, we have tired of you.

    , @DNA
    Wow. Impressive. Truly a slam dunk. Awesome. Inspiring.

    To somebody, I suppose.

    But sad nonetheless. How many times have you gone back and re-read your post to feel that warm flush of superiority?

    Cm on lighten up counsel.......
    , @Carroll Price
    Wizard,
    One of your fellow hasbara trolls ( DNA) has advised that you lighten up on the rhetoric. He or she appears worried that your post are beginning to make the Tribe look bad.
    , @SolontoCroesus
    . . .

    and yet, and yet, Israeli Jews long more than anything else on earth to be "recognized as part of" the "noble Persian empire" -- of yesterday AND today.

    http://www.brookings.edu/events/2015/03/12-israel-periphery-doctrine-search-middle-east-allies

    We Israelis, . . . to this day, have a need to -- a deep need to be recognized and accepted by the region.

    You see, Bibi’s demand, which is supported by most Israelis, that the Palestinians recognize us as a Jewish state, or the state of the Jewish people -- the nation-state of the Jewish people -- this goes way back, this need to be recognized.

    It explains our relationships with some of the Christian and Kurdish and Druze minorities as well, and so at the height of the periphery doctrine, when things are going well, there’s this sense that the ancient peoples of the Middle East have created an alliance, the people who precede the Arabs, okay. We go back with Iran, we just celebrated Purim, all right, we go back 2,600 years with Iran. The Egyptian, the Ethiopian national narrative is King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba. So, this is almost a biblical -- a new biblical chapter.
    This is how some people in Israel felt.
     
    I'll wait while you recover from fit of laughter/incredulity.

    Buncha no account, no history, no kultcha Polish/Russian/ Lithuanian Jews "go way back 2,600 years with Iran."

    howler material fer shur.

    To their credit, my Iranian friends remain protective of Iranian Jews, and Jews consider Iran the place where they first learned about culture -- writing, for example, and rule of law, although many Jews now abuse both, the first through overuse, the second through underuse.
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  67. @Wizard of Oz
    Haven't you got a sensible wife to say "there there dear don't get so excited and just stop digging: what you say or anyone thinks of you really isn't all that important - and remember not to answer questions without your lawyer or at least your editor present. You know how bad you are on picking up the detail".

    Your links are absurd. Even the nutters in Veterans Today (am I getting this right "a magazine for the clandestine community"?) start their 2011 story (nothing recent?) by calling it incredible in the first par. Then you cite something from Foreign Policy which doesn't even get you off the ground with a serious suggestion that the Stuxnet virus, or any other, may have actually caused any of the disastrous Fukushima problems. (BTW my distinguished Japanese engineer relation was an electrical engineer and senior manager with a power company and confirms that, as far as he's concerned your fantasy is total crap in the nicest polite Japanese way).

    I know I'm being rude and impatient and maybe it's got to do with the outstanding New Zealand pinot noir** I was served at lunch courtesy of a communications entrepreneur who was feeling expansive but really you do illustrate why ordinary amateurs who litigate need lawyers and novice pols need PR professionals. If you can't see what a mess you've got into trying to establish that you originally used a pejorative term such as "rumor" and suggesting
    (a) that "the jury is out" conveyed the same meaning as "rumor", and
    (b) that perhaps I didn't understand the expression
    then you should get friendly help.
    As it happens I am very familiar with just about every expression in which the word "jury" is commonly used because of, for example, having the 9th Juror part in an eight night run of "Twelve Angry Men " for charity within the last two years, and, 20 years ago being the lead author of a research report for government on major aspects of jury law and jury service which took us, inter alia, to the OJ trial when the jury was, quite literally, "out" to interview with Eric Holder on the federal jury system and contrasting experiences in Canada, Hong Kong and Ireland inter alia. So you can see why I am not only familiar with the terminology and usage pertaining to juries but in a position to point out that, by saying "the jury is out" you are saying that the responsible decisionmakers have before them evidence (not "rumor" which would be inadmissable hearsay) which passes the test of a prima facie case on which the jury could find that the charge was proved. (For a proper fee I will provide you with some inconsequential quibbles you can voice if you are really desperate but the above is basically slam dunk). So isn't a pity that you didn't just say first up tout court "I didn't and don't mean to imply that there was serious reason to believe that there was anything but natural disaster and human error and arse covering involved at Fukushima" instead of adding silly links to prove that you are indeed really muddleheaded?

    As for your "noble" Persian civilisation [don't forget the "noble" which you now clearly want to apply to everyone from Cyrus to Ayatollah Khameni and his Iranian Revolutionary Guards] I won't embarrass you by actually demanding that you try and make sense of your meaning but you might like to reflect on how you would delineate Persian Civilisation by reference to the categories customarily used in describing the much more familiar concept of Western Civilisation. (Think rule of law, the Renaissance and Reformation, Enlightenment, personal liberty for just some clues to get you thinking. Come to think of it capital punishment in the old fashioned Middle Eastern way could be your idea of "noble" I suppose - quick and bloody as against long drawn out chemical torture...)

    What some third party chooses to call his course isn't persuasive on the issue of substance. Likewise the fact that someone (in Humpty Dumpty style: I trust you know the reference) tendentiously says that Israel is seeking hegemony or is hegomonic in the Middle East doesn't make it anything but an assault on a useful word which has well established precise meaning when discussing, for example, Germany's unification under Prussian hegemony. Even "As the only large healthy economy Germany is threatening to become a hegemonic power in Europe" would show a proper grasp of the regular usage which is required for effective unambiguous communication.

    **I won't tease: the outstanding pinot noir was an Amifield - 2013 (from memory). I think its from a newish vineyard on a hill country sheep property in the South Island.

    Sorry if you think your mate CP maybe baying in my direction to good effect. I’ve blocked his Comments and don’t propose to unblock.

    Read More
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  68. @Carroll Price
    The biggest problem Israel has with Iran is that Iran supports Syria and Hezbollah. Which in turn prevents Lebanon from being invaded by Israel. Which prior to 2008 occurred on a routine basis as (more or less) realistic military exercises under live fire. But ever since Iran effectively trained and armed Hezbollah defense forces, Israel is no longer able to invade Lebanon on a whelm without suffering major casualties that Israelis will not support. As was made evident by the weeping, wailing, and gnashing of teeth among Israelis following the pell-mell retreat of IDF forces out of Lebanon after being defeated by Hezbollah defense forces in 2008.
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  69. Not to join in the nutter parade, but Fukushima failing due to Stuxnet would be more glamorous and equitable to Tepco than the lazy, haphazard, half-assed way they ran their reactors in the past. The going joke at one time was it’s harder to get a job cleaning a gym in Tokyo than getting on with Tepco.

    Read More
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  70. @Wizard of Oz
    Haven't you got a sensible wife to say "there there dear don't get so excited and just stop digging: what you say or anyone thinks of you really isn't all that important - and remember not to answer questions without your lawyer or at least your editor present. You know how bad you are on picking up the detail".

    Your links are absurd. Even the nutters in Veterans Today (am I getting this right "a magazine for the clandestine community"?) start their 2011 story (nothing recent?) by calling it incredible in the first par. Then you cite something from Foreign Policy which doesn't even get you off the ground with a serious suggestion that the Stuxnet virus, or any other, may have actually caused any of the disastrous Fukushima problems. (BTW my distinguished Japanese engineer relation was an electrical engineer and senior manager with a power company and confirms that, as far as he's concerned your fantasy is total crap in the nicest polite Japanese way).

    I know I'm being rude and impatient and maybe it's got to do with the outstanding New Zealand pinot noir** I was served at lunch courtesy of a communications entrepreneur who was feeling expansive but really you do illustrate why ordinary amateurs who litigate need lawyers and novice pols need PR professionals. If you can't see what a mess you've got into trying to establish that you originally used a pejorative term such as "rumor" and suggesting
    (a) that "the jury is out" conveyed the same meaning as "rumor", and
    (b) that perhaps I didn't understand the expression
    then you should get friendly help.
    As it happens I am very familiar with just about every expression in which the word "jury" is commonly used because of, for example, having the 9th Juror part in an eight night run of "Twelve Angry Men " for charity within the last two years, and, 20 years ago being the lead author of a research report for government on major aspects of jury law and jury service which took us, inter alia, to the OJ trial when the jury was, quite literally, "out" to interview with Eric Holder on the federal jury system and contrasting experiences in Canada, Hong Kong and Ireland inter alia. So you can see why I am not only familiar with the terminology and usage pertaining to juries but in a position to point out that, by saying "the jury is out" you are saying that the responsible decisionmakers have before them evidence (not "rumor" which would be inadmissable hearsay) which passes the test of a prima facie case on which the jury could find that the charge was proved. (For a proper fee I will provide you with some inconsequential quibbles you can voice if you are really desperate but the above is basically slam dunk). So isn't a pity that you didn't just say first up tout court "I didn't and don't mean to imply that there was serious reason to believe that there was anything but natural disaster and human error and arse covering involved at Fukushima" instead of adding silly links to prove that you are indeed really muddleheaded?

    As for your "noble" Persian civilisation [don't forget the "noble" which you now clearly want to apply to everyone from Cyrus to Ayatollah Khameni and his Iranian Revolutionary Guards] I won't embarrass you by actually demanding that you try and make sense of your meaning but you might like to reflect on how you would delineate Persian Civilisation by reference to the categories customarily used in describing the much more familiar concept of Western Civilisation. (Think rule of law, the Renaissance and Reformation, Enlightenment, personal liberty for just some clues to get you thinking. Come to think of it capital punishment in the old fashioned Middle Eastern way could be your idea of "noble" I suppose - quick and bloody as against long drawn out chemical torture...)

    What some third party chooses to call his course isn't persuasive on the issue of substance. Likewise the fact that someone (in Humpty Dumpty style: I trust you know the reference) tendentiously says that Israel is seeking hegemony or is hegomonic in the Middle East doesn't make it anything but an assault on a useful word which has well established precise meaning when discussing, for example, Germany's unification under Prussian hegemony. Even "As the only large healthy economy Germany is threatening to become a hegemonic power in Europe" would show a proper grasp of the regular usage which is required for effective unambiguous communication.

    **I won't tease: the outstanding pinot noir was an Amifield - 2013 (from memory). I think its from a newish vineyard on a hill country sheep property in the South Island.

    I guess I was wrong in thinking that Hasbara central paid you all in the number of responses. It appears that they pay you by the word count since you have spent the whole day just to come up with a veritable diarrhea of verbiage, and as the bard said “full of sound and fury, signifying nothing” (go look it up, I am sure Hasbara central has a library somewhere).

    But it is also clear that Hasbara central must be spread thin as more people wake up, since they are now sending their dimmest bulbs this way. Run along now, we have tired of you.

    Read More
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  71. KA says:
    @anonymouse
    Do keep in mind that Mr. Margolis also writes for that bastion of conservative thought, the Huffington Post, also for Dawn, an English language Pakistani newspaper, the Gulf Times in Qatar, and the Khaleej Times in Dubai.

    Referring to Obama's election as president, Mr. Margolis wrote:

    Americans did not "liberate" Iraq, but they certainly liberated their own nation last week by sweeping the Republican Party from power. One prays America's long nightmare of foreign aggressions, fear, religious extremism, and flirting with neo-fascism is finally at an end.

    Mr. Margolis also believes that the U.S. government may have been behind the attacks on 9/11. He despises the Tea Party. And, last, but not least, his mother, Nexhmie Zaimi, was a well know advocate for Palestinians.

    No bias here at all.

    He writes in those for many reasons. One of the reason is the same that didn’t allow M & W publish ,ISRAELI LOBBY AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY in USA . Its the same reason Donald Neff couldn’t get a review of his books in NYT Review of Books or Prof at University of Buffalo couldn’t get his piece on MY PROMISED LAND by Shavitz get published ,or J Sorbone was fired for . There are many who made to the list.

    Mother of Margolis is Palestine advocate!
    Lets see – can we ask NYT who covers Israel and what relations she/ he has with IDF,settlers,and mayor of Tl Aviv?
    What about Rubin of WaPo?
    What about those male and female voices in NPR?
    Did Blitzer work for AIPAC?
    What bout Chait of WaPo?
    From Commentray magazine to Tablet to MSM in US to Jerusalem Post – the thread goes right back to Israel.

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  72. DNA says:
    @anonymouse
    Do keep in mind that Mr. Margolis also writes for that bastion of conservative thought, the Huffington Post, also for Dawn, an English language Pakistani newspaper, the Gulf Times in Qatar, and the Khaleej Times in Dubai.

    Referring to Obama's election as president, Mr. Margolis wrote:

    Americans did not "liberate" Iraq, but they certainly liberated their own nation last week by sweeping the Republican Party from power. One prays America's long nightmare of foreign aggressions, fear, religious extremism, and flirting with neo-fascism is finally at an end.

    Mr. Margolis also believes that the U.S. government may have been behind the attacks on 9/11. He despises the Tea Party. And, last, but not least, his mother, Nexhmie Zaimi, was a well know advocate for Palestinians.

    No bias here at all.

    Cmon lay off the facts, don’t want to confuse the LIV

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  73. DNA says:
    @Wizard of Oz
    Haven't you got a sensible wife to say "there there dear don't get so excited and just stop digging: what you say or anyone thinks of you really isn't all that important - and remember not to answer questions without your lawyer or at least your editor present. You know how bad you are on picking up the detail".

    Your links are absurd. Even the nutters in Veterans Today (am I getting this right "a magazine for the clandestine community"?) start their 2011 story (nothing recent?) by calling it incredible in the first par. Then you cite something from Foreign Policy which doesn't even get you off the ground with a serious suggestion that the Stuxnet virus, or any other, may have actually caused any of the disastrous Fukushima problems. (BTW my distinguished Japanese engineer relation was an electrical engineer and senior manager with a power company and confirms that, as far as he's concerned your fantasy is total crap in the nicest polite Japanese way).

    I know I'm being rude and impatient and maybe it's got to do with the outstanding New Zealand pinot noir** I was served at lunch courtesy of a communications entrepreneur who was feeling expansive but really you do illustrate why ordinary amateurs who litigate need lawyers and novice pols need PR professionals. If you can't see what a mess you've got into trying to establish that you originally used a pejorative term such as "rumor" and suggesting
    (a) that "the jury is out" conveyed the same meaning as "rumor", and
    (b) that perhaps I didn't understand the expression
    then you should get friendly help.
    As it happens I am very familiar with just about every expression in which the word "jury" is commonly used because of, for example, having the 9th Juror part in an eight night run of "Twelve Angry Men " for charity within the last two years, and, 20 years ago being the lead author of a research report for government on major aspects of jury law and jury service which took us, inter alia, to the OJ trial when the jury was, quite literally, "out" to interview with Eric Holder on the federal jury system and contrasting experiences in Canada, Hong Kong and Ireland inter alia. So you can see why I am not only familiar with the terminology and usage pertaining to juries but in a position to point out that, by saying "the jury is out" you are saying that the responsible decisionmakers have before them evidence (not "rumor" which would be inadmissable hearsay) which passes the test of a prima facie case on which the jury could find that the charge was proved. (For a proper fee I will provide you with some inconsequential quibbles you can voice if you are really desperate but the above is basically slam dunk). So isn't a pity that you didn't just say first up tout court "I didn't and don't mean to imply that there was serious reason to believe that there was anything but natural disaster and human error and arse covering involved at Fukushima" instead of adding silly links to prove that you are indeed really muddleheaded?

    As for your "noble" Persian civilisation [don't forget the "noble" which you now clearly want to apply to everyone from Cyrus to Ayatollah Khameni and his Iranian Revolutionary Guards] I won't embarrass you by actually demanding that you try and make sense of your meaning but you might like to reflect on how you would delineate Persian Civilisation by reference to the categories customarily used in describing the much more familiar concept of Western Civilisation. (Think rule of law, the Renaissance and Reformation, Enlightenment, personal liberty for just some clues to get you thinking. Come to think of it capital punishment in the old fashioned Middle Eastern way could be your idea of "noble" I suppose - quick and bloody as against long drawn out chemical torture...)

    What some third party chooses to call his course isn't persuasive on the issue of substance. Likewise the fact that someone (in Humpty Dumpty style: I trust you know the reference) tendentiously says that Israel is seeking hegemony or is hegomonic in the Middle East doesn't make it anything but an assault on a useful word which has well established precise meaning when discussing, for example, Germany's unification under Prussian hegemony. Even "As the only large healthy economy Germany is threatening to become a hegemonic power in Europe" would show a proper grasp of the regular usage which is required for effective unambiguous communication.

    **I won't tease: the outstanding pinot noir was an Amifield - 2013 (from memory). I think its from a newish vineyard on a hill country sheep property in the South Island.

    Wow. Impressive. Truly a slam dunk. Awesome. Inspiring.

    To somebody, I suppose.

    But sad nonetheless. How many times have you gone back and re-read your post to feel that warm flush of superiority?

    Cm on lighten up counsel…….

    Read More
    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
    Wow, was it that good?!? I must go back and read it if the lesson isn't that I should have reread it to self-edit instead of dashing it off [Cheeky smiley that disrupts it seems]

    Sadly no sense of superiority because the subject of one's scorn has to be someone of sufficient credentials or quality to make comparison other than demeaning.

    What was satisfying was to suddenly realise how completely he had delivered himself up by rabbiting on about the jury being out and his pretence that he had originally implied what "rumor" implies.

    Hoping for the success of, and my enjoyment of, Ron's great enterprise over the long haul it is quite important from my point of view that I can ignore
    1. non-humorous trolls; ie. people whose bad faith or frivolity has no compensating features;
    2. Angry obsessives and others who put one in mind of Mark Twain's "To a man with a hammer everything looks like a nail";
    3. Those who, when tested, if not exactly tested to destruction but given every chance, simply aren't bright enough or well informed enough to be worth spending time with. As Sam Shama (possibly his real name) noted the blogger who, under one hat, calls himself SolontoCroesus shows signs of having done some interesting reading and being scrupulous enough not to make things up. And there are others one might strongly suspect have only one foot on the same planet but have something interesting to say or say something which is made interesting by the acuteness of the way in which it is expressed. However Koko's list does get longer.

    Phew! It was that piratical smiley wot did it. I don't often use them butwonder why some people manage it on the Unz Review and I cannot.

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  74. DNA says:
    @Carroll Price
    Islamic nations may not have exactly been friends of the West, but they were never enemies until after the children of Japheth purchased the US and British governments, bribed it's lawmakers into granting them the land Palestine, ethnically cleansed the land it of it's native population, then went about terrorizing neighbors on every side. Over the past 5,000 years, the children of Isaac have compiled a record of butchery that any sociopath would envy.

    Oh my gosh. So the “religion of peace” website is just a big lie. It’s THE JOOOS!!!!!!!!!!

    Too much

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  75. @DNA
    Wow. Impressive. Truly a slam dunk. Awesome. Inspiring.

    To somebody, I suppose.

    But sad nonetheless. How many times have you gone back and re-read your post to feel that warm flush of superiority?

    Cm on lighten up counsel.......

    Wow, was it that good?!? I must go back and read it if the lesson isn’t that I should have reread it to self-edit instead of dashing it off [Cheeky smiley that disrupts it seems]

    Sadly no sense of superiority because the subject of one’s scorn has to be someone of sufficient credentials or quality to make comparison other than demeaning.

    What was satisfying was to suddenly realise how completely he had delivered himself up by rabbiting on about the jury being out and his pretence that he had originally implied what “rumor” implies.

    Hoping for the success of, and my enjoyment of, Ron’s great enterprise over the long haul it is quite important from my point of view that I can ignore
    1. non-humorous trolls; ie. people whose bad faith or frivolity has no compensating features;
    2. Angry obsessives and others who put one in mind of Mark Twain’s “To a man with a hammer everything looks like a nail”;
    3. Those who, when tested, if not exactly tested to destruction but given every chance, simply aren’t bright enough or well informed enough to be worth spending time with. As Sam Shama (possibly his real name) noted the blogger who, under one hat, calls himself SolontoCroesus shows signs of having done some interesting reading and being scrupulous enough not to make things up. And there are others one might strongly suspect have only one foot on the same planet but have something interesting to say or say something which is made interesting by the acuteness of the way in which it is expressed. However Koko’s list does get longer.

    Phew! It was that piratical smiley wot did it. I don’t often use them butwonder why some people manage it on the Unz Review and I cannot.

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  76. @Wizard of Oz
    Haven't you got a sensible wife to say "there there dear don't get so excited and just stop digging: what you say or anyone thinks of you really isn't all that important - and remember not to answer questions without your lawyer or at least your editor present. You know how bad you are on picking up the detail".

    Your links are absurd. Even the nutters in Veterans Today (am I getting this right "a magazine for the clandestine community"?) start their 2011 story (nothing recent?) by calling it incredible in the first par. Then you cite something from Foreign Policy which doesn't even get you off the ground with a serious suggestion that the Stuxnet virus, or any other, may have actually caused any of the disastrous Fukushima problems. (BTW my distinguished Japanese engineer relation was an electrical engineer and senior manager with a power company and confirms that, as far as he's concerned your fantasy is total crap in the nicest polite Japanese way).

    I know I'm being rude and impatient and maybe it's got to do with the outstanding New Zealand pinot noir** I was served at lunch courtesy of a communications entrepreneur who was feeling expansive but really you do illustrate why ordinary amateurs who litigate need lawyers and novice pols need PR professionals. If you can't see what a mess you've got into trying to establish that you originally used a pejorative term such as "rumor" and suggesting
    (a) that "the jury is out" conveyed the same meaning as "rumor", and
    (b) that perhaps I didn't understand the expression
    then you should get friendly help.
    As it happens I am very familiar with just about every expression in which the word "jury" is commonly used because of, for example, having the 9th Juror part in an eight night run of "Twelve Angry Men " for charity within the last two years, and, 20 years ago being the lead author of a research report for government on major aspects of jury law and jury service which took us, inter alia, to the OJ trial when the jury was, quite literally, "out" to interview with Eric Holder on the federal jury system and contrasting experiences in Canada, Hong Kong and Ireland inter alia. So you can see why I am not only familiar with the terminology and usage pertaining to juries but in a position to point out that, by saying "the jury is out" you are saying that the responsible decisionmakers have before them evidence (not "rumor" which would be inadmissable hearsay) which passes the test of a prima facie case on which the jury could find that the charge was proved. (For a proper fee I will provide you with some inconsequential quibbles you can voice if you are really desperate but the above is basically slam dunk). So isn't a pity that you didn't just say first up tout court "I didn't and don't mean to imply that there was serious reason to believe that there was anything but natural disaster and human error and arse covering involved at Fukushima" instead of adding silly links to prove that you are indeed really muddleheaded?

    As for your "noble" Persian civilisation [don't forget the "noble" which you now clearly want to apply to everyone from Cyrus to Ayatollah Khameni and his Iranian Revolutionary Guards] I won't embarrass you by actually demanding that you try and make sense of your meaning but you might like to reflect on how you would delineate Persian Civilisation by reference to the categories customarily used in describing the much more familiar concept of Western Civilisation. (Think rule of law, the Renaissance and Reformation, Enlightenment, personal liberty for just some clues to get you thinking. Come to think of it capital punishment in the old fashioned Middle Eastern way could be your idea of "noble" I suppose - quick and bloody as against long drawn out chemical torture...)

    What some third party chooses to call his course isn't persuasive on the issue of substance. Likewise the fact that someone (in Humpty Dumpty style: I trust you know the reference) tendentiously says that Israel is seeking hegemony or is hegomonic in the Middle East doesn't make it anything but an assault on a useful word which has well established precise meaning when discussing, for example, Germany's unification under Prussian hegemony. Even "As the only large healthy economy Germany is threatening to become a hegemonic power in Europe" would show a proper grasp of the regular usage which is required for effective unambiguous communication.

    **I won't tease: the outstanding pinot noir was an Amifield - 2013 (from memory). I think its from a newish vineyard on a hill country sheep property in the South Island.

    Wizard,
    One of your fellow hasbara trolls ( DNA) has advised that you lighten up on the rhetoric. He or she appears worried that your post are beginning to make the Tribe look bad.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    Do yourself and your conspiratorial mate C & D a favor old son. Don't fight out of your weight group and try and stop him making a fool of himself even if WoZ is an infuriating pedant who, godammit, has the wood on you (and some heavy artillery).
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  77. […] Eric Margolis, author of American Raj, writes: […]

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  78. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Carroll Price
    Wizard,
    One of your fellow hasbara trolls ( DNA) has advised that you lighten up on the rhetoric. He or she appears worried that your post are beginning to make the Tribe look bad.

    Do yourself and your conspiratorial mate C & D a favor old son. Don’t fight out of your weight group and try and stop him making a fool of himself even if WoZ is an infuriating pedant who, godammit, has the wood on you (and some heavy artillery).

    Read More
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  79. Eric Margolis is the most reputable and knowledgeable reporter out there. He knows this region and he knows his stuff.

    Read More
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  80. @Wizard of Oz
    Haven't you got a sensible wife to say "there there dear don't get so excited and just stop digging: what you say or anyone thinks of you really isn't all that important - and remember not to answer questions without your lawyer or at least your editor present. You know how bad you are on picking up the detail".

    Your links are absurd. Even the nutters in Veterans Today (am I getting this right "a magazine for the clandestine community"?) start their 2011 story (nothing recent?) by calling it incredible in the first par. Then you cite something from Foreign Policy which doesn't even get you off the ground with a serious suggestion that the Stuxnet virus, or any other, may have actually caused any of the disastrous Fukushima problems. (BTW my distinguished Japanese engineer relation was an electrical engineer and senior manager with a power company and confirms that, as far as he's concerned your fantasy is total crap in the nicest polite Japanese way).

    I know I'm being rude and impatient and maybe it's got to do with the outstanding New Zealand pinot noir** I was served at lunch courtesy of a communications entrepreneur who was feeling expansive but really you do illustrate why ordinary amateurs who litigate need lawyers and novice pols need PR professionals. If you can't see what a mess you've got into trying to establish that you originally used a pejorative term such as "rumor" and suggesting
    (a) that "the jury is out" conveyed the same meaning as "rumor", and
    (b) that perhaps I didn't understand the expression
    then you should get friendly help.
    As it happens I am very familiar with just about every expression in which the word "jury" is commonly used because of, for example, having the 9th Juror part in an eight night run of "Twelve Angry Men " for charity within the last two years, and, 20 years ago being the lead author of a research report for government on major aspects of jury law and jury service which took us, inter alia, to the OJ trial when the jury was, quite literally, "out" to interview with Eric Holder on the federal jury system and contrasting experiences in Canada, Hong Kong and Ireland inter alia. So you can see why I am not only familiar with the terminology and usage pertaining to juries but in a position to point out that, by saying "the jury is out" you are saying that the responsible decisionmakers have before them evidence (not "rumor" which would be inadmissable hearsay) which passes the test of a prima facie case on which the jury could find that the charge was proved. (For a proper fee I will provide you with some inconsequential quibbles you can voice if you are really desperate but the above is basically slam dunk). So isn't a pity that you didn't just say first up tout court "I didn't and don't mean to imply that there was serious reason to believe that there was anything but natural disaster and human error and arse covering involved at Fukushima" instead of adding silly links to prove that you are indeed really muddleheaded?

    As for your "noble" Persian civilisation [don't forget the "noble" which you now clearly want to apply to everyone from Cyrus to Ayatollah Khameni and his Iranian Revolutionary Guards] I won't embarrass you by actually demanding that you try and make sense of your meaning but you might like to reflect on how you would delineate Persian Civilisation by reference to the categories customarily used in describing the much more familiar concept of Western Civilisation. (Think rule of law, the Renaissance and Reformation, Enlightenment, personal liberty for just some clues to get you thinking. Come to think of it capital punishment in the old fashioned Middle Eastern way could be your idea of "noble" I suppose - quick and bloody as against long drawn out chemical torture...)

    What some third party chooses to call his course isn't persuasive on the issue of substance. Likewise the fact that someone (in Humpty Dumpty style: I trust you know the reference) tendentiously says that Israel is seeking hegemony or is hegomonic in the Middle East doesn't make it anything but an assault on a useful word which has well established precise meaning when discussing, for example, Germany's unification under Prussian hegemony. Even "As the only large healthy economy Germany is threatening to become a hegemonic power in Europe" would show a proper grasp of the regular usage which is required for effective unambiguous communication.

    **I won't tease: the outstanding pinot noir was an Amifield - 2013 (from memory). I think its from a newish vineyard on a hill country sheep property in the South Island.

    . . .

    and yet, and yet, Israeli Jews long more than anything else on earth to be “recognized as part of” the “noble Persian empire” — of yesterday AND today.

    http://www.brookings.edu/events/2015/03/12-israel-periphery-doctrine-search-middle-east-allies

    We Israelis, . . . to this day, have a need to — a deep need to be recognized and accepted by the region.

    You see, Bibi’s demand, which is supported by most Israelis, that the Palestinians recognize us as a Jewish state, or the state of the Jewish people — the nation-state of the Jewish people — this goes way back, this need to be recognized.

    It explains our relationships with some of the Christian and Kurdish and Druze minorities as well, and so at the height of the periphery doctrine, when things are going well, there’s this sense that the ancient peoples of the Middle East have created an alliance, the people who precede the Arabs, okay. We go back with Iran, we just celebrated Purim, all right, we go back 2,600 years with Iran. The Egyptian, the Ethiopian national narrative is King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba. So, this is almost a biblical — a new biblical chapter.
    This is how some people in Israel felt.

    I’ll wait while you recover from fit of laughter/incredulity.

    Buncha no account, no history, no kultcha Polish/Russian/ Lithuanian Jews “go way back 2,600 years with Iran.”

    howler material fer shur.

    To their credit, my Iranian friends remain protective of Iranian Jews, and Jews consider Iran the place where they first learned about culture — writing, for example, and rule of law, although many Jews now abuse both, the first through overuse, the second through underuse.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
    Delightful. That gives you at least three months probationary suspension from the Wizard's Koko list.

    I am, rather late, beginning to get a feel for why anti-Semitism exists though the madness often exhibited on these threads - which on balance I don't think is trolling designed to damage the Unz Review - is outside my imaginative sympathies. I remain however someone who likes Jews and puts a high value on brains energetically used. I have never been conscious of Jewish tribalism in the sense of feeling an impact from it (despite knowing and liking Jews who won't have the sons who have married out at the Shabat dinner table: that tends to be the rule of the female and not the father in my limited expetience). I can see how some people might regard Jews, seen as people who stick together and support each other, as harming them or their businesses, but my experience, or at least my perception of it has been the opposite if anything. "Unto them that hath shall be given" perhaps.

    It is notable by the way how much good work and good works are directed by Australian Jews towards Aborigines and their causes and interests. It would be absurd to take this to be part of some Jewish effort to raise up competition to the dominant WASP** tradition by analogy with what is alleged in the US. A conversation I have never had but must put on my agenda is one in which I ask whether they recognise themselves as trying to expiate guilt over the Palestinians. No doubt some would say "not at all: but we all remember at Passover that we were slaves in the land of Egypt and when we do well it is to the underdog that we turn as someone who needs help". Maybe.

    **(though now also very much the Irish Catholic tradition which is no longer at war with the Protestants)
    , @Sam Shama
    We have exchanged views on this subject in the past, and I am not entirely sure what you are hinting at here. If I remember correctly, you seem to view Purim as a celebration of a coup d'etat, which while arguably might be, does not obviate a few points I have whispered in the past: that we have had a very warm relationship with ancient Fars and similarly in the modern era with the Druze etc. (in fact I predicted before the actual official action, that Tel Aviv would move to protect the interests of the Syrian Druze from Al Nusra atacks. It did turn out to be correct, and I do believe I subsequently posted the relevant link in that conversation.).
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  81. @SolontoCroesus
    . . .

    and yet, and yet, Israeli Jews long more than anything else on earth to be "recognized as part of" the "noble Persian empire" -- of yesterday AND today.

    http://www.brookings.edu/events/2015/03/12-israel-periphery-doctrine-search-middle-east-allies

    We Israelis, . . . to this day, have a need to -- a deep need to be recognized and accepted by the region.

    You see, Bibi’s demand, which is supported by most Israelis, that the Palestinians recognize us as a Jewish state, or the state of the Jewish people -- the nation-state of the Jewish people -- this goes way back, this need to be recognized.

    It explains our relationships with some of the Christian and Kurdish and Druze minorities as well, and so at the height of the periphery doctrine, when things are going well, there’s this sense that the ancient peoples of the Middle East have created an alliance, the people who precede the Arabs, okay. We go back with Iran, we just celebrated Purim, all right, we go back 2,600 years with Iran. The Egyptian, the Ethiopian national narrative is King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba. So, this is almost a biblical -- a new biblical chapter.
    This is how some people in Israel felt.
     
    I'll wait while you recover from fit of laughter/incredulity.

    Buncha no account, no history, no kultcha Polish/Russian/ Lithuanian Jews "go way back 2,600 years with Iran."

    howler material fer shur.

    To their credit, my Iranian friends remain protective of Iranian Jews, and Jews consider Iran the place where they first learned about culture -- writing, for example, and rule of law, although many Jews now abuse both, the first through overuse, the second through underuse.

    Delightful. That gives you at least three months probationary suspension from the Wizard’s Koko list.

    I am, rather late, beginning to get a feel for why anti-Semitism exists though the madness often exhibited on these threads – which on balance I don’t think is trolling designed to damage the Unz Review – is outside my imaginative sympathies. I remain however someone who likes Jews and puts a high value on brains energetically used. I have never been conscious of Jewish tribalism in the sense of feeling an impact from it (despite knowing and liking Jews who won’t have the sons who have married out at the Shabat dinner table: that tends to be the rule of the female and not the father in my limited expetience). I can see how some people might regard Jews, seen as people who stick together and support each other, as harming them or their businesses, but my experience, or at least my perception of it has been the opposite if anything. “Unto them that hath shall be given” perhaps.

    It is notable by the way how much good work and good works are directed by Australian Jews towards Aborigines and their causes and interests. It would be absurd to take this to be part of some Jewish effort to raise up competition to the dominant WASP** tradition by analogy with what is alleged in the US. A conversation I have never had but must put on my agenda is one in which I ask whether they recognise themselves as trying to expiate guilt over the Palestinians. No doubt some would say “not at all: but we all remember at Passover that we were slaves in the land of Egypt and when we do well it is to the underdog that we turn as someone who needs help”. Maybe.

    **(though now also very much the Irish Catholic tradition which is no longer at war with the Protestants)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sam Shama
    You write:

    (despite knowing and liking Jews who won’t have the sons who have married out at the Shabat dinner table: that tends to be the rule of the female and not the father in my limited expetience).
     
    There is a rather tiny but die-hard percentage that clings to such parochial attitudes, however if one looks at the actual trend of things, some orthodox rabbis are at their wits end when increasing numbers of the congregation brings a 'shiksa' to the temple :-) . The overwhelming majority of rabbis and membership embrace this trend with equanimity and welcome.
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  82. Sam Shama says:
    @SolontoCroesus
    . . .

    and yet, and yet, Israeli Jews long more than anything else on earth to be "recognized as part of" the "noble Persian empire" -- of yesterday AND today.

    http://www.brookings.edu/events/2015/03/12-israel-periphery-doctrine-search-middle-east-allies

    We Israelis, . . . to this day, have a need to -- a deep need to be recognized and accepted by the region.

    You see, Bibi’s demand, which is supported by most Israelis, that the Palestinians recognize us as a Jewish state, or the state of the Jewish people -- the nation-state of the Jewish people -- this goes way back, this need to be recognized.

    It explains our relationships with some of the Christian and Kurdish and Druze minorities as well, and so at the height of the periphery doctrine, when things are going well, there’s this sense that the ancient peoples of the Middle East have created an alliance, the people who precede the Arabs, okay. We go back with Iran, we just celebrated Purim, all right, we go back 2,600 years with Iran. The Egyptian, the Ethiopian national narrative is King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba. So, this is almost a biblical -- a new biblical chapter.
    This is how some people in Israel felt.
     
    I'll wait while you recover from fit of laughter/incredulity.

    Buncha no account, no history, no kultcha Polish/Russian/ Lithuanian Jews "go way back 2,600 years with Iran."

    howler material fer shur.

    To their credit, my Iranian friends remain protective of Iranian Jews, and Jews consider Iran the place where they first learned about culture -- writing, for example, and rule of law, although many Jews now abuse both, the first through overuse, the second through underuse.

    We have exchanged views on this subject in the past, and I am not entirely sure what you are hinting at here. If I remember correctly, you seem to view Purim as a celebration of a coup d’etat, which while arguably might be, does not obviate a few points I have whispered in the past: that we have had a very warm relationship with ancient Fars and similarly in the modern era with the Druze etc. (in fact I predicted before the actual official action, that Tel Aviv would move to protect the interests of the Syrian Druze from Al Nusra atacks. It did turn out to be correct, and I do believe I subsequently posted the relevant link in that conversation.).

    Read More
    • Replies: @SolontoCroesus
    Not sure/don't much care what you're yammering on about re Purim.
    Even less interested in Wizard's ruminations.

    The major point is that Persian benefices to Jews far predate Esther: Cyrus, the Zoroastrian king of Persia, acted toward Yehud with generosity and universal humanism. Moreover, of all the quasi historic leaders in the Hebrew Torah, from Abraham to Moses, David, Solomon, and even Jesus in NT, only Cyrus (and Zoroaster) can be proven from sources other than the bible to be real, historic personages who did what the bible says they did. (The Esther story is a version of the Mesopotamian myth of Ishtar.)

    Esther, on the other hand, represents Jewish ingratitude and treachery toward Persians -- you know, that inconvenient detail -- Esther had 75,000 innocent Persians murdered.

    Why Yossi Alpher thinks Purim marks the point of endearment between Persians and Jews is beyond my ken. "If I kill you will you be my friend? And if you won't be my friend after I kill you, I'll get somebody else to kill you some more." That's the concept that permeates Alpher's description of Israeli "grand strategy."
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  83. Sam Shama says:
    @Wizard of Oz
    Delightful. That gives you at least three months probationary suspension from the Wizard's Koko list.

    I am, rather late, beginning to get a feel for why anti-Semitism exists though the madness often exhibited on these threads - which on balance I don't think is trolling designed to damage the Unz Review - is outside my imaginative sympathies. I remain however someone who likes Jews and puts a high value on brains energetically used. I have never been conscious of Jewish tribalism in the sense of feeling an impact from it (despite knowing and liking Jews who won't have the sons who have married out at the Shabat dinner table: that tends to be the rule of the female and not the father in my limited expetience). I can see how some people might regard Jews, seen as people who stick together and support each other, as harming them or their businesses, but my experience, or at least my perception of it has been the opposite if anything. "Unto them that hath shall be given" perhaps.

    It is notable by the way how much good work and good works are directed by Australian Jews towards Aborigines and their causes and interests. It would be absurd to take this to be part of some Jewish effort to raise up competition to the dominant WASP** tradition by analogy with what is alleged in the US. A conversation I have never had but must put on my agenda is one in which I ask whether they recognise themselves as trying to expiate guilt over the Palestinians. No doubt some would say "not at all: but we all remember at Passover that we were slaves in the land of Egypt and when we do well it is to the underdog that we turn as someone who needs help". Maybe.

    **(though now also very much the Irish Catholic tradition which is no longer at war with the Protestants)

    You write:

    (despite knowing and liking Jews who won’t have the sons who have married out at the Shabat dinner table: that tends to be the rule of the female and not the father in my limited expetience).

    There is a rather tiny but die-hard percentage that clings to such parochial attitudes, however if one looks at the actual trend of things, some orthodox rabbis are at their wits end when increasing numbers of the congregation brings a ‘shiksa’ to the temple :-) . The overwhelming majority of rabbis and membership embrace this trend with equanimity and welcome.

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  84. @Sam Shama
    We have exchanged views on this subject in the past, and I am not entirely sure what you are hinting at here. If I remember correctly, you seem to view Purim as a celebration of a coup d'etat, which while arguably might be, does not obviate a few points I have whispered in the past: that we have had a very warm relationship with ancient Fars and similarly in the modern era with the Druze etc. (in fact I predicted before the actual official action, that Tel Aviv would move to protect the interests of the Syrian Druze from Al Nusra atacks. It did turn out to be correct, and I do believe I subsequently posted the relevant link in that conversation.).

    Not sure/don’t much care what you’re yammering on about re Purim.
    Even less interested in Wizard’s ruminations.

    The major point is that Persian benefices to Jews far predate Esther: Cyrus, the Zoroastrian king of Persia, acted toward Yehud with generosity and universal humanism. Moreover, of all the quasi historic leaders in the Hebrew Torah, from Abraham to Moses, David, Solomon, and even Jesus in NT, only Cyrus (and Zoroaster) can be proven from sources other than the bible to be real, historic personages who did what the bible says they did. (The Esther story is a version of the Mesopotamian myth of Ishtar.)

    Esther, on the other hand, represents Jewish ingratitude and treachery toward Persians — you know, that inconvenient detail — Esther had 75,000 innocent Persians murdered.

    Why Yossi Alpher thinks Purim marks the point of endearment between Persians and Jews is beyond my ken. “If I kill you will you be my friend? And if you won’t be my friend after I kill you, I’ll get somebody else to kill you some more.” That’s the concept that permeates Alpher’s description of Israeli “grand strategy.”

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    “The writer of such a script could claim Biblical authority. In Isaiah 44:28, the God of Israel declares through his prophet that Cyrus “is my shepherd, and he shall carry out all my purpose.” Throughout Chapter 45 of Isaiah he speaks directly to Cyrus—”his anointed”—calling him “righteous” and informing him that “the wealth of Egypt and the merchandise of Ethiopia” will “come over to you, and be yours.” www.conuterpunch.com

    Obviously this Biblical account was written decades after Persia had subjugated and colonized Egypt with the treacherous support of the Egyptian Jewish in 5 th century BC .

    Most likely - Esther was the response once and when Persia refused to continue to support the Jewish adventure in Egypt or in surrounding Palestine ( Cannan land) . America faces a situation like Persia faced at the hand of Esther .

    Then again we could be wrong on speculation of the existence of a cabal between Persian and Egyptian diaspora Jews .

    American could find themselves at a loss to explain their defeat and costly losses in Middle East oneday unless the alternatives to Fox and CNN and WSJ and NYT lying machines are protected and the truth are preserved.

    , @Sam Shama
    Yes in your version.

    Akhashverosh (the noble king, don't you know?) chopping his own queen Vashti's head for her refusal to undress before a crowd (in the noble and ancient Iranian tradition) had certainly, nothing to do with it. Nor the fact that Esther was forced to go to the beauty pageant for Akh'vesrosh to choose had nothing absolutely. Nor yet, that Haman was plotting to put Jews under the sword.

    Tell your story to someone else bard!

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  85. KA says:
    @SolontoCroesus
    Not sure/don't much care what you're yammering on about re Purim.
    Even less interested in Wizard's ruminations.

    The major point is that Persian benefices to Jews far predate Esther: Cyrus, the Zoroastrian king of Persia, acted toward Yehud with generosity and universal humanism. Moreover, of all the quasi historic leaders in the Hebrew Torah, from Abraham to Moses, David, Solomon, and even Jesus in NT, only Cyrus (and Zoroaster) can be proven from sources other than the bible to be real, historic personages who did what the bible says they did. (The Esther story is a version of the Mesopotamian myth of Ishtar.)

    Esther, on the other hand, represents Jewish ingratitude and treachery toward Persians -- you know, that inconvenient detail -- Esther had 75,000 innocent Persians murdered.

    Why Yossi Alpher thinks Purim marks the point of endearment between Persians and Jews is beyond my ken. "If I kill you will you be my friend? And if you won't be my friend after I kill you, I'll get somebody else to kill you some more." That's the concept that permeates Alpher's description of Israeli "grand strategy."

    “The writer of such a script could claim Biblical authority. In Isaiah 44:28, the God of Israel declares through his prophet that Cyrus “is my shepherd, and he shall carry out all my purpose.” Throughout Chapter 45 of Isaiah he speaks directly to Cyrus—”his anointed”—calling him “righteous” and informing him that “the wealth of Egypt and the merchandise of Ethiopia” will “come over to you, and be yours.” http://www.conuterpunch.com

    Obviously this Biblical account was written decades after Persia had subjugated and colonized Egypt with the treacherous support of the Egyptian Jewish in 5 th century BC .

    Most likely – Esther was the response once and when Persia refused to continue to support the Jewish adventure in Egypt or in surrounding Palestine ( Cannan land) . America faces a situation like Persia faced at the hand of Esther .

    Then again we could be wrong on speculation of the existence of a cabal between Persian and Egyptian diaspora Jews .

    American could find themselves at a loss to explain their defeat and costly losses in Middle East oneday unless the alternatives to Fox and CNN and WSJ and NYT lying machines are protected and the truth are preserved.

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  86. KA says:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/mike-huckabee-iran-oven_55b4f0a2e4b0224d88328498?m73qh0k9

    Huckaboo plays Peek a Boo with national interest while warming up to get some left over crumbs from Adelson.

    In the interview Huckaboo claims to be presidential material only on one issue that he is against the deal. He confirms that he carries social,conservative views on sex and gender still as before . He then asserts that he has a chance since he is an underdog in the middle of the pack.

    That’s it. End of the interview . This is from Fox . This is its duty to US electorate . This is its way to illuminate America who to choose and what is important in choosing a presidential candidate.

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  87. Sam Shama says:
    @SolontoCroesus
    Not sure/don't much care what you're yammering on about re Purim.
    Even less interested in Wizard's ruminations.

    The major point is that Persian benefices to Jews far predate Esther: Cyrus, the Zoroastrian king of Persia, acted toward Yehud with generosity and universal humanism. Moreover, of all the quasi historic leaders in the Hebrew Torah, from Abraham to Moses, David, Solomon, and even Jesus in NT, only Cyrus (and Zoroaster) can be proven from sources other than the bible to be real, historic personages who did what the bible says they did. (The Esther story is a version of the Mesopotamian myth of Ishtar.)

    Esther, on the other hand, represents Jewish ingratitude and treachery toward Persians -- you know, that inconvenient detail -- Esther had 75,000 innocent Persians murdered.

    Why Yossi Alpher thinks Purim marks the point of endearment between Persians and Jews is beyond my ken. "If I kill you will you be my friend? And if you won't be my friend after I kill you, I'll get somebody else to kill you some more." That's the concept that permeates Alpher's description of Israeli "grand strategy."

    Yes in your version.

    Akhashverosh (the noble king, don’t you know?) chopping his own queen Vashti’s head for her refusal to undress before a crowd (in the noble and ancient Iranian tradition) had certainly, nothing to do with it. Nor the fact that Esther was forced to go to the beauty pageant for Akh’vesrosh to choose had nothing absolutely. Nor yet, that Haman was plotting to put Jews under the sword.

    Tell your story to someone else bard!

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  88. KA says:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/24/opinion/shmuel-rosner-testing-the-us-israel-bond.html?_r=0

    Roster is lying about traditional roles US have played in ME . Rosner is lying about the reason Iran deal is bring rejected by Israel. He is asking Obams and the average Amerucans to put Israeli views above and beyond any American concerns and needs , and asking Americans to support Israeli centric policies to the detriment of that of US.

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  89. […] Margolis, a self-described “Eisenhower Republican” and outstanding journalist, states in no uncertain terms that the anti-deal brigade is on the opposite side of America’s […]

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  90. […] Margolis, self-described “Eisenhower Republican” and outstanding journalist, states in no uncertain terms that the anti-deal brigade is on the opposite side of America’s […]

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