The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
The Unz Review Digest - September 20, 2017

By a very wide margin, our most popular featured article this last week was Marcus Cicero’s exposition of some of the very important details of the deadly Charlottesville violence totally ignored and covered up by our national media.  In particular, the female protester who death elevated her to martyr status was actually morbidly obese, weighing perhaps 300 or even 400 pounds, and the cause of her death apparently being a heart attack, with no hard evidence that she was injured by the car.  When all mainstream media outlets refuse to reveal such crucial details, more and more Americans will turn to alternative sources of information, such as this piece, which provoked over 300 comments, totaling over 25,000 words.

Ranking second, was Linh Dinh’s discussion of the recent terrorist attack in Spain by young Muslim immigrants, and the considerable skepticism that his visit to the area raised about whether the facts were as reported, or whether the alleged perpetrators were actually the victims of a government-organized operation, with the collusion of ever-unreliable media.

In third place was Boyd Cathey’s article on the ongoing “American Cultural Revolution,” in which public monuments that have stood unchallenged for many decades or more have suddenly become the objects of bitter political denunciations and even vandalizing attacks.

Rounding out the leading pieces was the Saker’s discussion of the extremely provocation American action taken against the Russian consulate in San Francisco, representing a remarkable violation of traditional diplomatic norms, Steve Sailer’s previous piece on the extremely “politically correct” but factually incorrect list of names that Google ranks as America’s greatest inventors, and the serious questions that military officer Danny Sjursen’s raises about whether American are actually the “bad guys” in the Middle East.

Finally, special mention should be made of the ultimate installment of Chanda Chisala’s discussion of African IQs based on the evidence of board game achievements, which although it currently ranks just outside the top group of articles by traffic, has already generated a comment-thread of over 50,000 words and is still going strong.

shutterstock_674740966
Dear friends: During our conversation you stated the following: The US needs a military One of the reasons why the US needs a military are regimes like the North Korean one The US has a right to intervene outside its borders on a) pragmatic and b) moral grounds During WWII the US “saved Europe” and... Read More
Shouldn't they recuse themselves when dealing with the Middle East?
kristol
I spoke recently at a conference on America’s war party where afterwards an elderly gentleman came up to me and asked, “Why doesn’t anyone ever speak honestly about the six-hundred-pound gorilla in the room? Nobody has mentioned Israel in this conference and we all know it’s American Jews with all their money and power who... Read More
Africans have finally ended Russia’s historical state-sponsored dominance in the fastest form of international checkers: blitz draughts. Jean Marc Ndjofang of Cameroon (pictured above) is the 2017 blitz world champion.
Arthur Jensen's generation of race hereditarians (Eysenck, Rushton, Shockley and perhaps even Charles Murray et al) were quite different in posture from many of their current young followers. Jensen, like most of his friends, apparently wished to be proved wrong about his genetic hypothesis of racial differences in IQ because he genuinely hoped that what... Read More
Tucker Carlson and his guest Dan Bongino raised what you might call a look-away issue: Looting. As the two looked on at footage of looters in post-Irma Florida, TV talker and guest volunteered that "this" was "not about race." "This," presumably, being a reference to the looting. Here was one of those, "Who are you... Read More
The Power Elite in the Time of Trump
shutterstock_651612043-2
Introduction In the last few months, several competing political, economic and military sectors - linked to distinct ideological and ethnic groups - have clearly emerged at the centers of power. We can identify some of the key competing and interlocking directorates of the power elite: 1. Free marketers, with the ubiquitous presence of the ‘Israel... Read More
Photo by sime simon | CC BY 2.0
A new report by a retired IT executive at IBM, debunks the claim that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential campaign by hacking Democratic computers and circulating damaging information about Hillary Clinton. The report, which is titled “The Non-Existent Foundation for Russian Hacking Charge“, provides a rigorous examination of the wobbly allegations upon which the... Read More
shutterstock_212410933
Can the Putin Fans League win municipal elections in New York City? Not bloody likely, you’ll murmur, and probably justifiably so. However, in the municipal elections last week, pro-American forces captured one third of the seats in Moscow. A great shock, slightly mitigated by the media silence that accompanied both the election and its results.... Read More
DACA, DACA, DACA. Now, when I see or hear that acronym DACA, I just start to seethe. DACA [Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals] should have been scotched with a forked stick, like a snake on your patio, eight months ago, as Donald Trump promised would be done. Instead we’re stuck with the damn thing apparently... Read More
If you go to Google and type in American inventors you get back from Google pictures of the top American inventors of all time. The #1 American inventor of all time is Lewis Howard Latimer, who, I just learned, worked with both Edison and Bell. Thomas Edison is in 6th place and a well-tanned Alexander... Read More
Or Buck Rogers in the 21st Century
[This piece has been adapted and expanded from Alfred W. McCoy’s new book, In the Shadows of the American Century: The Rise and Decline of U.S. Global Power.] Not quite a century ago, on January 7, 1929, newspaper readers across America were captivated by a brand-new comic strip, Buck Rogers in the 25th Century. It... Read More
Signaling the Greatest Narrative Collapse in Modern History
heather-heyer-fat
At this point I want everybody to forget the assassination of JFK because it’s too far back in time for even Boomers to remember many of the details. Forget 9/11 because we’ll never see the documents highlighting the entire story for decades to come. And pretty much forget the Michael Brown saga (just put it... Read More
In my last post “Even more genes for intelligence”, I alluded to the mysterious Hsu Boundary, and I encourage you to use this phrase as often as possible. Why should other researchers have a monopoly of jargon? The phrase should help you impress friends, and also to curtail tedious conversations with persons who have limited... Read More
campofthesaints
Jean Raspail, Camp of the Saints, Social Contract Press, 1973, 306pp., $17.95 (softcover). “In this curious war taking shape, those who loved themselves best were the ones who would triumph.” – Jean Raspail The Camp of the Saints, written by Jean Raspail in 1973, is a novel about the end of the white race. Its... Read More
Galileo Galilei (1564–1642) has been called the Father of Modern Science. So it is fitting that he was, perhaps, the first scientist to be censured and silenced by political forces represented in his day by the Catholic Church. The issue then was evidence Galileo presented supporting the Copernican heliocentric model of the solar system that... Read More
The conventional view of nationalism is that it was a product of mass literacy and the modern state, underpinned by schoolbooks and Tombs of the Unknown Soldier. Recent years have seen challenges to this historiographic consensus at both a general level (e.g. Azar Gat's Nations), and with respect to specific peoples (Robert Tomb's recent The... Read More
Tarragona, Spain, 2017
In Catalonia, there’s a summer drink that combines beer with lemon soda. In Barcelona, it’s called “clara.” Further South, it’s dubbed, most charmingly, a “champu,” as in Head and Shoulders. Champu is quite good at eliminating the dandruff inside your skull. It is late summer, and I’m in Cambrils, drinking my second champu in Hawaii,... Read More
The eyesore presidential libraries
p
The social justice warrior charge to purge the United States of all monuments relating in any way to the Confederacy has been rapidly expanding to include the scourge represented by all white people all through history. The Founding Fathers who owned slaves will undoubtedly be the next ones on the block and the list will... Read More
"The Barbarian cannot make ... he can befog and destroy but ... he cannot sustain; and of every Barbarian in the decline or peril of every civilization exactly that has been true." Hilaire Belloc's depiction of the barbarian is recalled to mind as the statues honoring the history and heroes of the Republic and of... Read More
shutterstock_297517967
Our knowledge of the early life of Alexander the Great is based upon very slender literary evidence.[*] Arrian devotes only a few sentences to the years prior to Alexander's campaigns. Plutarch's coverage of Alexander's youth is also very condensed, and both he and Arrian rely almost exclusively upon pro-Alexander sources such as Ptolemy and Aristoboulos.... Read More
For a while already the Russian diplomats have been openly saying that their American counterparts are недоговороспособны or “non-agreement capable”. This all began under Obama, when Kerry flew to meet with Lavrov and declared ‘A’, then flew back to Washington, DC and declared ‘B’. Then there were the cases in Syria when the US agreed... Read More