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Title
Author Period
  1. From the Earth to the Moon
    and, Round the Moon
    Jules Verne • 1870 • 90,000 Words
  2. Off on a Comet
    or, Hector Servadac
    Jules Verne • 1887 • 101,000 Words
  3. The Stolen Bacillus and Other Incidents
    H.G. Wells • 1895 • 44,000 Words
  4. The Time Machine
    H.G. Wells • 1895 • 33,000 Words
  5. The Wheel of Chance
    A Bicycling Idyll
    H.G. Wells • 1896 • 55,000 Words
  6. The Island of Doctor Moreau
    H.G. Wells • 1896 • 43,000 Words
  7. The Plattner Story, and Others
    H.G. Wells • 1897 • 77,000 Words
  8. The Invisible Man
    A Grotesque Romance
    H.G. Wells • 1897 • 48,000 Words
  9. The War of the Worlds
    H.G. Wells • 1898 • 60,000 Words
  10. When the Sleeper Wakes
    H.G. Wells • 1899 • 82,000 Words
  11. Tales of Space and Time
    H.G. Wells • 1899 • 71,000 Words
  12. The First Men in the Moon
    H.G. Wells • 1901 • 68,000 Words
  13. The Food of the Gods
    and How It Came to Earth
    H.G. Wells • 1904 • 74,000 Words
  14. The Gods of Pegana
    Lord Dunsany • 1905 • 16,000 Words
  15. A Modern Utopia
    H.G. Wells • 1905 • 93,000 Words
  16. In the Days of the Comet
    H.G. Wells • 1906 • 81,000 Words
  17. Time and the Gods
    Lord Dunsany • 1906 • 41,000 Words
  18. The War in the Air
    H.G. Wells • 1908 • 97,000 Words
  19. The Sword of Welleran and Other Stories
    Lord Dunsany • 1908 • 34,000 Words
  20. A Dreamer's Tales
    Lord Dunsany • 1910 • 37,000 Words
  21. The Country of the Blind
    and Other Stories
    H.G. Wells • 1911 • 161,000 Words
  22. The Book of Wonder
    Lord Dunsany • 1912 • 23,000 Words
  23. Fifty-One Tales
    Lord Dunsany • 1915 • 16,000 Words
  24. Tales of Wonder
    Lord Dunsany • 1916 • 41,000 Words
  25. Tales of War
    Lord Dunsany • 1918 • 26,000 Words
  26. Tales of Three Hemispheres
    Lord Dunsany • 1919 • 27,000 Words
  27. Don Rodriguez
    Chronicles of Shadow Valley
    Lord Dunsany • 1922 • 74,000 Words
  28. The Dark Other
    Stanley Weinbaum • 1950 • 50,000 Words
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"That isn't what I mean," said Nicholas Devine, turning his eyes on his companion. "I mean pure horror in the sense of horror detached from experience, apart from reality. Not just a formless fear, which implies either fear of something that might happen, or fear of unknown dangers. Do you see what I mean?" "Of... Read More
Chronicles of Shadow Valley
To WILLIAM BEEBE After long and patient research I am still unable to give to the reader of these Chronicles the exact date of the times that they tell of. Were it merely a matter of history there could be no doubts about the period; but where magic is concerned, to however slight an extent,... Read More
From steaming lowlands down by the equator, where monstrous orchids blow, where beetles big as mice sit on the tent-ropes, and fireflies glide about by night like little moving stars, the travelers went three days through forests of cactus till they came to the open plains where the oryx are. And glad they were when... Read More
He said: “There were only twenty houses in Daleswood. A place you would scarcely have heard of. A village up top of the hills. “When the war came there was no more than thirty men there between sixteen and forty-five. They all went. “They all kept together; same battalion, same platoon. They was like that... Read More
Ebrington Barracks Aug. 16th 1916. I do not know where I may be when this preface is read. As I write it in August 1916, I am at Ebrington Barracks, Londonderry, recovering from a slight wound. But it does not greatly matter where I am; my dreams are here before you amongst the following pages;... Read More
Fame singing in the highways, and trifling as she sang, with sordid adventurers, passed the poet by. And still the poet made for her little chaplets of song, to deck her forehead in the courts of Time: and still she wore instead the worthless garlands, that boisterous citizens flung to her in the ways, made... Read More
Come with me, ladies and gentlemen who are in any wise weary of London: come with me: and those that tire at all of the world we know: for we have new worlds here. In the morning of his two hundred and fiftieth year Shepperalk the centaur went to the golden coffer, wherein the treasure... Read More
and Other Stories
The enterprise of Messrs. T. Nelson & Sons and the friendly accommodation of Messrs. Macmillan render possible this collection in one cover of all the short stories by me that I care for any one to read again. Except for the two series of linked incidents that make up the bulk of the book called... Read More
I hope for this book that it may come into the hands of those that were kind to my others and that it may not disappoint them. —Lord Dunsany Toldees, Mondath, Arizim, these are the Inner Lands, the lands whose sentinels upon their borders do not behold the sea. Beyond them to the east there... Read More
With deep gratitude to those few, known to me or unknown, who have cared for either of my former books, "The Gods of Pegana," "Time and the Gods." Where the great plain of Tarphet runs up, as the sea in estuaries, among the Cyresian mountains, there stood long since the city of Merimna well-nigh among... Read More
“This here Progress,” said Mr. Tom Smallways, “it keeps on.” “You’d hardly think it could keep on,” said Mr. Tom Smallways. It was along before the War in the Air began that Mr. Smallways made this remark. He was sitting on the fence at the end of his garden and surveying the great Bun Hill... Read More
These tales are of the things that befell gods and men in Yarnith, Averon, and Zarkandhu, and in the other countries of my dreams. Once when the gods were young and only Their swarthy servant Time was without age, the gods lay sleeping by a broad river upon earth. There in a valley that from... Read More
The World's Great Age begins anew, The Golden Years return, The Earth doth like a Snake renew Her Winter Skin outworn: Heaven smiles, and Faiths and Empires gleam Like Wrecks of a Dissolving Dream." I SAW a gray-haired man, a figure of hale age, sitting at a desk and writing. He seemed to be in... Read More
This book is in all probability the last of a series of writings, of which—disregarding certain earlier disconnected essays—my Anticipations was the beginning. Originally I intended Anticipations to be my sole digression from my art or trade (or what you will) of an imaginative writer. I wrote that book in order to clear up the... Read More
In the mists before THE BEGINNING, Fate and Chance cast lots to decide whose the Game should be; and he that won strode through the mists to MANA-YOOD-SUSHAI and said: "Now make gods for Me, for I have won the cast and the Game is to be Mine." Who it was that won the cast,... Read More
and How It Came to Earth
In the middle years of the nineteenth century there first became abundant in this strange world of ours a class of men, men tending for the most part to become elderly, who are called, and who are very properly called, but who dislike extremely to be called—"Scientists." They dislike that word so much that from... Read More
Mr. Bedford Meets Mr. Cavor at Lympne As I sit down to write here amidst the shadows of vine-leaves under the blue sky of southern Italy, it comes to me with a certain quality of astonishment that my participation in these amazing adventures of Mr. Cavor was, after all, the outcome of the purest accident.... Read More
There was, until a year ago, a little and very grimy-looking shop near Seven Dials, over which, in weather-worn yellow lettering, the name of "C. Cave, Naturalist and Dealer in Antiquities," was inscribed. The contents of its window were curiously variegated. They comprised some elephant tusks and an imperfect set of chessmen, beads and weapons,... Read More
One afternoon, at low water, Mr. Isbister, a young artist lodging at Boscastle, walked from that place to the picturesque cove of Pentargen, desiring to examine the caves there. Halfway down the precipitous path to the Pentargen beach he came suddenly upon a man sitting in an attitude of profound distress beneath a projecting mass... Read More
No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man... Read More
A Grotesque Romance
The stranger came early in February, one wintry day, through a biting wind and a driving snow, the last snowfall of the year, over the down, walking from Bramblehurst railway station, and carrying a little black portmanteau in his thickly gloved hand. He was wrapped up from head to foot, and the brim of his... Read More
WHETHER the story of Gottfried Plattner is to be credited or not, is a pretty question in the value of evidence. On the one hand, we have seven witnesses—to be perfectly exact, we have six and a half pairs of eyes, and one undeniable fact; and on the other we have—what is it?—prejudice, common sense,... Read More
ON February the First 1887, the Lady Vain was lost by collision with a derelict when about the latitude 1° S. and longitude 107° W. On January the Fifth, 1888—that is eleven months and four days after—my uncle, Edward Prendick, a private gentleman, who certainly went aboard the Lady Vain at Callao, and who had... Read More
A Bicycling Idyll
If you (presuming you are of the sex that does such things)—if you had gone into the Drapery Emporium—which is really only magnificent for shop—of Messrs. Antrobus & Co.—a perfectly fictitious “Co.,” by the bye—of Putney, on the 14th of August, 1895, had turned to the right-hand side, where the blocks of white linen and... Read More
The Time Traveller (for so it will be convenient to speak of him) was expounding a recondite matter to us. His grey eyes shone and twinkled, and his usually pale face was flushed and animated. The fire burned brightly, and the soft radiance of the incandescent lights in the lilies of silver caught the bubbles... Read More
TO H.B. MARRIOTT WATSON Most of the stories in this collection appeared originally in the Pall Mall Budget, two were published in the Pall Mall Gazette, and one in St James's Gazette. I desire to make the usual acknowledgments. The third story in the book was, I find, reprinted by the Observatory, and the "Lord... Read More
or, Hector Servadac
“Nothing, sir, can induce me to surrender my claim.” “I am sorry, count, but in such a matter your views cannot modify mine.” “But allow me to point out that my seniority unquestionably gives me a prior right.” “Mere seniority, I assert, in an affair of this kind, cannot possibly entitle you to any prior... Read More
and, Round the Moon
During the War of the Rebellion, a new and influential club was established in the city of Baltimore in the State of Maryland. It is well known with what energy the taste for military matters became developed among that nation of ship-owners, shopkeepers, and mechanics. Simple tradesmen jumped their counters to become extemporized captains, colonels,... Read More