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This is taking the average of four 2015 federal NAEP scores: both Math and Reading for both 4th and 8th Grades.
Here are the 2015 National Assessment of Educational Progress scores for Asians (orange) and whites (blue). I took a simple average of four scores: Reading and Math for both 4th and 8th grades. The overall sample size for the whole country is about 280,000, which is a lot, although I wouldn't put too much faith... Read More
Here are the brand new 2015 federal National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) tests scores sorted in order of the size of the White-Black Gap on 8th grade math. The color reflects whether the state went for Obama (blue) or Romney (red) in 2012. A few comments: - Although it's often assumed that The Gap... Read More
For years, Audacious Epigone and myself have been pointing out that Texas public school kids do surprisingly well on the federal NAEP exam within each ethnic group. Now, the NYT finally figures that out, too: Surprise: Florida and Texas Excel in Math and Reading Scores OCT. 26, 2015 David Leonhardt @DLeonhardt When the Education Department... Read More
A general assumption of the moderate conventional wisdom over the last half century is that average black performance is dragged down by specific impediments, such as poverty, crime, culture of poverty, parental taciturnity, lead paint, or whatever. One would therefore expect blacks without those impediments to score equal with whites. But a close inspection of... Read More
With Puerto Rico in the news for threatening to go broke, Paul Krugman is worried that hedge funds want to "destroy the island’s education system in the name of fiscal responsibility." But it turns out that Puerto Rican school administrators have largely done that already. Although Puerto Rico spends more per public school student than... Read More
Paul Krugman argues today that Puerto Rico is kind of like West Virginia, Mississippi, and Alabama: Okay, but there's a huge difference in test scores. The federal government has been administering a special Puerto Rico-customized version of its National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) exam in Spanish to Puerto Rican public school
From the Baltimore Sun: Baltimore City, New York, and Milwaukee test scores are broken out separately in the NAEP test's Trial Urban District Assessment program. (The other two districts are suburban counties in the rich Washington DC area. Three of the top five most expensive districts in the country are in liberal Maryland.) I'll look... Read More
Let's count the word choices in this huge New York Times feature article: California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth The state’s history as a frontier of prosperity and glamour faces an uncertain future as the fourth year of severe shortages prompts Gov. Jerry Brown to mandate a 25 percent reduction in non-agricultural water use.... Read More
Long time readers know I've been interested in the question of school test scores in the two biggest states, California and Texas. In the federal National Assessment of Educational Progress scores, Texas routinely beats California across all racial groups. But the NAEP is low stakes to students, which makes it easier for state officials to... Read More
One of the older, more nagging conundrums for anybody interested in education and demographics is the lack of readily available meaningful data on how high school students do by state and by race on high stakes tests such as the SAT and ACT college admissions tests. The federal government invests a lot of money in... Read More
Audacious Epigone has posted his table of white IQ estimates by state, using NAEP scores for 8th graders (public and private), ranging from 108.0 in Washington D.C. (which isn't a state) and 104.4 in Massachusetts and 103.5 in New Jersey to 97.7 in Oklahoma, 97.5 in Alabama and a hurting 95.1 in West Virginia. Thus,... Read More
The federal government's National Assessment of Educational Progress test results for 12th graders in readin' and 'rithmetic are now out for 2013. The feds have a nice website to display the numbers. I've been following these kind of test score stats for almost as long as I've been following baseball statistics, but I have to... Read More
  This graph displays the mean of the Math, Science, and Reading test scores from the OECD's 2012 Programme for International Student Assessment. American scores are red, white countries are blue, East Asians countries are yellow, Muslim countries are green, and Latin American countries are brown.So, Asian Americans outscored all large Asian countries (with the... Read More
At Your Lying Eyes, Ziel writes: 9. The per capita GDP of Brazil, measured in $PPP, relative to t
Over the years, I've given Michael Bloomberg a hard time. Why? Well, the billionaire New York City mayor who likes to claim that he has "the seventh-largest army in the world" seems like a worthy foe. One of Bloomberg's boasts has been that, based on rising test scores, he had fixed the New York City... Read More
Jennifer Rubin, who scribes the pro-immigration "Right Turn" column in the Washington Post, denounces Jason Richwine for the high crime of Noticing Things: Jennifer Korn, executive director of the pro-immigration-reform conservative Hispanic Leadership Network, responds: “If you start with the off-base premise that Hispanic immigrants have a lower IQ, it’s no surprise how they came... Read More
Texas public school students usually score pretty well in the federal government's NAEP school achievement tests, at least when adjusted for ethnicity. I've always wondered how they do it. It would seem like the kind of thing worth checking into. One way, it turns out, is by excluding more students from having to take the... Read More
The feds' National Assessment of Educational Progress has a table of 4th and 8th grade vocabulary and reading comprehension scores by state. Sample size issues are of concern for smaller states which tend to bounce around, but we can state with a high degree of statistical confidence that the future of the state of California,... Read More
Psychometrics is a relatively mature field of science, and a politically unpopular one. So you might think there isn't much money to be made in making up brand new standardized tests. Yet, there is. From the NYT: <nyt_byline> Standardized exams — the multiple-choice, bubble tests in math and reading that have played a growing role... Read More
Americans have devoted an enormous amount of effort over the centuries to devising useful baseball statistics. In recent years, Americans have talked a lot about devising useful educational statistics. For example, I've pointed out a million times over the last decade that it doesn't make much sense to judge teachers, schools, or colleges by their... Read More
Almost a decade ago, President Bush and Senator Kennedy got together and pushed through the No Child Left Behind act, which mandated that every single child in America would score "Proficient" or "Advanced" on reading and writing by 2013-2014, and told the states to concoct, administer, and grade their own tests to demonstrate this (nudge,... Read More
From the Washington Post, here are the scores by state on the Preliminary SAT (PSAT) required to make the first cut in the National Merit Scholarship program. (To convert from the three part PSAT score to the traditional two-part SAT Math plus Verbal scores, divide by 3 and multiply by 20: e.g., Arizona requires a... Read More
Charles Murray blogs: My published articles are archived at iSteve.com -- Steve Sailer
John McWhorter posts at The New Republic: Saletan Responds: OK, Let's Try This William Saletan has responded to my comment on his discomfort with No Child Left Behind data being tabulated by race. I get where he's coming from. He makes many valid points. One of them is that while I argued that cultural differences... Read More
Slate's "Human Nature" correspondent got such a beat-down from his friends when he said a few things in defense of James D. Watson in 2007 that he's decided that it's best just not to think about race anymore: By William Saletan "'No Child' Law Is Not Closing a Racial Gap." That's the New York Times... Read More
Is this the best ranking yet available of how the states differ in how good a job their public schools are doing? Rank State Whites' relative NAEP improvement from 4th grade to 8th (St.Dev.) 1. Montana .93 2. North Dakota .84 3. Maryland .71 4. Oregon .67 5. Idaho .57 6. Dept. of Defense .55... Read More
Although demographics obviously are the driving force in measures of student achievement, it is possible for one state to do a better job than another relative to what it has to work with in terms of student potential. One interesting way to analyze the value added performance of a state's public schools is to compare... Read More
The 2005 National Assessment of Educational Progress scores are now out for eighth grade Science, and the cutting edge state of California, home of Silicon Valley and Cal Tech but also of millions of illegal aliens, ranks second worst out of the 44 states measured, ahead of only Mississippi. In California, only 18% of eighth... Read More
IQs by State, 1960 -- You probably remember the notorious "Democratic states have higher IQs" hoax from last May. Well, here, thanks to Prof. Henry Harpending of the U. of Utah anthropology dept., might be the closest thing to a national sample of IQ scores ever: the Project Talent database of 366,000 9th-12th grade students.... Read More
Graduate degrees by state -- Washington D.C.: first in grad degrees, first in liberal voting, but last in NAEP scores for 8th grade public school students. In this table, there is a correlation between voting for Gore in 2000 and graduate degrees. Liberals seem to prefer to live in more stratified, inegalitarian societies. The more... Read More
The future looks dumberer -- Looking at the NAEP scores for public school 8th graders by state (see below), it struck me that California is a going to be, on average, a much dumber state in the future than it is now. I always thought of it as a pretty smart state, what with Silicon... Read More
IQs by State, 1960 -- You probably remember the notorious "Democratic states have higher IQs" hoax from last May. Well, here, thanks to Prof. Henry Harpending of the U. of Utah anthropology dept., might be the closest thing to a national sample of IQ scores ever: the Project Talent database of 366,000 9th-12th grade students.... Read More
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Steve Sailer
About Steve Sailer

Steve Sailer is a journalist, movie critic for Taki's Magazine, VDARE.com columnist, and founder of the Human Biodiversity discussion group for top scientists and public intellectuals.


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