The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
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Out-of-Africa

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@razibkhan this looks like a v nice paper but do we really believe that Egyptian & Ethiopian genetics is reflective of what was there 60ka? — Pontus Skoglund (@pontus_skoglund) May 28, 2015 There's a new open access paper in AJHG, Tracing the Route of Modern Humans out of Africa by Using 225 Human Genome Sequences... Read More
The Austronesian expansion over the past 4,000 years, Credit
Over the past week or so the perpetual argument about whether we were "superior" to Neandertals or not has cropped up again, thanks to a new paper in PLoS ONE, Neandertal Demise: An Archaeological Analysis of the Modern Human Superiority Complex. In it the authors utilize material remains to infer that no, in fact Neandertals... Read More
The latest edition of The American Journal of Human Genetics has two papers using "old fashioned" uniparental markers to trace human migration out of Africa and Siberia respectively. I say old fashioned because the peak novelty of these techniques was around 10 years ago, before dense autosomal SNP marker analyses, let alone whole genome sequencing.... Read More
The BBC has a news report up gathering reactions to a new PLoS ONE paper, The Later Stone Age Calvaria from Iwo Eleru, Nigeria: Morphology and Chronology. This paper reports on remains found in Nigeria which date to ~13,000 years B.P. that exhibit a very archaic morphology. In other words, they may not be anatomically... Read More
The Pith: The human X chromosome is subject to more pressure from natural selection, resulting in less genetic diversity. But, the differences in diversity of X chromosomes across human populations seem to be more a function of population history than differences in the power of natural selection across those populations. In the past few years... Read More
The Pith: We are now moving from the human genome project, to the human genomes project. As more and more full genomes of various populations come online new methods will arise to take advantage of the surfeit of data. In this paper the authors crunch through the genomes of half a dozen individuals to make... Read More
A few months ago I exchanged some emails with Milford H. Wolpoff and Chris Stringer. These are the two figures who have loomed large in paleoanthropology and the origins of modernity human for a generation, and they were keen in making sure that their perspectives were represented accurately in the media. To further that they... Read More
Last summer I made a thoughtless and silly error in relation to a model of human population history when asked by a reader the question: "which population is most distantly related to Africans?" I contended that all non-African populations are equally distant. This is obviously wrong on the face of it if you look at... Read More
The Pith: I review a recent paper which argues for a southern African origin of modern humanity. I argue that the statistical inference shouldn't be trusted as the final word. This paper reinforces previously known facts, but does not add much that both novel and robust. I have now read the paper which I expressed... Read More
John Farrell pointed me to this Anne Gibbons' piece, A New View Of the Birth of Homo sapiens. Here's some interesting passages: I suppose 'assimilation' sounds too generic, but 'leaky replacement' seems more fitting for a building 'super'. But it isn't as if paleoanthropology has a Don Draper, a rogue with a way with words.... Read More
Image credit: Luna04 My post The paradigm is dead, long live the paradigm! expressed to some extent my befuddlement at the current state of human evolutionary genetics and paleoanthropology. After the review of the paper of possible elevated admixture with Neandertals on the dystrophin locus a friend emailed, "Remember when we thought everything would be... Read More
Guelta d'Archei, Chad. Credit: Dario Menasce. Everyone who is literate knows that the Sahara desert is the largest of its kind in the world. The chasm in cultural, biological, and physical geography is very noticeable. Northern Africa is part of the Palearctic zone, while the peoples north of the Sahara have long been part of... Read More
Dilettante human genetics blogger Dienekes Pontikos has a post up with a somewhat oblique title, Is multi-regional evolution dead? I say oblique because a straightforward title would be "Multi-regionalism lives!" He posted a chart from a 2008 paper which outlines various models of human origins, and their relationship to molecular data at the time. I... Read More
Quick review. In the 19th century once the idea that humans were derived from non-human ancestral species was injected into the bloodstream of the intellectual classes there was an immediate debate as to the location of the proto-human homeland; the Urheimat of us all. Charles Darwin favored Africa, but in many ways this ran against... Read More
Despite the reality that I've cautioned against taking PCA plots too literally as Truth, unvarnished and without any interpretive juice needed, papers which rely on them are almost magnetically attractive to me. They transform complex patterns of variation which you are not privy to via your gestalt psychology into a two or at most three... Read More
I assume by now that everyone has read A Draft Sequence of the Neandertal Genome. It's free to all, so you should. At least look at the figures. Also, if you haven't at least skimmed the supplement, you should do that as well. It's nearly 200 pages, and basically feels more like a collection of... Read More
Alan Templeton, whose text Population Genetics and Microevolutionary Theory is right below Hartl & Clark in my book, recently published a strongly worded paper, Coherent and incoherent inference in phylogeography and human evolution. The possibility of statistical errors in published work is not shocking, I have heard that when statisticians are asked to sort through... Read More
Razib Khan
About Razib Khan

"I have degrees in biology and biochemistry, a passion for genetics, history, and philosophy, and shrimp is my favorite food. If you want to know more, see the links at http://www.razib.com"