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African Genetics

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The Khoisan are not the oldest people on the face of this earth, they simply have been the lest impinged by population crashes over the past ~200,000 years. This is not a shocking assertion, but it is supported with greater robustness by a new paper in Nature Communications, Khoisan hunter-gatherers have been the largest population... Read More
Ten years ago the story of how modern humans expanded across the face of the world would have been a relatively simple one. The story generally recounted for popular consumption was most forcefully articulated in Richard Klein's The Dawn of Human Culture. Around ~50 thousand years ago a small group of Africans resident in the... Read More
I mentioned this in passing on my post on ASHG 2012, but it seems useful to make explicit. For the past few years there has been word of research pointing to connections between the Khoisan and the Cushitic people of Ethiopia. To a great extent in the paper which is forthcoming there is the likely... Read More
There's two papers in Nature Genetics on the 17q21.31, and variation of haplotypes of inversions in world wide populations. Here's a part of the discussion from the first paper: In conclusion, we propose that the ancestral H2′ haplotype arose in eastern or central Africa and spread to southern Africa before the emergence of anatomically modern... Read More
After the second Henn et al. paper I did download the data. Unfortunately there are only 62,000 SNPs intersecting with the HGDP. This is somewhat marginal for fine-grained ADMIXTURE analyses, though sufficient for PCA from what I recall. That being said, the intersection with the HapMap data sets runs from ~190,000 SNPs, to the full... Read More
Zinedine Zidane, a Kabyle There is a new paper in PLoS Genetics out which purports to characterize the ancestry of the populations of northern Africa in greater detail. This is important. The HGDP data set does have a North African population, the Mozabites, but it's not ideal to represent hundreds of millions of people with... Read More
In my post below, Tutsi probably differ genetically from the Hutu, there were many comments. Some I did not post because they were rude, though they did ask valid questions. I will address those issues, but let me quote one comment: So I replicated ADMIXTURE runs for many of the same populations as I did... Read More
A Cape Coloured family I've mentioned the Cape Coloureds of South Africa on this weblog before. Culturally they're Afrikaans in language and Dutch Reformed in religion (the possibly related Cape Malay group is Muslim, though also Afrikaans speaking traditionally). But racially they're a very diverse lot. In this way they can be analogized to black... Read More
Aka Pygmies The Pith: There has been a long running argument whether Pygmies in Africa are short due to "nurture" or "nature." It turns out that non-Pygmies with more Pygmy ancestry are shorter and Pygmies with more non-Pygmy ancestry are taller. That points to nature. In terms of how one conceptualizes the relationship of variation... Read More
Over the past few days I've been trying to read a bit on the Sandawe. Most of the stuff I've been able to find is in the domain of linguistics, and is basically unintelligible to me in any substantive manner. The crux of the curiosity here is that the Sandawe, like their Hadza neighbors, have... Read More
Khoikhoi on the move.... Dienekes mentioned today a new paper, Signatures of the pre-agricultural peopling processes in sub-Saharan Africa as revealed by the phylogeography of early Y chromosome lineages. Because of the recent comments in this space on the genetic history of Africa I was curious, but after reading it I have to say I... Read More
The Pith: I review a recent paper which argues for a southern African origin of modern humanity. I argue that the statistical inference shouldn't be trusted as the final word. This paper reinforces previously known facts, but does not add much that both novel and robust. I have now read the paper which I expressed... Read More
In the open thread someone asked: "Any recent stuff on the genetics of Ethiopians." That prompted me to look around, because I'm curious too. Poking around Wikipedia I couldn't find anything recent. A lot of the studies are older uniparental lineage based works (NRY and mtDNA). Ethiopia is interesting because unlike almost all other Sub-Saharan... Read More
Last year a paper came out in Science which made a rather large splash, The Genetic Structure and History of Africans and African Americans by Tishkoff et al. Since it's more than a year old I recommend that those of you curious about the details of the paper and don't have academic access go through... Read More
Since we've been talking about Fst a fair amount, I thought it might be nice to put it in some concrete graphical perspective. First, to review Fst in the genetic context measures the proportion of genetic variation which can be attributed to between population differences. To give a "toy" example if you randomly divided the... Read More
Razib Khan
About Razib Khan

"I have degrees in biology and biochemistry, a passion for genetics, history, and philosophy, and shrimp is my favorite food. If you want to know more, see the links at http://www.razib.com"