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Germany

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The latest bestseller by German economist Thilo Sarrazin, a former member of the Bundesbank executive board, is a rambling critique of the eurozone. His book Deutschland braucht den Euro nicht (Germany does not need the euro) tells you everything you might want to know about why the eurozone is collapsing. The countries that formed the... Read More
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Much to the consternation of Western intellectuals and journalists, Hungary’s government sponsors a House of Terror in Budapest which dares to devote attention to not only Nazi crimes, but also Stalinist ones. Ever since the ascendance of the “antifascist” (read: neo-Stalinist plus PC) persuasion in our “liberal democracies,” it has become gauche and somehow even... Read More
Since neoconservative journalists, at least to my knowledge, have not been lately slamming the “German connection,” I rejoiced at a feature article in yesterday's New York Post (March 20) going after the “series of German outrages” that helped push us into World War One. A commentary by Thomas A. Reppetto, on German saboteurs during World... Read More
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Political correctness has permeated the historian’s craft to such a degree that honest historians must reinvent the wheel. PC has infected German history in particular. The doctrine of German “collective guilt” is often held as a precondition for German good behavior. Established historians in the US, England, and especially Germany must assume their subjects’ general... Read More
German historian Wolfgang Schivelbusch published a far-ranging 2003 study on the culture of defeated nations that focuses on three cases: the American South after the Civil War, the French after their defeat in the Franco-Prussian War in 1871, and Germany after WWI. According to Schivelbusch, defeated nations (Verlierernationen) as typified by the three cases he... Read More
Rich Lowry is beginning to remind me of Dickens’s Mr. Dick in David Copperfield. Dick couldn’t stay on a topic very long without blurting out “And they beheaded Charles I.” To his credit, the feeble-minded Dick could at least provide factual information. The Puritans did indeed execute their monarch by cutting off his head exactly... Read More
Unfortunately, I can’t resist pointing out minicon stupidities, and the latest example of this problem came to my attention in a recent syndicated column by Rich Lowry. In what is intended to be a discourse on American exceptionalism, Lowry goes through the anti-democratic evils of continental countries and then gets to England, which is awarded... Read More
Throughout the summer, former director of the German Bundesbank and a longtime adherent of the German Social Democrats, Thilo Sarrazin, remained in the crosshairs of the German political class for his controversial work dealing with the relation between high crime and Germany immigration policy. Only by the peculiar standards of Germany’s national parties, courts, and... Read More
A close friend of mine, Jost Bauch, who teaches general sociology and sociology of medicine as a part-time professor at the German University of Konstanz, has recently seen what he had of a career brought to a grinding halt. Probably because of his non-leftist views, which stand out in the leftist and anti-nationalist German university... Read More
For readers of this website who know some German, I heartily recommend the doctoral dissertation of Claus Wolfschlag, a study that was subsequently turned into a book published by Leopold Stocker Verlag, Das antifaschistische Milieu (2001). Wolfschlag, who has produced among other works an informative book, based on interviews, dealing with Hitler's opposition on the... Read More
Steve Sailer's interpretation of Tarantino and his latest flick Inglorious Basterds coincided with that of my older son, who discussed Tarantino's work with me last night over the phone. Like Steve, Joe viewed the subject matter of Tarantino's latest blood-and-guts spectacle as more of the same violence and cynicism that one encounters in all of... Read More
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The latest issue of The American Conservative (July 14) includes a provocative symposium on whether World War II should be considered “the good war” and, no less significant, whether Winston Churchill deserves the adulation that the media have accorded him as “man of the century.” The contributions are all well documented and boldly framed, and... Read More
In his response to an article on the supposed, mystifying limits of spreading democracy by Lawrence Kaplan in The New Republic, Richard Spencer seems bothered by Kaplan's examples that 'all peoples are capable of democracy.' When Kaplan mentions the Germans, Japanese, and Catholics of South America as those who managed to practice democracy, contrary to... Read More
A debate in the French weekly Courrier International (December 21, 2006) held between Polish political scientist Marek Cichocki and Claus Leggewie, a widely respected German professor at the University of Giessen, points to two diverging paths into the European future. Both commentators explain how their views about the end of the Second World War have... Read More
The recent trial and subsequent execution of Saddam Hussein has understandably brought up parallels with the Nuremberg Trials, conducted by the victorious Allies in postwar Germany. This event is thought to have created a useful precedent for trying those accused of "crimes against humanity." The crimes for which defendants at Nuremberg were to be tried... Read More
Fred Reed and I have what seems to be a shared problem, receiving hallucinatory notes from anti-Semitic readers who insist, "the Jews are behind everything." Perhaps I should feel honored that despite my family's flight from the Nazis, I have been taken into the confidence of non-Jews who have the same grip on reality as... Read More
The Chronicle of Higher Education To the editor: Context is everything, as I try to explain to my students and readers. In his indiscriminate digs at me, Alan Wolfe seems to ignore this maxim entirely. He lashes out at me for such decontextualized sins as putting quotation marks around fascism and for daring to say... Read More
A repulsive article in the German paper Neue Westfälische (November 11, 2003) concerning my friend Johannes Rogalla von Bieberstein and his work on Jewish Bolshevism continues to grate. First of all, contrary to the ominous references to "the extremist tradition of thought," which Bieberstein supposedly incarnates, there is nothing in his book that is even... Read More
A rant by neocon journalist Ralph Peters in the New York Post against the Germans as continuing fans of the Third Reich, whom we should never forgive and whose products we should never buy, provides two lessons. One, the neocon hatred of Germans, like their distaste for Southern whites (the same editorial section featured denunciations... Read More
The following response was written to a detailed review of Brian Bond's Trinity College Lectures dealing with the First World War. The reviewer Ted Rawes prepared his commentary for the twentieth-anniversary issue of the Salisbury Review, in which my rejoinder will appear during the summer. Nothing in my remarks should be interpreted as casting aspersions... Read More
The cover story in the German weekly Junge Freiheit, "The Debacle of the Union," was as predictable as it was elegiac. The center-right Christian Democratic-Christian Social Union coalition under Edmund Stoiber had botched the September 22 national election. It lost by two points when, given every economic indicator and the widespread dissatisfaction with immigration, it... Read More
Having just seen the latest exercise in neocon academic grandstanding, a widely publicized letter to "German colleagues" by defenders of the US war against terror, I am driven ineluctably to the following observation. Although the reasoning offered by the Red-Green coalition government in Germany for not contributing to a US attack on Iraq is both... Read More
Paul Gottfried
About Paul Gottfried

Paul Edward Gottfried (b. 1941) has been one of America's leading intellectual historians and paleoconservative thinkers for over 40 years, and is the author of many books, including Conservatism in America (2007), The Strange Death of Marxism (2005), After Liberalism (1999), Multiculturalism and the Politics of Guilt (2002), and Leo Strauss and the Conservative Movement in America (2012) . A critic of the neoconservative movement, he has warned against the growing lack of distinctions between the Democratic and Republican parties and the rise of the managerial state. He has been acquainted with many of the leading American political figures of recent decades, including Richard Nixon and Patrick Buchanan. He is Professor Emeritus of Humanities at Elizabethtown College and a Guggenheim recipient.