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A recent incident in Wallingford, Connecticut, not far from where I grew up, caused VDARE.com Editor Peter Brimelow to comment: “Cultural Marxist totalitarianism is coming to an America near you.” A complaint was lodged with the local police that “hate” merchandise— Nazi and Confederate memorabilia—was being publicly exhibited and sold at a popular flea market.... Read More
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Since the Charleston shootings, GOP officials have been scrambling to complywith Leftist demands that Southern Whites be stripped of visible signs of their Confederate heritage. The GOP has actually been downplaying the Confederacyfor years—Jeb Bush conspicuously removed Confederate banners and insignias from the Florida statehouse back in 2001. [Jeb Bush Ordered The Confederate Flag Removed... Read More
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Since the neoconservatives took over the American conservative movement, in alliance with GOP operatives, I’ve been looking for a no-nonsense defense of academic and intellectual freedom issuing from the establishment Right. And I am still waiting for such a defense and may go on waiting until the end of my life. It’s not that Republican... Read More
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Recently while working on a paper concerning the English political journalist Walter Bagehot and his 1867 classic The English Constitution, I was struck by Bagehot’s heated objections to the Reform Act of 1867. An act introduced by the Tory government of Benjamin Disraeli and reluctantly supported by most Liberal MPs, it doubled the franchise in... Read More
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Those Intellectuals Who Know Nothing of the Past May Help to Repeat It
I recently received an unexpected gift from American historian and political theorist Barry Alan Shain, The Declaration of Independence in Historical Context, a 600 page collection of documents from the era of the American Revolution, with accompanying commentaries and a long introductory essay, published by Yale University Press. It would be marvelous if Barry’s ambitious... Read More
In a recent assault on the intellectual Left, Jonah Goldberg complained about “the dreck” that is circulating in our culture courtesy of anti-American Leftist historians. [The Stone Truth: Left-Wingers Are Boring, National Review, December 7, 2012] Jonah is especially exercised by Oliver Stone and his co-author, American University historian Peter Kuznick, who have published a... Read More
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César Franck: His Life and Times, R.J. Stove, Scarecrow Press, 371 pages
R.J. Stove’s intensively researched biography of Belgian French composer César Franck (1822-1890) has striking merits. Stove writes exquisitely, in periodic sentences, and manages to make detailed discussions of musicology an aesthetic experience for experts and neophytes alike. He also blends his musical discussions with well-told anecdotes, the most appealing of which is his recounting of... Read More
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Much to the consternation of Western intellectuals and journalists, Hungary’s government sponsors a House of Terror in Budapest which dares to devote attention to not only Nazi crimes, but also Stalinist ones. Ever since the ascendance of the “antifascist” (read: neo-Stalinist plus PC) persuasion in our “liberal democracies,” it has become gauche and somehow even... Read More
Since neoconservative journalists, at least to my knowledge, have not been lately slamming the “German connection,” I rejoiced at a feature article in yesterday's New York Post (March 20) going after the “series of German outrages” that helped push us into World War One. A commentary by Thomas A. Reppetto, on German saboteurs during World... Read More
A vastly underexplored topic is the British government’s role in greasing the skids for World War I. Until recently it was hard to find scholars who would dispute the culturally comfortable judgment that “authoritarian Germany” unleashed the Great War out of militaristic arrogance. Supposedly the British only got involved after the Germans recklessly violated Belgian... Read More
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Political correctness has permeated the historian’s craft to such a degree that honest historians must reinvent the wheel. PC has infected German history in particular. The doctrine of German “collective guilt” is often held as a precondition for German good behavior. Established historians in the US, England, and especially Germany must assume their subjects’ general... Read More
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In what may be described as the Dell comic-book version of “the Civil War’s true beginning,” Allen C. Guelzo, seated as Henry R. Luce Professor of the Civil War Era at Gettysburg College (I’ll bet my hat that the neocons are paying for this oddly named chair), explains in the New York Post what really... Read More
Rich Lowry is beginning to remind me of Dickens’s Mr. Dick in David Copperfield. Dick couldn’t stay on a topic very long without blurting out “And they beheaded Charles I.” To his credit, the feeble-minded Dick could at least provide factual information. The Puritans did indeed execute their monarch by cutting off his head exactly... Read More
Unfortunately, I can’t resist pointing out minicon stupidities, and the latest example of this problem came to my attention in a recent syndicated column by Rich Lowry. In what is intended to be a discourse on American exceptionalism, Lowry goes through the anti-democratic evils of continental countries and then gets to England, which is awarded... Read More
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In an effort to make a mountain out of a molehill, Rob Stein in the Washington Post (December 12) announces that the newly released Nixon tapes “reveal anti-Semitic, racist remarks.” What these tapes really reveal is something like those bull sessions I heard late at night as a graduate student at Yale in conversation with... Read More
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Among the neoconservatives' kept pontificators on modern history, Victor Davis Hanson may well be the most ridiculous. A respectable scholar when writing about Greek hoplites and other aspects of ancient military history, Hanson becomes a raving maniac as soon as he puts on his neocon spectacles. His latest syndicated column, "World War II: Unfashionable Truths"... Read More
Steve Sailer's interpretation of Tarantino and his latest flick Inglorious Basterds coincided with that of my older son, who discussed Tarantino's work with me last night over the phone. Like Steve, Joe viewed the subject matter of Tarantino's latest blood-and-guts spectacle as more of the same violence and cynicism that one encounters in all of... Read More
Richard Spencer has furnished a detailed report of NRO's discussion of Buchanan's grievous errors about the Second World War. With due respect to Richard, from the standpoint of those doing the shunning, it does not seem to have been an oversight to keep Pat from participating. The author of the book at issue does not... Read More
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The latest issue of The American Conservative (July 14) includes a provocative symposium on whether World War II should be considered “the good war” and, no less significant, whether Winston Churchill deserves the adulation that the media have accorded him as “man of the century.” The contributions are all well documented and boldly framed, and... Read More
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Without wishing to talk to death certain issues raised by Churchill, Hitler and "The Unnecessary War," I have been noticing the obsession of Buchanan's critics with German blame for World War One. This fixation has recently come up with particular force in one truly egregious article in Newsweek that global democratic atheist and part-time Teutonophobe... Read More
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The following is the first installment in a three-part critical symposium on Patrick Buchanan’s Churchill, Hitler, and the “Unnecessary War.” It is not surprising that Pat Buchanan’s new book, exploring the collapse of the British Empire and the connection of that disaster to England’s involvement in two world wars, should have received a strong endorsement... Read More
What follows are a few brief responses to the often informative comments generated by my comments on the “Nazi” Stauffenberg. Never would I deny that the opponents of the Nazi regime were limited to the July 20 conspirators. The activities of the Weisse Rose, a group of anti-Nazi students in Munich who were executed in... Read More
Every now and then I am forced to retch with disgust as I read some choice slander in the neoconservative press. Such a reaction occurred recently while I was looking at a picture of Tom Cruise in the New York Post. Cruise was dressed in a German Wehrmacht uniform and obviously shown in his cinematic... Read More
Although Sid Cundiff in a recent blog praises me as someone who recognizes “shades of grey,” I may be losing that capacity when it comes to certain neoconservative journalists. In an article for the Canadian National Post, which was also published on NRO (November 11, 2007), David Frum bewails the fact that Canadians are not... Read More
I’ve just finished two books written by promising young scholars, The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Constitution by Kevin A. C. Gutzman and 33 Questions about American History You’re Not Supposed to Ask by Thomas E. Woods, Jr. Neither of the authors seems interested in sounding like the staff of the Republican National Committee or... Read More
In August 1966, while visiting Vienna as an ABD graduate student from Yale, I chanced upon the office of Aktion-Europa, a group that would soon change its name to the Paneuropabewegung. As I learned from going to its offices on the Prinz Eugen Strasse, Aktion-Europa was an organization that defended the Habsburg dynasty. As the... Read More
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Confederate Flag Day, State Capitol, Raleigh, N.C. -- March 3, 2007
[A major oration, previously unpublished, by Prof. Paul Gottfried] Those Southern secessionists whose national flag we are now celebrating have become identified not only with a lost cause but with a now publicly condemned one. Confederate flags have been removed from government and educational buildings throughout the South, while Confederate dignitaries whose names and statues... Read More
In a monumental but entirely predictable display of Chutzpah in History News Network (3/21/05), Rutgers University professor of journalism and New Republic senior editor David Greenberg has scoffed at the author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History as "a hitherto unknown assistant professor at Suffolk Community College." Presumably his workplace and supposed lack... Read More
Although the attack on Tom Woods by Ronald Radosh in FrontPageMag (March 10) did not contain any new accusations against Tom or his best-selling guide that one could not read in other establishment publications, what made the newest screed stand out was the accuser's mask. Unlike the motley crowd of left-libertarians, neo-liberals, and global democratic... Read More
Adam Cohen's editorial diatribe in the NYT (January 27) against Tom Woods and his scholarship shows the degree to which the relation between facts and historical narrative has dissolved. Cohen does not seem to know, or perhaps want us to know, that segregation began as a Northern institution that, after Reconstruction, Southern states adapted to... Read More
The following is a letter that was submitted to The New Republic in response to a review by Hoover Institute scholar Anne Applebaum, on Richard Overy's recent study The Dictators. Since there is at most an outside chance of my letter being published in TNR, I have turned it over to Lew Rockwell, who has... Read More
In a deservedly positive review on this website, Jeff Tucker sings the praises of Tom Woods's The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History. Woods combines clear, forceful writing with the valorous attempt to clean up the fabrications about the American past that have come from professional historians. He dissects their concoctions, about Wilson's "crusade for... Read More
The following response was written to a detailed review of Brian Bond's Trinity College Lectures dealing with the First World War. The reviewer Ted Rawes prepared his commentary for the twentieth-anniversary issue of the Salisbury Review, in which my rejoinder will appear during the summer. Nothing in my remarks should be interpreted as casting aspersions... Read More
Media critics have been dumping on the new Civil War movie Gods and Generals, based on the novel by Jeff Shaara, in proportion to how jubilantly they've welcomed the HBO series Six Feet Under. The former is depicted as being in stilted Victorian language and a"shameless apologia for the Confederacy as a divinely inspired crusade... Read More
With what purports to be historical erudition, National Review editor Richard Lowry (NRO April 9) jerry-builds a "telling historical analogy," between the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the Spanish Civil War. Although "imperfect," this analogy is nonetheless described as "telling," and Lowry rushes to talk about those who have already made it, namely, New York Times columnist... Read More
Now that Taki has said it, perhaps it should be said again. The Western world could not have done worse, and might have done better, if the Central Powers had triumphed in World War One. The suspicion that I had really meant that when in some articles in the 1970s I had blamed both sides... Read More
Paul Gottfried
About Paul Gottfried

Paul Edward Gottfried (b. 1941) has been one of America's leading intellectual historians and paleoconservative thinkers for over 40 years, and is the author of many books, including Conservatism in America (2007), The Strange Death of Marxism (2005), After Liberalism (1999), Multiculturalism and the Politics of Guilt (2002), and Leo Strauss and the Conservative Movement in America (2012) . A critic of the neoconservative movement, he has warned against the growing lack of distinctions between the Democratic and Republican parties and the rise of the managerial state. He has been acquainted with many of the leading American political figures of recent decades, including Richard Nixon and Patrick Buchanan. He is Professor Emeritus of Humanities at Elizabethtown College and a Guggenheim recipient.