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Chanda Chisala has been producing pile after pile of nonsense for quite some time. At first, I was content with simply leaving comments at his posts refuting his rubbish because it was rather easy to point out where he was full of baloney. Since then, I've been banned by him, mostly for my signature flair.... Read More
Some really interesting and quite significant publications have appeared in recent days. Each adds key pieces of evidence to the topic of HBD, and I wanted to talk about each here. I may do review columns like this periodically, somewhat akin to HBD Chick's (get well soon!) linkfests. This is nothing short of a brilliant... Read More
(Please see also link to older post at the bottom of this one.) Donald Trump:  Elon Musk: Mitt Romney:   Previously: Idiocracy Can Wait?
What does it take to make a nation great? What makes a country a great place to live, a healthy society, and a bastion of stability? Various theories and ideas have been put forward, and I think they are all pretty much bunk. I think we can apply a little reductionism here, and conclude that... Read More
Post updated, 7/23/15. See below! At long last, I reach my 200th blog post. It's been a quite a ride! Blogging on human biodiversity – or simply humanity – has taught me a great deal. Since the start, I hoped that I could offer some meager contribution to mankind with this blog. I will continue... Read More
One of the greatest pieces of evidence demonstrating that the family/rearing environment has no effect on eventual outcomes is the absence of birth order effects. Birth order is an excellent test for these effects: it is something that systematically differs between siblings and is bona fide non-genetic (mostly). Hence, it's a great way to see... Read More
Post updated, 10/21/14. See below! It's general trope in the HBD community: people are getting dumber. The low IQ are outbreeding the high IQ, leading to a slow decline in genetic intellectual potential in the population. Indeed, my own analyses seem to have shown that there was a fair fertility advantage among the lower IQ... Read More
Can be quite substantial. Jump off the Empire State Building and see for yourself. But, beyond that, the question remains how much of the variation in health outcomes and longevity can be explained by behavioral variation? Well, we don't quite know. But we do have evidence which indicates that – at least in the developed... Read More
My previous post – “Squid Ink” – has spawned a little discussion about the role of the "environment." However, I'd argue what all the discussion is about – what it is always ever about when people invoke "environment" – is changeability. This is what people really want to know about that, and they see heredity... Read More
Post updated, 9/14/14 6/5/14. See below! In my earlier post on Gregory Clark's work, The Son Becomes The Father, I laid bare the case for the known high heritability of human behavioral traits (including values and attitudes) and life outcomes. As well, equally important, I illustrated the complete absence of shared environment influences on these... Read More
said! I spotted it in a conversation with Dennis Mangan. I guess it's good to see that someone else has brought up these points. Here's the rest of the it seems, Dennis Mangan – like many in the medical establishment – appears permanently locked into a rather unscientific way of thinking. The problem of disentangling... Read More
A vigorous discussion has been triggered by the release of Gregory Clark's The Son Also Rises: Surnames and the History of Social Mobility. In this book, Clark details his work which shows a large transmission of status from generation to generation, all across the world, going back centuries. The discussion has raged on the mode... Read More
"Misdreavus" was having a field day on Twitter yesterday. Here are some the products of that: For the record, "misdreavus" is non-White, like me. He is also the coup de grâce about that? These are basically the running themes on my blog, and other places in the HBD-space. As we've seen with "misdreavus's" commentary previously... Read More
I may have to make "misdreavus" a co-blogger here at some point, considering how I quote him here. But, in defending HBD (Human BioDiversity), he has made a nice basic summary of the reasons why we believe in HBD (that is, overwhelming evidence). This was all in response to social anthropology scholar A. J. West,... Read More
Go check out this fantastic post by HBD Chick on HBD and the motivations behind believers and detractors: you and me and hbd | hbd* chick now, i am the LAST person who should criticize anybody for obsessing about any one thing (see: most of this blog), but i’m going to any
"Racial Reality" (RR), also known as "Italianthro," has apparently responded to my challenge. He claims to have left a comment to my post, but I didn't see one. I haven't looked in my spam box in a while, so if it ended up there, it may have gotten deleted (spam comments are automatically deleted after... Read More
After nearly two years, the shipwrecked Costa Concordia has finally been righted! [gigya src="http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/32545640" width="500" height="300" FlashVars="launch=53030510^290^134720&width=592&height=346" allowscriptaccess="always" allowFullScreen="true" wmode="transparent" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" pluginspage="http://www.adobe.com/shockwave/download/download.cgi?P1_Prod_Version=ShockwaveFlash"] "A testament to what engineering can do" indeed. Make no mistake, we mean American (and others of Northern European – including likely Northern Italian) engineering: [gigya src="http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/32545640" width="500" height="300" FlashVars="launch=53019092^240^154290&width=592&height=346" allowscriptaccess="always" allowFullScreen="true" wmode="transparent"... Read More
Continuing my on-going series on the regional differences – genetic regional differences – between the different Euro-Americans in the United States and Canada, here I will present a series of maps demonstrating some of the evidence for the existence and significance of these differences, beyond the historical circumstances explored by David Hackett Fischer (DHF) in... Read More
Post updated, 1/14/15. See below! Let me start by once again giving the disclaimer that I am an unapologetic atheist. Of course, I would conclude that being an atheist is the only natural position one can have if one is being a true scientist. Now, that said, I realize that I am only able to... Read More
Continuing my ongoing investigation into fertility, I wanted to take another look at who's having children. This post will look at fertility from a different angle: the spread in fertility by sex, IQ, political orientation, and education. I was prompted to this by a recent article describing parenthood in Norway. It found that a fifth... Read More
Post Updated, 10/9/13. See below! Readers coming to my blog from The Atlantic article "The Mystery of Why Portugal Is So Doomed" saw my comment there directing you to my earlier post "A Tale of Two Maps." Matthew O'Brien over at The Atlantic seemed to indicate the poor economic situation in Portugal was somehow mysterious.... Read More
This is my 100th blog post. Upon reaching this milestone, I thought that this would be a great time to take moment to look back at my experience as a blogger in Human BioDiversity (HBD) and share my thoughts on the things to come. 1. The Beginning 2. Fertility 3. Immigration and the economy 4.... Read More
In my previous post, I noted that the oft-mentioned association between obesity and poor health and "early" death may be a function of the lower average IQ of obese people. I suggested that the true correlate of these things was in fact low IQ. And indeed, I've stumbled on additional studies that suggests that this... Read More
Previously, I intimated that the connection between obesity and cardiovascular disease and death from such diseases may not be what is commonly believed: The idea is that people who are in poorer health have all around poorer genetic quality – in other words, they tend to have higher levels of genetic load (see here at... Read More
This post is meant to serve as a prod to certain of my smart liberal friends to start having children. It will come as no big surprise to my long time readers. The 2012 General Social Survey (GSS) results have been released. I decided to take a quick look to see if certain trends were... Read More
Over at Psychology Today, clinical psychologist Ellen Walker has a blog called Complete Without Kids, which is dedicated to the modern child-free (presumably professional) adult. There, she extols and rationalizes the conscious decision to not reproduce. Of course, it's not like Psychology Today isn't loaded with the typical cutting-edge suspect psychological wisdom, and it isn't... Read More
EDIT, 5/30/15: [Post updated with results of new meta-analyses of behavioral genetic studies. See below!] Edit, 1/3/13: [Post updated to reflect additional information provided in the comments. See below and see the comments.] The time has come for a little reminder of the First Law of behavioral genetics. In my final post of 2012, I... Read More
There has been a lot of discussion in the blogosphere as of late as to whether the "cads"—i.e., low paternal investment, promiscuous (and often low-IQ) men were siring more children than "dads"—high paternal investment, monogamous, high-IQ men. While I and others have produced some evidence (primarily from the GSS) that tenuously indicates that this is... Read More
Last month, neuroscientist Dario Maestripieri committed a faux pas after visiting a conference of his fellow neuroscientists. On his Facebook page, he left the following statement about his female colleagues: An uproar over this ensued. Despite the furor, Meastripieri's comment actually sounds like a fairly sound empirical observation. Nonetheless, his comments have not sit well... Read More
(CNN) -- Boys in the United States are starting puberty earlier than ever, according to a new study publishing in the November issue of the journal Pediatrics. In the study, lead author Marcia Herman-Giddens from the University of North Carolina's School of Public Health and her colleagues show that boys are starting to sexually develop... Read More
Commenter redzengenoist has brought to my attention that in his homeland of Denmark, policy seems to have accomplished two rather remarkable feats: Fertility among non-Western immigrant women (primarily Muslims) is down to 1.88 children/child-bearing woman, from a high of 3.4. And, more importantly, the fertility rate among educated Danish women has nearly caught up to... Read More
Post edited (9/28/2012), see below! A new study was released, discussed by Ilana Yurkiewicz at her Scientific American blog, that seems to conclusively prove that gender bias in the sciences does exist. The article describes the challenges involved in studying this and how these challenges were overcome: It’s tough to prove gender bias. In a... Read More
Following up on my three previous posts, I want to talk again about what to do with this HBD knowledge. It is now clear, or at least should be, that demographic issues drive many of our current problems. Indeed, changes in the population drive history, and these changes are the primary reasons that civilizations rise... Read More
Half Sigma has an excellent post up which talks about a topic that is an under-appreciated concern: the obsolesce of human labor, thanks to automation. Virtually all of the increase in worker productivity over the past few decades is due to increased automation. I've quoted this post and some of the comments here: There’s an... Read More
Following my previous post. [youtube especially be mindful:
Steven Pinker, a great academic, and whose 2002 book The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature introduced me to hereditarian explanations for human behavior (and which is required reading for anyone with no familiarity with the role that genes play in human behavior) has recently sent a note to Ron Unz attacking his... Read More
Ron Gunhame over at Inductivist has an interesting post looking at out-of-wedlock births had by Americans, by political orientation. By looking at the GSS data, he seems to have found that among the never married, conservatives were far more likely to have children. This is interesting, for one, because of its implications for my "pioneer... Read More
Greg Cochran and Henry Harpending have recently proposed a hypothesis on their blog that posits that the lower average IQ of tropical peoples may be related to the number of fitness reducing mutations these people carry. Apparently, the rate of mutation is higher in the tropics. The majority of mutations that occur are neutral and... Read More
Courtesy Razib Khan's Pinboard Feed: ScienceDaily (July 15, 2012) — Your genes determine much about you, but environment can have a strong influence on your genes even before birth, with consequences that can last a lifetime. In a study published online in Genome Research, researchers have for the first time shown that the environment experienced... Read More
Anecdotally, I have noticed that those who have sexual fetishes (or paraphilias as they are known technically) as a group have a higher average IQ than those who don't. I don't know of any data that verifies this (I haven't seen any studies linking sexual fetishes to IQ), but I suppose that runs into the... Read More
Post updated, 11/17/13 4/14/13 1/19/13, see below! It is already known that educational attainment and income are highly heritable. However, finding specific genes linked to cognitive and behavioral traits has been difficult. This is primarily because most traits arise not from a few genes with large effects, but from many genes with small effects (and... Read More
Post edited, 9/24/2012: See below! Earlier I discussed the origin of modern levels of IQ and the origin of modern ideologies. I noted that both of these things have roots in the societal conditions during the Middle Ages. But what, exactly, about this period led to the evolution of these traits? In this multi-part series,... Read More
In the spirit of (partial) full disclosure, in my earlier post on the topic, I announced that I'm liberal. In this post, I'll announce that I am Black. That is, at least, according to American hypodescent; I'm a mixed Black/White/Chinese second generation Jamaican-American. As such, of course I have a soft spot for the American... Read More
Edited, 6/6/13. See below! I'll have much more on this later, but I stumbled across this map, and I thought it was too poignant to ignore: This is a map of the 2010 unemployment rates across Europe, broken down by region, originally found here. I have filled in the unemployment rates of the former Yugoslav... Read More
Someone brought this to my attention (sensational title and all), and I couldn't resist. All I can say is it's about damned time he said this! By Amelia Proud PUBLISHED: 19:36 EST, 27 April 2012 | UPDATED: 10:44 EST, 28 April 2012 Barack Obama had some advice for the single men of America today -... Read More
Edit, 3/13/14 8/24/13: Post updated. See below! This started as an e-mail I wrote to a friend to sum up the important events of the Middle Ages for Europe and the Near East. Then I decided that this was blog post worthy, so here it is: a nice, fairly concise summary of the events of... Read More
In an earlier post I mentioned the recent Italian cruise ship disaster. I stated that this was an example of "Italian incompetence." Italians have a certain reputation attached to them, as many of you may have seen with Italian jokes after the tragedy (a word I use deliberately, as we'll see). Southern Italians have been... Read More
I had promised a couple of posts to bring those not necessarily familiar with HBD (i.e., Human BioDiversity) up to speed, but as I've not been getting around to those transitional posts, I've decided to skip that step and go on ahead. So here is my first semi-original contribution to the world of HBD. I'm... Read More
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