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Libya

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“We came, we saw…he died” boasted a beaming Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton, speaking of the 2011 western overthrow of Libya’s leader Muammar Khadaffi. She was, of course, shamelessly paraphrasing Caesar’s famous summary of his campaign around the Black Sea. Mrs. Clinton, who seems ordained to be America’s next president, should have been rather more... Read More
I went to Libya in 1987 to interview its strongman, Muammar Khadaffi. We spent an evening talking in his colorful Bedouin tent outside the Bab al-Azizya Barracks in Tripoli which had been bombed a year earlier by the US in an attempt to kill the troublesome Libyan leader. Khadaffi predicted to me that if he... Read More
“What’s going on, what’s happening,” a wounded, dazed Muammar Gadaffi reportedly asked just before he was murdered in Sert, Libya. The “Brother Leader” had once asked me something similar. A year after the US sought to assassinate him by dropping a 2,000-pound bomb on his bedroom in Tripoli’s Baba al-Azizya barracks, Gaddafi took me by... Read More
“What’s going on, what’s happening,” a wounded, dazed Muammar Gadaffi reportedly asked just before he was murdered in Sirte, Libya. The “Brother Leader” had once asked me something similar. A year after the US sought to assassinate him by dropping a 2,000lb bomb on his bedroom at Tripoli’s Baba al-Azizya barracks, Gadaffi took me by... Read More
Watching rebel gunmen rampage through Col. Muammar Gadaffi's Bab al-Aziziya compound — once Tripoli's Forbidden City of Tripoli — was a strange experience for me. I spent an evening there with Gadaffi in 1987, a year after it was bombed by US warplanes. Libya's "Brother Leader" talked about the Mideast, Palestine, North Africa. He led... Read More
After 43 years of eccentric, zany, or comical rule, underscored by Western charges of terrorism, it appears the era of Libya's Col. Muammar Gadaffi, once called by Ronald Reagan, "the mad dog of the Middle East," is over. Col. Gadaffi has been the longest-ruling Arab leader. His sons, who were positioned to succeed him, are... Read More
Muammar Gadaffi's Libya may not be sinking yet, but it's low in the water and springing new leaks by the day. Italy, a key player in North Africa, sniffed the winds of change, then decided to abandon old ally Gadaffi and recognize the revolutionary junta in Benghazi. Last Wednesday, Libya's Foreign Minister, Moussa Koussa, dressed... Read More
The finest strategic thinker of the 20th century, Britain’s Maj. Gen. J.F.C. Fuller, wrote the object of war is achieving political goals, not military victory. Politicians keep forgetting Fuller’s dictum. The last examples of wars without defined political objectives were Vietnam, Afghanistan, and Iraq. Welcome a fourth: Libya. US foreign policy is becoming permanently militarized.... Read More
With déjà vu we see US cruise missiles being launched from the sea, Libyan AA firing helplessly into the night sky at invisible B-2 heavy bombers, and the burning wreckage of armor and vehicles on desert roads. Here we go again! It's Iraqi-style shock and awe for Libya. Let's get that nasty Saracen, Muammar Gadaffi,... Read More
I recently wrote that Libya's "Leader," Muammar Gadaffi, had used up all of his nine lives. After being written off by great powers and world media, Gadaffi, the dictator we love to hate, is still in power and making rude gestures at his assorted foes. We should call Gadaffi Mr. Lucky. As the western powers... Read More
The US media, perfectly described by Israeli thinker Uri Avnery as "a mixture of propaganda, news and entertainment," is steaming with righteous indignation over the awfulness of Libya's wicked Colonel Muammar Gadaffi, and is once again baying for his blood. "On to Libya! Down with the Tyrant of Tripoli!" That's the latest hue and cry... Read More
Watching Col. Muammar Gadaffi deliver a bombastic, defiant speech last week from the ruins of Tripoli's Bab al-Azizia barracks brought me back to 1987 when Libya's leader led me by the hand through this same wreckage of his former residence. On 14 April, 1986, US aircraft attacked Libya after a Berlin disco frequented by US... Read More
Muammar Qaddafi has used up twelve of his nine lives, but he still keeps going strong. He came to power — with some help from CIA it is whispered — in a 1969 coup against Libya's doddering, British-run puppet king, Idris. Forty years in power in the Mideast is a remarkable feat. President Ronald Reagan... Read More
If you ever wonder why journalists become cynical, look at this week's events in Italy and Libya. Romano Prodi's new centre-left coalition, which won power April 9 in a razor-thin vote, appointed Giorgio Napolitano, leader of Italy's "reformed" Communist Party, to be president of Italy. This position is mostly ceremonial but commands great prestige. It... Read More
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Eric Margolis
About Eric Margolis

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles have appeared in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times, Nation – Pakistan, Hurriyet, – Turkey, Sun Times Malaysia and other news sites in Asia.

He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post, Lew Rockwell. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

His internet column www.ericmargolis.com reaches global readers on a daily basis.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow.

A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

A native New Yorker, he maintains residences in Toronto and New York, with frequent visits to Paris.


Personal Classics
Bin Laden is dead, but his strategy still bleeds the United States.
Egyptians revolted against American rule as well as Mubarak’s.
“America’s strategic and economic interests in the Mideast and Muslim world are being threatened by the agony in Palestine, which inevitably invites terrorist attacks against US citizens and property.”
A menace grows from Bush’s Korean blind spot.
Far from being a model for a “liberated” Iraq, Afghanistan shows how the U.S. can get bogged down Soviet-style.