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Sociobiology

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"The Paleo Manifesto" by John Durant, published in 2013. Rating: 5/5. Most books on the paleo diet follow a set pattern: An inspirational story about how the author wrecked his health with junk food or vegetarianism before the caveman came riding on a white horse to the rescue; an explanation of why, contrary to the... Read More
I am currently (re)reading The National System of Political Economy by Friedrich List (published in 1841), and this jumped out at me: In no European kingdom is the institution of an aristocracy more judiciously designed than in England for securing to the nobility, in their relation to the Crown and the commonalty, individual independence, dignity,... Read More
One of the books I've been reading lately is Steven Pinker's massive door-stopper The Better Angels of Our Nature. Incidentally, I found it a very interesting read with tons of cool factoids, although it could have done with a third of its text and a tiny fraction of its liberal sanctimonious. But that's for the... Read More
In the discussion at the previous post, in which I took exception to Ron Unz's theory of the East Asian Exception, he alerted me to so additional work on the matter he'd done as a Harvard freshman on Chinese IQ. You can read his summary of Social Darwinism and Rural China as well as Steve... Read More
He writes: China isn't anywhere near as backward as he portrays it. (1) The urban-rural ratio was essentially 50/50 according to the 2010 Census. Furthermore, rural Chinese don't really suffer from the absolute destitution common to peasants in Third World countries. They own their own land and it is almost impossible for them to lose... Read More
And no, I ain't talking of that von Neumann crap. :) Game theory as developed by Heartiste and Co (1, 2, 3, 4). Before we start, there are two concepts we must avail ourselves of: Female hypergamy: Woman's tendency to mate up the social hierarchy. Soft polygamy: See picture right, as helpfully illustrated by yours... Read More
Now that I'm done with the Necessary Caveats, it's time we had a look at why exactly HBD/IQ theories are both valid, and relevant to the real world. As I see it, their main import (as interpreted by me) can be distilled into a few logically consecutive, falsifiable statements: IQ tests are a valid, culturally... Read More
Russia is in something of a homophobic fever. Four regions (including Saint-Petersburg) have banned the dissemination of "gay propaganda" to minors, it may yet go federal, and disassociated itself from a G8 statement on gay rights. It's obviously not like in many Middle Eastern countries where homosexuality is illegal (as in the USSR) but attitudes... Read More
This may be the article I've hesitated longest over publishing. Its subject matter has always hovered as a specter over my writings on the close relation between human capital and economic growth; an obvious but studiously ignored presence*. I am talking, of course, about race and IQ. Of racial differences in IQ, to be precise.... Read More
Depressingly fatalist, morbidly truthful, irresistibly Nietzschean. That's Howard Bloom's "The Lucifer Principle" in a nutshell: a meandering trawl through disciplines such as genetics, psychology and culture that culminates in a theory of evil, purporting to explain its historical necessity, its creative potential and the possibility of it ever being vanquished. The odds do not appear... Read More
Then you might get something like Peter Turchin's War and Peace and War, which I've finally read on the recommendations of Kolya and TG. Ranging from Ermak's subjugation of the Sibir Khanate to the rise of Rome, Turchin makes the case that the rise and fall of empires is reducible to three basic concepts: 1)... Read More
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Anatoly Karlin
About Anatoly Karlin

I am a blogger, thinker, and businessman in the SF Bay Area. I’m originally from Russia, spent many years in Britain, and studied at U.C. Berkeley.

One of my tenets is that ideologies tend to suck. As such, I hesitate about attaching labels to myself. That said, if it’s really necessary, I suppose “liberal-conservative neoreactionary” would be close enough.

Though I consider myself part of the Orthodox Church, my philosophy and spiritual views are more influenced by digital physics, Gnosticism, and Russian cosmism than anything specifically Judeo-Christian.