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"The Paleo Manifesto" by John Durant, published in 2013. Rating: 5/5. Most books on the paleo diet follow a set pattern: An inspirational story about how the author wrecked his health with junk food or vegetarianism before the caveman came riding on a white horse to the rescue; an explanation of why, contrary to the... Read More
I have managed to find 3 polls querying people on their attitudes towards radical life extension. By far the most comprehensive one is PEW's August 2013 Living to 120 and Beyond project. The other two are a poll of CARP members, a Canadian pro-elderly advocacy group, and by Russia's Levada Center. While PEW and Levada... Read More
This conference is organized by brain health and IQ researcher Hank Pellissier, and its aim is to bring all kinds of quirky and visionary folks - "Biohackers, Neuro-Optimists, Extreme Futurists, Philosophers, Immortalist Artists, Steal-the-Singularitarians" - together in one place and have them give speeches and interact with each other and the interested public. One of... Read More
As you can see the site has had a major redesign, and new blog posts will start appearing as of this Monday. Here are the major changes: (1) Back to self-hosted, after a year and a half at WordPress.com. There will be no repeat of the pharma hack that torpedoed the old Sublime Oblivion. My... Read More
Is summarized below for each state (source) - and it shows some very interesting patterns. The average life expectancy of Asian-Americans (86.5 years) is 4 years higher than in Japan - the longest-lived big East Asian country. Taiwan and South Korea are at around 80; Hong Kong is at 83; Singapore is at 81. The... Read More
One of the best possible arguments against vegetarianism in just 1:24 minutes. They like steak too. Most herbivores are herbivores because their teeth can't chew through fur and tough skin, not because they are humanitarians. (In the conventional meaning of the word). But put some little defenseless critter in front of them, and they'd be... Read More
This Sunday I had the pleasure of meeting up with Hank Pellissier, who used to work for the IEET, a futurist/transhumanist institute, and is now a blogger-journalist and amateur researcher at the Brighter Brains blog. As one may glean from the title of that blog, his current area of major interest lies in IQ and... Read More
What striking about Syria is how so many people insist on speaking about it in profoundly moralistic, Manichaean terms. This is complete nonsense, given that its civil war isn't a showdown between democracy and dictatorship, but an ethnic and religious conflict. Here's a more realistic guide: The rhetoric: He kills his own people! He is... Read More
A few months late, but worth posting anyway. The results are based on the latest "wave" of the World Values Survey, a very interesting project that tracks sociological data across countries - and which I will likely post more about in the future. Interesting observations: (1) The West in general is the world's least "racist"*... Read More
First you couldn't have more than 10% fat in your diet, then carbohydrates became the source of all evil*. Slow-Carb waged war on the various Schools of Paleo. But the Food Pyramid continues to loom over them all like some kind of Eldritch abomination. Weight machines were once all the rage, but then free weights... Read More
I have already written on the joys of cleaning house and how less is more when it comes to possessions. But possessions aren't limited to the physical realm. Your digital files - documents, emails, music libraries, photos, etc. - share many features with property, especially as regards the need to keep them well organized and... Read More
Repost of Alexander Mercouris' comments at Mark Chapman's blog and The Russia Debate forum. The original compilation is posted at Mercouris' blog. PS. Originally, this space hosted just one of Mercouris' comments. Now that he has taken the trouble to gather up his output, the least I could do is update it and try to... Read More
Further to my post on the remarkable failure of Scandinavian education systems to develop their students to anywhere near the levels indicated by their IQ potentials, a professor of mathematics at a Wisconsin university sent me data on the percentage of respondents in the TIMSS who gave the correct answer to the following question: Below... Read More
I had been meaning to post about this for a long time. Better late than never, I suppose.The TIMSS and PIRLS are international assessments of academic ability in math, science and literacy that are conducted once every four years. They are similar to the PISA tests, although the latter are less purely academically focused and... Read More
My response to Snowdengate, the new Graph Search, its inevitable integration with Google Glass? I will be minimizing my privacy settings and for all intents and purposes making my Facebook public. So good ahead, look up my profile. Friend me. Whatever. I don't mind. Sounds counter-intuitive, huh? There's a logic behind the madness. It's now... Read More
So apparently an Ambassadorship costs $1.8 million per post in the US. In virtually any other country, even where the situation with corruption is quite dismal, such arrangements would be seen as unquestionably corrupt. And yet the US scores an entirely respectable 73/100 in Transparency International's Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI), leagues above say Italy which... Read More
Here it is. Or just skip the graphics and download the data in Excel here. I can't say I care much about most of it. Of course most people everything think corruption is "increasing," because they are a grumpy lot. What does matter is the number of people who report paying a bribe in the... Read More
(1) Just as with Manning, it is beyond dispute that Snowden broke US law. As such, the US government is perfectly entitled to try to apprehend him (on its own soil), request his extradition, and prosecute him. This is quite perpendicular to whether Snowden's leaks were morally "justified" or not. In some sense, they were.... Read More
I'm a sucker for classification graphs, so I was delighted to see that "Another Reactionary Blog" had compiled a "map" of the neo-reactionary / "Dark Enlightenment" thinkers. It's reproduced below: I'm not disappointed not to see myself there, as I blog about a lot of different things making classification quite hard. If I had to... Read More
While researching a different topic I stumbled upon the following 2006 report on the Internet. It contains comprehensive estimates for the prevalence of birth defects all around the world. The relevant graph is reprinted below (you can click on it to get a bigger picture). What leaps out at first sight is the sheer extent... Read More
Make of this what you will. (1) The older brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, never adjusted to life in the US. "I don't have a single American friend," he said. His younger brother, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, had an understanding of US teen hood / SWPL culture. He was a 9/11 "truther." That's from the Twitter account. That said,... Read More
Several days ago, the USD/BTC exchange rate soared to dizzying heights, reaching almost $250 for one unit of the virtual, decentralized currency. Then it crashed to $55. But since then, it has gone back up to $100. I'd heard of them before, but I had assumed it was some sort of pyramid, and that the... Read More
"The Otherness of Self" by Xin Liu, published in 2002. Rating: 1/5. I don’t want to sound overly demanding, but really, unless a writer is the next Kant or Heidegger, he owes it to his readers to make his prose at least minimally engaging. With this book on too many occasions I was under the... Read More
In Search of Wealth and Power by Benjamin Schwartz, published in 1964. Rating: 4/5. In Search of Wealth and Power is a very dense but richly rewarding tome by Benjamin Schwartz, a noted China scholar. He focuses on the life of the translator Yan Fu to illustrate the culture clashes that arose when traditional Chinese... Read More
A friend on Facebook said it best: I am personally entirely neutral and indifferent to her. I have British acquaintances who are her fans, as well as those who are very hostile to her. I think both sides overstate her real significance. The coal mines were dead men walking by the 1980's, and any British... Read More
The WHO has recently released a list of countries by their average BMI and it makes for interesting reading. Obviously of relevance to younger world travelers, "love tourists", and mini-retirees. It confirms many stereotypes, but also throws up a couple of surprises. It is reprinted below the text for some of the bigger and more... Read More
In my previous post about the real incidence of rape (it is in massive decline! contrary to the claims of the campus rape industry), I said there was a discrepancy in the National Crime Victimization Survey statistics about its prevalence in the past several years. Steven Pinker writes that it was at 50/100,000 in 2008,... Read More
Over the past week I've completed one of my most significant projects, though I'm not megalomaniac enough to think it will present much interest to other people. It's a list of all the books I've ever read. Well, not all of them, of course. That's unrealistic. Since completing it, I've remembered a couple more. But... Read More
Chinese Characteristics by Arthur Henderson Smith, published in 1894. It is available free here. Rating: 5/5. In rich and evocative prose reminiscent of De Tocqueville's writings on America, Arthur H. Smith lays out what he sees as the core features of the Chinese character and his values. The tone is bold and fearless, making sweeping... Read More
Confessions of an Online Hustler by Matt Forney, published in 2013. See the Amazon version of this review. Rating: 4/5. Let's get one thing straight right off the bat: This book isn't for the casual reader. Despite the title, it's not a "life interest" story with a morass of prurient and scandalous details, nor is... Read More
I am currently (re)reading The National System of Political Economy by Friedrich List (published in 1841), and this jumped out at me: In no European kingdom is the institution of an aristocracy more judiciously designed than in England for securing to the nobility, in their relation to the Crown and the commonalty, individual independence, dignity,... Read More
Convict Conditioning by Paul Wade, published in 2010. Also Convict Conditioning 2, a followup published a year later. Rating: 4/5. A couple of months ago, I was walking in a park with my dad. We passed an outdoor gym sort of place and decided, "Why not try out some of the exercises?" It was quite... Read More
The Buddhists say that attachment to material things is the source of much suffering in the world. In the past few days, I have been inclined to agree with them. Now I don't of course mean to say that being an impoverished wayfarer is any better of a proposition than hoarding. That has tons of... Read More
Okay, I promise this will be the last post on the matter. But some of the tropes that come up time and time again in coverage of Chavez's legacy, from neocons and faux-leftists alike, just have to be addressed for me to rest easy. Note that this is NOT meant to be comprehensive; just some... Read More
Not sure you can say that of many national ambassadors! This is what I wrote to this email for expressing condolences on Chavez's passing: Here is his response: Incidentally, Mr. Moncada has an impressive academic pedigree, with a PhD in h
We all suspected this would come sooner or later. As it happens, Chavez struggled heroically against his cancer, confounding the intensive Schadenfreude and concerted death wishes of his loathsome detractors month after arduous month. But this is what you can expect to get when you look out for your own countrymen and stand up to... Read More
No matter how you look at it, he is a traitor. He violated the UCMJ. Although he is free to make ethical arguments as to why he leaked Collateral Murder and the US Embassy cables, the US is fully within its rights to prosecute him. I'm quite consistent about this: Treason is a punishable offense,... Read More
It might happen this June or later, reports RT citing Israeli media. Obama and Netanyahu are at least discussing the prospect. In previous years I was sure that it would happen eventually, probably before year end 2012. That is because that was the most convenient window between the fielding of the Massive Ordnance Penetrator (early... Read More
The past two days I had the pleasure of observing the blowout over a post by blogger Matt Forney about rape - or more precisely, about "how to rape women and get away with it." It's completely satirical, quite funny, and one can't help but by impressed by the size of the balls (no homo)... Read More
Regular readers of this blog may remember my comments regarding Ron Unz's theory that East Asians have high IQ's independent of time/nutrition/urbanization whatever it is that causes the Flynn Effect. Here is his original article on his theory of the "East Asian Exception" and my two responses are here and here. Anyway a new paper... Read More
I knew that gays had a maybe five or even ten times higher chance of getting AIDS and other STD's than heterosexuals. I didn't know the differential was actually more like 50. Something like 20% of the US gay population (which makes up 3.5% of its total population) is HIV positive. It is 5% in... Read More
One of the books I've been reading lately is Steven Pinker's massive door-stopper The Better Angels of Our Nature. Incidentally, I found it a very interesting read with tons of cool factoids, although it could have done with a third of its text and a tiny fraction of its liberal sanctimonious. But that's for the... Read More
Heard of the political compass? Well, one enviro person compiled something similar for those who seriously entertain the possibility that industrial civilization will collapse. (H/t Mark Sleboda for pointing me to it.) Needless to say, the "deniers" are almost as absurd as the "rapturists." All the business as usual scenarios lead to collapse by mid-century.... Read More
It all began on January 9, 2008. It began, as it is now, as Da Russophile over at blogger. And I was a Russophile then, perhaps unreasonably so. That said I did do some useful work back then. I am most proud of the demographic models by which I predicted: Russia will see positive population... Read More
An original poem: And there shall come a time of wist and woe, When flesh grows weak and spirit fails, Of dark foreboding (and of secret glee), When I look down into the Abyss. There in its sad and murky depths, Where daemons lurk and spirits fall, The realm of death awaits. With its tenebral... Read More
Western liberals, their puppets, and the Arab Spring in a nutshell (and I do mean nut).
Chavez won. The comprador candidate got sent packing. As, indeed, 80% of the pre-elections polls predicted. I fully expect the usual democratist presstitutes to cry foul in the coming days. Not because the Venezuelan elections were unfair - though they will doubtless be claimed to be so by the organs of imperialist propaganda like the... Read More
And the protestations of demented democratists be damned. [tweet And even apart from all the HBD stuff, here is the most succinct summary of why democracy is never going to flourish in the Arab world for the foreseeable future. Libya isn't among the countries above, but it is conservative even by Arab standards. Benghazi contributed... Read More
Mashable tells students about 12 things they should never do in social media. By now this doesn't apply to me, as between my non-anonymous Russophilia, HBD-ing, gaming, and AGW-ing I've long ostracized myself from both liberals and conservatives and torpedoed myself any hopes of "respectable" employment anyway. I do however wonder about the point of... Read More
At least according to ultra-leftist Stieg Larsson (of Girl with the Dragon Tattoo fame). But thing is, if you actually ask women if they've been experienced violence sexual or physical violence from a partner, one will find that it is actually East Asian and White countries that have the lowest rates. Via The Inductivist: Japan... Read More
Anatoly Karlin
About Anatoly Karlin

I am a blogger, thinker, and businessman in the SF Bay Area. I’m originally from Russia, spent many years in Britain, and studied at U.C. Berkeley.

One of my tenets is that ideologies tend to suck. As such, I hesitate about attaching labels to myself. That said, if it’s really necessary, I suppose “liberal-conservative neoreactionary” would be close enough.

Though I consider myself part of the Orthodox Church, my philosophy and spiritual views are more influenced by digital physics, Gnosticism, and Russian cosmism than anything specifically Judeo-Christian.