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Pavel Ryzhenko (2008): Umbrella. The latest in our series of translations of Russian national-conservative intellectual Egor Kholmogorov, as promised. In his latest article, published at Vzglyad, Kholmogorov demolishes twelve myths about the Bolshevik revolution, using a recent article by the Russian novelist Zakhar Prilepin as a foil. Why Prilepin? Who is he, anyway? You won't... Read More
There is a general consensus that Stalin was a sadistic tyrant. But the ghost of his predecessor remains "handshakeworthy" on the left hand side of the political spectrum. The SWPLy bobos of Seattle, who would not have been long for the Communist world, erected a statue to him in the city center. The New York... Read More
On October 26, Almazbek Atambaev, the outgoing President of Kyrgyzstan, signed a decree replacing the November 7 celebrations of the October revolution with a “Day of History and Remembrance.” The “history” and “remembrance” in question refers to the Urkun, the Kyrgyz name for their 1916 revolt against Tsarist Russia. Here is an extract from the... Read More
The latest in our series of translations of Russian national-conservative thinker Egor Kholmogorov. Translated by: Fluctuarius Argenteus; slightly edited by AK. Original: http://zavtra.ru/blogs/pravoslavnyij-sotsializm *** It may seem strange that, at the turn of the 21st century, the word “Socialism” is back in the popular political idiom. The final decade of the preceding century seemed to... Read More
What everyone thinks the Russian Empire was like. "Tsarist Russia was this superstitious land of icons and cockroaches with Cossacks on thot patrol with nagaikas in hand - and it was absolutely horrific!" - Liberals, Marxists. "Tsarist Russia was this superstitious land of icons and cockroaches with Cossacks on thot patrol with nagaikas in hand... Read More
The conventional view of nationalism is that it was a product of mass literacy and the modern state, underpinned by schoolbooks and Tombs of the Unknown Soldier. Recent years have seen challenges to this historiographic consensus at both a general level (e.g. Azar Gat's Nations), and with respect to specific peoples (Robert Tomb's recent The... Read More
Ilya Glazunov, one of Russia's great painters is dead at the age of 87. The "official" art of the modern age is an aesthetic desert; a postmodernist joke that celebrates fraudsters and degenerates, and benefits art dealers and billionaires. Yet there are still men of idealism, far from the cameras and the accolades of handshakeworthy... Read More
The USSR played the leading role in the defeat of Nazi Germany, which the majority of Europeans recognized in 1945 even if half a century of Hollywood propaganda successfully displaced it in the public imagination in favor of the USA. But what about within the USSR itself? Back in January 2015, during his brief nationalist... Read More
About two thirds of the USSR's 27 million casualties were civilians - that is, almost 10% of its prewar population. Had those percentages been applied to Nazi Germany, it would lost 8 million people - an order of magnitude than the 400,000 civilians it lost due to Allied strategic bombing, and the 600,000 who died... Read More
don't follow many people on YouTube, since it's not really my format, but EmperorTigerstar is one of the few people I make an exception for. Not only has he mapped all the classics - WW2, WW1, Napoleonic Wars, history of Europe and the Roman Empire - but also plenty of relatively less well known conflicts... Read More
The (excellent) historical journal Arzamas has a quiz, now translated into English, about your political compass location in the context of 1917 Russia. You can take it here: http://arzamas.academy/materials/1269 My own result, probably unsurprisingly, was Black Hundreds.
Simon Hix has published graphs showing the percentage share accruing to different ideological families in European elections since 1918. The first thing that strikes one is how constant things have been, all things considered. There was a Radical Right spike in the early 1930s, and a longer-term Radical Left resurgence following the war that petered... Read More
Stalin waxing lyrical about the friendship of peoples in April 1941, a famous period of international idyll when there were no other important concerns: ... I want to say a few words about the Tajiks. The Tajiks are a special people. They are not Uzbeks, Kazakhs, or Kyrgiz - they are Tajiks, the most ancient... Read More
It's hard to view Stalin as any sort of Russian national hero considering the demonstrable idiocy of his apologists' arguments. Trying to portray him as such involves descending into a fantasy world in which no country had ever managed to industrialize itself without killing off millions of its most intelligent and productive people or have... Read More
Rosa Luxemburg in her 1918 book on the Russian Revolution: It is actually rather remarkable how much her critiques echoes that of Russian conservative opponents of the Bolsheviks (even if from the opposite side of the ideological spectrum): The Bolsheviks are in part responsible for the fact that the military defeat was transformed into the... Read More
When I posted a 2007 map of the share of European children born out of wedlock from Reddit to Twitter, it generated considerably discussion, including a discussion at Razib Kan's blog. There are many rather interesting patterns here: The Nordics, France, The Former GDR, Estonia, Bulgaria all have high rates out of wedlock births. Most... Read More
Here's a map from the May 16, 1941 edition of the St. Petersburg Times showing the results of a Gallup poll on support for declaring war against Germany: And here is a map of percentage German ancestry from the 1890 Census:   Lingering cultural ties to Germany? Ethnic genetic interests? Something related to the American... Read More
The cultural and scientific achievements of Ancient Greece are so manifold that it is barely worth recounting them. Socrates, Plato and Aristotle laid the foundations of Western philosophy. Pythogoras, Euclid, and Archimedes launched mathematics as a disciple grounded on logic and proof, a break from the approximative techniques that had held sway in other civilizations... Read More
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HBD, Hive Minds, and H+
Today is the publication date of Hive Mind, a book by economist Garett Jones on the intimate relationship between average national IQs and national success, first and foremost in the field of economics. I do intend to read and review it ASAP, but first some preliminary comments. This is a topic I have been writing... Read More
One interesting approach that has nothing to do with Pumpkin Person's z factors: People tend to associate most closely with people of similar IQs. Fortunately, uniquely for the elites of a major state, we have some detailed data on the IQs of the Nazi leadership (with the exception of a few important guys like Goebbels,... Read More
One of the consequences of selecting a literary nobody for the world's most prestigious intellectual prize is that people will begin digging into their biographies. And find some very, very interesting things. This is what has been happening in regards to 2015 Nobel Literature Prize winner Svetlana Alexievich, whose main distinguishing feature seems to be... Read More
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In the latest news from the ongoing comedy skit that is Ukrainian politics, we learn that Mikheil Saakashvili has been appointed governor of Odessa oblast. Who is Saakashvili? The son of Soviet apparatchiks with ties to the diplomatic service, which was dominated by Georgians in the late USSR, this onetime university dropout enjoyed a great... Read More
A few months ago, I wrote the following: Well, now we do have such polls, not only for the US and Britain but also for some other countries of interest like Germany and Finland, all thanks to two big recent polls by YouGov and ICM Research. Updated with an additional IFOP poll for France, and... Read More
Xi Jinping (pictured right, meeting the Patriarch Kirill) penned an op-ed in a Russian newspaper on May 6th in which, in stark contrast to the typical Western bile and hostility, he acknowledges the role of the Soviet Union in defeating Nazism and warns off against attempts to revise that outcome, be it on paper or... Read More
There are some massacres that are clearly genocides, such as the Holocaust, and there are some massacres that are clearly not, such as Katyn, but in between there is a vast, gristly spectrum that in the absence of any strict and universally accepted definition of the term is dominated by quacks and cranks driven more... Read More
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The benevolent dictator, much like Communism, seems to be one of those semi-mythical things that seem to be good in theory but rarely if ever pan out in practice. But every so often there occurs an exception. If there was one man who embodied the archetype, it was Lee Kuan Yew, who passed away earlier... Read More
I do swear this is my last post on Auschwitz this year. But the followup to Putin's disinvitation is too juicy to resist writing about. Following in the Polish footsteps, Ukrainian PM Arseny Yatsenyuk has literally claimed that it was the Ukrainians, in particular soldiers from Zhytomyr and Lvov, who liberated Auschwitz. Here is a... Read More
Title got your attention? No, it's not going to be... that. Read on. While the rest of the world (or a few Europeans, anyway) is obsessed with yet another "Polish death camps" episode, this time on CNN, a somewhat more significant historical scandal brewed between Poland and Russia. Explaining away Poroshenko's status as a guest... Read More
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Anatoly Karlin
About Anatoly Karlin

I am a blogger, thinker, and businessman in the SF Bay Area. I’m originally from Russia, spent many years in Britain, and studied at U.C. Berkeley.

One of my tenets is that ideologies tend to suck. As such, I hesitate about attaching labels to myself. That said, if it’s really necessary, I suppose “liberal-conservative neoreactionary” would be close enough.

Though I consider myself part of the Orthodox Church, my philosophy and spiritual views are more influenced by digital physics, Gnosticism, and Russian cosmism than anything specifically Judeo-Christian.