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In the discussion of the results of the Presidential elections in Russia, Sen. John McCain claimed the result was an insult to all Russians. Israel Shamir on the pages of The Unz Review claimed they were rigged just a little. Some pro-Western Russian critics argued that that the very fact that Putin received over 75 per cent of the vote proved that the election results was not normal, because in normal countries there usually are two candidates who run in close proximity and then follow in a run-off. In the view of this speaker, that in itself is proof of the democratic nature of elections.

The overall reaction of Western media is disbelief, suspicion of foul play or at best reluctant and cold reception of the fact. The smashing victory this landslide shows exactly the opposite. Russia is normal, rallied around its leader, and the West is in a deep domestic crisis. The run-off in France or close results in the USA or Germany or Italy are symptoms of a serious malaise or as one political scientist put it, turbulence in Western Democracy as a system.

Russian West-looking Liberals have habitually accustomed themselves to thinking that anything that is in the West is better. This kind of attitude is unfortunately very Russian or at least very typical for the Westernizing part of Russian intelligentsia.

Remember that in 1914 Russia’s educated society was almost entirely pro-Western. The Constitutional Democrats, the leading party then (Kadets) wanted Russia to be like France, the Socialists Revolutionaries wanted to overthrow the hated Tsarist regime and worshipped the Russian peasants as the repository of wisdom and goodness, and the Marxists of all varieties were inspired by the Western Marxist ideology of liberation. Lenin’s priority was not Russia but world revolution. Of course, there was a Stolypin, the murdered Prime Minister who wanted not great upheavals but Great Russia. Yes there was Petr Struve who claimed that Russian intelligentsia lacked gosudarstvennost or concern for the wellbeing of the state. He thought it was too destructive and mimicking of the West.

What is particularly repulsive in the reactions of these western critics, is the contemptuous disdain for the votes of millions of Russians. Who gave McCain the right to evaluate the wishes of the Russian people? Who is in crisis? Look at the Western democracies.

France:

In France the totally new party En March of Macron won the run off against Marin Le Pen, the leader of the National Front, a party that wanted to shut down frontiers, restore French sovereignty and reconsider relations with EU and maybe even the Euro, scoring 30 per cent. 20 per cent of electorate were for the leftist Green party, also critics of the regime. The establishment parties of Socialists and Republicans all suffered losses. Macron offered no more than efficiency, integration with Germany, reform of the EU and stricter border controls. In other words, he offered a watered down version of the National Front platform, and seized the center of the political spectrum.

The run-off was not a sign of a stable democracy but a sign of a society in crisis, of deep divisions among the French over such issues as labor codes, immigration, EU, and integration with Germany. The fundamental crisis of the French society is in that they cannot afford to live the way they used to and are reluctant to face to the new reality, hence the desire to let Macron go at it again trying to do what Holland had failed to achieve.

Germany:

The latest election was a total disaster for the ruling CDU party. From over 40 percent of the national vote it came down to slightly over 20. The SPD lost heavily too, The CSU in Bavaria was in open revolt about immigration policy. The winners were the Alternative for Germany, the Left and the Greens, i.e, the anti-establishment parties who do not like each other but all detest Merkel. Moreover, the coalition is deeply unpopular, as some SPD people are warning that that is a suicide course for the SPD, that it is going to keep losing voters if it stays with Merkel and yet they chose to keep doing the same, as they fear Alternative for Germany and the former Communists Die Linke. Is that a sign of a healthy political spectrum? No, it is a sign of turbulence, a sign of fragmentation and inability to form any government other than the one that lost all this support i.e. the grand coalition CDU/CSU and SPD.

Italy:

The latest elections showed a rebellion of the electorate against the establishment. All the winners were anti-establishment: The Five star movement is leftist and anti-immigrant. The League is rightist and anti-immigrant and anti-EU and Berlusconi has joined with the right and anti-immigrant movement. The liberals and the European integrationists have lost miserably and Italy is, as they say, ungovernable with a huge debt, with a revolt against immigrants, with a rift between North and South and with a political system what is basically discredited. Is that something to be admired? Is that a healthy stable democracy?

USA: a shining example of democracy for Russian western looking liberals.

The US political system is likewise in crisis. Many people wore a sign: Not my President. The courts overruled the President’s executive orders. The Congress technically in the hands of Republicans is in fact pursuing the Democrats’ agenda of incriminating the President of some kind of collusion. The FBI is alleged to have spied on a Presidential candidate. Government high-ranking officials lied to Congress in favor of their party affiliation. The Democratic party nomination process was manipulated; the super delegates picked a pre-arranged candidate. Clinton broke the law and got away with it. The Justice department covered up the email investigation. The Pentagon ignores the President and is on its own in Syria. Are these signs of a normally functioning democratic system? No, these are all signs of a crisis of dysfunction in the American political system. These are signs of turbulence, gridlock, and powerlessness of the President

Britain:

Here you have a government that is committed to Brexit by a public referendum but in fact, the ruling party or at least its half wanted the opposite result. You have a deeply divided society: some want Brexit, other want to stay, but all want to keep their pound sterling and their sovereignty. You have both major parties who have reluctantly accepted referendum results, but are procrastinating in its implementation without having any clear policy. The issue of Irish border is unresolved, the issue of Scotland independence is dormant for now ready to explode at any new crisis. The trade relations with EU are not resolved; the relations with US are on hold. Are these signs of a stable democratic government? No, these are signs of a crisis, of malaise, of indecision and of turbulence.

Despite all these signs Western observers point a fingure at Russia as having some kind of impure democracy or worse a rule of a bloody dictator, poisoning innocent spies on British soil. Continued adoration of Western democracies by Russian so called liberal westernizers is simply pathetic. They either do not know or refuse to know or are deliberately blind to what is unfolding in Western countries.

Russia:

Now let us turn to Russia. What the critics just cannot comprehend is that the Russian people do not want them. Navalny urged the EU not to recognize the elections because he was not allowed to run. What arrogance. Does he think that if he was allowed to run he would have won? No way, he has nothing to offer, just rallies, empty words that everything is bad, that you see corruption, theft, and no choice. These are the favorite themes of those so called democrats.

So let me remind them what was real corruption, what was real theft and what was real no choice before Putin.

When they were in power, the Westernizers, the friends of America, the free marketers, in the early 1990s, they plunged the country into shock therapy: prices skyrocketed, people lost their life savings. Factories closed, salaries were not paid, and starvation and poverty hit the country. Criminal gangs divided up the peoples’ property. A bunch of oligarchs privatized what was built over the Soviet years. Suddenly, there appeared huge corporations with Western participation that began to own Russian natural resources: Russian aluminum, steel, everything. Tens of billions of stolen assets were moved overseas through a myriad of off shore schemes. The Westernizer rulers of Russia proved themselves to be stooges of Western companies, thieves and robbers of natural resources. Elections showed a dozen parties of all kinds including for example the Love beer party. In the provinces, power was usurped by mafia bosses, criminal gangs, who terrorized opponents, killed journalists, turned kindergartens into private mansions, created private armies that disregarded local police. In some places they turned police into auxiliary criminal force.

The country descended into chaos, rape, murder skyrocketed, birthrate fell, pensions unpaid, education collapsed, army was taken over by a selling spree on a worldwide scale. Military plants stayed idle, and so many talented engineers left the country.

In politics there was a president who opened live fire on the parliament and had it stormed with hundreds killed. Constitution was altered without any proper procedure. The Constitutional Court was ignored and disbanded. The elections of 1996 were stolen, and to add humiliation to national pride the Russians saw their president drunk, conducting an orchestra playing for Russian troops departing from Germany. On top of it all, the President started a disastrous war in Chechnya, a real war inside the Russian Federation borders. The West applauded and received him in the White house and cheered him as a true leader of Russian democracy. Were they blind? Why did they refuse to see what was going on in Russia? Probably because deep down, they loved it. Russia was destroying itself and that was good for what was thought to be a coming American Century.

Russia was disappearing as a nation. Its future and very survival was in doubt. The demographic situation saw steady decrease of population, steady fall of birth rates and increase of death rates and massive outflow of people and capital to the West.

Western banks got Russian money and Western firms got Russian specialists. In this catastrophic situation comes VLADIMIR THE SAVIOR.

Yes he was not alone. Yes, the ouster of Yeltsyn was probably done through difficult negotiations and powerful political forces behind the scenes. But the result was that Russia received a new government that started to put humpty dumpty together again. Slowly, step by step, without rough quick moves, He recreated what he called the pivot of power. Russia received a state that began to fulfill its functions: to restore law and order, to cleanse the police, the army and the bureaucracy. New economic policy legitimized the questionable privatization in exchange for stopping or curbing capital flight and acceptance of the principle Primacy of the State. Oligarchs’ power was broken, some of the worst ones, fled the country, others accepted new rules of the game, those that did not, were jailed. Mafia bosses in the provinces were replaced; salaries were beginning to be paid, pensions likewise. The law was beginning to be taken seriously for the first time since the Bolshevik revolution.

It was an uphill battle and at every stage and every year we heard the same story from the so called liberals, still too much corruption, still too much theft. The implicit answer was patience and hard work. To uproot corruption it was necessary to create new ethical norms and those would come with new pride in the nation, with positive example from peers and enforcement of law for all, not for the privileged few.

What Putin has accomplished or what Russia has accomplished since 2000 is astonishing. It amounts to a political, economic, and moral revolution. Any aspect of Russia’s existence you take, you see measurable progress. The standard of living has grown, pensions are payed, factories are working, and unemployment is lower than in most European countries. Life expectancy has steadily increased, birth rates have increased, and incomes have increased. Education is back, Russian research and development is back again, one of the best in the world and not staffed by foreigners who flock to Silicon valley, but staffed by Russians educated in Russia.

Military technology made a breakthrough of historical significance. For the first time ever Russia has weapons superior to those of the US, not to mention Britain, France and Germany combined.

For the first time in a hundred years Russian agriculture is producing for export and for the first time ever, Russia exported more grain that the US.

Russian culture is flowering again, the spurt of creativity is breath taking. Look at the Russian theater, more than 30 plays in big cities every single day with a repertoire that changes daily. By contrast in Washington there is one theater Arena Stage and in Boston-Cambridge also one, Repertoire theatre. In New York you have mostly the same musicals that run for months. In most American cities, there are no theatres at all. Russian dance, ballet, songs, and poetry is back again as in the good old times. Russia is experiencing a true new renaissance. Most importantly, for the first time since a long time Russians can be proud to be Russian. They do not need to look at accomplishments of the West. For the first time in its history Russia can show that what it has is truly Russian, unique and beautiful, a unity of the nation that has overcome a very difficult period. Putin’s victory is much much more than a victory of a candidate in elections. It is a triumph of the nation that found strength to come together again to find unity and rally around the leader who saved the country from the abyss it faced.What the western critics do not comprehend is that Russia has overcome its turbulence, has come out of the crisis, has discovered a new path.

Of course it is not just Putin. It is the creativity of the nation. It is the talents of millions, it is the Presidents’ team. But still, the leadership counts for a lot. Look at our ex-Soviet neighbors. Ukraine is still in the hands of the thieves and oligarchs. Worse, it was hi-jacked by neo-Nazis. Look at the Baltics, that like to think of itself as a success story. In fact, these republics are ruled by scared nationalistic elites that had sold out national sovereignty to Germany and US. Their young people are fleeing as soon as they have a chance to wealthy Europe. They are totally dependent on Western investment Western everything. Is that the independence they sought? Moreover, they are deluding themselves that they are ahead and they are free and that beyond is wild uncivilized Russians. I once talked to a neighbor in the airplane to Vilnius and he seriously was telling me that they Lithuania were the last bulwark against the Russian hordes, ready to jump onto Europe. Truly, I was disappointed in Vilnius: it looks like a provincial Soviet town, sleepy and deserted. Coming to Moscow after Vilnius is like coming to New York from Oklahoma.

So Russia under Vladimir the Savior has accomplished unimaginable. When I was young in the 1970s Soviet Union we dreamed of a Russia free from aging gerontocracy of Soviet regime, free from censorship, a country of freedom, prosperity and democracy. Well now the dream is pretty much come true. Russia is free and sovereign and proud and strong, everything one can dream of. One has to be either stupid or blind not to see it.

Dr. Brovkin is a historian, formerly a Harvard Professor of History. He has published several books and numerous articles on Russian History and Politics. Currently, Dr. Brovkin works and lives in Marrakech, Morocco.

 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: American Media, EU, Russia, Vladimir Putin 
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  1. Very interesting point of view.
    The Free West™ definitely is not used to be seen and interpreted from a less than friendly position.

    However: it would behoove each and any Russian to come to terms with the crimes committed in Ukraine and elsewhere, mass killings that surpass anything but the crimes committed by Mao Tse Tung.

    After nearly nine decades, with perpetrators and victims gone, it might be possible just not to talk about „Nazis“ but rather about the causes for negative emotions against Russia and Russians and what might be done other than name calling.

    • Replies: @qjdransome
    , @padre
    , @alan2102
  2. An excellent piece, but this statement is not entirely true:

    Military technology made a breakthrough of historical significance. For the first time ever Russia has weapons superior to those of the US, not to mention Britain, France and Germany combined.

    In fact, by early 1980s the technological gap not only was closed in crucial fields, in many the US was simply surpassed. There was lag, constantly decreasing, in computers and in some sensors (not radar). In fact, the list of the military technology in which USSR led the US by 1980-85 is huge. In fact, many breakthroughs of today in military, have their roots in Soviet programs of 1970-1980s. Just to give some example:

    In 1988, Anthony Batista, senior staff member of the Armed Forces Committee, speaking about the Soviet Project 971 (Schuka-Pike, NATO Akula) nuclear submarine declared, “The Akula is the best submarine in the world today.”

    Here are some estimates for 1989-1990 by none other than Norman Polmar–a person who doesn’t need introduction to any military professional in the world. It shows some rather startling revelations (known really well in USSR) for Westerners about the real (more-or-less) state of the affairs:

    This is just one example. Issue of aerospace is a whole other story altogether. But, yes, this fine article gets to the heart of the issue quite well.

    • Replies: @polskijoe
  3. Vladimir Brovkin [AKA "vlad"] says:

    THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR YOUR COMMENT. iT MEANS A LOT FROM A SPECIALIST LIKE YOU.
    I follow your article avidly

  4. Randal says:

    Excellent pushback against the US sphere propaganda position.

    The summaries, in contrast with Russia, of the parlous political states of the US and its main European client states are pretty accurate.

  5. anonymous[380] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s a good big picture article showing where they were and where they are now. The last twenty-five years have been very tumultuous for the Russians, seniors reduced to penury, life expectancies dropping to shocking levels and so on as listed. How some alcoholic like Yeltsin came to be president is a mystery to me yet through the lens of American media he was portrayed as some great democratizer, opening fire on a retrograde parliament and standing atop a tank in heroic pose. Anyone ever tally up how much of the public wealth was carted off out of the country during that period? Any good books about why they collapsed so suddenly?
    No great power likes to see the rise of a new rival hence the hostility with which the US has viewed the revival of the Russian state. It’s tried to isolate and contain it politically and economically as well as to encircle it with military bases and unfriendly governments. The Ukraine coup was part of a strategy to block them off from Europe, a plan that was wrecked by Putin and which will eventually fold up. It’s very impressive how much has been accomplished in less than twenty years and demonstrates their inner resilience. No matter the screeching about Putin being a “thug” over and over again reality has a weight of it’s own. The preferred next step for the US would be to drop the hostility and war hysteria and have a normal environment of trade. No more international banditry whereby the US has attacked numerous vulnerable countries simply because it could.

  6. Beckow says:

    Russia was always the ‘second world’, different, seen as a threat, demonised and intentionally misunderstood. We again have an escalating conflict. The media abuse and hysteria, pride and hatred, lying and fear, symptoms of the inevitable conflict.

    In Washington the last person who doesn’t want a war with Russia is Trump. He is lonely and isolated as the hatred for Trump has merged with the hatred for Russia. In UK, Boris-the-clown has gone full-moron, prancing around with war-like threats – what is worrisome is not Boris, but that no adults have stepped in to talk him down.

    The rest of Brussels-run Europe has no policies, only buffet dinners and desperate hope to keep the good life going. Hope is not a plan, it is what you are left with when you have nothing else. The naive determined look on Merkel’s face says it all: ‘can we have a few more years? can we postpone it all?’

    With Russia’s rise of national will – and its nukes – there is no happy ending to this story. It was supposed to be different, the ‘regime’ replaced, the oligarchs doing the dirty work, the economy was supposed to collapse (best way we see the Western policy is by reading their responsible media – they literally ‘report‘ what they want to happen, thus disclosing their government plans). We are 2-3 personnel changes and one well-done ‘incident’ away from a catastrophe. Is it really worth it?

    • Replies: @peterAUS
  7. KA says:

    Russian West-looking Liberals have habitually accustomed themselves to thinking that anything that is in the West is better. This kind of attitude is unfortunately very Russian or at least very typical for the Westernizing part of Russian intelligentsia.”

    Isn’t the problem of the entire English language dominated countries -Egypt Jordan Pakistan India Nigeria and much less but still significantly influenced countries like Malaysia Indonesia Sri Lanka Thailand , Mexico, Brazil Argentina ,S Africa , Ethiopia ?. I will run out of space. This is the problem because to hear what China Russia Iran Brazil Argentina or Iraq or Syria,or Turkey think and do or believe , one have to depend on English medium who I suspect have been colluding with US for years irrespective of the country the medium primarily serves .

    Thanks to the web, Internet has done a great job in making these ideas and facts ( like this one expressed in UNZ) available to the millions .

    • Replies: @JustJeff
    , @Gavrick
  8. Randal says:

    Britain:

    My own country is looking particularly shabby at the moment, over a number of topical news stories:

    The alleged Salisbury attack, and in particular the disgraceful and shameful British government response to it and the lockstep backing for it by the establishment media. Rush to judgement, childish government and diplomatic ranting, Iraq War-style manipulation of seemingly laughably inadequate evidence to “fit the facts around the policy”, massive jingoistic propaganda effort.

    Intelligence and security community involvement in the manipulative anti-Trump hysteria in the US.

    Now, the related Cambridge Analytica/SCL Elections story and the comical performance in presumably giving time to cover up information on that company’s servers with a convenient court delay in issuing a search warrant:

    Cambridge Analytica: search of London HQ delayed by wait for warrant

    The information commissioner will have to wait until at least Friday to enter the offices of Cambridge Analytica after a high court judge adjourned the hearing into her application for a warrant.

    The commissioner, Elizabeth Denham, announced on Monday night that she planned to request an urgent warrant to enter the company’s London offices, after it was revealed that it had been given information from 50m Facebook profiles without users’ permission.
    ….
    On Tuesday, crates were seen being removed from the central London office that Cambridge Analytica shares with other tenants. No one on the scene would comment on the origin of the crates, and the ICO said it was not involved in their removal.

    The effectiveness of US sphere establishment media propaganda can be judged from the widespread belief that Russia was likely responsible for the alleged attack in Salisbury, when in reality the case against Russia is almost literally non-existent. One survey suggested as few as 26% even questioned the state approved and propaganda-imposed version (poll conducted 14th/15th March):

    73% of people in the poll think that Russia is responsible for the poisoning, 21% are unsure, 5% don’t think it was Russia. There is also broad public support for the government’s reaction – 60% support the measures they’ve announced so far and 14% are opposed.

    • Replies: @NoseytheDuke
  9. ‘So Russia under Vladimir the Savior has accomplished unimaginable. When I was young in the 1970s Soviet Union we dreamed of a Russia free from aging gerontocracy of Soviet regime, free from censorship, a country of freedom, prosperity and democracy. Well now the dream is pretty much come true. Russia is free and sovereign and proud and strong, everything one can dream of. One has to be either stupid or blind not to see it.

    Dr. Brovkin is a historian, formerly a Harvard Professor of History. He has published several books and numerous articles on Russian History and Politics. Currently, Dr. Brovkin works and lives in Marrakech, Morocco.’

    Biggest country on Earth. Yet he would rather live in Morocco than anywhere in Russia.

  10. @anony-mouse

    Biggest country on Earth. Yet he would rather live in Morocco than anywhere in Russia.

    So, you are suggesting for Vladimir to commute each morning from Moscow or St. Petersburg (Rostov, Krasnodar, Sochi etc.) to his work in Marrakesh, right?

  11. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:

    Anon from TN
    The author is painting Putin as larger-than-life figure, which he isn’t. He is a normal man, capable and intelligent, but he is not by any means that superhuman leader and savior. He looks much greater than he is because you subconsciously compare him with pathetic nonentities that the Western world sees as leaders now. In fact, the leadership of the US Empire and all its vassal countries visibly degenerated in the last decades. Just compare De Gaulle with sad excuses La Belle France had for presidents lately. Or compare Nixon (he might have been a nasty person, but he was a great President of the country) with various clintons, bushes, obamas, and trumps. Or compare Chancellor Kohl with that poor excuse for a chancellor that Germany has today. You get the drift.
    Just like the Soviet Union was not defeated by the US, but actually collapsed due to internal problems, regime change rampage is over largely because the United States pushed their luck and overextended themselves, and not just thanks to Putin. Throughout history, all dominant empires lose their grip and eventually crumble (remember Roman or British), and now it’s the turn of the US Empire. Fortunately or unfortunately, the next will be the Chinese Empire, not Russian.
    After the disastrous Yeltsin rule (which came on the heels of disastrous rule by Gorbachev) Putin and his team rescued Russia economically, politically, and militarily. However, the US played a huge role in increasing Putin’s popularity inside Russia, more than his propaganda machine ever could. Before the US-sponsored coup in Ukraine in 2014, Putin’s approval hovered at about 45%. Nazi takeover in Ukraine and his decisive move to take Crimea back (it was transferred to Ukraine from Russia by Khruschev in 1956, illegally even by vague Soviet law; Crimea tried to get away from Ukraine ever since the breakup of the USSR in 1991; polls by Gallup and German company GfK showed that 80%+ Crimean residents wanted to join Russia, rather than remain in the madhouse that Ukraine became after the coup) resulted in his approval soaring above 70%. Ill-advised sanctions added even more. Now he did not need to rig elections, he got genuine 70%+ vote, a level of support Western politicians can’t even dream of (e.g., Trump was elected by 26% of eligible voters; Merkel’s party in Germany got even less).
    As far as Western “democracies” are concerned, the author hit the nail on the head. Yet there are lots of problems in Russia that the author does not mention. I think current Russian take on Soviet propaganda summarizes everything nicely: “what they told us about socialism was a pack of lies, but what they told us about capitalism turned out to be perfectly true”.

    • Agree: Kiza, yurivku
    • Replies: @Kiza
    , @yurivku
    , @Sergey Krieger
  12. peterAUS says:
    @Beckow

    We are 2-3 personnel changes and one well-done ‘incident’ away from a catastrophe.

    Agree.

    Is it really worth it?

    What do you mean? Wait, have to take this selfie and post on my Facebook. Oh, BTW, did you see that episode of “xxxxx” last night? Oh, and you know what happened to me at the service station yesterday? And…….blah…blah…..blah….

  13. @Andrei Martyanov

    No, I would assume that since Russia is now such a wonderful place (certainly better than a third world country) that he’d rather work and live in Russia.

    • Replies: @ploni almoni
  14. First rule of Unz.com: a writers adulation for any area guarantees they don’t actually live there.

  15. Watch for it: CNN is going to start accusing Trump of hacking the Russian election so that Putin would win.

  16. @anony-mouse

    First rule of Unz.com: a writers adulation for any area guarantees they don’t actually live there.

    Hm, I thought it was a rule number seven, or fifteen.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  17. polskijoe says:
    @Andrei Martyanov

    Here is what supposedly a US report said:

    Soviet technology had unquestionable lead in 23 scientific areas.
    And the US had a lead in 18 areas.

    https://qph.fs.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-9bde3a837c197a71dfdff9e771029ae2

    I think after 1970s it was possibly equal, and before the end maybe USSR had an advantage.
    Also the projected status in that picture.

    Though when the USSR fell, I know some secrets were leaked and sold.

    From 1990-2000 the US had chance to improve wouldnt they?
    Since Russia was having internal errors and being robbed by certain tribal group…

    Then comes the spending today…. Russia spends way less but Russia isnt looking to match them in spending but finding “holes” to take advantages in key areas. Russian equipment usually costs less too.

    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov
  18. Mr. Hack says:
    @Andrei Martyanov

    Where do you live? Another ‘Russian patriot’ who lives in the West? :-)

  19. @byrresheim

    Yes, i fully understand why Russian voted for Putin, and i believe the process was democratic. But why is he good for the world or Europe? I am gaving trouble …

    • Replies: @Vidi
  20. Kiza says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Let me translate Andrei: “If you do not agree with the US regime (Deep State) then you are a traitor to the whole US nation.” Next thing, they will be verbally sending you home (whatever that means), or really putting you into an internment camp. But what will they do with those who were born in US and do not agree with the regime’s national sacrifice for Israel? Just hang them?

    We all know what Bolsheviks (Ziocons) did in Russia, why would they not do the same in US? They would cut a Russian’s stomach open, nail his small intestine to a telegraph pole and then deliver blows to his head until his intestine would be all wrapped around the pole (Maxim Gorky quote). Those are the kind of people defending Israel and its destruction of Middle East.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  21. Who gave McCain the right to evaluate the wishes of the Russian people? Who is in crisis? Look at the Western democracies.

    Amen.

    In fact, who gave Screwball the Songbird the right to anything? The fact that such despicable scum exists proves that Gawd’s a sadist.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  22. Kiza says:
    @AnonFromTN

    Yes, I agree that every Western attack on Putin or Russia increases Putin’s popularity. Maybe the last British attempt added a percent or two to voter participation and equally into Putin’s vote. The videos of some people stuffing the ballot boxes and similar to the videos from Obama’s election (I have seen a number of them). It does not even mean that they were always done by Putin’s proponents. But whilst in the West such cheating matters because the quasi-candidates are so close in votes, in Russia it is something just for the electoral commission to deal with, it does not invalidate the whole election.

  23. ValmMond says:
    @anony-mouse

    That’s a remarkably silly assumption. I may like many countries or realize that they have changed for the better. Does that mean that I have to go live there? Various reasons can prevent me from doing so: work, study, family, private circumstances… The author is not trying either to convince you to move to Russia tomorrow. He draws historical and political parallels. Discusses facts, numbers and trends. The validity of his arguments and conclusions is totally unrelated to his current whereabouts.

    • Agree: Andrei Martyanov
    • Replies: @Dagandy
  24. ValmMond says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Live? Maybe he’s here on a “mission”? Most of us are :). It’s not our fault that you are way too gullible to realize it. One would make you believe anything. 19 arabs with box-cutters etc… We saw you are desperately looking for an enemy. So we thought, why not be your enemy from within. It worked as a charm: last year you elected a clown for a president. “Mission accomplished” as another one of your imbeciles in chief once famously noted. Although, we didn’t help with his election, we’ll make sure that in the future, you chose them dumber and dumber.
    And since you live not just in a police state but in an incompetent police state, I have to put a big SARCASM tag on this entire post.

  25. Israel Shamir on the pages of The Unz Review claimed they were rigged just a little.

    His guess is that Putin’s real result was 60%-65%, versus the official 76.7%. That’s not “just a little” by any stretch of the imagination.

    Fortunately, the real result as estimated by statisticians who do this thing semi-professionally is 74-75%.

  26. yurivku says:
    @AnonFromTN

    Yes, you are absolutely right.
    - He is not a genius.
    - He had a limited support before Crimea.
    - His current support is a result of Crimea, sanctions, Ukraine, Syria, Western hatred etc

    But people’s support is getting lower because of internal economics, lack of will in Syria, Ukraine, sports etc.

    My estimates of current support is about 60-65%, the “true” election company added some to these numbers, but obviously now majority does support him.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  27. Great to find what ‘great’ means.
    I indeed fear the article is true, the day before yesterday we in the Netherlands had our municipal elections.
    The big losers were the national governing parties.

    Our country, like Germany and Belgium, is becoming more and more ungovernable, because of parties labeled populist.
    Populist, in my view, just is against the ruling ‘elite’, the ‘elite’ that just follows Brussels.
    Our media supported the elite.

    One swallow does not make summer, but just this morning on tv news, to my surprise, prime minister Rutte was asked a critical question, the first time I can remember, the EU yesterday decided on more hostile action against Russia.
    The question ‘is there now more proof ?’.
    Rutte, ‘not necessary, May says that Russian guilt is “highly probable”‘.

  28. @Andrei Martyanov

    Marrakesh, nice climate, cheap to live.
    The only problem there is that Morocco is a USA ally, writing articles like this, I would prefer a safer country.
    Such as Columbia, maybe Bolivia is even better.

  29. @Kiza

    Not Putin’s popularity directly, but indirect.
    Few people realise that during the Cold War until 1990 ordinary Russians feared the west.
    This fear now must return, therefore they want, and need, in my view, a strong leader.
    When Hitler attacked Poland the Polish government expected the Hitler regime to collapse in a few days.
    I fear that nowadays the west is making the same mistake.

    • Replies: @ploni almoni
  30. Vojkan says:

    I can’t say for other countries but regarding the assessment of French elections, about Macron, well, not exactly. As a matter of fact, the French elections weren’t democratic all. For all the TV stations, almost all the radio stations, 99% of the printed magazines, all the dailies except le Figaro were rooting for Macron before the first round. Between the two rounds, the attacks against Marine Le Pen in all the pro-Macron media and the media that wasn’t so pro-Macron make the current wave of Russia bashing almost seem polite. On Facebook and Twitter, thousands of accounts of people who were pro Marine Le Pen were suspended or closed. Macron was a blitz operation by the globalist elite launched in fear of losing France to French patriots.
    Anyone believing that France is a democratic country, with her selective justice, her hate speech laws, her gun laws, her globalist owned media, is either incurably naive or delusional or paid by the elites to hold such a belief.
    On the other hand, regarding the USA, where there is indeed freedom of speech, I don’t know how anyone on Earth can consider its electoral system, with third parties having a mere decorative role, as free and fair.
    So, we have France with an electoral system that is on paper free and fair but where there’s no free media and no free speech, and we have the USA, where there is free speech, but where the electoral system is rigged in favor of the two major parties whose disagreement is limited to such issues as whether boys who claim to be girls will be allowed to pee(p) in the girls room.
    I think the defensive tactics adopted by the Russians when they’re attacked on democracy are plain stupid. If I were Russian, I wouldn’t even pay attention to Westerners’ blathering.

    • Replies: @Dagandy
  31. likbez says:

    This is way too rosy account. Russia has several significant problems with growth of Muslim population and the fact that this is last term for Putin, which might signify the end of the period of political stability.

    Also economic rape by local and Western neoliberals of Russia in 1991-2000 was so successful that the country still can’t fully recover. Hundreds of billions were stolen and transferred to the West. The “problem of neoliberal oligarchs” as “fifth column” still remains and is a threat to the future of the country. Too much depends of Putin personally. In this sense China is in a better position.

    Moreover, Putin was forced into new arm race (by the USA) and military spending now are high and that creates another set of problems including growing influence of internal military industrial complex. Add to this the cost of Syria war and related set of external and internal problems, such as almost complete absence of allies (neither China not Iraq are reliable allies; most post-Soviet republics, even Kazakhstan, are now hostile to Russia)

    And Russia does not have too many degrees of freedom yet, as it still depends on the West for many technologies and complex machinery. West dominates high technology area. Add to this brain drain and export of capital from Russia.

    Technological dependence means that really crippling sanction are always a possibility. Availability of some of those technologies in China makes this problem less acute than in the past, but still in no way Russia can pursue completely independent policy.

    Add to this dependence on dollar and the fact that Russian national bank, which remain a neoliberal institution, controlled by neoliberal Nabibulina (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elvira_Nabiullina, who is close to Gref ) who like any “good” neoliberal keeps natural sovereign fund invested in US Treasuries. In this sense whe is not that different from Kudrin.

    And that means that those money can be confiscated anytime, like the USA did with Iran in the past. Also oligarchs money are not in danger due to clear desire of London to improve its financial standing at Russian oligarchs expense.

    What is true is that neoliberalism as a political system entered deep crisis after 2008. In the USA political system became dysfunctional and there is some kind of “virtual” civil war between two factions of neoliberal oligarchy — classic neoliberals and bastard neoliberals (aka economic nationalists). Add to this “strage” relations with Izreal, which sometimes suggest that the tail wags the dog and I do not see why the USA can’t experience something similar to processes that took place in Britain after the WWII.

    But there is still no alternative social system on the horizon and return to “New deal capitalism” is impossible as the social alliance of management caste changed.

    So Russia remains a neoliberal country which hates neoliberalism (in which by definition the power belongs to the financial oligarchy) and which tries to fight Western neoliberal imperialism in ofreign policy including attempts to make is a vassal and appropriate its natural resources (and Russia was a vassal of the West under Yeltsin) while remaining a neoliberal country and promoting neoliberalism externally. that’s a recipe for a color revolution in the future, more successfully then 2012 “White” color revolution run by Moscow comprador class. Which in Moscow might well represent probably one third of the population (programmers, doctors, accountants, employees of foreign companies, part of “integrated with West” artistic cicles, writers, journalists, etc.). They were politically decimated by events in Ukraine and then by Russiagate hysteria in the USA. So “neoliberal compradors” class was not a player in the current elections. But that situation might eventually change and they can restore part of their political power.

    So, in a way, Putin is some kind of Don Quixote which fight neoliberalism (and neoliberal globalization) externally, while allowing it to exist and even flourish internally (Medvedev, BTW looks like classic neoliberal, a Trojan horse in Putin’s administration).

    And internally neoliberalism naturally produces high level of corruption, which is amplified by “New Economic Policy” elements on the current Russia political regime (which allowed free operation of small and medium business, but tried to cut/decimate political power of large business — a very difficult, if not impossible undertaking)

    I think Professor Brovkin forgot the classic Lenin work “Imperialism, the Highest Stage of Capitalism”. That’s sad…

    Moreover, former pro-Putin people who are now CEO of large government companies. which influence their political orientation. In a sense, people like Gref and Sechin are dangerous strata of Putin-created “nova riches”, who can betray him any moment, especially if their money will be under the treat of confiscation by the West.

    It might well be that Putin was an anomaly and Russian will enter “Maidan” period or some other form of political crisis after Putin relinquishes his power.

    BTW Ukrainians were successfully deceived by the West twice, so I do not see why Russians can’t repeat this trick and step of the same rake again by electing some variation of Yeltsin who will promise them immediate bright future and jump in the standard of living (which for the last three year deteriorated due to low oil prices and a huge depreciation of ruble). For Ukrainians around 20 year was enough to forget all lessons.

    My impression is that Russian might experience yet another serious of political cataclysm in the near future, when “Putinism” will disappear with Putin.

  32. Vladimir Brovkin [AKA "Vlad"] says:
    @anony-mouse

    You are so concerned why I do not live in Russia. So to satisfy your curiosity. I have been in the USA since I was 22 now I am 66. I have lived most of my life in the West. But in 2000 I did for as long as it was possible five years. go back to Russia as an American Professor and stayed and taught there at a university. You live where your job is.

  33. “Lenin’s priority was not Russia but world revolution.”

    Originally it was the plan. But unlike Putin, Lenin quickly was learning what is working and what is not. Eventually he indeed turned towards building up Soviet Russia. NEP, GOELRO. Further continuation of Lenin policies by Stalin. Stolypin reforms would have results in same end probably more violent as they depended upon dispossession of millions of peasants.
    The author forgets where modern Russia is coming from. It is from Lenin and Stalin not from Stolypin or other dreamers. Modern Russia capabilities and abilities to defend herself are 100% Soviet union made, which leads to Lenin.

  34. This piece is just the mirror image of a Western hit job, and just as false. Putin is not the “Savior of Russia”, he’s basically a talented parasite. Russia is a great nation of educated creative people that is eternally cursed by its constant desire to put its faith in a leader rather than letting people make their own decisions. Putin and his cronies just skim off the top. All Putin has done is consolidate the crime gangs under the control of the security apparatus – which was a trend already visible before Putin came to power, brought the oil and gas sector under state control (also an oligarchical decision, not Putin) and wasted billions on flashy but ultimately stupid projects like the Sochi Olympics. The infrastructure is still a mess, the quality of manufacturing outside the military sphere is a joke, and education and health care are still well below Soviet levels. I wonder if the author has ever spent time in provincial Russia. Compare Ivanovo, Samara or Saratov to Lublin in Poland, Cluj in Romania, or anywhere in the Baltics and the amount of waste and lost opportunities in Russia becomes glaringly obvious. Compare Russian development to China, and Putin looks awful.

    I agree that the resurgence in Russian agriculture and food processing is a great story, but that is not really Putin’s doing. To a large part that has been the effect of Western sanctions which forced Putin’s elite friends to start buying local instead of wasting money on Western crap. Putin can call himself Russia’s savior when he forces Russians to stop shipping all their capital to London and Switzerland and makes them invest in Russia.

    Putin did have the balls to retake Crimea, have to give him that.

  35. utu says:

    Sounds good. Optimistic picture. Good to hear about theaters. I hope that Russians keep reading literature as much as they used to.

  36. Vladimir СИЛНИ is the President of Humanity and Defender from Anglo-Saxon hordes and their vassals!
    God Bless Vladimir!
    In Кинжал we Trust!

    • Replies: @yurivku
    , @in the middle
  37. Nille says:

    When everyone knows there are video CCTV at the polling booth Why engage in ballot stuffing.
    It screams provocation.

    The navalny idiots going there to invalidate the vote they were talking of undergoing training to obstruct the elections.

    The videos were made public by the electoral commission and the votes invalidated.

    I would have arrested the ballot stuffers and fined them heavily with attempted fraud

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
  38. yurivku says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Putin can call himself Russia’s savior when he forces Russians to stop shipping all their capital to London and Switzerland and makes them invest in Russia.

    Exactly

    Putin did have the balls to retake Crimea, have to give him that.

    Yes

    and will destroy system corruption which not seems to be very likely…

  39. yurivku says:
    @Proud_Srbin

    Vladimir СИЛНИ

    Probably СИЛЬНЫЙ ?

    • Replies: @Vojkan
  40. Vojkan says:
    @yurivku

    Силни is in Serbian.

    • Replies: @yurivku
  41. yurivku says:
    @Vojkan

    Oh I see ;-). Ok ,let him to be Силни.

  42. @Peter Akuleyev

    http://temoins.bfmtv.com/mediaplayer/video/manifestation-des-fonctionnaires-et-des-cheminots-echauffourees-entre-jeunes-manifestants-et-policiers-a-paris-temoins-bfmtv-1050343.html

    What I only find in French news, the resistance against the man who sees himself the saviour of France, Macron.
    Those who are planning to visit France, strikes have been annunced in the railway system for two days a week during a few months.
    The French love job security.
    Macron wants to abolish this, he’s modernizing France, in his view.
    At the same time, he denies the existence of French culture.

  43. Russia received a state that began to fulfill its functions: to restore law and order, to cleanse the police, the army and the bureaucracy. New economic policy legitimized the questionable privatization in exchange for stopping or curbing capital flight and acceptance of the principle Primacy of the State. Oligarchs’ power was broken, some of the worst ones, fled the country, others accepted new rules of the game, those that did not, were jailed. Mafia bosses in the provinces were replaced; salaries were beginning to be paid, pensions likewise.

    Even if this were true at one time, it isn’t anymore. Putin has drubbed the Russian economy and it is falling behind by every measure. While there is some room for growth, that room is very small and Putin’s renewed dictatorship has brought Russia back to Soviet Times. He has a pathetic military that can’t be upgraded because of his economic stupidity and corruption.

    The mafia still controls Russia and Putin is simply one of their thugs. Nothing will change in Russia until it is broken apart and the parts of the old Russian empire still under Moscow’s thumb are allowed to go their own way. It has long been more corrupt than Ukraine, and Transparency International has finally gotten around to acknowledging the fact.

  44. Merkel also no saviour, she just said she will not prevent the collapse of Deutsche Bank, once the bank with most prestige in the world.
    Share prices dropped for two consecutive days with some 5%, today six.
    Volume of transactions huge, today some 25 million shares, the days before also huge, normal some 8 million.
    Over 2017 bonuses of over two billion were paid.
    That DB was in great trouble was known for years, they had derivate assets in the region of fifteen to twenty times the German annual national income.
    The direct cause seems to be that a USA daughter, affiliate, where one can deposit gold, cannot give the gold back.
    My sinister suspicion is that it is simply no longer there, that DB misused it for saving itself, somehow.
    Cats in a corner make weird leaps.
    The financial and political implications will be interesting, to say the least.
    Alas especially the financial ones will not be fun.

  45. @Quartermaster

    Of course, this is why Russia still exists, and why Putin is very popular.

  46. God bless Putin and Russia and Assad and Syria for defending Christians in Syria and defending Syria against ISIS aka AL CIADA which is a creation of the U.S. and Israel and Britain via the Zionists who are in control of these nations.

    The Zionists are Satanists who are using terrorists to destroy nations to further their goal of a Zionist one world government and the Zionists are in total control of the U.S. as was proven by the fact that Israel and the deep state did 911 and got away with it.

  47. @Peter Akuleyev

    Cluj in Romania

    LOL.

    or anywhere in the Baltics

    And who are you trying to BS here? Have it occurred to you that some people here can and, very likely, have people who know those places you are listing and even live there. I understand there are very many butt-hurt people out there after Putin’s victory but please, explain to me this:

    the quality of manufacturing outside the military sphere is a joke

    What do you consider “outside military sphere”? Is rolling stock a “military sphere”, is manufacturing of processors or other electronics “outside”? I will omit here other consumer goods such as, among many, clothing which you may buy even in US department stores. What about toys? Do you consider Russia’s massive software industry with a whole line of original world-class products be “outside”? I don’t know, maybe gas-turbines are not considered by you to be related to “manufacturing”, but I can give you a hint–it is world class in a number of sectors (segments). I, of course, omit here Rosatom or, for that matter, have you ever heard of Russian composites? No? I’ll give you a hint–they produce it all for aerospace, construction, manufacturing, medicine etc.

    http://www.hccomposite.com/

    I’ll give you a hint–in terms of materials, including metallurgy, Russia is a world leader. So, to conclude this very short brief on your “joke”, all this listed here barely existed or was surviving by 2005-06. But, of course, the phrase which betrays a complete ignorance on any issue related to actual manufacturing is this, your, I quote:

    outside the military sphere

    Let me give you some news–if not for war and military we all today wouldn’t have had: antibiotics, Ultra-sound, MRI, CT Scans, new materials, new medicine, GPS-GLONASS, modern aerospace, modern propulsion. Do you need me to continue? But I think when Romania or blessed depopulating Baltic states will produce MS-21, SSJ-100, space stations, own processors, computers etc. Then give a holler. Somehow I think I will not live to hear it.

    Per this:

    time in provincial Russia. Compare Ivanovo, Samara or Saratov

    If you call Samara “provincial”–a city with population of 1.2 million and a major industrial center (we have a truck load of friend living there), I guess the rest of your “argument” is as “sound”.

    P.S. Just a hint, Samara is one of the major research and manufacturing centers for Russia’s aerospace, with strong emphasis on space.

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
  48. @Mr. Hack

    Where do you live? Another ‘Russian patriot’ who lives in the West? :-)

    I live in Pacific North West and is madly in love with the area and many folks here. But if you insist, I may apply to Russian Consulate for Russian citizenship (it may take a while, of course), after all what right do I have to call BS out and, what is most startling, justify why what I call out is a BS. ;-)

  49. Mr. Hack says:
    @Kiza

    “If you do not agree with the US regime (Deep State) then you are a traitor to the whole US nation.”

    Trump got elected partially on a platform of draining the swamp (deep state). Millions voted for him. Deep state has got an awful lot of work to do! :-)

  50. One of the most remarkable signs of a renaissance in Russia are the new church buildings. On St. Petersburg websites like ‘Fontanka.ru’, ‘Karpovka.ru’ and ‘the-village.ru’ one regularly can find photo surveys of new church architecture that are truly amazing. The new church buildings point towards a renewal of faith & morals among the Russian people, not only in the countryside, but also in the metropoles. If one takes this phenomenon of new churches being build as a renaissance benchmark the situation on the Western side is indeed alarmingly different.

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  51. Dagandy says:
    @Vojkan

    Can’t ignore em ..have to sway apathy into attention .
    Slow process that looks to be working from western Canadian shores .

  52. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @jacques sheete

    Anon from TN
    McCain is a historic personage. So far he is the only person in history who totally disabled US aircraft carrier. But his dad was an Admiral, so he was never punished for his stupidity.

  53. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @Kiza

    Anon from TN
    Russians had vebcams in most precincts. In fact, they annulled the results in several where ballot stuffing was caught on camera. To the best of my knowledge, this was never done in the US.

    • Agree: Kiza
  54. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @yurivku

    Anon from TN
    I realize that many people in Russia believe that Putin is too soft. He often takes the Chinese wisdom literally: sit on the bank of a river and wait until the corpse of your enemy floats by. That’s why I said elsewhere that the West will rue the day Putin is gone. Russians have learned their lesson of the 1990s, so no Gorbachev or Yeltsin will rise to the top in the next 100 years.

  55. Anon[436] • Disclaimer says:

    If the name Vladimir Brovkin is unfamiliar to you as it was to me I recommend Googling for something like “Vladimir Brovkin historian”. If it matters to you whether someone wss a Harvard Professor with whatever authority might attach to the titles of the likes of Professors (Emeritus now no doubt) Kissinger or Pipes you will find that he was an Associate Professor at Harvard for a few years. His article largely speaks for itself but I am surprised that UR would bill him as having veen a Professor of History at Harvard.

  56. Joe Hide says:

    To Vladimir Brokin,
    Well written and informative article. Don’t worry about distracting / trolling commenters that dont/ can’t understand your highly informative insights. A lot of we readers would like you to make more articles available for us.

    • Replies: @Vladimir Brovkin
  57. Anonymous[273] • Disclaimer says:

    When will Russia put a stuffed dummy into a electric car, launch it into space and distribute the propaganda around the web?

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  58. Putin’s American supporters are very much on the defensive! If not panicking! What was supposed to be a sweeping triumph has been turned into a quasi-defeat. Given the polls, 70% would have been credible but 76% quite simply isn’t. Even if you accept the official figures, Putin only got about 50% of the electorate. If you allow for rigging, both of the result and the turnout, he probably has the support of somewhere between 40 and 50% of the Russian electorate. I don’t see him surviving six years on that kind of result. As for gerontocracy, Putin is already 65. That’s retiring age in Europe. And he’s been in effective power for 19 years, which very definitely doesn’t normally happen in European democracies. The ordinary working of human nature means that many Russians are probably just fed up with him.
    By the way, it’s worth googling the author’s name.

    • Troll: ValmMond
    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  59. @Andrei Martyanov

    Andrei, does it mean you live around Seattle?

    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov
  60. @All we like sheep

    Communism never succeeded in dealing with religion, as Kennan reported to Washington.
    Putin was very wise to cooperate with the church.
    The USA puppet shah, with CIA advice, rooted out all political opposition, what remained was religion.
    This religion in 1979 removed the USA puppet, now the USA possible is going to wage war on the one and only Muslim ruled country, they created themselves.
    In 1953, at the time of the CIA coup, Iran was a democratic and liberal country.
    Oil brings in 50 dollar a barrel, the real costs are far higher.

    • Replies: @ANON
  61. @Anonymous

    They already did this with a living dog, he or she gave his life for the USSR.

  62. @Quartermaster

    ” The mafia still controls Russia and Putin is simply one of their thugs. ”

    Any proof ?

    • Replies: @ValmMond
  63. @Sergey Krieger

    Andrei, does it mean you live around Seattle?

    Yep.

  64. Anonymous[328] • Disclaimer says: • Website
    @Andrei Martyanov

    Lucky Vladimir. He has dropped out like a hippie and is living the life in Marrakesh: stable political system, great weather, great restaurants, and other entertainments and amenities. And excellent Internet service. The counter on one my papers showed a hit from Marrakesh just last week. From pictures of the town, Dr. Brovkin is doubtless living the life of Kubla Khan who a stately pleasure dome decreed. In 1997, the Cambridge Crimson reported, Vladimir lost it at Mr. Foto, a 1 hour photo lab common in that era. “They are my property (sc. the negatives) and you must retrieve them from the lab instanter.” <-I paraphrase. A Mr. Kim working there, invited him to take their confrontation outside. Cash register was swept off the counter. Etc. He publishes books on the minutiae of 20th century Russian history. As a practiced reader of the actual reality on the ground of enduring Russia, his take is likely spot on. Oliver Stone’s recent multi-part interview of Putin is a must see

  65. ValmMond says:
    @jilles dykstra

    Probably a shelf of second rate Hollywood blockbusters in which the eternal soft-spoken, gay-looking, f(l)ag-waving, former CIA agent gone wrong, turns up in Moscow on a vigilante mission, kills half of the Kremlin staff and departs with the nuclear suitcase. Can’t argue with them. They have infantile beliefs and atrophied cognitive skills. It’s the Harry Potter generation that have lost any notion that there is a difference between fantasy and reality.

  66. CanSpeccy says: • Website

    That the general sense of this article is correct is suggested by what is surely the case that if Putin’s personality, intelligence, and nationalism were miraculously to be substituted for the tiny mind of one of Europe’s present leaders, that leader would undoubtedly win a fair election with something like 75% support.

    • Replies: @Beefcake the Mighty
  67. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @Michael Kenny

    Anon from TN
    According to you, Putin got the votes of ~50% of the electorate. You call this quasi-defeat. In that case, what would you call the election of Trump who got votes of 26% of the electorate, or that of Merkel, whose party got the votes of only 25% of electorate? Who should be on the defensive, pray?
    It may come as a surprise to you, but trolling requires some brains, especially trolling when the position of the paymaster is very weak.

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  68. padre says:
    @byrresheim

    If I understand you correctly, you are talking about Soviet Union “crimes”, and you blame Russian for it!Well, if I remember correctly there were very few Russians in the heart of it, there was Stalin, Lenin, Beria, Hrushcev, not the Russian and so on!Name one russian who is to blame!

  69. @AnonFromTN

    Macron’s new political party got some 380 out of 600 seats in French parliament with fifteen % of the possible votes.
    The result, large scale manifestations and strikes in France against democratically decided reform measures.

    http://temoins.bfmtv.com/mediaplayer/video/manifestation-des-fonctionnaires-et-des-cheminots-echauffourees-entre-jeunes-manifestants-et-policiers-a-paris-temoins-bfmtv-1050343.html

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  70. Anonymous[277] • Disclaimer says:

    Putin helped the Washington Post, Fox News, New York Times and the rest of the western media since they’d have to create something or someone else to distract everyone’s attention as required in the information war.

    Putin is just another actor in the CIA’s play like legendary New York liberal Donald Trump.

    Americans might hear a twitter falling in the forest or a facebook satellite exploding on the launchpad but if no one else can the US is certainly losing the war. The 24/7 effort to make sure know one knows anything will implode.

  71. @polskijoe

    Though when the USSR fell, I know some secrets were leaked and sold.

    Actually, the whole industries and technological know-hows were completely compromised. China transported plane-loads of documentation from aerospace plants in Ukraine and Russia. Rocketry, automatics systems, propulsion know-hows–all was transferred to China, West and in many cases to any higher bidder.

    From 1990-2000 the US had chance to improve wouldnt they?

    It, realistically, couldn’t–the problem is not only technological or engineering, it is cultural.

    Then comes the spending today…. Russia spends way less but Russia isnt looking to match them in spending but finding “holes” to take advantages in key areas. Russian equipment usually costs less too.

    Actually, in military aerospace, armor, let alone AD even before Putin’s announcements on March 1, Russia was more than a match technologically, and in some aspects–quantitatively. In general, relation and balance is much more complex in military field than just numbers of tanks, aircraft, submarines etc. US procurement practices are insane and make no operational or strategic sense. This is not the case in Russia.

    • Replies: @Sergey Krieger
    , @Kiza
  72. @Andrei Martyanov

    And yet, after Soviet direct help, this transfer of technologies and knowhow after some 60 + years of effort Chinese still lag. They are smart people so it is strange.

  73. JustJeff says:
    @KA

    Your suspicions are correct because literally everything you read about Russia in Anglosphere media is bullshit. If the NYT tells you it’s sunny in Moscow, pack an umbrella.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  74. JustJeff says:
    @anony-mouse

    I love the south but I can’t live there cause it’s too damn hot and humid but you don’t see me wanting to tear down confederate statues. Why are only Russians held to this standard?

  75. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @jilles dykstra

    Anon from TN
    Thanks! I didn’t know that in France the numbers of the “winner” are even lower than in the US and Germany. But the trend is the same in all “democracies”: the leader is actually voted in by a minority.

  76. @Sergey Krieger

    And yet, after Soviet direct help, this transfer of technologies and knowhow after some 60 + years of effort Chinese still lag. They are smart people so it is strange.

    It is difficult to pinpoint a precise cause for that but they also are narrowing the gap in some fields, albeit they are still far behind in a number of absolutely crucial technologies (of the future). Militarily it is absolutely true.

  77. @Andrei Martyanov

    If you call Samara “provincial”

    Learn English. Samara is not the capital. It is provincial. It is not an insult, it is descriptive of a regional city. I would call Pittsburgh provincial as well. Samara is also ugly and underdeveloped compared to Cluj, which you have obviously never been to. I have been to both. 30 years ago Samara was much nicer and richer than Cluj. It certainly isn’t anymore.

    Do you consider Russia’s massive software industry with a whole line of original world-class products be “outside”?

    Again, if you are going write English, learn it. Software is not manufacturing. Software does well in Russia despite the government. Government officials have a harder time shaking down software firms which can always move. Factories can’t. Even Ukraine has a decent software industry. You need smart people for software, which Russia has. But you need government to stay out of the way to build decent manufacturing companies.

    Don’t even try to talk about medicine. I spent months not very long ago trying to find a decent Russian company that could make a quality operating table. Doesn’t exist. Go to any trade show in any manufacturing industry. You will see rows and rows of Chinese and Turkish companies with nice looking products. Often a fair number of Brazilian companies, and lately even Indians and Indonesians. You won’t see any Russian companies unless it’s weapons, aerospace or gas and oil related. Or basic inputs like steel and concrete. Where are the value added products? Belarus has better manufacturing than Russia.

    Putin and the gang have kept Russia locked into a few government managed sectors where Russia does well. But government corruption strangles anything outside what the chinovniki understand and can control.

    You are a typical Sovok. Dreaming about world power while half the population has to wallow in shit to support your fantasies. That’s the reason intelligent Russians keep leaving in droves.

  78. @Andrei Martyanov

    I suspect in military fields and generally military capabilities and use of military force they will never close the gap. But they are not that kind of people anyway. For selfdefence they got more than enough.

  79. @Peter Akuleyev

    Judging by your hysteria and lack of knowledge of both English and Russian languages where “provincial” term goes also as a definition of:

    a : a person of local or restricted interests or outlook
    b : a person lacking urban polish or refinement

    Moreover, in Russian language Provintsyalnyi stands primarily for non-polished, primitive, crude etc. But that is beyond the point since your ignorance shines through:

    Software is not manufacturing.

    Once you produce and sell large quantities of software products from simple games to industrial software, including engineering one, it becomes manufacturing since it also generates not only profits (and huge value added) but all “infrastructure” which comes with it–from packaging, to carriers to hundred other things which make it a product. But this pathetic “argument”:

    Don’t even try to talk about medicine. I spent months not very long ago trying to find a decent Russian company that could make a quality operating table. Doesn’t exist. Go to any trade show in any manufacturing industry. You will see rows and rows of Chinese and Turkish companies with nice looking products. Often a fair number of Brazilian companies, and lately even Indians and Indonesians. You won’t see any Russian companies unless it’s weapons, aerospace or gas and oil related. Or basic inputs like steel and concrete. Where are the value added products? Belarus has better manufacturing than Russia.

    So, your basic economic analysis is based on the manufacturing of the operation tables, well then since we are not talking about medicine of which you also have no clue, I’ll give one example of medicine:

    https://sdelanounas.ru/blogs/105256/

    See marked in bold? That is a first sign of you being butt-hurt hack who has no even basic education in any serious manufacturing or engineering field. Not that it matters but for you from CIA 2018 fact book:

    complete range of mining and extractive industries producing coal, oil, gas, chemicals, and metals; all forms of machine building from rolling mills to high-performance aircraft and space vehicles; defense industries (including radar, missile production, advanced electronic components), shipbuilding; road and rail transportation equipment; communications equipment; agricultural machinery, tractors, and construction equipment; electric power generating and transmitting equipment; medical and scientific instruments; consumer durables, textiles, foodstuffs, handicrafts

    https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/rs.html

    I can give (not you–your kind is not worth wasting too much time on) a serious review of almost all serious manufacturing industries of Russia. You cannot–you simply have no background to pass any competent judgement on that. Go to Cluj and live there, maybe you will find solace there and will get attached to Romania’s mighty economy. The rest of your butt-hurt delirium is not worth responding to.

    P.S. Yep, I am Sovok.

    • Replies: @ValmMond
  80. @Proud_Srbin

    Actually, Christ, is the savior of Humanity!

    However, Mr. Putin indeed is “Kicking NWO ass, and tanking names since 2000″, you have to give him that at least.

  81. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @JustJeff

    Anon from TN
    It’s not only in Anglosphere. What you read in mainstream German and French newspapers is also BS. However, it could be worse. Whereas ~80% of stuff you read about Russia is lies, in case of Ukraine it is more like 90%, with the remaining 10% containing tidbits of truth twisted beyond recognition. So, there is “room for improvement”.

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  82. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @Andrei Martyanov

    Anon from TN
    I have a hypothesis, based on what I know about biological sciences. Probably for cultural reasons, Chinese considered research as a way to please the boss, rather than find out the truth. They understand the problem now, and they started luring Chinese and non-Chinese scientists trained in real science, from the US and elsewhere.

    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov
  83. ValmMond says:
    @Andrei Martyanov

    Great response. But pay no attention. Putin’s victory hit them hard. They are apoplectic now – going from forum to comment section, copy-pasting the same “clever” lines from those newspapers’ clippings they cut in 2000s in their favorite russophobe Economist articles.
    I actually enjoy seeing them suffer.
    I wonder if too much of a schadenfreude can be bad for one’s health?

    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov
  84. @ValmMond

    I wonder if too much of a schadenfreude can be bad for one’s health?

    Nah, it is OK to get drunk once in a while. Occasion calls for it. ;-) Let’s see if and how government will be reshuffled.

    • Replies: @ValmMond
  85. Z-man says:

    Putin Da!! Putin-Trump 2018-2?.

  86. @AnonFromTN

    Probably for cultural reasons

    It has to be. Chinese are smart people and yet such a situation.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
    , @Erebus
  87. Rurik says:

    http://www.informationliberation.com/?id=58137

    the man is the statesman of the century

    and I’m saying that from inside a nation and controlled media that hiss his name, and insinuate that he’s our most dangerous enemy, when the truth is that it’s our government and media that are our most dangerous enemy, and most dangerous enemy of the people of this planet.

    Putin is perhaps the one man positioned to save not just Syria, but the whole world from the plague that is the zio-fiend.

    by telling Germans they’re not evil, he’s emasculating the zio-scum who depend on ancient hatreds and resentments for foisting their wars.

    • Replies: @Beefcake the Mighty
  88. ValmMond says:
    @Andrei Martyanov

    I didn’t mean the drink. I was thinking of schadenfreude as in:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schadenfreude

    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov
  89. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @Andrei Martyanov

    Anon from TN
    Like everybody, Chinese are different. I had three Chinese post-docs, one was my best, very smart and productive (now he is an Assistant Professor at a different University), the other two were not particularly smart. My Chinese grad student was pretty good, but second best (the best was an American girl from Iowa, of all places). My best tech ever was a girl from Cameroon. You never know. My experience taught me not to generalize.

  90. @ValmMond

    I know what it is, read my blog;-) I am just saying that overdoing it, as in getting drunk, is fine once in a very long while.

  91. Kiza says:
    @Andrei Martyanov

    US procurement practices are insane and make no operational or strategic sense. This is not the case in Russia.

    A significant part of the US military budget is hidden in other government budgets to make the military budget look smaller than it really is. For example, the nuclear weapons are in the budget of the Department of Energy, care for war veterans is in the Department of Veterans’s Affars and several other large chunks have been spread around.

    But I like to think of the US military budget as 90% fat and 10% meat, at least when they do not lose track of trillions of dollars. In Russia, it is probably the other way around. It just cannot compare.

  92. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @Kiza

    Anon from TN
    You are about right: 90% of Pentagon budget is pork, no more than 10% is useful for anything. The facts that the engine of $8 billion Zumwalt broke down during its first voyage right in the Panama channel, or that after countless billions wasted on the project F35 pilots lose consciousness in flight tell the story. Then again, look on the bright side: this massive thieving saves countless lives all over the world.

    • Replies: @Kiza
    , @jilles dykstra
  93. @CanSpeccy

    Putin also contrasts strikingly with American politicians, whose vapidity and venality have no limits. He is certainly not perfect (no man is), but when the smoke finally clears, Putin will be remembered as one of the great leaders of our time.

  94. @Rurik

    Yes. A German-Russian alliance makes too much sense (hence unyielding Anglo-Zionist opposition to it), it will eventually happen.

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  95. the one thing putin did right, he stopped the raping of his country.

  96. Kiza says:
    @AnonFromTN

    Then again, look on the bright side: this massive thieving saves countless lives all over the world.

    Now that thought did cross my mind. The US tax donkeys cannot be helped under the current system, but there would be probably a couple million more dead people per year all around the world if the US military budget was as efficient as the Russian one.

    • Agree: Vojkan
    • Replies: @Anon
  97. Vojkan says:
    @Andrei Martyanov

    I suppose that when you destroy the intellectual potential of a country, like China did repeatedly before Deng Xiaoping, it takes time to rebuild one from scratch.

  98. Vojkan says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    “…the quality of manufacturing outside the military sphere is a joke”

    “Compare Russian development to China”

    My mother returned to Serbia three years ago to spend her retirement years here. I returned last year Everything she got fixed in the house with Chinese stuff, I’m spending my time repairing by replacing the Chinese stiff. So much for the quality of Chinese manufacturing. Which btw, most of the times happens in highly polluted environments, with underpaid workers who are trying to escape the misery of the countryside. I guess that if they were paid adequately, the incentive for Western companies to move their production there would be far lesser.
    Speaking of delocalisations, France, the 5th largest economy in the world is ~79% services, ~19% industry, and ~2% for other sectors. Other Western economies have similar numbers.
    France’s average IQ has gone down 4 points in the last 10 years, the British a whopping 14 points since WWII.
    Regarding the food they eat, do I have to mention the numerous health scandals, GMOs, the monopoly on seeds of the big agri-business companies, endocrine disruptors which are according to some, apart from being responsible for many cancers, also responsible for the gay epidemy in the West. If that’s how you imagine countries with a bright future, good for you. There are people to whom the grass seems always greener elsewhere than at home.
    I on the other hand think Russia has to be grateful to God for having got Putin instead of the mediocrity it had before and the Western world has been having in the last 40 years.

    • Replies: @Anon
  99. @Beefcake the Mighty

    Any idea of the USA military presence in Germany ?
    I often wondered if Merkel’s EU support originates from the desire to throw off the USA yoke.

  100. @AnonFromTN

    The money now wasted could be spent in the USA on education and health care.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  101. @AnonFromTN

    I stopped reading a Dutch newspaper around 2003.
    I just watch Dutch tv news to see what BS they’re bringing.
    As soon as it gets too bad, we stop watching.
    The only thing we watch on tv is detectives, not the USA ones.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  102. @Andrei Martyanov

    I live in Pacific North West and is madly in love with the area and many folks here.

    I will ignore all the grammatical mistakes made by the author who quite often lectures others on the proper use of English language. The Russian heritage can be a nasty thing, particularly the tendency to imbibe. I do not understand though how somebody can be in love with people who he despises, belittles, scorns, disdains, decries and disparages on this forum on a daily basis. I do like the quote at the end of one of his comments. Frankly,I am surprised that he put it there. It contradicts all that he is saying about his beloved Russia.

    A Russian is self-assured just because he knows nothing does not want to know anything, since he does not believe that anything can be known.

    What a fitting description of the self appointed genius, the type that comes around only once every one thousand years.

    • Replies: @Johnny Rico
    , @ValmMond
  103. Erebus says:
    @Andrei Martyanov

    In my sometimes frustrating experience, I’ve come to a similar conclusion. They’re smart on “How?”, and not very smart at all when it comes to “Why?”. If things go differently than anticipated, this trait prevents one from digging deeper into the mechanisms that drive the results they see. That leads all too often to a “Good enough” dead end when things work, and “Oh well” when they don’t.

    As we touched on in another thread (re Chinese SU35s), I’m convinced the source of this cultural trait lies in the arbitrary relations between sound, meaning, and appearance of the language itself and that those discontinuities resonate through the Chinese world view.

  104. Both Akuleyev and Martyanov exaggerate somewhat. But Martyanov to a greater extent.

    There is a substantial Russian manufacturing sector, which is comparable in size to that of France and Brazil.

    However, apart from the MIC, and some niche strengths in metallurgy, nuclear, and power turbines, it is not internationally competitive. And things are unlikely to get better anytime soon.

  105. @Peter Akuleyev

    You are a typical Sovok. Dreaming about world power while half the population has to wallow in shit to support your fantasies. That’s the reason intelligent Russians keep leaving in droves.

    There is nothing wrong about dreaming about world power, nor does it make one a sovok.

    Indeed, actually realizing world power is a lot harder if you are a sovok.

    Conversely, one can be a sovok without dreaming about world power at all.

  106. ANON[436] • Disclaimer says:
    @jilles dykstra

    Iran in 1953 a “liberal” [any sense] country!!???? Really?

  107. @AnonFromTN

    generalizing is just how certain people cope with things out of their control (chinese success in the last 40 years) or how they show their innate racism (can’t ever change this) :)

  108. dax says:

    of course, putin is the savior of russia. check out the 1) the scope and scale of initial very dismal conditions he inherited; 2) the gigantic size of russia, which is not the singaporean city-state; and 3) extreme focus needed to quarterback the russian defense against the most vicious colonialists in world history.

    in truth, the usa and uk are just waiting for putin to retire, and hope that something as awful as merkel, may, or macron (whats with the “m” and mediocrity?!) will be the new yeltsin or gorbachov.

    if putin somehow drives 20 to 50 (this is a modest target as russia needs more like 500 dramatic innovations to permanently push away the us-nato zombies) tech breakthroughs in manufacturing and financial services within the last 6 years of his dispensation, he may actually do a singapore, but on a f*cking yuge dragon scale.

    as for his detractors, name just one us-nato leader with comparable leadership accomplishments. i have a bad cold and i need to laugh for hours to fully recover.

    • Replies: @Anon
  109. Anon[436] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kiza

    When do you think the USSR/Russian military budget became efficient? And how did it happen? Any star bureaucrats?

    • Replies: @Sergey Krieger
  110. Anon[436] • Disclaimer says:
    @Vojkan

    If you are saying thefe has been dysgenic breeding (and immigration) in the UK and France I would agree with you that it is pretty obvious. But where do you get your figures from and do they allow for or even result in part from the Flynn Effect?

    • Replies: @Vojkan
  111. Anonymous[436] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnonFromTN

    With respect I would have hoped that you didn’t need experience to teach you that you shouldn’t generalise confidently from very small samples (such as what you have related of youe experience). As a generalisation however I would accept that your experience is justification for rejecting many other people’s certainties and over confident generalisations. It’s a way of staying sane on UR threads :-)

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  112. Anon[436] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnonFromTN

    I know a very smart Englishman who has had a career dealing with very smart people and who now supervises PhD students at a major Ivy League graduate school. He says his Chinese students, while able, lack originality.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  113. Anon[436] • Disclaimer says:
    @dax

    When you call him the savior you are implying that it couldn’t have happened without him. It isn’t very respectful of the Russian people to suggest that the good things wouldn’t have happened under rough and ready govrrnment like, say, that of America in the late 19th century.

    • Replies: @dax
  114. @Nille

    “When everyone knows there are video CCTV at the polling booth”

    That is a good point, if true. I’m not questioning your statement, only saying that I didn’t know this and had assumed that the cameras were hidden and that the ballot handlers didn’t know they were being recorded.

    CCTV cameras in the polling stations would be a great idea for US elections.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  115. @jilles dykstra

    Merkel obviously has some connections to the intelligence organs (she was surely a Stasi asset, what kind of family moves from West to East Germany), and Germany certainly benefits from its position within the EU. But I am not sure the EU (and Germany in particular) wants the US military presence gone, it effectively subsidizes their own military spending. And I am also not sure that the German oligarchy views the EU as furthering German national interests as opposed to globalist interests. The European ruling class are partners with their Anglo-Jewish counterparts, they may disagree with some details but they wouldn’t go along with suicidal open borders and economically ruinous sanctions pushed by the Americans, unless they shared a common vision. (The US clearly supports establishment European politicians against populist rivals.) The historical inevitably of a Russo-German alliance cannot happen until Merkel and her ilk are gone.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  116. @Kiza

    Good points. Even with the sleight of hand in spreading military costs around to to other departments, no accountability is possible. The procurements procedures are at fault for massive waste and theft.

    That may be why, once in a while, the losing track of a few trillion here and there is necessary as a lame attempt to account for all the waste and theft. It’s as though the military budget itself is a way of hiding the looting of the treasury by the connected parties who are the only beneficiaries.

  117. @anony-mouse

    Well you assume wrong. And in fact, you think very badly. You should try to do better.

  118. @Anatoly Karlin

    “However, apart from the MIC, and some niche strengths in metallurgy, nuclear, and power turbines, it is not internationally competitive.”

    Is it possible that those “niche strengths” are domestic assets that need not be exported? My thought is that not everything produced in a country has to be made available to the world market at a profit to be a positive good for that country’s economy.

    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov
  119. @jilles dykstra

    You are very ambiguous. And the country is Colombia.

  120. Vojkan says:
    @Anon

    Regarding France, the figure is from a research by two university professors Edward Dutton and Richard Lynn published in the journal Intelligence, and there has been much talk about it in the French media. I must say that I am not convinced by the methodology but I am willing to believe there’s something in it because of my own experience with young graduates in the last 20 years. The younger generations seem to struggle with things that are a matter of common sense. I think the sinking quality of education has more to do with it than diversity. As for the UK, I honestly don’t remember where I read it, and a quick google yields results that apply to the whole Western world apparently.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=Drop+by+14+points+of+IQ&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b&gws_rd=cr&dcr=0&ei=21C2WrjzEY3TwALLm7nADw

  121. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @jilles dykstra

    Anon from TN
    Two things contradict this hypothesis. One, Merkel is ruining her own country and the fortunes of her own party. This cannot be done in pursuit of German interests. Two, her government behaves like an obedient US vassal, even though Germany is far stronger economically then many countries that are not afraid to show the US the middle finger.
    My personal hypothesis is that CIA has her on a short leash, likely by having strong evidence that she worked for Stasi in her GDR past. That would not be unprecedented: Lithuanian “president” Gribauskaite was a KGB asset, Lech Walesa in Poland was an informer of their equivalent of KGB, etc.

  122. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @jilles dykstra

    Anon from TN
    That is true, but the political system in the US is so infested with money that sensible spending or any policy in the interests of the country are totally out of question. Today nobody even talks about the education, healthcare, or infrastructure in MSM. The educational system is pathetic, there are no national standards in schools, local school boards (often full of ignoramuses) decide what kids are taught. Half of college education is remedial: students are taught what they should have learned in school but didn’t. Besides, only 2% of the US college students attend good quality colleges (Ivies and equivalent). In grad school we spend the first year teaching our grad students what they should have learned in college but didn’t. In good Universities grad school is world-class after that, at least in natural sciences, as the students then work in high-class labs. Not so in the majority of the US Universities. My estimate is that in biomedical sciences maybe 10% of PhD holders deserve the degree. The infrastructure is crumbling, but Federal government is not investing in it, pouring money into “defense”, likely because the room for thievery is much greater there. Healthcare is pathetic. The US spends more per person on healthcare than most developed countries, but the resources are wasted on health insurance companies (which are pure for-profit parasites) and enormous salaries of physicians, a large chunk of which goes to malpractice insurance (the US is a lawsuit culture).

  123. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @jilles dykstra

    Anon from TN
    Well, when I left the USSR in 1991 I though that Soviet propaganda was a pack of lies and I still believed in free media in the West. Even during the dismemberment of Yugoslavia I did not question the stories told by CNN and MSM. For me things changed after Ukrainian coup of 2014. I have friends and relatives all over that unfortunate country, so I know exactly what’s going on. I found that 90% of MSM reports on Ukraine are lies, whereas the remaining 10% contain kernels of truth twisted beyond recognition. Now I see that compared to Western propaganda the Soviet variety was a paragon of truthfulness. They could have twisted facts or omitted them, but they never invented blatant lies. Looks like “comrade Ogilvy” thing (remember “1984”? It was a prophesy) is an Anglo-Saxon phenomenon. The propaganda in the US and UK follows the rule of Joseph Goebbels: “when one lies, one should lie big, and stick to it”. That’s what we see in Skripal affair and many other cases (Kosovo, Iraq, Ukraine immediately come to mind).
    I did not watch TV for 8-9 years, and I do not miss it. I get my news from the Internet, checking out European and Russian sites. As a biologist, I think nature gave us two eyes for a reason: you cannot see much from only one perspective. Thus, you read stories, and then you think what would that particular party say to advance its interests, and dismiss everything that falls into that category. What remains is an approximation of truth.

    • Replies: @Kiza
    , @Sergey Krieger
  124. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @Anonymous

    Anon from TN
    Matter of fact, my sample is much greater. I teach 15-30 grad students every year since 2003. The course I teach requires logic and basic intelligence. Students from various cultures come on top. Considering that ~80% of our grad students are from the US, they are sadly underrepresented among top performers. However, I cannot evaluate their creativity. I can only judge creativity of the people who worked in my lab.

  125. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @Anon

    Anon from TN
    In my experience, the best Chinese in science are those who got college education in China and then went to the grad school in the US. Those are well educated (in contrast to their American counterparts) and learn to be creative.

  126. @Anatoly Karlin

    There is a substantial Russian manufacturing sector, which is comparable in size to that of France and Brazil.

    Karlin, see in bold? That is why you should stick to reviewing things within your “expertise” range–fashion, iPhones, maybe entertainment. computer games and not parade yourself as ignorant hack. You have zero, in fact it is negative, background in anything related to manufacturing, be that manufacturing of socks or composite or metal parts for aerospace industry. You opinions on anything Russia-relayed, especially in manufacturing, are worthless. A rubbish basically. Which your reference to Brazil is a first indicator. Try to attend, you are still young, some serious Russian technological school (granted you will last there couple semesters), I may even suggest some–who knows, maybe you will learn something of value there, before being thrown out for academic failure. May I suggest Bauman’s engineering faculties, wink-wink.

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
  127. @Twodees Partain

    Any talk about “economy” within framework of modern Western “economism” (a euphemism for FIRE) is a waste of time. There is no real economy without enclosed technological cycles–that’s the name of the game and always was since the start of industrial age. Father of liberalism Herbert Spencer abhorred national industrial self-sustainability as an indicator of militarism. Paradoxically, he was partially correct with this association.

  128. @Kiza

    But I like to think of the US military budget as 90% fat and 10% meat, at least when they do not lose track of trillions of dollars.

    A lot depends, and I mean a lot on realistic doctrines, both geopolitical and military–the US has neither.

  129. @Regnum Nostrum

    I do not understand though how somebody can be…

    He doesn’t either, but I’m sure he’ll explain it to you and call you an idiot for good measure.

    • Replies: @Regnum Nostrum
  130. Vladimir Brovkin [AKA "vlad"] says:
    @Joe Hide

    Thank you for kind words. If you are interested in Russian history I posted a whole bunch of lectures on you tube under my name.

  131. @Johnny Rico

    That is what I am hoping for. See, I am looking up to him. A brilliant guy with all that super education, knowledge of warfare, ( I wonder how many wars he has won. He is to modest to say. ), economics, geopolitics, formulas and only God knows what else. I do not mind getting insulted by somebody like him. I realize how inadequate I am compared to him. For me the world is a rather complicated thing while for him it is all simple. It either what he says or BS.

    • Replies: @Johnny Rico
  132. Rurik says:
    @jilles dykstra

    if Merkel’s EU support originates from the desire to throw off the USA yoke.

    not hardly

    since the (((EU)))) is nothing more than an extension of (((the Fed))))

    and it’s the Fed = zio-scum responsible for all the wars and the other evils that plagues both Germany and the Middle East and is also responsible for destroying the ZUS and Germany with open borders and Eternal Wars (for Israel)

    The EU (ECB) is the Fiend, just as the Fed = The Fiend

    they’re both simply expressions of the Zionist, Jewish supremacism that intends to enslave the people of the planet and turn us all into Kulaks / Palestinians.

    (duh)

  133. @Andrei Martyanov

    Embraer must be a figment of my imagination.

    As is Brazil producing almost twice as many vehicles as Russia.

    Of course Russia balances things out by producing many more things like nuclear subs and Gen4++ fighters.

    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov
  134. @Anatoly Karlin

    Embraer must be a figment of my imagination.

    Yep, Karlin–it is, which only supports my point about your “expertise”. The reason being that Embraer has NO own line of engines, nor line of avionics, nor aggregates most of which are of the US and EU manufacturing and design, which, as you might have guessed already, is absolutely not the case with Russia, which apart from producing a line of civilian and combat aircraft which would make Brazil’s economic bottom fall out, produces all of that completely out of own design and resources.

    As is Brazil producing almost twice as many vehicles as Russia.

    LOL. Karlin, Brazil is a country of rampant crime, corruption and fawellas. For all intents and purposes it is a failed state with economy which completely depends of US and EU for its machine-building complex.

    Of course Russia balances things out by producing many more things like nuclear subs and Gen4++ fighters.

    Again, do you understand what modern 5th generation fighter, project 885 SSGN or new advanced rocketry are and what real economy and expertise it takes to create them? Brazil has nothing, from academe to manufacturing base, to expertise to design and produce anything like this. It doesn’t exist and will not exist there in the future. You do have also some issues with arithmetic since Russia’s GDP, which is about (plus-minus) 1 trillion USD larger than that of Brazil’s, granted Russia has a significantly smaller population, has in its structure about 35% of manufacturing, as opposed to Brazil’s 20-22. Did they teach you how to write proportions in school? In related news, Russia has a developed and increasingly improving (and growing) micro and radio-electronics industry, apart from massive IT sector which increasingly uses Russian designed and manufactured processing power–a feature Brazil doesn’t have and will not have any time soon. So, basically you decided to compare a first world country, granted with her own ills and problems, such as Russia with some, pardon my French, third world shithole which is simple large and bulky. If you don’t believe me, try CIA.

    https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/br.html

    P.S. I am still laughing about your Embraer “argument”.

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
  135. dax says:
    @Anon

    wow, thats a wonderful use of a counterfactual assertion. are you a cheap economist?!! the thing is putin is the leader and nobody else. “rough and ready” america?!!! now that’s true jealousy to change the referent country in your argument. because america has no putin yet in this world or the next?

    may i please know who the rough and ready american leader was? factually, any country would like to have the right leader that they need at the right time.

    • Replies: @Anon
  136. Kiza says:
    @AnonFromTN

    To Anon from TN,

    A very similar experience here. The only difference is that I woke up in 1991 when the internal-external dissolution of Yugoslavia started. Following the Western media at the time, I lost the respect I had very quickly and for exactly the same reason as you – the total amount of outright, blatant, ruthless lies: about 90% of everything said in MSM. Initially, I was almost in shock and could not understand why or accept that someone could lie so much, having been used to the twisting of the truth in the socialist media.

    To be clearer on what I (you and I) mean, twisting is similar to commercial advertising which puts the rare product benefits in front to hide all its drawbacks and bad effects. Lying is like advertising something to men by saying straight that if you consume this product you will grow taller, or to women your breasts will grow larger. I did not like socialism much, thus I hoped for the respect of truth and plain reliability in my new home. Ha, ha, I look so naive to myself now. It appears that those blatant public media delivered regime lies are unique to the West in the domains of all three of its groups: Anglo, Franco and Germanic, I have not encountered such big lying and total reversal of the truth anywhere else in the World, as a broad generalisation most other countries lie by twisting the truth and the big lies are rare but also laughed at by the population.

    It is obvious that the wake up call comes from parallelisation on a topic which is highly familiar and of concern to one. Till then you start holding suspicions, but either the topic does not concern you much or you stay unconvinced in the no-man’s land between disbelieving and trusting. I am guessing that most Westerners stay in this pre-realisation zone forever because they do not care and because they lack an established truth reference about many topics.

    Just like you I have stopped consuming both TV and printed media. In the hindsight, I remember how surprised I was when I visited the head office of the main national newspaper and encountered almost military-grade security at the entrance. If you lie so much, you do need a military grade security to protect from those who have been severely impacted by your lies. In other words, when your power comes from lies.

    Perhaps the last straw was the realisation that terrorism in the Western countries, excluding the lone-wolf attacks, is largely a dual use domestic product of the Deep State. The War on Terrorism one of the gratest regime inventions ever, a gift which just cannot stop giving. Luckily so far the country that I live in does not use it much domestically, but this could change.

    • Replies: @Kiza
  137. @Andrei Martyanov

    Well, it would suck for Brazil in general, and Embraer in particular, if the US/EU was to embargo it, but they haven’t and most likely are not going to anytime soon, so…

    Russia is 42nd and Brazil is 50th on the Atlas of Economic Complexity. It’s not perfect – the Philippines of all countries being above Russia doesn’t make much sense – but if you have an alternative quantitative measure, let’s hear it.

    … Brazil is a country of rampant crime, corruption and fawellas.

    Crime – correct. Favelas – also correct. Though southern Brazil (mostly Portuguese and European descended) is reasonably functional.

    Corruption – worse in Russia by almost all measures.

    The most important factor is that Russians are more intelligent than Brazilians, so yes, it should have better prospects, and can make some things that Brazilians may not be capable of mastering. However, my basic point was on the relative size of each country’s manufacturing sector.

    You do have also some issues with arithmetic since Russia’s GDP, which is about (plus-minus) 1 trillion USD larger than that of Brazil’s, granted Russia has a significantly smaller population, has in its structure about 35% of manufacturing, as opposed to Brazil’s 20-22.

    Those figures were given as a percentage of nominal GDP, which is arguably more relevant for comparing manufacturing sectors since they produce tradable goods. Incidentally, if you were to compare by PPP-adjusted manufacturing, then China’s manufacturing sector would exceed the US by a factor of about 2.5x (and Russia by a factor of 12x).

    Anyway, Russia’s manufacturing is nowhere near 35% of GDP – that’s the industrial sector’s percentage of its GDP (which includes oil and other extractive industries).

    Manufacturing as % of Russian GDP is merely 14%: https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NV.IND.MANF.ZS

    In related news, Russia has a developed and increasingly improving (and growing) micro and radio-electronics industry, apart from massive IT sector which increasingly uses Russian designed and manufactured processing power–a feature Brazil doesn’t have and will not have any time soon.

    In this sphere Russia is of course ahead of Brazil. But behind China, the US, and much of East Asia.

    But again, not relevant to the point I made.

    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov
  138. Kiza says:
    @Kiza

    One more observation from me.

    In socialism, the communist rulers were terribly afraid of the rumour mill and this is why talking in a cafe or bar badly about the regime could land you into trouble. To curtail this alternative medium to the regime controlled public media, the regime would sometimes place police provocateurs into such places of drinking, waiting for alcohol loosened up tongues to spill out and get arrested, to make a scary example for everybody. I never encountered such myself, but there were stories and movies. Stasi was famous for this.

    In the Western quasi-capitalism, the Internet plays a very similar role to the rumour mill of the Eastern quasi-socialism. It is a way to circumvent the regime’s public media. Like the rumour mill, it contains a lot of information, many theories, inventions and lies, and only our brain is a filter of truth. The Internet makes the Western regimes as worried as the rumour mill made the Eastern regimes. This is why every Western country must have an omni-surveillance, panopticon, data vacuum suction agency, starting from the most famous NSA. Always justified by terrorism, of course.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  139. @Anatoly Karlin

    but if you have an alternative quantitative measure, let’s hear it.

    You do not have capabilities to get it, since you are what is called in English militantly ignorant. So, I wouldn’t even suggest you to read my book on precisely that–you wouldn’t understand it anyway. I can only suggest you to go back to any serious higher education school which gives some actual applicable skills and knowledge and try to forget whatever they taught you in whatever Likbez you “graduated” with whatever degree which you are hiding so conspicuously. But again, since you are being exposed as fraud you are, not least through presenting some obfuscated BS of value added from WB, we may go to, however criticized by many, CIA and extract it from there:

    agriculture: 4.7%
    industry: 32.4%
    services: 62.3% (2017 est.)

    https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/rs.html

    So, at this stage, Karlin, just get back to your bottom-feeding and pretending that you know something and have something to say on issues you have no clue about. I am not interested in responding to the rest of your delirium. Have a nice weekend, go out–Moscow has a nice club scene, try to impress some girls–I am sure they will believe you.

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
  140. @AnonFromTN

    Interesting. Actually Soviet propaganda was telling mostly truth about re West and USA in particular. I lived almost all my life among military men in ussr and there was no kitchen talks in my family or among all our friends or aquentancies. My dad close friend was from the same department of KGB Putin hails from but dealing with USA. He spent 5-6 years there and he did confirm that a lot what Soviet propaganda was telling was truth. I also remember reading in 1982 in one book about USA intelligence services that NSA main purpose was to spy on USA citizens. Snowmen confirmed this. I was coming from cycles that were totally loyal hence betrayal by the leadership was total. I do not trust no one including Putin. Until I see what I want to see. Loyalty is two way road.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  141. @Andrei Martyanov

    So it emerges Martyanov doesn’t know the difference between manufacturing and industry (which includes manufacturing, extraction, and utilities).

    What was it he called it? Ah. “Militantly ignorant.”

    PS. By Martyanov’s own standards (industry % of PPP-adjusted GDP), we must acknowledge Saudi Arabia as a great industrial power: Industry 43% of GDP, GDP (PPP) of $1.8 trillion, working out to a significantly larger PPP-adjusted industrial sector than, say, France [20%*$2.8 trillion].

    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov
  142. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @Kiza

    Anon from TN
    So, you awoke earlier because the US beast decided to devour the country you know, Yugoslavia, earlier. I was in Yugoslavia in 1989, mostly in Slovenia and Croatia, but I did not know much about it, except that both Lyublyana and Zagred were rather provincial-feeling cities, Lyublyana in a nicer way than Zagreb. I was in Zagreb with my wife a few years ago and was surprised to see how poor it is compared to even provincial Russian cities.
    Now I know that pretty much all stories about Bosnian “concentration camps” or genocide of Albanians in Kosovo were outright lies. If anything, in Kosovo Albanians genocided Serbs, dismembering them to sell organs. The US and NATO brought mafia to power in Kosovo, just like they brought to power criminals and unreformed Nazis in Ukraine.
    We had some KGB provocateurs in Soviet times, but in Brezhnev period (I don’t remember much about preceding Khrushchev rule, and I was born 4 years after Stalin died) KGB was afraid of scandal more than of anti-Soviet views. They kept record of what “wrong” things you said, but that was pretty much it. It took some effort to get arrested, although I am sure they had a dossier on me. I am ~99% sure that two of my University classmates were KGB informers (not too many out of a class of 250 at Moscow State University).
    I had my suspicions when the US decided to occupy Iraq, but I did not think that the US propaganda lies were so big, typical “comrade Ogilvy”-type stuff. At first I even believed that Saddam might have some chemical weapons. Now I know that everything he had was made out of Western-supplied components and used against Iran and Kurds. As soon as the West stopped supplying him with the components, he could not produce any chemical weapons.
    Only after Ukraine coup I realized how many blatant lies the Western public is fed, and how the official narrative can have nothing at all in common with reality. Now, if the US State Department says that 2×2=4, I am going to doubt this.

    • Replies: @Vojkan
  143. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @Sergey Krieger

    Anon from TN
    I saw it from a very different angle. I was a student at Moscow State University 1975-80, and most of us believed that Soviet propaganda lies, whereas the West has independent media. I live in the US since 1991, so I can compare directly. Soviet Pravda was more independent and lied less that Western MSM. They never invented things, whereas Western propaganda does this all the time., “comrade Ogilvy”-stile. When their fakes have served their purpose, they just stop mentioning them. Have you noticed that mentioning Ukraine in MSM became as impolite as loud farting in church? Ukraine disappeared from MSM, just like Bosnian genocide, Kosovo, Darfur, Aleppo hospitals, little girl Bana, and other fakes before it. I have no faith in anything the West officially says or spreads through the MSM.
    BTW, I kept wondering why British special services organized the Skripal provocation in such a clumsy way without a prepared coherent lie (so they had to change the story five times already), as if they acted in haste. Now his former classmate Timoshkov claims that Skripal wrote a letter to Putin asking for forgiveness and permission to return to Russia. That would make Brits act quickly without time for legend preparation. It agrees with what Litvinenko father now says, that CIA eliminated his son and blamed Russia. It is also well known now that Russian oligarch Berezovsky wrote to Putin asking for forgiveness and permission to return. The Brits immediately “suicided” him, like Dr. Kelly of Iraq WMD fame, and performed fake investigation, even though everyone who knew Berezovsky agreed that he was certainly not the type to commit suicide.
    I knew that Western secret services are totally amoral and unscrupulous, but I am still surprised to what extent. They certainly reached the level of Stalin’s NKVD and Hitler’s Gestapo, possibly even surpassed it.

    • Replies: @Sergey Krieger
  144. ValmMond says:
    @Regnum Nostrum

    Love the sinner, hate the sin.
    Your country has become a sin. A Babylon, run by a self-celebrating, satan-worshipping cast.
    It is a moral imperative to despise their crimes against humanity, G_d and Creation.
    American people are kind, honest and credulous to a fault. They are just starting to realize that their country has been hijacked by a vicious and bloodthirsty minority with a supremacy complex.
    That’s why you are in such a hurry to take their guns away. When they figure out what actually happened to them on 9-11, it’s not going to be pretty. And it may be too late to chose sides.

  145. Very interesting and revealing. To fill out the picture would you be so good as to tell us what brought you to the West and what you have been doing since. All in Tennessee?

    What intrigues me is your misunderstanding of the Western MSM as businesses. Nearly all MSM attention is devoted to news, i.e. new news, to keep the customers’ attention and inspire them to return. So why would you expect the Bosnian genocide, Kosovo or Darfur to keep on featuring after the first few times MSM has paid for someone with a camera and recorder to go and ask “is there anyone here who has been raped and speaks English?” ?

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
    , @Kiza
  146. Anon[436] • Disclaimer says:
    @dax

    You seem to have a couple of problems. One is to ignore altogether the logic of my point about use of the word ‘savior”.

    The other shows gross ignorance or carelessness. I did not refer to a “rough and ready American leader”. If you knew any American history you would understand my reference to the kind of vaguely democratic government America had while it grew and prospered in the years before 1900 – or 1917 or 1929 if you like. Savior leaders were decidedly not a design feature or any feature of it.

    • Replies: @dax
  147. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @Wizard of Oz

    Anon from TN
    As you seem to be asking me, I answer. Work brought me to the US, and it keeps me here: I do basic (not translational) research in biochemistry and cell signaling, and there was little of that in the USSR. By the end of 1989 the funding for this kind of thing dried up completely, and I had 7-year old daughter at the time. I did not think I have a right to make her starve. So, I had a choice: do something else for a living and stay in Russia, or do research and move where research is a gainful occupation. That’s why I moved to the US. First to Philadelphia, PA, then to AZ, and then to TN.
    Now, the US MSM do not behave like businesses: they totally disregard their credibility, lying through their teeth all the time. They keep harping on the same subject as long as the State Department keeps harping on it (say, Bosnia was “in the news” for a few months), and switch off when it becomes too embarrassing even for shameless liars to keep repeating the same lies.

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
  148. Vidi says:
    @qjdransome

    Putin is good for the world, and good for Europe specifically, because he is doing his mightiest to avoid World War III.

    He (and Xi) are also doing much to forestall the final victory of the Western corruptocracy, for which the rest of us should be immensely grateful.

  149. @Anatoly Karlin

    we must acknowledge Saudi Arabia as a great industrial power: Industry 43% of GDP

    LOL, I love desperation of hacks. Yes, Karlin, Saudi Arabia, if you have not heard, is a great oil producing country and as such she has what is known a mono-economy with roughly a single real industry, oil extraction and initial processing, which, indeed, constitutes a very large part of her, otherwise hollow, GDP. But, of course, you never heard a thing which I repeat since my appearance on this site and in reality much earlier: an enclosed technological cycle. You, obviously, never heard also about well-known:

    Martyanov’s own standard

    also used universally (wink, wink) and invented even before I was born–GDP structure and GDP composition where Industry stands precisely for manufacturing and processing, that is not services. Karlin, read Marga Simonyan’s recent manifesto–there is a lot there about people like you. As I stated, you are no expert on anything, you are especially no expert on Russia or anything Russia-related and as such you have no future (meaningful in your imagination) in Russia’s real expert community. Bottom feeding and shuffling with the fringe crowd of pseudo-thinkers of Navalny or Prosvirnin caliber–that is your fate there. Get into vocational college, get a profession, apply yourself. But considering your visceral Russophobia and ego larger than cathedral I may suggest you move to Czechia or Poland. There your “expertise” on Russia may be needed in propaganda attacks and spreading BS about her and you will be able to make some sort of living doing what you do best–promoting yourself by pretending being someone who you are not. Hell, I think at that point there will be no need to pretend.

    • Replies: @Vojkan
    , @Anatoly Karlin
    , @dax
  150. @AnonFromTN

    Obviously some State Department media releases are sources MSM are likely to use (that’s part of being a business. Apart from any prima facie newsworthiness of what the State Department says, it is cheap) but, again, “revealing” is the word for your post. I have known scores of MSM journalists and editors (and rsdio and TV producers) and many owners and controllers of MSM outlets. I have been in no doubt about the prevalence of factual error and bad reasoning since I remarked at the age of 20 that whenever I read something in Time Magazine that I knew about personally I found some error but I can say for certain that your paranoid interpretation of your finding what you choose to call lies (without amy of the necessary proof of motive) is off the planet. I defer to your knowledge of the pre 1991 Soviet media and the behaviour of its practitioners. You should be modest enough to know the limits of your understanding of the Western media. Apart from anything else you should be happier.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  151. Vojkan says:
    @AnonFromTN

    Do you imagine Pravda ever publishing outlandish stuff like this:

    https://edition.cnn.com/2018/03/21/opinions/russia-electric-grid-should-worry-americans-burke/index.html

    Obviously those people watch too much Hollywood movies.

    On the subject of Yugoslavia, I did my military service in the former Yugoslav People’s Army in Slovenia 1987-1988 and was located in the very compound where was the military court that tried the Slovenian trio Borštner, Bavčar, Janša – the latter became prime minister of Slovenia some years later and was tried again, this time for corruption -, and sentenced them to light prison sentences.
    It was common knowledge in the army that the whole Slovenian “opposition” was operated by the CIA and the German BND. The whole thing was even documented. I knew from that trial that Yugoslavia was doomed. Knowing what I knew, I was even surprised that the USA initially supported the unity of Yugoslavia.
    Regarding the coverage of the war, I happen to have had access to AFP and Reuters news wires, and was surprised to see how only a selected and heavily editorialised subset made it to the mass media. I also worked for the news agency of the Republika Srpska SRNA so I really had great access to information during the 1990s. One thing that struck me was that Western media reported imaginary crimes committed by Serbs but never actually reported their real ones because those were either actually prosecuted or committed by people who it seemed inconvenient to accuse.
    So on one side there was the real information and on the other the Western media, because you have seen the original wires on which they are based, or you just happen to know the sources, you have reports that you know are packs of lies, and you realise that the reports are made to fit a narrative, you realise there is an agenda behind it all, in pretty much the same way the reports fit a narrative and there is an agenda today targetting Russia.
    When you try to explain it, you are met with disbelief, it’s not true if it’s not on TV, because you see, Western countries are democracies and democracies don’t lie. The people in Eastern Europe were smarter than that.
    One blatant instance of disinformation was the NATO war against Yugoslavia in 1999, of which yesterday was the anniversary. I happen to have dug out the document presented to Serbs in Rambouillet while the parties were still “negotiating”. There were no actual negotiations, Serbs were presented with an ultimatum that can be summed up in one sentence: “let us occupy your country or we’ll bomb you”. That’s about what Austria-Hungary asked of Serbia in 1914, in much more polite terms, and that’s what Hitler asked of Yugoslavia in 1941, but even Hitler was less blunt.
    The fascinating thing is that not only nobody in the West believed that was what was asked of then Yugoslavia but nobody in Serbia believed it in spite of two historical precedents. The bombardment ended with an accord in Kumanovo which was then brandished as proof of victory by the regime in Belgrade. On paper it was indeed, the request to occupy Serbia was dropped, UN, not NATO troops were supposed to be deployed in Kosovo. The only reason for the destruction of Serbia, no matter how irrational it seems, is because she is seen, rightly or wrongly, as a little Russia, and no matter the level of Serbia’s sucking up to the West, it will forever be so. Therefore it is in Serbia’s vital interest that Russia be strong.
    To one who feels almighty as the US Empire felt, a signature isn’t worth the ink with which it is written. Paradoxically, it is now that the USA is not almighty any more that it is the most dangerous. The power drunk tend to cling to power at any cost, even in their last throes, no matter what human suffering it entails, because they’re essentially psychopaths.
    Russians seem to begin to realise it only now. How great is Vladimir remains to be seen knowing that given the recent nominations in Washington DC, from now on, every step back he’ll take will only embolden the bully to be even more aggressive. He must hold his ground even when they talk sweet.

  152. Vojkan says:
    @Andrei Martyanov

    Russia is a country of ~145 million people, that’s ~ the population of France + Germany, therefore Russia is a market of France + Germany potential consumers. Russia’s industry immediate task is not to export to the USA but to produce enough quality goods to sell to Russians.
    The only activity in which I find Russia lagging is marketing. I would love to see for instance UAZ selling their Hunter outside of Russia. As a less costly alternative to a Land Rover Defender or a Mercedes G, it could prove very popular among people living in the countryside or near mountains like I do. There are plenty of Ladas 4×4 in mountaineous regions in Europe. The UAZ could be a great hit but the Russians don’t know to market. They associate trade and dishonesty. They know to speak the truth but they don’t know to sell it.
    A lot of other examples in other sectors can be found if one searches the Web. That’s the problem, one has to search, Russians just don’t know how to market, but to say that Russia has no developed industry is non-sense.

  153. @Andrei Martyanov

    … constitutes a very large part of her, otherwise hollow, GDP.

    Well it’s a good thing I was not claiming otherwise, but using your own criteria of how to proxy “real” economic power: “You do have also some issues with arithmetic since Russia’s GDP, which is about (plus-minus) 1 trillion USD larger than that of Brazil’s, granted Russia has a significantly smaller population, has in its structure about 35% of manufacturing, as opposed to Brazil’s 20-22. Did they teach you how to write proportions in school?

    Using your own criteria here, adjusted for “militant ignorance” [that is, treating industry share of GDP as synonymous with manufacturing share of GDP], then Saudi Arabia is indeed a great economic power. Greater than France and the UK. Which I of course would consider nonsense. But you apparently don’t.

    But, of course, you never heard a thing which I repeat since my appearance on this site and in reality much earlier: an enclosed technological cycle.

    Just now I got interested in finding out more about “enclosed technological cycles” – something I don’t recall from any of my econ textbooks – so I tried Googling the term.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=”enclosed+technological+cycles&#8221;

    74 results. First 10 are all from you. Evidently, it is a term that was invented and almost exclusively used by yourself.

    And we are ignoramuses spreading BS because… we can’t mind read you?

    Now okay, maybe it is some concept that is specific to Russian/Soviet economics. In this case, since it is apparently unknown in the West, it would have been incumbent on you to precisely define what “enclosed technological cycles” and how one could measure them. Something that I don’t recall you ever doing, though I would be happy to be proven wrong.

    But if it is a Russian concept, let’s search it in Russia. Let’s Google “технологии с замкнутым циклом”. Again, nothing. The first 10 results refer to the (American) concept of a “circular economy,” which belongs to environmental economics, which incidentally the Communist Party of China has started hammering on a lot about. Has nothing to do with what you’re talking about, though.

    GDP structure and GDP composition where Industry stands precisely for manufacturing and processing, that is not services.

    Where did I mention services? I (correctly) said that industry is manufacturing + extraction + utilities.

    If you don’t believe me, ask Rosstat: http://www.gks.ru/bgd/free/B04_03/IssWWW.exe/Stg/d03/48.htm
    or Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_production

    You quoted the industry share of Russian GDP, and took it to be synonymous with manufacturing.

    Instead of quietly letting that correction slide, you doubled down and drew even more attention to how you splattered into the puddle. As is your wont.

    • Replies: @dax
    , @Andrei Martyanov
  154. dax says:
    @Anon

    charming arrogant poster you are. you do not even understand the meaning of savior yourself while pretending to understand english. i suppose you are what was popularly called american white trash in earlier times.

    logic? i have several degrees involving lots of maths and sciences, where failed logic like yours mean one cant graduate.

    democratic american govt in the 1900s??? america still owes over a hundred thousand american soldier lives, without interest yet, for invading the philippines. yes and killing lots of civilians. you should have read the diaries of some american soldiers on their crimes.

    anyway, it’s way past bedtime for your walnut brain. who knows, the russians may finally end the postings of poorly educated boys like you.

    • Replies: @Anon
  155. dax says:
    @Andrei Martyanov

    please dont break the economist-wannabe heart of mr karlin. in his own good time, mr putin might finally use the decisive corrective actions suggested by dr pc roberts on the countries raised on fake news, fake histories, and fake military capabilities.

    god sees the truth but waits.

    have a pleasant day sir in seattle. am just waiting for nuclear winters. i hope these come before game of thrones end.

  156. dax says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    good morning sir.

    i was captivated by how you turned a simple thread on mr putin to a war of the dismal science definitions and metrics with mr martyanov.

    i marvel at how you try to show that the flawed metrics of a discredited “science” are worth serious attention. it is as if economists are not like lawyers, who see the truth depending on who are paying them at the moment. my wife, an economics graduate, explained this inconvenient truth to me.

    well, mr putin would rather embark on economic and social development, rather than rendering justice to russia’s enemy nations. he wants defense expenditures to go below 3 percent. sadly, mr putin wants peace; a good upbringing does that.

    i am very disappointed with his recent pronouncements. i have prepared already for nuclear winters where keynesian economists and central bankers of us-nato allied nations will be fed to the ice dragon beyond the wall.

    if things continue as they are, we should be able to see in 20 years (20 years after mr putin began his leadership) whether us-nato economies outperform the chinese-russian allied nations.

  157. dax says:

    hello mr karlin:

    sorry, i ran out of editing time. it should be 20 more years after mr putin’s first 20 years.

    there are very few national economies that the us-nato alliance can loot freely in the next 20 years, or destroy without serious retaliation costs.

    i will continue to respectfully read your posts mr karlin, and your spats with mr martyanov.

    thank you and have a nice day.

  158. Anon[436] • Disclaimer says:
    @dax

    I’m sure I remember you from when you thought you could walk into a decent university for graduate study and I had to agree to blocking you, not on the ground that I felt loomed rather too large with my colleagues, namely that you were a crude barbarian who would soon wear out his welcome in the Graduate Common Room, but that you would have to do at least a six month course to bring your English language skills up to a passable standard.

    Don’t feel too bad about it though. There are even higher standards and I recall an American Rhodes Scholar friend who had to do a special English course in London before coming up.

    • Replies: @dax
  159. “Sen. John McCain claimed the result was an insult to all Russians”.

    Reality, the hard fact is that elections in US is the biggest sham, fraud perpetrated not only on Americans but the entire world.Bunch of candidates, all competing with one another to show who is more loyal to a foreign nation, Israel.Those elected reptiles belonging to both political spectrum congratulate and applaud even when Israel kicks (albeit figuratively) on the face of American president even after draining American treasury.Now the master Israel is demanding that the slave America should denude Iran with nuclear bombs. Soon you can expect another war for Israel, not for America.Not only that American “democracy” is perversion of democracy, that nation is an abomination of nationhood.
    Nothing to say about Putin other than he cares for his nation and people accept him for that. Shame on McCain, shame on all Americn law makers who may not be knowing the meaning of shame.

  160. @Vojkan

    “Russia’s industry immediate task is not to export to the USA but to produce enough quality goods to sell to Russians.”

    That is exactly what I was trying to ask about in a reply to Karlin. You state it much better than I did. I would happily buy a Hunter if it wasn’t effectively banned by regulation here. Lada is another car that I’d like to drive at least once. Isn’t AvtoVAZ now majority owned by Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance? That makes marketing of the Lada possible, I think.

    I agree that it’s nonsense to state that Russia has no manufacturing industry to speak of.

    • Replies: @Vojkan
  161. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @Wizard of Oz

    Anon from TN
    Let me point out that there is a huge difference between an error (e.g., 2×2=5) and a lie (e.g., 2×2= Russian aggression). I have an opportunity to compare State Department and MSM narrative on Ukraine with reality I know from friends and relatives actually living in that unfortunate country. So, I can say with full confidence that this narrative is a lie, not an error. Hearing from people from former Yugoslavia (see comment 158; also, now that I got interested, I have info from many people in Serbia and Croatia), the narrative on that subject was also a lie, not an error. In fact, former prosecutor of the UN criminal court Carla Del Ponte resigned because she was disgusted by official lies and court reluctance to prosecute crimes committed by those the US/NATO supported. Fakes about numerous Aleppo hospitals allegedly bombed by the Russians (even though the whole of Syria never had that many hospitals), little girl Bana (who, as it turned out, does not speak any English, whereas the blog was made in her name in pure English), and now Skripal affair, where we are on version #5 already, and not a shred of proof was ever presented, are all not errors, but lies made up to fit a particular narrative.
    Thanks for your concern about my happiness! I am pretty happy, thank you very much, I do what I love and I am very successful in it. I just don’t believe liars any more, but in my book that’s good.

  162. Vojkan says:
    @Twodees Partain

    The Lada 4×4 is really good off road. You’ll never be stuck in the mud with it but it’s definitely not a highway vehicle, the suspension is not exactly air cushion and the seats are anything but easy chairs. I don’t know about the newer ones but the older models with Peugeot engines that can last several hundred thousand kilometers without major problems are really reliable. In short, it’s totally adequate for the pothole riddled roads in my area ;-)
    I would prefer a Hunter though to have enough room for my Japanese Akita couple. Currently, I can put only one at a time in my Alfa Romeo.

  163. @AnonFromTN

    I think western elites and media supporting them completely lacks any sense of honor. They plainly has no clue about what it is. Hence they lie and backstab and break treaties. It was not just now but always. One has to check those Indian treaties and extrapolate those upon now and bingo. It is same pattern repeated all the time. I have never before had a thought of 9/11 being false flag, but considering what we know there is high probability that it is. Regarding NKVD, think there was a huge struggle in 30′s that resulted in eventual victory by national forces. I am afraid that what really was going on then is still hidden because opening it all would undermine the general line that is in place since 1956. But as Jesus told by results of what they are doing we can know who they are. I also wonder why such a large and well educated part of Soviet intelligenciya trusted more to enemy propaganda and behaved accordingly. As far as I know no other people of great nations showed such pattern so consistently.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  164. @Vojkan

    Russia is a country of ~145 million people, that’s ~ the population of France + Germany, therefore Russia is a market of France + Germany potential consumers. Russia’s industry immediate task is not to export to the USA but to produce enough quality goods to sell to Russians.

    Precisely. But for our dear West-”educated” (a euphemism for dumbing down and ignorance) globalists here such a thing as internal market is beyond comprehension not to mention the fact that practically none of them ever worked a day of productive labor connected to a tangible, forget complex, product. Just to give one example of Russia’s civilian aviation which was practically killed by a bunch of crooks in 1990s who resorted to a second-hand Boeing and Airbus aircraft under entirely false pre-text of “inferiority” of Russian aircraft and engines. It took an immense effort to lift Russian commercial aviation back off the ground, but it was largely accomplished. With SSJ-100 shaming all those doom sayers and MS-21 hitting operations sometime in 2019 it remains absolutely incomprehensible how all these poseurs here fail to understand a simple fact–the nation which produced state-of-the-art and arguably best fighter planes in the world is bound to produce state-of-the-art commercial aircraft and that they will be primarily for own market. But here we are back to discussing the good ol’ issue of Western so called “expertise” on Russia.

    As per marketing. I have some news here–while marketing is important, as well as follow-up services for technology (even more important), again–using the example of commercial aviation–West will do everything in its power to not allow serious penetration of the Russian commercial aviation. By that I mean literally sabotage and political pressure. Considering hysteria in US re: Turkey and Saudi Arabia buying S-400 one can only imagine what will follow if any major Western air carrier would even look towards Russian, extremely competitive, commercial aircraft. So, marketing, goes only so far–in key industries it is a (geo)political arrangement which matters above all. Although, to be frank, I remember in early 2000s some American senior naval officers calling for directly buying SU-33s (updated for US Navy use) for US Navy carriers. So, who knows what could be.;-)

  165. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @Sergey Krieger

    Anon from TN
    As one of those who believed Western propaganda, I can name two reasons.
    One, the party nomenclature was too far removed from the people, so they were perceived as an enemy. Besides, think of Soviet history: only those who came to the top before Bolsheviks took power were in any measure decent, everyone who rose to the top when they were in power (from Khruschev on) were defective, to put it mildly. Which means that the system had built-in negative selection, decent people had no chance to advance high. That’s how traitors came to control the USSR and break it apart. Two, Soviet authorities did not allow people to travel abroad and see for themselves. This suggested that propaganda lies about foreign countries. In fact, it lied a lot less than we thought. As Russians aptly say today, “what they told us about socialism was a pack of lies, but everything they told us about capitalism turned out to be perfectly true”. Too late now, though.

    • Replies: @Sergey Krieger
  166. @Anatoly Karlin

    And we are ignoramuses spreading BS because… we can’t mind read you?

    LOL. You, certainly, are ignoramus. Other people, it seems, have no problem understanding what is a full chain from extraction, to processing, to R&D, to manufacturing to gargle, spit, repeat which is enclosed technological cycle. For example, here is one of definitions.

    https://dic.academic.ru/dic.nsf/polytechnic/3071/%D0%97%D0%90%D0%9C%D0%9A%D0%9D%D0%A3%D0%A2%D0%AB%D0%99

    Or, if you want to try some more general review, you can try this:

    http://economy-ru.info/info/2615/

    But then again, you don’t know what is Manufacturing Cycle. I would have a blast watching you trying to write even simplest manufacturing plan on production of say basic composite strap. I am sure your textbooks will come really handy, LOL.

    But that is beyond the point. The point is an ability to produce a whole chain (cycle) of life from the raw material to manufacturing of product to its recycle. The other point is:

    something I don’t recall from any of my econ textbooks

    Karlin, most of your “textbooks”, judging by the depth of your ignorance (not to mention the fact of you being grossly butt-hurt) is a collection of pseudo-scientific crap with you being a prime example, in fact embodiment, of the utter failure of the economic-statistical whatever the other BS parts constitute so called filed of your “expertise” which resulted in US being de facto destroyed economically and being in full blow decline–some “education” and “text books” I’d say. Remarkably, boys like you–same level of ignorance and egos larger than cathedrals played a crucial role in economic destruction of Russia in 1990s. You were still going to potty when I had to deal with many of those, both of Russian and American variety. Yet, you continue to parade yourself with “opinions” which do not pass even a slightest smell test. I know, they do not teach empirical evidence in your “textbooks”.

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
  167. @Andrei Martyanov

    The first dictionary definition you gave (“продукты технологич. операции возвращаются в предыдущую или в ту же операцию, обеспечивая полноту переработки исходного сырья”) sounds exactly equivalent to the concept of the circular economy, which is part of environmental economics and has nothing to do with what you’re banging on about.

    The second link is more relevant to what I think you mean by “enclosed technological cycles” (though in this case you should call them manufacturing cycles instead of inventing new terms that nobody else uses). However, the question which I asked but you have yet to answer, is how you are supposed to go about measuring them? And in particular, how to go about certifying your claim that Russia has more and/or more complex “enclosed technological cycles” than any other country.

    I would have a blast watching you trying to write even simplest manufacturing plan on production of say basic composite strap.

    Sure, if you pay me sufficiently, I’ll have a stab at it. Otherwise this is relevant how?

    … which resulted in US being de facto destroyed economically and being in full blow decline–some “education” and “text books” I’d say.

    The US has been getting “destroyed economically and being in full blow decline” since the 1970s. And yet there it still is, with the USSR history and Russia enjoying a fraction of its living standards (regardless of all its “enclosed technological cycles”).

    • Replies: @Vojkan
    , @Andrei Martyanov
  168. Vojkan says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    “And yet there it still is” because the dollar being the currency of international transactions, and being supported not by gold reserves but by US military power – see what happens to countries trying to switch to another currency (e.g. Iraq and Libya) -, the US can print fiat money and then spend that fiat money. Replace the dollar with another currency and the US economy collapses.

  169. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @Vojkan

    Anon from TN
    “Replace the dollar…”
    That’s what Russia, China, and a few other countries are doing. Hence the US hysterics.

  170. @Anatoly Karlin

    And yet there it still is,

    And that is why, Karlin, you are bound to remain where you are and who you are–a butt-hurt troll.

    Sure, if you pay me sufficiently, I’ll have a stab at it

    Karlin, you are worthless on serious labor market since you have zero serious skills. Entry level? maybe. I am not going to talk about your worth as any kind of “analyst”–it is negative but, as I stated, try yourself in Moscow’s liberal Parnassus–maybe your “expertise” will be needed there. Although I have to warn you–the competition is really stiff, the number of “humanities-educated”, “economists” and other Kreakls with high IQ is large, while the sources of financing are rather limited. But I am sure you will fit right in. Have a nice life.

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
  171. @Andrei Martyanov

    a butt-hurt troll.

    Powerful samokritika.

  172. @Vojkan

    The nation which is 21+ trillion in debt and has to service interest on this debt and which is basically by many economic metrics doesn’t do that well turning fast into the third world country is hardly a success story, especially when one considers American non-stop military failures. The US had her chance, she exited WW II with pockets filled with cash and through Ike’s Presidency she did well. The decline started in late 1960s and many Reagan worshipers here still don’t get how “holy” Reagan accelerated this process in 1980s. There was historically short moment of about 10-15 years after the collapse of the Soviet Union when US experienced some increasing economic prosperity and got really drunk on the delusion of grandeur and missed what today is clearly an extremely dangerous institutional rot and decline. I lived in US permanently since mid-1990s, in 20+ years I observed unprecedented precipitous decline in American expertise and competences across the whole spectrum of modern nation’s activities: from intellectual field, to technology, to education (always weak), to military, to diplomacy, to whatever else. While Soviet collapse was tremendous and consequences of it were disastrous for millions upon millions, what is transpiring now in the US is simply mind-boggling. As I said, state and government institutions are simply non-functional in a larger scheme of things. Worst of all, unlike it was the case with Russia in 1990s where there was a coherent and well defined view on what needs to be done to save the nation, I, currently, am at loss when trying to think what can save the US. In fact, there is no nation per se anymore–it is torn at the ethnic, cultural and political seams.

    • Replies: @Kiza
  173. @AnonFromTN

    That’s what Russia, China, and a few other countries are doing. Hence the US hysterics.

    Russia is doing more than that–in 4 years she literally blew the myth of American military and technological omnipotence out of the water. Remove this myth and Pax Americana crumbles. And that is what we are observing this very minute. Strong and confident nations (same as people) do not get hysterical when facing challenges, they meet them. This is not the case with US anymore. Well, Elon Musk, I guess, still can do some PR tricks and pacify the audience of geeks and losers for a while, but the strategic reality is not favoring the US.

  174. @Regnum Nostrum

    I’m more interested in your comments. They are more interesting and informative than anything I’ve seen him write. You have the gift of concision.

    Humans discovered centuries ago that having served in uniform doesn’t make one smarter than someone who has not.

    He is only half-educated. Poorly-to-the point-of-not-read in military history. He is not a historian. He possesses a muddled understanding of 20th century politics, ideology, and international security issues.

    He is a blogger with a decent understanding of Russian weapon systems. Far from unique. He is a Russian propagandist.

    He expends most of his typing trying to convince the world he is the expert on everything that he believes himself to be.

    But mostly it is channeled into attempting to evict Anatomy Karlin from the real-estate Karlin rents in his head.

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
  175. @AnonFromTN

    Current crop is a lot worse. I remember reading Zinoviev saying that any power should have some privileges for stability and privileges of nomenclature were mere trifles. Compare to what they have now and people have nothing of what was a shred under Soviets power. People of Lenin and Stalin caliber do not happen often. I still think Soviet leadership before Gorbachov could have been favorably compared to what the West has had since long time ago. Putin also being the last product of the previous system and new crop is coming and no one knows what will happen after Putin is gone. Many also did not count Soviet Russia tragic history of w0th century with country razed to the ground twice within 25 years period. We’re comparing conditions in countries which were not that ruined or never ruined like USA or got a lot of help to rebuild like Germany while ussr did all itself while maintaining almost war like ready military. From what I read in Russian blogs majority already understand what they lost and how wrong they were. But too late. No wonder Stalin was warning that without him capitalists would have Soviet leadership and people like blind kittens. Naivety and trusting Greeks bringing gifts is never a good thing. Regarding Krushev, that certainly was some fool. Still i wonder that he might be better that what goes for leaders now.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  176. @AnonFromTN

    I like the way it is being done. Slowly but with ever increasing pressure like vise.

  177. @Andrei Martyanov

    American military omnipotence seems to always was a myth. But now due to USA overexposure and numerous failures and challenge by much smaller Russia and USA inability to do anything about it the whole thing is accelerating. USA good looks of 80s was achieved at the expense of getting on debt nidle. That where Reagan took usa. There is no more room for maneuver and with increased interest rates it is getting more expensive to service ever growing debt. I notice that China also is on debt binge with debt being 23+ trillion. Not good. China has history of falling apart many times with times of troubles lasting a lot longer than in Russia. Really debt is like decrease.

  178. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @Andrei Martyanov

    Anon from TN
    Yes, shrill hysterics and remarkably clumsy dirty tricks like the Skripal provocation are a sure sign of weakness and desperation. However, many countries (including China) have a lot of their currency reserves in dollars, so they won’t let the dollar collapse quickly. They would likely spend those dollars on something profitable (like speed rail to Europe via Russia, infrastructure projects in Asia and Africa, or Syrian and Iraqi reconstruction) before pulling the plug. So dollar is likely to have value for a few years yet. But, unless the Empire self-destructs and destroys the world in WWIII, it is going under, like all dominant Empires before it.
    On a different subject. Stop arguing with that Karlin personage, he is not worth it. Your replies make him feel more important than he will ever be in real life. Let him write whatever BS he is paid for. If he is really in Russia, his rightful place is at Dozhd or Echo Moskvy, where his audience will be even smaller than here. Personally, I don’t read his “comments”, as there is nothing there except hot air.

    • Agree: Kiza, yurivku
  179. AnonFromTN [AKA "Anon"] says:
    @Sergey Krieger

    Anon from TN
    I don’t live in Russia since 1991, so I am not an expert on internal situation. All I know is what I hear from people who live there and have no reason to lie, as far as I can tell. I know that the education system is being degraded. School education was remarkably good in the USSR; the best colleges like Moscow State gave the education that was not worse than what Harvard, Yale, and the like give. However, I always wanted to do and did research, and after graduation from Moscow State I had a feeling that they taught us to swim rather well, but did not put any water into the pool. Medicine is also being degraded, but there is quite a bit left from Soviet times, including some free healthcare (which you never find in the US: here if you come to a doctor, the first question is not what’s ailing you, but what insurance you have, and you are made to pay the part the insurance does not cover before any health-related questions are even asked). The Academy of Sciences was pretty bad in the USSR (I worked at one of their Research Institutes), but it was essentially emasculated and made even worse by recent “reforms”.
    You are right that compared to current oligarchs Soviet elite was modest and honest. But that’s if we compare to pre-1991. Now, if you consider the state of the country left by Yeltsin, Putin did a remarkable job restoring it.

  180. dax says:
    @Anon

    aah, ruffled some feathers did i? so you keep trying to remove yourself from the incredible stupidity of not even understanding a plain english word like “savior”, failing to identify your rough and ready american savior in the 1900s, and completely ignorant that american soldiets have mass murdered during the period you referred to?

    may i know your real name please and what graduate school you came from? we have to know where the american or english white trash like you are coming from.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Anon
  181. Anon[436] • Disclaimer says:
    @dax

    Nope. Just having the limited fun one can have with the uncouth barbarians. It’s your feathers that are ruffled. Now put your money where your mouth is. Let’s have your CV first. Your name, age, occupation, educational qualifications. It seems fair enough for you to go first since you raise the matter.

    • Replies: @dax
  182. Vidi says:

    I notice that China also is on debt binge with debt being 23+ trillion. Not good. China has history of falling apart many times with times of troubles lasting a lot longer than in Russia. Really debt is like decrease.

    China’s debt is more like $4 trillion, which is 25% of GDP. That’s a concern, but not a really serious one yet. Especially since the external part of it is more than matched by China’s foreign assets (several trillion dollars).

    Now the U.S.’s official debt of over 100% of GDP is truly serious. And that is just the Federal US debt; the states and cities are also seriously in hock. (Aren’t Detroit and Chicago on the verge of bankruptcy?)

    As usual, the U.S. is projecting its own fears onto others: if it accuses others of some mistake, you can almost guarantee that the U.S. is doing the same, or worse. As far as debt is concerned, much worse.

  183. Anon[436] • Disclaimer says:
    @dax

    You have a number of problems with English usage. Even “stupidity” is inappropriate to alleged ignorance of the meaning of “savior”. As to what you allege, without any particularisation, about “savior/saviour” I commend a course in Philosophy 101 to you in the hope that it would help you with your problem in understanding the issue. For the issue is one of logic. A person or country doesn’t need a savior if the course of events without a savior is going to be OK. That’s why we don’t take literally the “Oh thank you, my savior comes to the rescue” said by the person in a wheelchair whose car keys have been dropped and only rescued after a few minutes from an awkward place to reach when someone approaches his own car in the next parking bay. Really, don’t pretend you couldn’t grasp the point I was making. If you had to save face you could have said “OK just a little exaggeration: call it a Slavic flourish :-)

    • Replies: @dax
  184. dax says:
    @Anon

    aah the arrogant prick continues to run on, and hide in anonymity. and still cant tell who he is or what school he came from. still cant understand why the author called putin a savior. still cant identify the american savior of the 1900s in his stupid posts.

    a country doesnt need a savior in your esteemed opinion? really now. more stupid opinions to hide facts.

    did you really graduate from grade school?

    you did get one thing right. i am from one of the nameless barbarian gangs on this planet. if you are as brave as your pussy-faced arrogance seems to imply, i am sure you can tell me your real name and school, or if you are too shy, a real email and photo of you.

    as you know, us barbarians got to do what barbarians are supposed to do.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  185. Anonymous[436] • Disclaimer says:
    @dax

    I’m intrigued. Why not you first?

  186. Kiza says:
    @Wizard of Oz

    Hey Wiz, in 1995 and 1996 I worked inside the Australian and US media at a relatively high position. The lies were blatant and obvious, forget about the “factual errors”. It is fascinating to me how a very intelligent English guy, who was my boss and my friend a few years later, used exactly the same justification as you: random/lazy factual errors, not well planned, deliberate and constant lies. BTW, I never worked directly in news which is usually a separate department and I never worked out clearly the source of the lies, but it was obvious that they were coming from the Western intelligence agencies, for Australia the British and the US agencies, but the German ones were leading in Continental Europe.

    There is an interesting story that I was made aware of about the competition between the German BND and CIA, which lasted until CIA won thanks in part to Merkel and effectively subjugated BND to CIA, as things are now. This is why Germany now follows US without fuss and sometimes sacrifices German interests to those of US. During the beginning of the wars in Yugoslavia in 1991, Germany was an independent player destroying Yugoslavis even more actively than US. By around 1997, all of European policies were totally dictated by US. It was Britain and US which finished the job of deposing Milosevic with a color revolution in 2001.

  187. dax says:
    @Anon

    as i said i can find you.

    i cant just imagine my nephew and niece joining the us military to possibly take on russians; and dying for pathetic scumbags like you.

    now i understand why you wont ever need an american savior. you are not worth saving.

    • Replies: @Anon
  188. Kiza says:
    @Andrei Martyanov

    A comment directed at you and Anon from TN. Your stories are exactly what I hear from the highly successful people of my ethnicity living or retiring from US back into their home country. I am talking about people from those who were banking directors at JPM and similar, through those who were involved in Silicon Valley and US MIC, to those who are/were professors at leading US universities. Listening to their stories it is a decline with many explanations, not a single explanation. The money and champaign are still flowing, but slower and slower. It may be that the US universities have declined a little faster than other areas of the former US advantage.

  189. dax says:

    “When you call him the savior you are implying that it couldn’t have happened without him. It isn’t very respectful of the Russian people to suggest that the good things wouldn’t have happened under rough and ready govrrnment like, say, that of America in the late 19th century”

    see idiot, it was the author who called him a saxior, and i agreed with him. so which russian people are you talking about that needs respecting? the 76 percent who voted for putin?

    so when exactly did the rough and ready government of america appear in the 19th century? who were its leaders? so what giod did this rough and ready government produce that equal or exceed those of putin*

    you cant even detail what your stupid posts mean, and its relation to the author’s work.

    “You seem to have a couple of problems. One is to ignore altogether the logic of my point about use of the word ‘savior”.

    You have a number of problems with English usage. Even “stupidity” is inappropriate to alleged ignorance of the meaning of “savior”. As to what you allege, without any particularisation, about “savior/saviour” I commend a course in Philosophy 101 to you in the hope that it would help you with your problem in understanding the issue. For the issue is one of logic. A person or country doesn’t need a savior if the course of events without a savior is going to be OK. That’s why we don’t take literally the “Oh thank you, my savior comes to the rescue” said by the person in a wheelchair whose car keys have been dropped and only rescued after a few minutes from an awkward place to reach when someone approaches his own car in the next parking bay. Really, don’t pretend you couldn’t grasp the point I was making. If you had to save face you could have said “OK just a little exaggeration: call it a Slavic flourish ”

    so, did you address that very limited scope of savior to the author? i understand you want a dictionary, or a philosophy course you aŕe incompetent to teach, of your own for slavic morons like you. so in what way was putin not a savior then based on your dictionary? so now car keys and wheelchairs are required for your vapid defiinition?

    “The other shows gross ignorance or carelessness. I did not refer to a “rough and ready American leader”. If you knew any American history you would understand my reference to the kind of vaguely democratic government America had while it grew and prospered in the years before 1900 – or 1917 or 1929 if you like. Savior leaders were decidedly not a design feature or any feature of it.”

    so what vaguely democratic givernment happened before 1900, 1917 or 1929 that is remotely relevant to putin being a savior?
    was america fighting wars in its territory at that time or, was facing military competitors like the us-nato alliance facing russia today? truly a mega-idiot comparing america of the 1800s and 1900s with the russia of 1990s to 2018 seen by putin? so mega-idiot, why would it require an american savior at those periods you cite when america had no great problems like those faced by putin., and when america was simply killing more people?

    “I’m sure I remember you from when you thought you could walk into a decent university for graduate study and I had to agree to blocking you, not on the ground that I felt loomed rather too large with my colleagues, namely that you were a crude barbarian who would soon wear out his welcome in the Graduate Common Room, but that you would have to do at least a six month course to bring your English language skills up to a passable standard.

    Don’t feel too bad about it though. There are even higher standards and I recall an American Rhodes Scholar friend who had to do a special English course in London before coming up.”

    har har har! of course i never encountered a mega-idiot like you! i did step on some dog shit that sounds like your vocalized opinions while studying in the netherlands and germany for a master’s course. or was it in london, brussels, prague or viennqwhen i was travelling for pleasure that i stepped on your face?

    go to sleep anon turd. your brain keeps shrinking with each post.

  190. Anon[436] • Disclaimer says:
    @dax

    I think you have achieved a first for UR. The thugs’ threat “we know where you live”!!

    A pity that you have compounded the problems of credibility inherent in your version of English prose writing by supposing that I am American and living in America, which is not true.

  191. dax says:

    hey anon slavic mega-idiot, chexk out the recent news in the philippines fot you.

    yes, the same country that needed a savior when the “vaguely denocratic” american government snatched the philippine colony from spain, and killed several hundred thouaand civilians and freedom fighters. yes, killing and looting of the philippines during the period you mentioned.

    president duterte, the same leader who was honest enough called the non-savior obama a son of a bitch, and whose Democratic Party influence peddlers wanted in vengeance to convict him of crimes against humanity in the ICC in the hague, and the UN commiasion on human rights, got record highs in a recent survey.

    94 % of filipinos said they were happy in their livea today. 8 out of 10 said they trust duterte and approved his performance. there goes the asian putin.

    and now anon mega-idiot turd, sitting at ringside in america, a nation you said need no savior, watch what happens around you.

    • Replies: @Anon
  192. @Kiza

    There seems to be plenty of evidence from the last 150 years plus or minus X that insiders in government and in police and intelligence, not to mention some of the very rich or big corporations, have been able to plant lies or biased versions of stories for their own good reasons. But, even amid the paranoia which one needs to be wary of on UR threads, who really needs evidence? Human nature is enough to guarantee the trading of favours with most of the lies probably falling into the category of the omitted truth, the journalist’s failure typically being a failure to ask a critical question or to suggest the true degree of uncertainty he should have noted.

    I have in the family senior TV news and documentary producers for ABC, BBC and independent TV and journalists up to broadsheet (as was) foreign affairs editors and, given that voting for Margaret Thatcher once ot twice was just an aberration amongst them and fashionable London prejudices have been typical, I don’t for a moment think I would have failed to hear scandalised objection to any obvious attempts to foist lies on them.

    Mind you there are all sorts of odd “cultural” factors and prejudices, changing over the years, that one should pay attention to in forming a properly nuanced view. I was reminded of this as applied to a fair range of English snobs (but it could be wannabe upwardly mobile lackeys anywhere) when I read a NY Review of Books review of a biography of Lord (Kenneth) Clark who had just about got hold of Calouste Gulbenkian’s marvellous collections for the National Gallery when he resigned as Director and was replaced by a man who refused to meet Gulbenkian! (Oh dear, it might have been worse for the new man. It could have been a rich Australuan of convict ancestry who, disconcertingly, was Fellow of an Oxford College!). Think how the odd world of Englush class facilitated the exploits of the Cambridge spies. I am sure none of them would have had a problem planting stuff with media mates.

    • Replies: @Kiza
  193. Anon[436] • Disclaimer says:
    @dax

    If you are not actually mad youmust be a troll – except for one missing element. A person trolling for some purpose normally has a cause or political, national, religious or ethnic group he is seeking to discredit by his apparent support or opposition to its supposed enemies. But who could you possibly be discrediting but yourself? If it is Russians you have in your sights you have overdone it.

  194. @Kiza

    You cannot hope
    To bribe or twist,
    Thank God, the
    British journalist

    But seeing what
    The man will do
    Unbribed, there’s
    No occasion to

    Humbert Wolfe 1930

    • Replies: @Kiza
  195. dax says:

    for anon who cant understand anything:

    the value of a leader is whether he can do the best under the circumstances facing him or her. it was never about a russian, american, chinese or whatever nationalities are involved.

    putin did as good as it can get for his government and economy. duterte and set of circumstances, despite a completely different style, did the same for his country.

    american and english leaders lately have done as bad as can be. some leaders got a consistent grade of A+, others cant bring down the wall at C. none of the present us-nato government leaders come anywhere near what a savior is supposed to be.

    the serious, as in critically serious, situation is that leaders and government are really nothing more than dogs based on the legal framework of delegation of powers of the people. neighbors like friendly dogs, but warn owners – the people — if their dogs-government uncontrollably bark, bite or ruin manicured gardens.

    if the dog owners cant or wont discipline their dogs, natural justice demands that strong disciplinary or police action must be imposed on the owners and not just the dogs.

    in the real world, unfortunately, that’s when the nuke missiles and torpedoes become the policing force. an alternate image would be pulling the pin of a grenade out and in repeatedly to scare the neighbors. eventually a really bad explosion will happen. and you know who needs to be blamed.

    as i mentioned earlier, now is a good time to prepare for nuclear winters.

  196. Kiza says:
    @Wizard of Oz

    Mind you there are all sorts of odd “cultural” factors and prejudices, changing over the years, that one should pay attention to in forming a properly nuanced view.

    Finally, you are onto something, you should only have added Group Think to prejudices and you would have been quite close. Did you imagine before that I was saying that spies run around media organisations, telling everybody what to write and say?

    It is a long story how the Western media work, but in the shortest the media producers are the most avid media consumers. Therefore, it is much easier to form prejudices and group think among media people than in general population. On top of this are the control mechanisms of organisational hierarchy and money. Thus the media people compete who is going to pronounce prejudices and accusations more fervently, they actually turn weasel words of politicians into certainties and extremes. Also, as Vojkan describes, one of the most powerful techniques is filtering by editors. If your information product is filtered out, as a media person you get neither fame nor fortune, nor political career. And so on, it is a fairly efficient mechanism of lies always for someone’s interest.

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
  197. The man who lost Georgia, Ukraine and Moldova.

    The man who has just given NATO permission to move into Eastern Europe (which despite the ravings of Russian security analyst s hasn’t happened yet. The Baltic’s in particular are going to be an armed camp.

    The man who launched an unfundable military expansion which will impoverish the increasingly ageing population.

    The man who turned nascent partnerships with the EU and NATO into confrontation and a cool war.

    As I type Parliament is proposing to send significant money to reconstruct Ukraine.

    The man whose territorial claims echo those of interwar Germany – reclaiming lost empire, gathering in of the German/Russian people.

    And the Zapad exercises end in nuclear strikes.

  198. @Kiza

    Credit where due: I don’t disagree with a word you wrote.

    Indeed it is worth pointing out that producers and consumers in media have a big overlap. Some is very up front like Oz Cut & Paste or Gerard Henderson in Oz, ABC Media Watch or any morning radio talk back re newspaers online or in print.

    I’ve put you on my UR (very) shortlist now for having something you write about knowledgeably from first hand observation – as long as you eschew overstatement :-)

    • LOL: Kiza
  199. Anon from TN
    The decline in the US science is palpable. Pentagon spends in less than three weeks what NIH gets for the whole year. “Increases” in NIH budget do not keep up with inflation. Just by walking in the hallway in my University you can see that: you meet half as many people as you used to 15 years ago. The Congress does all it can to kill the US science, probably because science does not generate kickbacks and campaign donations, unlike “defense” spending. The US does not have cheap workforce to lure business or enough natural resources to support its population. Science and high-tech are the only things that can ensure a reasonably bright future of the country. However, neither the elites in their blinding greed nor bought and paid for “elected officials” see that. So, the US is in the process of committing suicide. It would take a decade or two, but I am afraid it’s no longer reversible. EU Europe is likely to go down with the US, or maybe even before the US. Twenty years ago telling a Chinese post-doc that you will send him/her back to China was perceived as a serious threat. Now they are coming back voluntarily in droves, and China is even actively luring non-Chinese scientists. They realized that what they have in natural sciences is defective: their cultural thing is to please the boss, rather than find out the truth, pretty much like in the US “political science” (a contradiction in terms, if there ever was one). China is fixing it, aided by the declining research funding in the US. Russia would have the resources for this kind of policy only if it curbed its oligarchs. This does not seem to be in the cards. So, this century is going to be a Chinese century, whether we like it or not. Unless the US Empire starts WWIII and we all perish in its death throes.

    • Replies: @Vidi
  200. @Philip Owen

    If your Parliament is going to fund Ukraine, it is even dumber than it appears. That black hole can swallow any amount of money: there are enough thieves in Ukraine for that.
    As to “unfundable military expansion”, it would have been unfundable if the corruption in the Russian MIC matched that in the US MIC. However, Russia never produced an $8 billion ship like Zumwalt to see its engine break during the very first voyage, in Panama channel, of all places. Yes, Russian system is corrupt, but compared to the Pentagon contractors Russian thieves are paragons of honesty.
    As to “lost Georgia, Ukraine, and Moldova”, check your facts. Georgia now is so eager to attract Russian tourists that it does not require a visa, even though technically Russia and Georgia do not have diplomatic relations. Ukraine is even more off the mark: say, if I lose my finger, it might inconvenience me, but my finger’s loss would certainly be a lot greater than mine.
    The phrase “partnership with NATO and EU” is a good one for the stand-up comedy. The US (NATO and EU are no more than a bunch of US vassals) understands only one thing, brute force, and that’s exactly what Putin is showing (unlike drunk traitor Yeltsin, who the US loved, willingly overlooking his illegal coup in 1993, stolen elections in 1996, and genocidal war in Chechnya).
    NATO troops in vaudeville states like Baltics may look impressive to naïve locals, but Russians know their history. Once in a hundred years Europe unites, makes war on Russia, get beaten to pulp, and then licks its wounds and whines for a century. In the nineteenth century there was Napoleon, in the twentieth – Hitler, in the twenty first – NATO? As the Russian saying puts it, go scare a hedgehog with a naked ass.

  201. Vidi says:
    @Philip Owen

    The man who lost Georgia, Ukraine and Moldova.

    That is very debatable, and just means that the West is not totally dead yet. It also means Putin isn’t perfect, but then who is?

    The man who launched an unfundable military expansion which will impoverish the increasingly ageing population.

    No doubt China will find some way to sustain Russia’s military industry. That was what happened in the 1990s, when the Russian economy was in ruins: China kept its neighbor’s military manufacturers going by buying lots of weapons. Doing it again will be much easier, as Russia is far healthier this time, thanks to Putin.

    However, the U.S. can’t afford another arms race, not when it’s so nearly broke that it can’t fix its bridges.

    As usual, one can tell what the Neocons fear the most by what they claim are the greatest weaknesses of others.

  202. Vidi says:
    @AnonFromTN

    The Congress does all it can to kill the US science, probably because science does not generate kickbacks and campaign donations, unlike “defense” spending.

    I’ve been thinking about this for a while. What you say (corruption) is probably true, but may not be the major reason for the decay of science and engineering in the U.S.

    My thinking (and I have no evidence for this, so I could be wrong) is that the social troubles in the 1960s caused the U.S. elites to do something drastic. They probably noticed that most of the disturbances originated on the university campuses. But rather than address the underlying problems, the elites decided to curb the upstart college population.

    By drastically raising the cost of tuition, the elites ensured that the most deplorable and troublesome elements (from the much despised lower classes, of course) could not afford to attend university — and kept those who did make it chained to a lifetime of debt slavery, and therefore kept them harmless.

    The policy of high tuition costs has clearly succeeded in keeping the campuses quiet. The drastic reduction in the output of scientific and engineering talent is a major problem, but perhaps the elites think that this is a price worth paying.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
    , @foolisholdman
  203. Avery says:
    @Philip Owen

    The Man who stopped the looting and destruction of Russia at the hands of foreign interests who were operating freely and stealing everything in Russia they could get hands on. When the gangsters first didn’t get the message, the Man sent one thief (Khodorovsky) to a Siberian jail. They got the message and most fled to Tel Aviv or London.

    The Man who raised Russia’s PPP from $14,000 under Yeltsin to $24,000 today.

    The Man who, with a lot of help from loyal Chechens, eradicated the Islamofascist Wahhbist infestation of Southern Russia.

    The Man who slapped CIA agent and nutjob and traitor Misha Sh_tsvili and liberated South Ossetia. Disgraced Sh_tsvili is a disease: nobody wants him. Even his Ukrainian pimps don’t want the whore in their country. And all thanks to the Man, who sent the Russia military to throw out Misha’s invading army – trained and equipped by US&Israel – and scattered them in all of 5 days.

    The Man who saved Crimea from impending theft by NATONazis and the theft of the heroic City of Sevastopol.

    The Man under whose leadership Russian military recovered from irrelevancy and became a potent force that could reach out and punch at great distances from Russia’s borders. The superbly trained force appeared out of nowhere and was everywhere in Crimea within hours, while NATO was trying to figure out or detect what the Man was going to do there to prevent NATO from stealing it. (…they were hoping that while the Man diddled with indecision, they would move in and present him with fait accompli.)

    The Man who saved Syria from the faith of Iraq and Libya and saved the lives of 10s of 1,000s of Christians of Syria who would be massacred by ISIS throatcutters (armed and equipped by US, UK, France, KSA,…….) if Syria fell to them.

    The Man under whose leadership Russia absorbed the oil-price shock engineered by US & KSA; absorbed the EU embargo; absorbed the US organized assault on the Ruble. Russia recovered from those shocks and is moving forward.
    ………..

  204. Vojkan says:
    @Philip Owen

    And how exactly did he lose Georgia, Ukraine and Moldova? Before losing, you must have, so when has he actually had Georgia, Ukraine and Moldova?

    And don’t you think that “the man who has just given NATO permission to move into Eastern Europe” and “the man who turned nascent partnerships with the EU and NATO into confrontation” make you sound a tad schizophrenic?

    And what territorial claims?

    But then, I suppose you’re British, the people who make Jewish chutzpah look as kindergarten play.

    • Replies: @Seraphim
    , @yurivku
  205. @Philip Owen

    “As I type Parliament is proposing to send significant money to reconstruct Ukraine.”

    Oh, you mean that your Parliament is hoping to send money that they don’t have in order to pay some new group of frauds that will impose the will of outside warmongers. There will be no reconstruction done with any money sent, you can bet on that. Is there any consideration at all of what effect that would have on the poor, common people of Ukraine?

    Shills like you deserve to be beaten in the streets.

  206. @Vidi

    Well, that’s yet another aspect I didn’t even touch upon. High tuition certainly culled the pool of undergrads, eliminating those the elites don’t want to see on campus. I am sure that this limited the pool of talent available to grad schools. Besides, kids from more affluent backgrounds are likely to go into law, business, or medicine, where you can get a lot of money, rather than into research where you are never paid as much. However, the research in the US is done by foreigners (at least 50% of faculty in good Universities, more than 80% post-docs, and many grad students (we have ~20%, but we are unusual, as we have a lot of training grant slots that foreigners are not eligible for).
    The research is stifled via a different mechanism: low funding. This acts in two ways: first, it reduces the number of active labs, and second, funding even an outstanding grant proposal becomes iffy, which discourages grad students from pursuing a research career. In year one of grad school the majority wants to go into academia, while by the end of 4-6 years it takes to get your PhD, barely a fifth still wants it, whereas the majority chooses industry, patent law, teaching, publishing, government, etc. The US is still the best place to do research, but 3-5 more years of current policies will change that irreversibly.

    • Replies: @Kiza
  207. Kiza says:
    @AnonFromTN

    Of course, both reasons appear correct. Personally, I left science because I realised that it was stuffed and turned to other areas of endeavour. It may be wrong for the nation to stuff up science and academia, but as individuals we have to adjust. As mentioned before, the decline is not only in universities then in most areas of the finance and economy.

    The funniest is how US projects most of its own ills onto China – there is an endless stream of articles about how unsound the Chinese finances are. This is partially true because finance is in a large part crookery, but the Chinese crookery has still a very long way to go before it eats out all the internal organs of the national economy as the US finance has. In other words, if the US finance article writers were applying the same criteria to US finance as they do to Chinese finance, there would be no banker out of jail in US. Ron Unz also likes to laugh and those “China is doomed” self-projecting articles.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  208. @Kiza

    I suspect that “China is doomed” and “Russia is doomed” are the mantras of the doomed Empire precisely because it is doomed. I think Dr. Sigmund Freud had a theory to back me up.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  209. @Twodees Partain

    I’d like to see everyone, on camera, present a US Citizen blue passport or an original birth certificate to prove US citizenship before being allowed to vote.

  210. @Beefcake the Mighty

    Great points, BtM. But there probably won’t be much of a Germany to ally with in 25 years.

    The native-german population has a median age of 47, one of the highest in the world. Even aging societies like France (41.4)and Russia (39.6) are way better off in that regard. For comparison, the USA is 38.8 and the world median age is 30.4.

    The native-German population is already slowly declining, and the decline is set to accelerate as the next generation has far fewer German women of childbearing age.

    200,000-plus new Muslim and African colonists settle in Germany each year, plus whoever is allowed in as family reunification,

    and the Muslim population of Germany already increases by nearly 80,000 annually from natural growth (births in excess of deaths, i.e. not counting immigration).

    Russia will be dealing with a Muslim-dominated “Germany” where more people speak Arabic or Turkish than English, Russian, or French. Native Germans will be gravely unsafe everywhere, including in their own homes and merely going from their homes to their schools, offices, and factories. Presumably Muslims will be shrewd enough to get more of their ilk into the german military, as well.

    Oh the other hand, how well would a much poorer, older, more Balkanized, violent, unstable Germany be able to resist a Russian (or Turkish) conventional invasion. They don’t have nuclear weapons, and their Air Force and navy are weak, small, and underfunded. When it comes to resisting occupation, the Germans don’t even have widespread meaningful firearm ownership by civilians.

    Worst of all, Germany will have too few loyal young men of their own race & culture to fill its military ranks. Guess who will be let in to the “German” armed forces to meet the numbers?

    If Russia can get its own native population and fertility further turned around, and deal with its own Muslim Fifth Column, it may find German and other european territory to be easy takings soon enough. Wouldn’t Russia like to have its final revenge on Germany, expand Russian Territory, and build a wider land buffer between Russia and the world?

  211. @AnonFromTN

    You’re right. That’s big-screen projecting right there.

  212. Seraphim says:
    @Vojkan

    For a characterization of Brits and their views on Russia (and of Russians on them):

    “For most Russians, mention of Britain causes a derisory sniff and its people a sneer of disapproval, considered as they are barbarians, uncultured and unable even to speak or write their own language properly, curled up giggling on the sofa at the mention of farts, which today seems to be a national obsession, traveling around in trains knee-deep in filth, boarding them at railway stations which look as though the residents of every pigsty in the vicinity has been let loose after a triple dose of laxatives and peering through murky windows with such expressions of wisdom as “Sarah shits”, and by the smell emanating from the sea of litter on the floor, it appears that Sarah does indeed. And has. They do not bother to learn foreign languages as a rule, mainly because they cannot get through their heads that not everyone likes greasy fish and chips or luke warm beer and because they are too damned arrogant and shit-headed to even try.
    But this is not a true picture of what Britain is or the British are. There are also quite a few Russians who like England and the English and who find the Scots quaint, the Welsh interesting and the Irish, sexy. Yeah, I know… This is because there is a veneer in England which covers the stench which I described above and it is this veneer that Russians like…
    These Russians enjoy drinking tea properly at Harrod’s, stirring it evenly in circles rather than making a dreadful noise clanking the spoon against the cup and shaking it dry rather than tapping it against the sides, then sipping the liquid slowly rather than slurping it like a pig. They appreciate the controlled idiocy of the game of cricket, with a manic bowling movement, legs thrashing around and arms flailing in a short run-up to the delivery of the ball and they chortle affectionately at the spectators, wheeled out of the eighteenth century with white moustaches, blazers, and standing at gravity-defying angles with glasses of Gin and It in their hands, talking about Nyasaland and Malaya and other former colonial outposts and custard apples and mango plantations and sugar cane.
    So long as the veneer holds, these more visible Englishmen and women are the ambassadors for their country and they present a positive external image. Just occasionally, the sun shines in England, the veneer chaps and all Hell breaks loose. The entire country descends into utter idiocy, people who are usually polite and civilized become rude and churlish, always xenophobic and principally, Russophobic”.

    Timothy Bancroft-Hinchey,Pravda.ru @ttps://russia-insider.com/en/englands-contagious-russophobia/ri22886

    Timothy [email protected]://russia-insider.com/en/englands-contagious-russophobia/ri22886

    • Replies: @Vojkan
  213. Dave 2 says:

    You missed some key information for why the US is not a democracy:

    In the US, the popular vote doesn’t award the presidency – the electoral college does.

    In the US there are term limits on head of government – but no Western democracy has them.

    Democracy means ‘rule by the will of the people’, and the US president typically has very low public support; Russia’s leadership has had very large public support for years and years – therefore, Russia, being a greater instance of ‘rule by the will of the people’ than the US, is also a greater instance of democracy than the US.

  214. Gavrick says:
    @KA

    And far too many Ukrainian West-looking Liberals would be willing to sell their sisters into prostitution for the right to relocate to the West.

    But hey, at least they’re great singers.

  215. yurivku says:
    @Vojkan

    But then, I suppose you’re British, the people who make Jewish chutzpah look as kindergarten play.

    People who being ruled by may, johnson and williamson. Do I add something to that?
    Land of stupid assholes and Skripals lovers.

    • Replies: @Vojkan
  216. @Johnny Rico

    It’s really funny to see you snuggling up to a fellow shill like this RN character. You two should toddle off and get a room before someone turns the hose on you.

  217. Yevardian says:
    @Sergey Krieger

    The notion of East-Asians being potential torch-carriers for civilisation if the West fails has to be one of the most false popular misconceptions of this age. Perhaps it terms of standardised tests and other measures of crystallised intelligence they may be slightly ahead of Europe, but even that can put mostly to the pitiful state of Western education systems and standards of discipline today. With a partial exception of the Japanese, they’re nothing more (outstanding individuals aside) than extremely conscientious, single-minded, rote-learning worker drones or ant people.
    China is heir to a more-or-less continuous civilisation thousands of years older than modern Europe, yet they have extremely little to show for it.

    As for Cluj-Napoca or Parnu being comparable to Russian provincial towns, that’s a rather dubious claim. I haven’t visited the latter in a while, but still. I usually incline to Martyanov’s side on the recurring comment wars he gets into, but not here.

  218. @Sergey Krieger

    And yet, after Soviet direct help, this transfer of technologies and knowhow after some 60 + years of effort Chinese still lag. They are smart people so it is strange.

    They are smart people do doubt, but look where they started from in 1949! I think it is simply astonishing that they have overcome the obstacles that were put in their way and made the progress they have. They are advancing quicker all the time too. They are, after all, people not supermen.

  219. @Vidi

    Might it be that almost all of the US/UK elite have no education in the hard sciences? That, in other words they do not understand what science is about and hence do not understand how crucially important it is?

  220. Vojkan says:
    @yurivku

    I never understood traitors, hated by those they betray, despised by those for whom they betray. No one has qualms when disposing of them, for when they outlive their usefulness, they become dispensable to all parties.
    Those who have once proven disloyal cannot expect to be rewarded with loyalty. It appears that the only usefulness Skripal had left was to serve as a mean to accuse Russia.

  221. Vojkan says:
    @Seraphim

    To some people, appearances matter more than substance. It is an affliction many post-communist Slavs seem to suffer from. Never mind that under the veneer lies a rotten soul. The fascination for luxury overwhelms the stench rising from beneath. When the end justifies the means, anything goes.
    I have been told by a well-informed and disgusted Frenchman, after witnessing myself an attempt at planting paedophile content on a good friend’s computer, that the secret services of the USA, the UK, and Israel had it as a common practice with regards to recalcitrant persons of interest. That means that they actually maintain databases of such content.
    If that goes then really anything goes and no evil they do can surprise me. Explaining it to our spurned lovers of everything Anglo-Zionist is a different matter though.
    PS: I do enjoy Shakespeare or British TV crime series, their reality obviously is more inspiring than ours when it comes to stage murder plots.

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