The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 David William Pear Archive
The US-Led Genocide and Destruction of Yemen
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>
Photo:  WhatsuPic, “Expanded War, Hunger, Disease, Death in Yemen. No Big Deal to US”.
Photo: WhatsuPic, “Expanded War, Hunger, Disease, Death in Yemen. No Big Deal to US”.

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

“Only God can save our children”, say Yemeni fathers and mothers as they can do nothing but watch their children die, try to comfort them in their final agonizing hours, and pray for God to spare them from death. The fathers and mothers watch and pray, as one by another their children die from cholera, dehydration and starvation.

Where is God? He cannot get through the total US blockade of Yemen to save the children. A cholera epidemic is a man-made disaster. Since 2015 the cholera epidemic has been spread by biological warfare against Yemen. US bombs dropped by Saudi pilots destroyed Yemen’s public water and sewage systems. The parts, chemicals and fuel to operate Yemen’s water purification and sewage plants are blockaded. Potable water, cholera vaccine, and even individual water purification tablets cannot get in. The resulting cholera epidemic was predictable.

Photo from Bln Ghaleb’s in Stop the War on Yemen Group
Photo from Bln Ghaleb’s in Stop the War on Yemen Group

The sewage from non-working treatment plants overflows into streams that run onto agricultural land, thus contaminating vegetables before they go to market. Sewage flows into the cities, residential areas and the refugee camps. Flies swarm over the sewage and spread cholera everywhere. The International Committee of the Red Cross, the Red Crescent, and Doctors Without Borders; hospitals, clinics and disaster relief organizations, and human rights workers have been deliberately bombed.

The US dominated United Nations adds a fig leaf of legality to the blockade, and a one-sided weapons embargo against Yemen. To ask why there is no UN arms embargo against Saudi Arabia is, of course, a rhetorical question.

The UN wrings its hands about a humanitarian crisis, and the worst cholera epidemic in human history. The UN does nothing to stop the US-led Saudi genocide and destruction of Yemen, and it puts out knowingly phony underreported numbers of the civilian deaths.

The former US ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley threw a temper tantrum when the UN dared to even voice mild criticism against the US, when it moved its embassy to Jerusalem. She spoke of the UN “disrespecting” the US, and she threatened financial retaliation against the UN and countries that voted contrary to US wishes. The UN is not an honest broker, because it is dominated and fears the US displeasure.

President Donald Trump cut funding to humanitarian UN agencies, did not try to stop Israel from gunning down thousands of unarmed Palestinians, withdrew the US from the UN Human Rights Council, and thumbed his nose at the UN International Court of Justice. Trump’s national security adviser John Bolton said that the US plans on withdrawing from more treaties that are the foundation of international law.

In other words, Bolton is confirming that the US is a rouge state; it makes a mockery of the United Nations. From the beginning of the Bush-era War on Terror, the US showed contempt for the Geneva Conventions. Obama too violated customary international law with impunity. Obama assassinated US citizens, droned Afghan wedding parties and funerals, and destroyed Libya. He invaded Syria in an illegal war of aggression. Obama was really good at killing. He allegedly said so himself.

Purposely causing a cholera epidemic is biological warfare. Yemen is not an unprecedented case of US use of biological-chemical warfare. During the 1950’s Korean War the US was accused convincingly of biological warfare. In the Vietnam-American War the US sprayed millions of gallons of Agent Orange, which poisoned the soil, rivers and people. Agent Orange, 50 years later is still “causing miscarriages, skin diseases, cancers, birth defects, and congenital malformations”.

The US contaminated Bosnia, Afghanistan, and the Middle East with so-called depleted uranium. Depleted uranium can cause cancer, birth defects, and as yet other unknown health effects. The US knows it. It has put out a health warning to US Iraq war veterans.

In 1995, Madeleine Albright was interview by Lesley Stahl on the TV show “60 Minutes”. That interview should live in infamy in a hall of shame for eternity. Stahl asked Albright if the death of over 500,000 Iraqi children caused by US sanctions was “worth it”. Albright’s answer was, “I think this is a very hard choice, but the price–we think the price is worth it.” (Whoever the “we” is, Albright did not elaborate.) It is now known that “we” purposely used biological warfare to kill those 500,000 Iraqi children.

How many more children did Albright, the Bill Clinton administration and “we” continue to kill because “we” thought it was “worth it”? Hundreds of thousands, according to a study of the partially declassified Defense Intelligence Agency document “IRAQ WATER TREATMMENT VULNERABILITIES” [emphasis in original]. The partially declassified document was discovered in 1998 on an official website of the Military Health System. In 2001 the Association of Genocide Scholars released the study referred to above: The Role of “Iraq Water Treatment Vulnerabilities” in Halting One Genocide and Preventing Others.

During the 1991 First Gulf War the US purposely targeted all of the water purification plants and sanitation works in Iraq, which is itself a war crime. The “Iraq Water Treatment Vulnerabilities” document produced by the US Department of Defense and implemented in1991, was continued under President Bill Clinton. Even after Albright’s admission on “60 Minutes” that the US sanctions regime had killed 500,000 Iraqi children, “we” continued the draconian embargo of water purification equipment.

The Department of Defense and Madeleine Albright’s “we” knew that without potable water that the rate of waterborne diseases, such as cholera, would sicken and kill hundreds of thousands of Iraqis. Depriving an entire population of the essentials of life is genocide, and it is a violation of the Geneva Conventions. Degrading of the water supply to knowingly cause epidemics, such as cholera, is biological warfare.

Economic sanctions and trade embargos are barbaric siege warfare against civilian populations. There is no way to pretty them up as surgically targeting a regime or being humanitarian. Now think about the millions of people of Cuba, Iran, Venezuela, Syria, Burma and, Côte d’Ivoire that are suffering under a US embargo today.

The “Iraq Water Treatment Vulnerabilities” document reveals the diabolical intention of a sanctions regime, even when authorized by the UN. It is for these and other reasons that The International Committee of the Red Cross has often raised concerns , including concerns about UN authorized sanctions regimes. Not even the UN has the authority to violate the Geneva Conventions, and the UN oversteps its authority when it does so.

The US has also overstepped the UN’s authorization by imposing a total blockade of Yemen. Just as predictably as in Iraq, children are dying in Yemen from cholera. Tens of thousands of civilians have died from starvation, disease and the lack of medicine. Twenty million human beings are starving to death in a famine caused by the US, and its proxy, the so-called Saudi coalition.

For three years, starting with the Obama administration the US has been passing Saudi Arabia the bombs, ammunition, fuel, and most importantly it is the US military at the command and control center of the war on Yemen. Other war-profiteering countries, such as the UK, EU countries, and Canada have their hands dripping with the blood and cholera infected feces of Yemeni children, too.

Photo: Nora Al-Alwaki, an American citizen killed by Navy SEALs when they raided her Yemeni village on January 29, 2017
Photo: Nora Al-Alwaki, an American citizen killed by Navy SEALs when they raided her Yemeni village on January 29, 2017

US Special Forces, Seal Team 6, and the CIA carry out night raids and assignations, such as the one that killed 8 year old Nora, pictured above. She was an American citizen who lived with her grandparents in a Yemeni village.

Nora was the daughter of Anwar al-Awlaki, who was the first known American citizen to be executed by the US without due process. A week later his 16 year old son, Abdulrahman al-Awlaki was assassinated by a US drone. Barack Obama carried out those killings in 2011.

It was also Obama that planned the raid in which Nora was killed on Trump’s orders, January 29, 2017. When Obama’s press secretary Robert Gibb was asked why 16 year old Abdurahman was killed, his answer was that his crime was that he “should have had a more responsible father”. Was that Nora’s “crime” too?

The war against Yemen is another dirty war just like Iraq, Libya and Syria. It is an ‘all but in name’ a US genocide-scale slaughter of civilians and the destruction of a country. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and its so-called coalition are the US proxy that pays for the bombs and drops them. It is the US that picks out the targets, back at the command and control center.

Most of the ground fighting inside Yemen is caused by an invasion of US, Saudi and UAE sponsored Salafists terrorists, mujahideen, al-Qaeda, Muslim Brotherhood, and Blackwater (rebranded Academi) US, Somalia and South American mercenaries. Saudi-backed terrorists are attacking in the north, while UAE-backed terrorist attack in the south. Saudi-backed terrorists are fighting UAE terrorists. Saudi Arabia has put a blockade on Qatar, in a squabble over Yemen.

The de facto government of Yemen is the leadership of the Houthi Movement, named after its charismatic founder Hussein Badreddin al-Houthi. The Houthi Movement is backed by Yemen’s military units, security forces and a broad base of the Yemeni people, including many Sunnis. That is not to say that Yemenis do not have many differences. They do, but when their common self-interests are at stake, they do come together, despite their differences.

There are some internal groups opposed to the Houthi Movement and they are collaborating with the Saudi and UAE terrorist groups, but this is not a Sunni vs. Shia war. Nor is the war a proxy war between Saudi Arabia and Iran, as the corporate mainstream media monopoly would have the US public believe.

The Zaydi Shia that makes up about 42% of Yemen’s population is closer to Sunni Islam than they are to the Shia branch of Islam in Iran. The Zaidi-led Houthi Movement “have not called for restoring the imamate in Yemen, and religious grievances have not been a major factor in the war”, according to Al Jazeera. Rather, the Houthi Movement has been primarily economic, political and regional in nature.

There is a separatist movement in what was once South Yemen, which until 1990 was a separate communist country: The Democratic Republic of Yemen. Before unification North Yemen was the Yemen Arab Republic. In the power struggle that followed unification the south lost power and patronage. The UAE is backing a southern separatist group, the Southern Transitional Council, which also opposes Hadi and Saudi Arabia. As mentioned, Saudi backed terrorists are fighting UAE-backed terrorists.

The US, KSA and the UN try to pass off the “internationally recognized legitimate government of Yemen” as if it were Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi. Hadi was the president of an interim government of Yemen from 2012 to 2014. Hadi fraudulently overstayed his term when it expired in 2014.

Hadi was forcefully removed from office by the Houthi Movement, and a broad base uprising of the Yemeni people. Hadi resigned his office and fled to Saudi Arabia. The US, KSA and the UN use Hadi as a figurehead to add a fig leaf of legality to the illegal US-led war of aggression against Yemen.

Photo: Press TV, US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley briefs the media in front of remains of what is said to be a Yemeni missile’
Photo: Press TV, US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley briefs the media in front of remains of what is said to be a Yemeni missile’

There is little if any evidence that Iran is providing the Houthi Movement with weapons, materials or fighters. Look at the map. How would Iran be able to get massive supplies of weapons past the total US blockade, even if it wanted to. Iran has its hands full with its (legal) support of its ally Syria. Iran is struggling with its own economic crisis caused by the illegal US economic sanctions regime, re-imposed by the Trump administration.

When the US was pressed for hard evidence to back up its allegations that Iran was involved in Yemen, the best that the former UN ambassador Nikki Haley could do was come up with a few missile parts. The UN dismissed Haley’s show as having “no evidence as to the identity of the broker or supplier.” Iran has denied involvement in Yemen, and rejected the US’s claims as unfounded, and Iran further added:

“These accusations seek also to cover up for the Saudi war crimes in Yemen, with the US complicity, and divert attention from the stalemate war of aggression against the Yemenis.”

Yemenis, regardless of religion, region or tribe are fiercely nationalistic, and they are nobody’s puppet. They resent attempts by foreign invaders to dominate them. Yemen, like Afghanistan, is a graveyard where empires come to die. The British and the Egyptians learned it in the 1960’s and now the Saudis and the UAE are leaning it the hard way.

The US is like a zombie empire that never dies in an empire graveyard. Instead when faced with humiliation and defeat, the US totally destroys its antagonist from the air, as it did Iraq, Libya and Syria. The US shows no mercy for the civilian population. The US destroys civilian infrastructure, blockades food, water and medicine. It targets the people with cluster bombs and white phosphorus; and the US poisons their water, soil and air with biological, chemical and radioactive weapons.

Photo: Minn Post, “Secretary of State Hillary Clinton with Libyan soldiers upon her departure from Tripoli in Libya on October 18, 2011
Photo: Minn Post, “Secretary of State Hillary Clinton with Libyan soldiers upon her departure from Tripoli in Libya on October 18, 2011

As with Iraq, Libya, and Syria and with so many other small countries that the US declared to be its enemy, Yemen poses no threat to the US national security. So why does the US destroy small countries, and why is the US destroying Yemen?

In the 1990’s with the collapse of the USSR, the US set out to build an empire to dominate the world, and it made no secret of it. The US plan for world domination has gone by different names, such as the Wolfowitz Doctrine, the Project for a New American Century (PNAC), Full Spectrum Dominance, the Indispensable Nation, American Exceptionalism, New World Order, and more subtly the role of US World Leadership.

Whatever name US world domination goes by, it is all the same. The US considers itself above international law, customary moral behavior and believes it alone has the right to pursue whatever it thinks is in its self-interest politically, militarily and financially. If the US were a person, it would be diagnosed as a psychopath, with no conscience, no empathy, and no remorse; aggressive, narcissistic and a serial mass murderer.

Yemen is often scripted by the corporate-government mainstream media as “the poorest country in the Middle East”, as if it has no wealth that anybody could possibly want. The people of Yemen are poor, but Yemen has oil, pipeline routes, gold, minerals, agriculture, fishing, state owned enterprises, desirable real estate, finance, and its geography gives Yemen great potential for tourism.

Yemen’s 30 million people are both a potential source of cheap labor and a potential market for the products of US global corporations. Yemen is strategically located at the Bab-el-Mandeb strait, through which 1.4 billion barrels of oil pass every day. For millennium Yemen was a center for trade.

The US covets Yemen’s wealth and its strategic location as part of the neoliberal New World Order. The US vision of the New World Order is a world dominated by US global corporations, US financial institutions and wealthy US family dynasties.

US foreign policy is shaped by special interests, monopolies and their political action committees (PACS), such as those of weapons manufacturers, financial institutions, pharmaceutical companies, and agri-business. Foreign countries such as Israel and Saudi Arabia also have powerful lobbies that can manipulate US foreign policy to their advantage. US foreign policy has little to do with the interests of the average US citizen.

Yemen is the southern neighbor to the KSA, and the Saudis want a corrupt, compliant and passive government in Yemen. The KSA has expanded its border to encroach on Yemen’s northern borderlands, which is the birthplace of the Houthi Movement. The Saudi dynasty also fears an independent Yemeni people that might influence the oppressed people of the Saudi Dynasty. The KSA is a powder keg for an uprising of the people, they are ready to explode.

The KSA uses extremist Wahhabi Islam as a political subterfuge to recruit jihadist, terrorists, and to spread Saudi influence throughout West Asia, Africa and beyond. International terrorism has been a joint venture of the US, Saudi Arabia and other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) member states. All the GCC states: KSA, UAE, Bahrain, Oman, and Kuwait are theocratic monarchies. That says volumes about US values for democracy and human rights.

The US has a long history of coveting the wealth of Yemen. In the mid-1980s the Bush family and their Texas oil buddies at Hunt Oil invested in Yemen’s oil-rich Marib Shabwa basin. Bush obtained for Hunt Oil the rights for future exploration. Deviously, the former director of the CIA and then Vice President Bush arranged for Iraq’s Saddam Hussein to finance the Bush-Hunt investments in Yemen. A few years later Bush “repaid” Saddam’s loan with Shock and Awe.

Photo One World: George H. W. Bush and Yemen’s Ali Abdullah Saleh
Photo One World: George H. W. Bush and Yemen’s Ali Abdullah Saleh

The war that started in 2015 is to protect US investments of global corporations, neoliberalism and the vision of a New World Order. The people of Yemen have been starch opponents of neoliberalism, and like their old world order. They rebelled against the 33 year rule of Ali Abdullah Saleh for selling out Yemen to neoliberalism, and then the people rebelled against the interim government of Hadi for his fire-sale privatization scheming with neoliberal empire.

The US beneficiaries of neoliberalism were not happy when their benefactor Hadi was deposed by the Houthi Movement. Nor was Saudi Arabia, which has been trying to exploit Yemen for decades. The vultures of the other GCC countries are circling Yemen in the hope of picking at its corpse too.

The US is providing the GCC with the Shock and Awe to kill the prey, and the US does not care if it kills 22 million people in the process of looting Yemen. It is the US that is providing the bombs. The Saudi-led coalition of GCC countries are just the delivery boys.

To summarize, there is no civil war in Yemen. Iran is made the scapegoat for a US-led illegal war of aggression. Saudi Arabia and its coalition of Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) states are headquartered in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The GCC states are made up of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Oman, and the United Arab Emirates. They are all monarchies. The US hopes to walk off with Yemen’s main prizes, and the KSA, UAE and Qatar are fighting each other over the crumbs. The lives of 22 million Yemeni people are hanging by a thread, because of a US blockade of food, water and medicine. The US is the cause of the worst cholera epidemic in history. It is biological warfare and genocide.

Photo: David William Pear speaking at an anti-war rally on the steps of City Hall, St. Petersburg, Florida, 2016
Photo: David William Pear speaking at an anti-war rally on the steps of City Hall, St. Petersburg, Florida, 2016

Bio: David William Pear is a progressive columnist writing on U.S. foreign policy, economic and political issues, human rights and social issues. David is a Senior Contributing Editor of The Greanville Post (TGP) and a prior Senior Editor for OpEdNews (OEN) for four years 2014 to 2018, and he is still a “Trusted Writer” for OpEdNews. David has been writing for The Real News Network (TRNN) for over 10 years, and has been a long-term financial supporter.

(Republished from The Greanville Post by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: American Military, Saudi Arabia, Yemen 
Hide 124 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. peterAUS says:

    The International Committee of the Red Cross, the Red Crescent, and Doctors Without Borders; hospitals, clinics and disaster relief organizations, and human rights workers have been deliberately bombed.

    Source, please?

    Obama assassinated US citizens, droned Afghan wedding parties and funerals, and destroyed Libya. He invaded Syria in an illegal war of aggression.

    US destroyed Libya?
    US invaded Syria? Invasion? This article written by ex US Special Forces guy?

    Purposely causing a cholera epidemic is biological warfare.

    Wow.

    ….The US contaminated Bosnia…

    Stopped reading here.

  2. [This is your absolutely last chance. Unless you begin keeping all your remarks strictly on-topic, reduce your comments to a reasonable number, and avoid religious disputes, everything you write will end up being trashed.]

    The US is providing the GCC with the Shock and Awe to kill the prey, and the US does not care if it kills 22 million people in the process of looting Yemen. It is the US that is providing the bombs. The Saudi-led coalition of GCC countries are just the delivery boys.

    Out of the six countries in GCC, Oman was the only one which didn’t participate in this mayhem.

    Blessed are the peace makers!

  3. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    Since the end of the Cold War, the US is the main Evil Force in the World. This is shocking when considering that the, all said and done, US has been on the right side in the Cold War.

    Though far from perfect, US was on the right side of WWII in defeating Germany and Japan. It was on the right side of history against communism.

    But since the 90s, the US has gotten crazier and crazier. Just like Sparta went nuts after defeating Athens, US got nutty with power and wealth and greed after the Cold War ended.

    This article is necessary BUT the author is as much part of the problem. Why? As one of those proggies, he’s for Open Borders. Open Borders is an act of war. It can be militarist open borders of invading other nations with bombs. Or it can be demographic imperialism like the mass migration-invasion of Europe, the madness supported by proggies.

    Why can’t proggies see the light? They denounce what happened to Palestinians and Yemenese, but BOTH were due to open borders. Palestine was invaded by Zionist immigrants, and Yemen has been destroyed by military open borders enforced by Saudis and US that don’t respect the borders of Yemen, just like US and its allies violated the borders of Iraq and Syria and messed things up.

  4. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:

    Pear is a progressive. Progressives favor affirmative action discrimination against Whites.

    They hate me. So I hate them.

    Oman is right next door to Yemen. Oman is a fabulously rich oil country. I’ve known nurses who worked there. It’s very well run and civilized.

    I still don’t understand why Saudi is attacking Yemen. Why is the Bush family attacking Yemen. Yemen has oil. The Bush company is an oil company. Every other oil country in the world is happy to take the oil money and use it to improve the country and its people

    it’s murually beneficial. They have the oil. The rest of the world needs the oil. The oil companies are the middlemen and everybody benefits. Except for Californians who pay huge gas taxes.

    I doubt Saudi and Bush are attacking Yemen because of the oil. They have’nt attacked. Oman or Kuwait.

    It doesn’t make sense that oil is the reason is Saudi is attacking Yemen.

  5. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @peterAUS

    I was still reading newspapers during the Bosnia vs Serb thing. The liberal newspapers told me the Bosnians were the good guys and the Serbs the bad guys.

    Because the liberal newspapers always lie about everything I realized the Bosnians were the bad guys and the Serbs the good guys

    Pear seems to believe the liberal newspapers of the Clinton era.

    • Replies: @peterAUS
  6. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @peterAUS

    The US did destroy Libya under those great humanitarian progressives Obama and the progressives’ warrior queen, Hildabeast

    • Agree: RobinG
  7. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    David Pear and his fellow progressives don’t think America was on the right side against communism.

    Progressives have adored communism it’s gulags and genocides since 1917.

  8. Tom Welsh says:

    Not quite the Yemen of “Salmon Fishing in the Yemen”, is it?

    • Replies: @David William Pear
  9. Tom Welsh says:
    @peterAUS

    This once, I’ll give you the benefit of the doubt and assume that you are ill-informed.

    1. “Source, please?”

    A simple Google search will provide you with hundreds of links, a proportion of which contain the “sources” you demand. E.g.:

    https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/what-we-do/news-stories/story/yemen-airstrike-hits-msf-cholera-treatment-center-abs

    https://therealnews.com/columns/saudi-arabia-tried-to-blame-doctors-without-borders-for-bombing-yemen-cholera-treatment-center

    However it is absolutely obvious to any sentient person that, when Saudi Arabia and its allies bomb hospitals, treatment centres, and civilian targets such as homes and buses, they are doing so deliberately.

    Or do you claim that the magnificent, state-of-the-art, precision US equipment they are using is so poor that they keep hitting hospitals by mistake?

    “MSF records clearly demonstrate that the GPS coordinates for the cholera treatment center were shared at least 12 times in writing with the coalition’s Evacuation and Humanitarian Operation Cell (EHOC). The coordinates were shared on a weekly basis over a period of more than two months prior to the bombing. EHOC acknowledged receipt of these coordinates in writing at least nine times. The SELC was therefore aware of the coordinates”.

    2. “US destroyed Libya?”

    Yes, US destroyed Libya. Wikipedia (which usually tends strongly to support the USA, NATO and the West generally) starts its article thus:

    “On 19 March 2011, a multi-state NATO-led coalition began a military intervention in Libya… military operations began, with American and British naval forces firing over 110 Tomahawk cruise missiles… The effort was initially largely led by France and the United Kingdom, with command shared with the United States. ”

    Already it is clear that the USA participated and shared command right from the start, and we can be quite sure that US forces fired a lot more of those cruise missiles than UK forces. Moreover, no “NATO-led coalition” could possibly start a war without the consent and, indeed, active leadership of the USA. The fig leaf about “shared command” is obviously just PR: frankly, NATO is just a political masquerade to conceal the fact that the USA initiates, controls and is mainly responsible for all NATO military actions.

    Furrther clues can be found at https://foreignpolicy.com/2016/03/22/libya-and-the-myth-of-humanitarian-intervention/

    ‘On March 28, 2011, U.S. President Barack Obama addressed the nation: “The task that I assigned our forces [is] to protect the Libyan people from immediate danger and to establish a no-fly zone.… Broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake.”’

    So we have Obama himself openly admitting that the US government led the attack on Libya, although he pretends that it was a “humanitarian intervention” and that he did not plan “regime change”.

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/apr/12/barack-obama-says-libya-was-worst-mistake-of-his-presidency

    ‘White House spokesman Josh Earnest on Monday said Obama’s regrets extended to what “the United States and the rest of the members of our coalition didn’t do”’.

    This openly admits that the USA led the coalition that destroyed Libya. Obama’s crocodile tears don’t change that fact.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2015/10/hillary-clinton-debate-libya/410437/

    “We came, we saw, he died” (chortles). You wouldn’t call that admission of guilt?

    3. “US invaded Syria? Invasion?”

    Yes, “invasion”. Without writing the short book that the subject deserves, the US government created ISIS (and its many branches and metastasised groups). It was after the second Iraq war, which was probably the last one in which American “boots” were “on the ground”. One-sided cakewalk as it was, too many Americans were hurt and died. That’s political death for the administration. Since then, they have adopted a new strategy: they choose, train, arm, pay, support and advise “rebels” to fight the governments Washington doesn’t like.

    They even give them air support, as in https://www.mondialisation.ca/sixty-two-dead-100-wounded-as-us-bombs-syrian-army-near-deir-ez-zor-bombing-was-in-support-of-isis-daesh-militia/5546787 You can find many other reports on that event. The salient features were that the US-led “coalition” air strikes killed and wounded over 100 Syrian soldiers fighting desperately against superior numbers of terrorists; that immediately after the attack the terrorists stormed the army’s positions and captured them (something they had been trying unsuccessfully to do for years); and that the US government did not apologise, claiming that it was a mistake and they had been trying to hit the “rebels” (actually undisguised ISIS terrorists).

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/jun/03/us-isis-syria-iraq

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-33997408

    4. “This article written by ex US Special Forces guy?”

    Yes, exactly. Someone who actually has been on the ground and knows how those things are done. Not someone who sits in Washington telling lies, or someone who gets their “information” from stenographic media reporting of those lies.

    • Agree: Agent76
    • Replies: @Tom Welsh
    , @peterAUS
  10. Tom Welsh says:
    @Tom Welsh

    Cartoons often convey a message with greater force than words could.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  11. TG says:

    Indeed, the actions of the US government and its proxies is vile. It is also irrelevant.

    Yemen is a small and arid country, with maybe enough fresh water to grow food for ten million people or so. They also have a sky high fertility rate, if the rest of the world continues to feed them, their population should double about every 20 years. In 1985 the population of Yemen was 10 million. Consider:

    1985: 10 million
    2005: 20 million
    2025: 40 million
    2045: 80 million
    2065: 160 million
    2085: 320 million
    2105: 640 million
    etc.

    Now the above projections won’t occur – somewhere along the way natural forces will start to limit Yemen’s population growth, bombs or no bombs, it won’t matter. Because no matte what you’ve heard, when people try to have more children than they can support, this does not create wealth (how can it?) but crushing poverty.

    Still, the US is responsible, but not in the way listed here. It is the ceaseless propaganda that more people are always better, that massive population growth is always good, that people should breed like cattle, pushed by our corrupt universities and media, that is ultimately responsible for what is happening in Yemen. And in Bangladesh, and Pakistan, and India, and Mexico… And sooner or later, coming to a country like yours.

    • Replies: @David William Pear
  12. Anon[235] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Some speculate that the war is being conducted to secure the Bab el Mandeb strait, which will allow the Saudis to secure an alternate oil shipping route should Iran blockade the strait of Hormuz. Why would the US facilitate this? Possibly because it might be a necessary precondition for war with Iran.

    • Replies: @Anon
  13. It is the Zionist control of America that has caused the U.S. government to be involved in wars since WWI and right down through the Mideast wars and all these wars were fought for the Zionist banking cabal with their control over their privately owned FED and IRS which were created by the Zionists in 1913 .

    The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and Libya and Syria and Yemen are all being fought for the Zionist bankers and Zionist Israel and their goal of a Zionist NWO and the resulting millions that are being killed and wounded clearly shows the disregard for humanity that the Zionists are known for since their Bolsheviks ran the Bolshevik slaughter house in Russia that killed some 60 million Russians.

    The Zionist disregard for human lives was shown on 911 when the Zionists and Zionist Israel attacked the WTC and killed an estimated 3000 Americans and got away with it, and every thinking American knows that Israel and the Israel controlled deep state did 911.

    Zionists and Israel are going to destroy America just as every parasite destroys its host.

    • Replies: @David William Pear
  14. FO337 says:

    Girlfriend of mine is a news hound and insists that Yemen had it coming.

    I leave the interpretation of that up to you, dear gentle reader.

    (PS: I got locked out of my F0337 acct so I’m now FO337)

  15. “Bolton is confirming that the US is a rouge state ….”

    I’ll grant the country is sliding to the left, but I think you mean ‘rogue.”

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @David William Pear
  16. @Anon

    Less oil on the world markets means higher prices for those still producing.

    • Replies: @Anon
  17. Well, the genocide in Yemen is not exactly US-led. Ruling Saudi crime family with its equally guilty allies is committing massive war crimes in Yemen for years, indiscriminately murdering thousands of civilians, including women and children. Saudi-led coalition bombs schools, school buses, hospitals, mosques, etc. – all war crimes. The US and UK support the Saudi troops committing these crimes, which makes these countries accessories to mass murder. To make things worse (and even more criminal), Saudis and their allies block the delivery of food, water, chemicals to treat drinking water, and medicines to Yemen. Western “free” press studiously avoids mentioning the events in Yemen, which shows just how free it is. In a fair world the leaders of KSA, its allies and supporters would all be tried (like in Nuremberg), convicted, and hung. This world is not fair, though.

  18. @Tom Welsh

    That describes things exceedingly well, but that cartoon describes the war in Syria, not Yemen.

  19. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Thanks. That’s a reasonable cause for this war instead of the eternal liberal nonsense of “ America wants to steal their oil”

    • Replies: @gT
  20. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Alarmist

    Windows spell check has imposed a new system. As soon as you type 2 letters it just types any word starting with those 2 letters. So you have to retype all those words. It’s a total pain

  21. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Alarmist

    So the Bush family is warring on Yemen to keep the Bush family oil off the market to enrich the other oil producing countries?

    How devious

  22. @Anon

    “Though far from perfect, US was on the right side of WWII in defeating Germany and Japan. It was on the right side of history against communism.”
    How can any sensible white person look at Europe today and think that defeating Germany was a good thing? Germany was fighting to save all of Europe from the jews. When it lost, all Europe was lost.

  23. @peterAUS

    Thank you for reading a few paragraphs of my article. As for the source of the “US contaminating Bosnia” there are some very good search engines, and I don’t mean Bing. Have you tried any others? As for your other “questions?”, they are pretty much common knowledge. If you read the rest of the article, I will be glad to discuss it with you intelligently.

    • Replies: @peterAUS
    , @nsa
    , @jacques sheete
  24. windwaves says:
    @peterAUS

    sure, run back to the NYT and WP, greatest examples of fake news empires, controlled by a couple of very well know morons who have been brain washing the USA in the interest of everything against America !
    Good news is that true americans are waking up. The morons seem to have been caught a bit late in their attempt to shut up everyone.

  25. bjondo says:

    Stahl asked Albright if the death of over 500,000 Iraqi children caused by US sanctions…

    500, 000 Iraqi children UNDER the age of 5 years if I remember correctly.

    Skimming article, not much to disagree with. Maybe needs more mention of Israel/Jewry.

    When it comes to that area of world, Jewry (US branch)/Israel can’t get enough blame.

  26. http://www.unz.com/article/the-us-led-genocide-and-destruction-of-yemen/#p_1_15:1-28

    Economic sanctions and trade embargos are barbaric siege warfare against civilian populations. There is no way to pretty them up as surgically targeting a regime or being humanitarian.

    Consider that this is the main way that the USA won both World Wars, and that they still form the ideological justification for US imperial dominance, and you’ll understand why it acts the way it does. America wins not by attacking the opposing armies, but by attacking their civilians, and then using overwhelming amounts of propaganda to accuse its’ enemies of doing worse.

    In WW1, the German army was undefeated in the field, and even after the failure of the Kaiserschlacht and the arrival of American soldiers it still remained in France until the Armistice. However, Germany had been under embargo since 1914 and had finally started to experience famine in 1918, with 750,000 civilians starving to death, as well as communist revolts. This was what caused the Kaiser to relinquish power and the new German government to surrender. When Hitler tried to raise Germany off of her back, he envisioned the lebensraum concept as a strategic counter to the starvation blockade. Basically, Germany needed its own food and oil in order to stay self-sufficient (Autarky), because without that it would be vulnerable to starvation. Food could be found in Ukraine, and oil could be found in the Caucuses.

    Hence, German expansionism is directly tied to America’s involvement in WW1. To counter the threat of continental land war, and knowing that they were no match to an opposing army, America and Britain developed the strategic bomber with the explicit goal of attacking civilian centers in cities. They envisioned bombers dropping chemical, incendiary, and explosive bombs and razing cities to the ground, and generally being so terrifying that no one would be willing to start a war again. This MAD concept was not forged in the fires of WWII, but was started in the mid ’20s, and American bombers were built with this in mind. In contrast, the German Luftwaffe had no long range strategic bombers, at most it had some medium bombers, but its’ focus had always been close air support of armies in the field. When the Luftwaffe attacked Warsaw, they were careful to point out that the city was heavily fortified and was essentially acting as a military outpost; and the first raids on Britain occurred after 8 weeks of British air raids on German cities. By the end of the war, they were incinerating entire cities full of civilians (and few military targets) such as Dresden; after the war, significant numbers of German civilians and POWs (sorry: “DEFs”) starved to death in what were called “The Hunger Years”. Japan later experienced a similar fate in the firebombing of nearly every one of their major cities. The nukes on Hiroshima and Nagasaki were actually less destructive than the “conventional” raids on Tokyo. And of course, Japan was under a starvation blockade as well.

    America simply learned from experience. If WWII was the good war, and it was won by slaughtering millions of civilians, surely killing the innocent can’t be all that bad, can it? We never would’ve “won” without supporting genocidal tyrants like Stalin and Churchill, so what’s so bad about Saudi Arabia and Israel? Far fewer Yemenis are dying than Germans and Japanese, so who cares? And most significantly, if the news won’t cover it, and when they do they liberally pepper it with counter stories of Saddam Insane, Islamo-fascism, axis of evil, etc. then why would most people even bother with it? Even when there are significant antiwar movements, like in 1940 and 2004, Americans are offered 2 pro-war candidates to choose from. At least Germans and Austrians voted for Hitler, but few Americans ever get to vote on if they go to war!

  27. Its pretty disgusting that anyone here can defend this evil. Or defend the US by saying “but we’re the good guys”, “we defeated the communists” WTF does that have to do with murdering millions and millions of children for the benefit of the rich?

    You do know you’re paying for these wars for the capitalists? You do know we’re 21 trillion in the hole?
    Someones gonna pay. It won’t be the Wall St bankers. It will be your children and grandchildren. You folks better wake up. Evil is evil, doesn’t matter if its us or someone else doing it, and from what I’ve seen in my lifetime, American capitalism has been the aggressor, not the communists/socialists. What happened a hundred years ago in Soviet Union? I don’t know! I wasn’t there and I wasn’t even alive. History can be distorted by the ones writing it. But I do know whats going on right now, and it ain’t commies running around the world blowing up kids. It ain’t commies building military bases in the middle of Africa, 900 or so now.

    You can repeat that the communists killed a lot of people all you want, doesn’t change the fact that globalism/capitalism has killed just as many, and many more die AFTER we’re done, the effects of depleted uranium, agent orange sticks around a long time.

    We need to leave the rest of the world alone. You all hate mass immigration and multiculturalism, but you can’t make the connection between it and capitalism.
    You bitch about your good manufacturing jobs being sent overseas, I guarantee you it wouldn’t be happening if not for CAPITALISM. More profit is the only thing that matters in a capitalist system. It does not care about you, your family or the your country. Take a look around folks. Stop defending the parasites that are raping you.

    - Excerpt from a speech delivered in 1933, by Major General Smedley Butler, USMC.

    https://fas.org/man/smedley.htm

    War is just a racket. A racket is best described, I believe, as something that is not what it seems to the majority of people. Only a small inside group knows what it is about. It is conducted for the benefit of the very few at the expense of the masses.

    I wouldn’t go to war again as I have done to protect some lousy investment of the bankers. There are only two things we should fight for. One is the defense of our homes and the other is the Bill of Rights. War for any other reason is simply a racket. There isn’t a trick in the racketeering bag that the military gang is blind to. It has its “finger men” to point out enemies, its “muscle men” to destroy enemies, its “brain men” to plan war preparations, and a “Big Boss” Super-Nationalistic-Capitalism.

    It may seem odd for me, a military man to adopt such a comparison. Truthfulness compels me to. I spent thirty- three years and four months in active military service as a member of this country’s most agile military force, the Marine Corps. I served in all commissioned ranks from Second Lieutenant to Major-General. And during that period, I spent most of my time being a high class muscle- man for Big Business, for Wall Street and for the Bankers. In short, I was a racketeer, a gangster for capitalism.

    I helped make Mexico, especially Tampico, safe for American oil interests in 1914. I helped make Haiti and Cuba a decent place for the National City Bank boys to collect revenues in. I helped in the raping of half a dozen Central American republics for the benefits of Wall Street. The record of racketeering is long. I helped purify Nicaragua for the international banking house of Brown Brothers in 1909-1912 (where have I heard that name before?). I brought light to the Dominican Republic for American sugar interests in 1916. In China I helped to see to it that Standard Oil went its way unmolested.

    • Replies: @Anon
  28. @Anon

    I agree that the US has gotten “crazier” after the collapse of its main rival the USSR, as I point out in my article. As for the “US was on the right side of WWII in defeating Germany and Japan”, there is a lot of mythology that has become unquestioned that it was the “good war”.

    From the early 1900′s the US embraced Japan and encouraged its imperialism. Many Japanophiles such as Teddy Roosevelt saw Japan as the US’s cats paw in Asia and backed Japan in having their own “Monroe Doctrine” to keep out European colonial powers, so that the US and Japan could split the booty. WW2 and the military buildup of Germany after WW1 was a direct result of US financial, industrial and military policy of aggression against the Bolsheviks.

    The US has a history of backing fascism, partly because of the fear of communism, and because fascist governments are business friendly for capitalism. A dress rehearsal to WW2 was the Spanish Civil War, in which the US backed the fascist Nationalists and the Bolsheviks backed the Republicans.

    Many in the US wanted to back Hitler, such as John Foster Dulles, except Hitler attacked Western Europe and declared war on the US, hoping that the Japanese would open a second front against Russia from the East.

    As oft said, it is the winners who write the history, but things are not as straight forward and simple as the “official” history books.

    P.S. As for my being a ” one of those proggies, he’s for Open Borders”, you need to practice you ability at being clairvoyant, as I have not stated my position, at least not in this article. Nor am I in favor of Zionist colonial settlerism and have spent time in Palestine confronting Israel. From my article it should be clear that I am opposed to the US-backed Saudi invasion of Yemen. Ditto Iraq, Syria, etc.

  29. denk says:

    murikkan crimes against humanities.
    A USA speciality….shooting fish in a barrel.

    Exhibit Fallujah….

    Here’r enough evidences, all faithfully recorded by murikkan MSM, of USA genocidal wars on civilians.

    The LA Times reported that “the US military” assaulted the city of Fallujah with the full “understanding” that “civilians…would be killed.” As a result, the Christian Science Monitor reported, “The sickening odor of rotting flesh” permeated the air circulating through the smoke filled and blood drenched streets of Fallujah.

    We learned this week, November, 2005 the US used naplalm and white phosphorus in Fallujah, leaving children, women and men burnt to the bone.

    according to “Iraqi NGO’s and medical workers…between 4,000 and 6,000″ mostly civilians were killed. In addition, “36,000 of the city’s 50,000 homes were destroyed, along with 60 schools and 65 mosques and shrines,” and up to “200,000 residents were forced to flee, creating a refugee population the size of Tacoma.” Creating a wasteland is a form of “collective punishment” and is a war crime. The leadership responsible for the wasting of Fallujah has yet to be held accountable

    The gory details…

    http://www.uruknet.de/?p=m18007

  30. @Anon

    The label progressive is meaningless and I should remove it from my bio.

    “Every other oil country in the world is happy to take the oil money and use it to improve the country and its people…”

    I think the above statement shows that you have a very basic lack of understanding of how neoliberalism and capitalism works in the real world.

    Almost every country the US is enemies with are the ones that want to use their own natural resources and sell them to the world for the betterment of their own citizens. Capitalists want to maximize their profits by not sharing the profits of a countries wealth with the citizens of the country that owns it.

    Instead oil companies would rather steal oil or payoff a corrupt autocracy to let them. Neoliberals and the Bretton Woods organizations insist on austerity (i.e. poverty) for the people.

    I did not say that the US-Saudi aggression against Yemen was just about oil. Oman and Kuwait are members of the US neoliberal empire, so why would the US want to attack them. They are already in the net of empire.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @renfro
  31. Tyrion 2 says:

    I see no justification for this being “US-led”. I don’t even think there’s any evidence of them intervening in the conflict. Yes, there have been some side actions against Al Qaeda in Yemen, but that is not the same conflict.

    It is pretty obvious that Saudi Arabia claimed Yemen as within its sphere of influence and intervened but were humiliated, so to save face they have continued this pointless and despicable war.

    America has not intervened. Of course, intervene or not intervene, to the progressive left, America, the white man, must be at fault.

  32. Agent76 says:

    Sep 10, 2018 20 Million Starving Yemenis Fueling the Saudi-US-NATO War Machine

    The people of Yemen have found themselves struggling not only for survival, but for a space in the Western media’s war coverage.

    • Replies: @David William Pear
  33. @Tom Welsh

    Re: Salmon Fishing is an example of the stupidity of Western “aid” for the benefit of an eccentric autocrat in Yemen, from what I remember about the movie.

  34. @TG

    I agree on the population time bomb in Yemen. When it was a rural country of about 10 million that had some very ingenious methods of terracing for sustainable agriculture, given the limited rainfall. Much of that has been destroyed by US “aid” when taught them how to “rationalize” their land use, migrate to the cities, and become wage slaves.

    The world has not been about to break away from the “Iron Law of Wages” that labor will work at subsistence wages, and nature will take its course in population control. I believe it is immoral and a tremendous waste of natural resources for the US to be intervening in reducing population with war.

    Malthus has not been proven wrong yet, but at the current level of world population and for the foreseeable future their are enough resources in the world to sustain every human being with the necessities of life. The problem is not shortages but distribution, with a few incredibly wealthy haves and the rest of the world have-nots.

    Eventually, the planet will not be able to sustain human life, which could happen very quickly from a nuclear war; or gradually from continued degradation of the planet.

    • Replies: @peterAUS
  35. @Tyrion 2

    Without US military support the massive Saudi air war would cease within 48 hours or so. Ending the US-led blockade of Yemen would allow humanitarian supplies, food, potable water etc. to enter to end the genocide.

    A few billion dollars of money diverted from the $ mega-billions for war would be enough to end the cholera epidemic and famine.

    That would not bring peace, but the level of violence would be reduced to the Saudi-backed terrorists groups and internal fighting between different groups of Yemenis who oppose the Houthis Movement, Souther separatists, political parties and religious differences.

    Democracy might not break out, but let Yemenis solve their own problems.

    P.S. The Saudi military ground force is no match for the Yemeni military. It would be the Saudi’s “Vietnam”; in many ways it already is. The war is bankrupting the Saudis. It sounds as if Trump is feed up with subsidizing it and wants them to pay even more. MbS may be finished.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  36. @DESERT FOX

    Unfortunately, Trump seems to be bought and paid for by the Israel lobby too.

    • Replies: @DESERT FOX
  37. peterAUS says:
    @Anon

    ..Bosnia vs Serb thing….

    Didn’t exist.

    Hold your seat, especially if you are an average American (geography and such):

    War in Croatia: Serbs and Montenegrins vs Croats.

    War in Bosnia AND Herzegovina: Serbs vs Croats and Muslims (given, at the time, name “Bosnians”).
    Then Serbs vs Croats vs Muslims (Croats vs Muslims as addition).
    Then, back to startup: Serbs vs Croats vs Muslims.
    Ah, B.T.W. Croats from Croatia, Serbs from Serbia helped their kin in Bosnia AND Herzegovina.

    War in Kosovo: Serbs vs Albanians and, well….NATO. Albanians as ethnic group in Kosovo, which was part of Serbia, and Albanians from Albania (well, and members of Albanian ethnic group from all over the world thanks to C.I.A.).

    Still reading? Interesting.

    Some other ethnic groups also participated as allies to the main groups/nations above.

    It’s actually even a bit more complicated but I didn’t want to make it too hard. Like games startup in Slovenia and ending in Macedonia. And, there was a country called Yugoslavia as well at the very start.

    If you didn’t get it, don’t worry. 99.9 Westerners haven’t and can’t.
    That, of course, won’t prevent the same people to have very strong opinions what and how happened there. From psychology to small unit tactics and everything in between.
    Including all of authors and almost all of commentators here.

    • Replies: @EugeneGur
  38. @The Alarmist

    Thank you. My face is red. Indeed it is rogue. Damn auto-spell check again!

  39. @Anon101618

    You seem well read in history, which few Americans are. I find little to take exception with you on. You left out the Korea War, but then there are just so many examples. Even with the total destruction of Korea both North and South and killing 20 to 30 % of their population the most the US could do was come to a draw. Like Vietnam, those histories are being rewritten to make them appear to be victories. Thanks for your contribution to intelligent discussion.

  40. @Agent76

    If it is not on TV, it isn’t happening.

    • Replies: @Agent76
  41. peterAUS says:
    @Tom Welsh

    A civil and well put together.

    I’ll try to reciprocate.

    This once, I’ll give you the benefit of the doubt and assume that you are ill-informed.

    1. “Source, please?”
    I stand corrected.
    Having said that, the center was still not operational at the time, was empty and there were no casualties.
    As for “bomb hospitals, treatment centres, and civilian targets such as homes and buses, they are doing so deliberately.” what world your types live in?
    While I could accept that bombing hospitals and treatment centres isn’t right, are you quite sure that those very centers weren’t used, at the same time, for other purposes? Like positioning own forces very close next to those objects or even within?
    As for “homes and buses”, definitely. The very essence of M.O.U.T. I am starting to get a feeling for you.

    2. “US destroyed Libya?”
    Disagree with your position. Mine is: it was Libyans who destroyed Libya.
    supported by multi-state NATO-led coalition. And, the bulk of NATO combat forces was not US but French and British.

    While we are on the topic the same types keep destroying their own country. Except, those types have no concept of country. It’s about clan and such. Add a bit of Islamist approach and here we are.

    I know that “progtard” can’t see that. It’s all “bad America” fault.

    Good.

    3. “US invaded Syria? Invasion?”
    Disagree with your position. Understand it, get your viewpoint and think I understand your overall position.
    You and me disagree on the most basic fundamentals of human existence.

    I’ll complete my comment and put you on ignore.
    I simply do not converse with those I feel as “progtards”.

    As for 4, I am starting to get a feeling the author could be of your type.
    If…if that’s correct it’s simple: I just don’t read his stuff anymore.

    All good.

    • Troll: Biff
    • Replies: @Big fat dane.
  42. EugeneGur says:
    @Tyrion 2

    America has not intervened. Of course, intervene or not intervene, to the progressive left, America, the white man, must be at fault.

    It’s not the abstract “white man”, my friend, it is the United States government that protects its allies the Saudis no matter what they do. The US supports the sanctions against Yemen and the blockade.

    The US mainstream media completely ignores the plight of Yemen civilians. You remember the staged picture of a boy, Aylan I believe, on the Turkish shore, that produced such an outpouring of sympathy mixed with indignation towards those denying the “refugees” the right to land wherever they wanted? The images of dead Yemeni children aren’t distributed and, thus, elicit no emotions.

    If you compare the outcries in the Western, including the US, media that constantly follow any even in Syria (a girl Bana wrings a bell?) with deafening silence about Yemen, you’d understand which side the US government is on. So, I wouldn’t say the America has not intervened, for it has and most effectively.

    If the “white man” identifies with these actions, then, yes, it is his fault.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    , @Anon
  43. Matty says:

    Thank you for your well written and understandable article David Pear. Somebody else mentioned here about how writers and thinkers ‘on the left’ (if that term/ paradigm has any meaning anymore) frequently seem caught up in the ‘Neo Liberal’ politically correct hatred or disdain for the White Western world. I wrote this a couple of days ago in relation to a Chris Hedges video I posted on Facebook:
    “Chris Hedges is an interesting ‘leftist’ journalist. Much of what he says on the propaganda of the corporate media, foreign policy, the corporate and ideological corruption of both US political parties, consumer culture and the deindustrialisation of the West/ globalised free-market economics etc is pretty much in line with what Nationalists like Pat Buchanan and Marine Le Pen say. Also like Buchanan he sees America collapsing into civil and economic strife at some point in the not too distant future. However unlike Buchanan Hedges is fully onboard with the mainstream ‘establishment’ ‘Neo-liberal’ cultural obsession with imaginary ‘racism’, ‘sexism’ identity politics, and the alleged benefits of mass immigration and multiculturalism. In other words he understands the economic problems brought about by globalisation but is oblivious to the cultural decay and conflicts it’s partly responsible for within the West.
    It’s been suggested that whilst Capitalism triumphed over Communism (IN ECONOMIC TERMS) with the collapse of the Soviet Union, Communism was entirely triumphant (in the West) in cultural terms. ‘The left’ don’t seem to realise that they have long had total victory in the culture war (we have a culture obsessed and indocrinated with Marxist concepts of equality) but they just don’t know when to stop. John Pilger and Noam Chomsky seem to fall into much the same camp as Hedges. Why can’t leftists see the obvious regarding the consequences and true purpose of mass immigration, identity politics and Western cultural degeneracy? Their medicine is always more of the same poison.”

    I don’t dispute that Yemen and much of Third World currently suffers more from ‘Neo liberalism’/ globalisation/ corporate imperialism or whatever you want to call it. But the people of Yemen will continue to exist in Yemen long after the people of Britian, France, USA etc cease to be majorities in the countries built by there ancestors. The war cuts both ways and in very different forms. I’d welcome your thoughts, (one day in an article) on the divisive cultural propaganda of identity politics being spoon fed to ‘Westerners’ and your thoughts about mass immigration and the cultural issues Pat Buchanan discusses.

    Here is a book I’d recommend everyone reads; “Babel Inc. is an essential primer on the politics of globalisation and multiculturalism. Bolton demonstrates that conventional distinctions between the political left and right have been transcended by transnational corporations who regard the remnants of the nation-state as the last hurdle for global domination and the attainment of their “new world order”.

    Babel Inc. is an exposé of multiculturalism as a “social control mechanism” that scorches the earth in preparation for the coming of the rationale of global capitalism: homo globicus. This global man will be at home anywhere in the world because the world will be homogeneously liberal. If that idea seems farfetched now, perhaps at the conclusion of Babel Inc. it will seem less a possibility than a growing reality.

    The strength of Bolton’s book lies not just in his studious research of historical facts, but also in his ability to focuses on the theoretical root causes of the problem, i.e., the dynamics of the Enlightenment and its religion of Progress, coupled with the starry-eyed American Puritanism, whose violent and inhumane secular avatars can no longer be ignored.

    “Dr. Kerry Bolton’s book Babel Inc. Multiculturalism, Globalisation, and the New World Order has the potential to be truly explosive.” — Mark W. Dyal

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Babel-Inc-Multicultralism-Globalisation-World-ebook/dp/B00N75J7KY/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1539714451&sr=8-1&keywords=multiculturalism+new+world+order+babel

  44. peterAUS says:
    @David William Pear

    If you read the rest of the article, I will be glad to discuss it with you intelligently.

    O.K.
    Let’s make it simple. Two questions:

    You still sure it was Bosnia that got contaminated and not Kosovo and Serbia proper?
    One short sentence as answer would suffice.

    More importantly, what’s your take on “bombing…civilian targets such as homes and buses…”?

    You are an ex-S.F. From Vietnam era, apparently, but I am sure you know fine points of M.O.U.T. especially how it’s done today in such places.

    Here one short paragraph would suffice.

  45. I’m not sure you could make a case for war crimes or genocide, but the inhumanity of blockading or depriving care and suppplies to ameliorate the devastation of the resulting cholera outbreak as well as the famine, among many other things, would be inhumane acts that rise to the level of a crime against humanity as defined by the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. This is probably why the US, Israel, et al have stepped back from it and the ICC.

    • Replies: @David William Pear
  46. @David William Pear

    They all are, JFK was the last POTUS that was a patriot, and that is why they took him out.

  47. EugeneGur says:
    @peterAUS

    Some other ethnic groups also participated as allies to the main groups/nations above.

    The issue is not the national conflicts, whether real or not, but violent intervention in these matters by the Western powers. The West isn’t answerable for the ethnic tensions but it is for bombing of Serbia. It is also responsible for stirring up those conflicts: in Srebretica, it proved difficult to start the trouble. So, an ingenious tool was employed: snipers that shot indiscriminately at all sides. Everyone blamed the others, and the fight started. The same exact tactics was used in Kiev in 2013 – if it works, why fix it?

    If you didn’t get it, don’t worry. 99.9 Westerners haven’t and can’t.

    What’s your point? That the Westerners are preternaturally stupid? Possibly, but that doesn’t absolve them of the responsibility, as ignorance of the law is no defense.

    Including all of authors and almost all of commentators here.

    Your comment are, naturally, a shining exception to this rule.

    • Replies: @peterAUS
  48. peterAUS says:
    @Anon101618

    Consider that this is the main way that the USA won both World Wars, and that they still form the ideological justification for US imperial dominance, and you’ll understand why it acts the way it does. America wins not by attacking the opposing armies, but by attacking their civilians, and then using overwhelming amounts of propaganda to accuse its’ enemies of doing worse.

    Germany had been under embargo since 1914 and had finally started to experience famine in 1918, with 750,000 civilians starving to death, as well as communist revolts. This was what caused the Kaiser to relinquish power and the new German government to surrender.

    By the end of the war, they were incinerating entire cities full of civilians (and few military targets) such as Dresden; after the war, significant numbers of German civilians and POWs (sorry: “DEFs”) starved to death in what were called “The Hunger Years”. Japan later experienced a similar fate in the firebombing of nearly every one of their major cities. The nukes on Hiroshima and Nagasaki were actually less destructive than the “conventional” raids on Tokyo. And of course, Japan was under a starvation blockade as well.

    America simply learned from experience. If WWII was the good war, and it was won by slaughtering millions of civilians, surely killing the innocent can’t be all that bad, can it? We never would’ve “won” without supporting genocidal tyrants like Stalin and Churchill, so what’s so bad about Saudi Arabia and Israel? Far fewer Yemenis are dying than Germans and Japanese, so who cares? And most significantly, if the news won’t cover it, and when they do they liberally pepper it with counter stories of Saddam Insane, Islamo-fascism, axis of evil, etc. then why would most people even bother with it? Even when there are significant antiwar movements, like in 1940 and 2004, Americans are offered 2 pro-war candidates to choose from. At least Germans and Austrians voted for Hitler, but few Americans ever get to vote on if they go to war!

    Something like that.

    You could’ve started with Sherman’s march to sea, though, then wars against Red Indians and proceed with Philippines before WW1.

    Now, I could also mention some phases of Franco-German war and proceed with how Germans fought, say, in Serbia in WW1.
    Continue with Japanese in Korea and China.
    Complete with Germans in Soviet Union and that little Serbia again in WW2.

    And, let’s not forget Soviets rolling into Germany.

    And, while we are onto topic of modern war and that part of the world the author is concerned about, how about Mahdis after taking Khartoum?
    Or how Islamists wage their wars against Infidels in general after the fall of Communism?

    Or ..hehehe……it’s all just “bad Murica” thing around here?

    • Replies: @Anon101618
  49. peterAUS says:
    @David William Pear

    The world has not been about to break away from the “Iron Law of Wages” that labor will work at subsistence wages, and nature will take its course in population control. I believe it is immoral and a tremendous waste of natural resources for the US to be intervening in reducing population with war.

    Malthus has not been proven wrong yet, but at the current level of world population and for the foreseeable future their are enough resources in the world to sustain every human being with the necessities of life. The problem is not shortages but distribution, with a few incredibly wealthy haves and the rest of the world have-nots.

    There is where we agree.

    Any suggestion re possible solution there?

    • Replies: @David William Pear
  50. Tyrion 2 says:
    @David William Pear

    Your definition of intervention seems to be limited to making money from selling arms to a long-standing ally, not spending billions on a humanitarian intervention and some wild claim about a blockade against medical supplies.

    Maybe the US should refuse easy money, break its long-standing alliance and go into further debt to save the lives of the people of Yemen on the other side of the world. A reasonable case can be made for all of those things, but that case cannot be called non-interventionist.

    Nor, in a big world full of people with moral agency, can I find any reason to defame the US for what is going on. It is a Middle Eastern conflict between Middle Eastern people. I wish they would stop, but I also wish that God give me the grace to accept that which I cannot change.

    The last 17 years have shown pretty conclusively that shouldering the white man’s burden achieves very little. Liberal internationalism and interventionism is out. Principled realism is in.

    As you imply, the realist part of ‘supporting’ a regional ally is in tension with the principled part of not supporting their terrible, pointless actions. I hope private diplomatic work is ongoing to fix this but this is not relevant to the argument tou are making.

    Without US military support the massive Saudi air war would cease within 48 hours or so.

    It isn’t difficult for a country with Saudi Arabia’s military budget to find companies willing to sell them armaments. Are you suggesting the US sanction Saudi Arabia?

    Democracy might not break out, but let Yemenis solve their own problems.

    One million percent agreed.

    • Agree: Lot
  51. nsa says:
    @David William Pear

    You are wasting your time…..PeteAuschwitz and the WizardofIz are the permanent resident hasbarist jooie trolls assigned to this site, while pretending to be Australians.

  52. Tyrion 2 says:
    @EugeneGur

    This is classic white man’s burden reasoning…because the US did something in Syria, it has to do something in Yemen….because some immigrants were let in, all immigrants must be let in…because there was a Marshall plan for Europe there must be one for Africa…

    Otherwise it is… unfair… hypocritical… racist… imperialist…neo-colonial… the cause of all that is evil and wrong in the world…

    I’ve read this same “logic” a million times and in a million contexts. It has never made any sense.

    Indeed, I’ve always felt ashamed for those using it to do their begging. It is how one sibling complains to their parents about some favour shown to another. Why have you made white people the Yemenis’ parents?

    • Replies: @peterAUS
    , @EugeneGur
  53. peterAUS says:
    @EugeneGur

    ….in Srebretica, it proved difficult to start the trouble. So, an ingenious tool was employed: snipers that shot indiscriminately at all sides. Everyone blamed the others, and the fight started.

    Hahaha….you sure it was like that?
    Any chance you could provide a source/link, please? Just one. Promise I’ll read it.

    The same exact tactics was used in Kiev in 2013 – if it works, why fix it?

    Actually, the tactics couldn’t have been more different, mate.

    Srebrenica and Kiev have nothing in common, except there was shooting and killings among humans.

    What’s your point?

    That’s a hard one. Let me think, please……ah, yes…ignorance of the masses, perhaps? Related to the age of instant information and democratic process.
    Something like that.

    Your comment are, naturally, a shining exception to this rule.

    How would you know? I mean, it would require real knowledge about some things. Like Srebrenica, for example. Not only you of course. Most around here. And, really important, those 99.9.
    And…hehe….it’s really all available on Internet. Anyone wishing to know exactly what and how it all happened could do it in, say…….8 hours, tops.
    But, then, it’s 8 hours less time to do things people really want to do. Online shopping, for example. Or checking their Facebook.

    All good.

    • Replies: @Anon
  54. peterAUS says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Good comments here, so far.

  55. EugeneGur says:
    @Tyrion 2

    This is classic white man’s burden reasoning…because the US did something in Syria, it has to do something in Yemen….because some immigrants were let in, all immigrants must be let in…because there was a Marshall plan for Europe there must be one for Africa…

    This logic exists only in you imagination: I most certainly didn’t say any of this. My point was exactly the opposite – it’d be better for all concerned if the US did not interfere that much in the affaires of the other countries, because such interference hardly ever does any good and most often does a lot of harm. The US tend to intervene on a wrong side in a wrong way as it does in Yemen.

    My example with the migrant child was simply used to point out the hypocrisy of the entire situation with Yemen, that’s all. The truth is that “white man burden” is a myth. That white man of yours never cared for anybody but himself and never scrupled to use other peoples for his own ends, to lie, cheat, kill, or whatever is necessary. Even a cursory look at the history of white people proves that.

    Why have you made white people the Yemenis’ parents?

    You don’t want to be – don’t be; nobody is expecting that of you. But why do you have to be their executioner?

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  56. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @David William Pear

    Oh for God’s sake, Saudi, Libya Iraq Oman Kuwait Quatar were primitive backwaters before their oil was drilled by western companies.

    Every one of the primitive sheiks managed to cut good deals with the oil companies and build very successful societies using the oil money Probably the sheiks weren’t so primitive after all.

    You’re the naive one who doesn’t realize that the money geologists expertise engineers and skilled workers to get oil pumped refinied and shipped it to the customers is even more important than living on top of an oil field for centuries

    Because you’re a White collar alleged intellectual you despise the blue collar geologist and workers who find the oil and get it to the customer.

    It takes 4: the oil countries the oil companies the oil shippers and the customers.

    Except for the British in Iran 140 years ago all the countries that had oil benefited. The Persians got rid of the English control of their oil industry when the first Pahlavi Shah overthrew the moron Quajars in 1925.

    Your articles are such a cliche of Mother Jones, The Nation, Socialist Workers of the World, The Guardian and the rest of the White hating liberals they’re laughable

  57. renfro says:
    @Anon

    It doesn’t make sense that oil is the reason is Saudi is attacking Yemen.

    You’re right. Its not about oil. “Its the oil!…is the standard retard go to for the too lazy to get the full story.

    Aljazeera can give you the back story that led to the war. Saudi wanted to maintain their leader in Yemen who was losing to the rebels inspired by the earlier ‘Arab Springs’ to over throw him. Plus ALQ has a position in Yemen. IOWs…its complicated….read on:

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2016/06/key-facts-war-yemen-160607112342462.html

    • Replies: @Anon
  58. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @EugeneGur

    What exactly do you suggest the average White man would be able to do about the situation in Yemen?

    I’m sure the liberal progressive solution is to airlift the entire population to America where they can go on welfare and or open up the standard crooked corrupt immigrant businesses with the help of SBA loans and tax exemptions for locating their little criminal enterprises in underprivileged and over criminalized neighborhoods.

    • Agree: Tyrion 2
    • Replies: @EugeneGur
  59. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @renfro

    Thanks. I’ll read it

  60. @The Alarmist

    “You still sure it was Bosnia that got contaminated and not Kosovo and Serbia proper?”

    No. I stand ready to be corrected and enlightened. Rather than “Bosnia”, I should have said “the former Yogoslavia”
    ( https://www.rferl.org/a/1095471.html )
    or
    “the Balkins” (https://www.nytimes.com/2001/01/07/world/radiation-from-balkan-bombing-alarms-europe.html)
    and not limited it to Bosnia without mentioning Serbia and Kosovo.

    Likewise, when discussing Vietnam, I probably should have included Cambodia and Laos, or said South East Asia.

    The point I am making is that the US has historically used biological, chemical and nuclear weapons to indiscriminately and purposely target and kill civilians in dirty wars of choice. My meaning is to corroborating historical evidence that the US is purposely destroying Yemen, without regard to the civilian population, and using cholera, starvation and deprivation of the necessities to maintain life to demoralize Yemen’s will to defend itself.

    The bombs that the US has supplied to the Saudis are extremely accurate. With the US active participation in targeting, command and control, etc., the US bears responsibility for direct hits on civilian targets such as school buses, hospitals, water treatment plants, etc.

    When the US is unsuccessful in one of its dirty wars it has a history of completely destroying the country, civilians and all, as punishment and as an example to others that might resist the US with armed force: Korea, Vietnam, Libya, Syria, to name a few.

    “More importantly, what’s your take on “bombing…civilian targets such as homes and buses…”?

    Is this a trick question? Off the top of my head, I am against all US wars of aggression, so there would be no circumstance in that case to bomb civilians. The US should be out of the business of dirty wars and wars of choice. War should be reserved for defense, not so-called preemptive wars, for wars in the interests of US corporations and natural resource wars, empire, global domination and neoliberal New World Order.

    If the US were really committed to the ideals of democracy and a free market economy, then all the US would need to do is lead by example and most of the world would follow. But obviously the US does not believe its own propaganda, so it uses violence to try and enforce its will on other people.

    When I was in SF during the mid-60′s urban warfare was no a priority. My training was in jungle warfare. I was what I think they now call a plan vanilla SF medic, “winning the hearts and minds” on an A team.

    • Replies: @peterAUS
  61. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @redmudhooch

    I despise cutthroat cannibal capitalism as much as I despise White hating liberals. But at least the capitalists don’t screech their hatred of Whites in every newspaper and magazine article, every TV show TV news every movie and every classroom in the country from K thru PHD.

  62. Anon[424] • Disclaimer says:
    @peterAUS

    Peter Autrali anus , you are sabotaging every comment with vile bad intentioned pseudoremarks ” are you sure ” ” how do you know ” ” please ,a link , source ” ” what`s your point ” . You are a negativistic defiant disgusting fart , shut up .

    • Replies: @nsa
  63. anonymous[333] • Disclaimer says:

    The Saudis have spent fantastic sums of money in weapons purchases from the US so now the US has to follow through and support them to the hilt in their war against Yemen. Can’t let a good customer down, can we? The Saudis weren’t just buying weapons but support and protection also. How much of this war is actually being run by the Saudis and how much is being carried out by Americans working on their behalf is hard to say since there’s much incentive to shroud this subject but it wouldn’t be surprising to learn that it’s a mostly US run operation. The Saudis have to be shown that being a customer of the US pays off and that their war will be successful. For the US it’s business, just about money, that’s appears to be the main consideration. Humanitarian considerations aren’t a factor at all and have never been throughout American history. All American wars have been dirty wars to some extent. Yemen is obscure enough for the average American citizen not to care much about. War crimes are what other countries do, not the good ole US of Ayyye. For a person with a humanitarian outlook there’s little reason to be optimistic.

  64. Tyrion 2 says:
    @EugeneGur

    You don’t want to be – don’t be; nobody is expecting that of you. But why do you have to be their executioner

    The war between Yemen and Saudi Arabia is a war between Arabs. When are you guys going to stop slaughtering each other? (I think probably when you stop allocating responsibility to the Americans for all of your problems…like you constantly slaughtering each other.)

  65. Agent76 says:
    @David William Pear

    Thanks for your time and comment.

    Government schooling is the tool of choice for the Banker’s and War’s.

    After leaving The Washington Post in 1977, Carl Bernstein spent six months looking at the relationship of the CIA and the press during the Cold War years. His 25,000-word cover story, published in Rolling Stone on October 20, 1977, is reprinted below.

    THE CIA AND THE MEDIA BY CARL BERNSTEIN

    How Americas Most Powerful News Media Worked Hand in Glove with the Central Intelligence Agency and Why the Church Committee Covered It Up In 1953, Joseph Alsop, then one of America’s leading syndicated columnists, went to the Philippines to cover an election.

    https://www.carlbernstein.com/magazine_cia_and_media.php

  66. renfro says:
    @David William Pear

    I think the above statement shows that you have a very basic lack of understanding of how neoliberalism and capitalism works in the real world.

    Almost every country the US is enemies with are the ones that want to use their own natural resources and sell them to the world for the betterment of their own citizens. Capitalists want to maximize their profits by not sharing the profits of a countries wealth with the citizens of the country that owns it.

    Instead oil companies would rather steal oil or payoff a corrupt autocracy to let them.

    Anon’s comment was not entirely wrong. Yemen is a case in point ….re your mention of Hunt Oil.
    I dont think you understand how oil companies work in foreign countries.

    Yemen had tried without much success to fully develop their oil fields…..that is why they entered into a ‘profit sharing’ oil production agreement with Hunt. These profit sharing agreements are the norm between countries and oil development companies…..the development companies like Hunt put up all the up front cost, which is a monumental investment subject to all kinds of risk…..such as wars, a country’s decision to ‘nationalize’ all assets such as oil production facilities as Iran did previously, etc.. These deals are not ‘stealing’ and the same as if I needed capital and expertise to start a business and agreed to giving an investor a share of profits in return for a specified length of time to recoup your investment and make a profit.

    Hunt had a 20 yr contract subject to a 5 yr extension….Hunt didn’t get the extension because the Yemen parliament didn’t approve it…..it ended up in the ICC court with both suing each other….Yemen won.

  67. peterAUS says:
    @David William Pear

    Khm…actually…it was my handle, not Alarmist, but anyway.

    “You still sure it was Bosnia that got contaminated and not Kosovo and Serbia proper?”

    No. I stand ready to be corrected and enlightened. Rather than “Bosnia”, I should have said “the former Yogoslavia”
    ( https://www.rferl.org/a/1095471.html )
    or
    “the Balkins” (https://www.nytimes.com/2001/01/07/world/radiation-from-balkan-bombing-alarms-europe.html)
    and not limited it to Bosnia without mentioning Serbia and Kosovo.

    Nice.

    Likewise, when discussing Vietnam, I probably should have included Cambodia and Laos, or said South East Asia.
    The point I am making is that the US has historically used biological, chemical and nuclear weapons to indiscriminately and purposely target and kill civilians in dirty wars of choice. My meaning is to corroborating historical evidence that the US is purposely destroying Yemen, without regard to the civilian population, and using cholera, starvation and deprivation of the necessities to maintain life to demoralize Yemen’s will to defend itself.

    Pretty much.

    The bombs that the US has supplied to the Saudis are extremely accurate. With the US active participation in targeting, command and control, etc., the US bears responsibility for direct hits on civilian targets such as school buses, hospitals, water treatment plants, etc.

    It does.

    When the US is unsuccessful in one of its dirty wars it has a history of completely destroying the country, civilians and all, as punishment and as an example to others that might resist the US with armed force: Korea, Vietnam, Libya, Syria, to name a few.

    It has.

    “More importantly, what’s your take on “bombing…civilian targets such as homes and buses…”?

    Is this a trick question?

    No it isn’t. It’s one of those common sense questions to filter “progtards” out. Those who say “guns are bad”, “violence is wrong” and similar.

    Off the top of my head, I am against all US wars of aggression, so there would be no circumstance in that case to bomb civilians. The US should be out of the business of dirty wars and wars of choice. War should be reserved for defense, not so-called preemptive wars, for wars in the interests of US corporations and natural resource wars, empire, global domination and neoliberal New World Order.
    If the US were really committed to the ideals of democracy and a free market economy, then all the US would need to do is lead by example and most of the world would follow. But obviously the US does not believe its own propaganda, so it uses violence to try and enforce its will on other people

    That’s fine, even admirable.
    I just feel that you are mixing war objectives and tactics. The question remains.

    I’ll try to help:
    Can US bomb a home where a couple of enemy combatants took shelter?
    Can US bomb a bus which carries a couple of enemy combatants?
    Simple question.

    When I was in SF during the mid-60′s urban warfare was no a priority. My training was in jungle warfare.

    Doesn’t matter.
    Jungle:
    Can US bomb a home, simple shack in a jungle, where a couple of enemy combatants made a MG nest in? You HAVE seen those I am sure.
    Can US bomb a donkey cart (for a lack of buses there) which carries a box of ammo for the MG above?

    I was what I think they now call a plan vanilla SF medic, “winning the hearts and minds” on an A team.

    Complements for that, and I do mean it.

    Still, war is a business of killing and maiming human beings when you get really down to it.

    So, I am sure, though, had your team been assaulted by enemy and you left as the last man standing (or laying prone….) you’d fired that M-60 at those shadows crawling into hand grenade range.

    I do feel you should refresh your knowledge about urban combat, especially in Third World, that part of the Earth in particular.
    Emphasis on
    - blending with civilian population
    -using civilians as shields
    -putting crew manned weapons close/in hospitals
    -moving own forces using ambulances and similar stuff.
    You got to keep up. Oh, and even killing your own people and blaming it on enemy and such.

    Or, for some reason, you believe Houthis are above all that?

  68. FO337 says:
    @Anon101618

    Agreed with Mr Pear here: Good writing, of which I’d enjoy seeing more.

  69. @Anon

    Oman was the home of Sinbad the Sailor and an advanced seafaring power for its time. It owned Zanzibar at one time.

  70. @renfro

    Yemen was such a basket case that unlike Oman or Dubai it was impossible for the West to do business there.

    Things got worse when the Berlin Wall collapsed and South Yemen was no longer a Communist Vassal state.

    Oil or no oil, there was no way for the West to do any sort of business there.

    • Replies: @David William Pear
  71. peterAUS says:
    @peterAUS

    Actually, I do have another question, if I may:

    Regarding

    When I was in SF during the mid-60′s urban warfare was no a priority. My training was in jungle warfare.

    In my book (and I am pretty sure in everybody’s) you ARE an ex-military first and all the rest second. You don’t do it and just walk away, especially those really committed and SF were/are/will be that type.

    So, from a purely,say, that viewpoint, why you haven’t kept up with the “trade” ?

    I mean, your passion and activism are related to modern warfare. So, how come you missed the importance of URBAN combat in modern, let alone future, wars ?

    Just curious.

    Because, when you get deep enough into the subject, especially in that theater, well, some interesting conclusions could come up.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  72. nsa says:
    @Anon

    PeteAuschwitz is a jooie troll assigned to this site with the purpose of obfuscation, deflection, and meaningless gassy bloviation…….all the while pretending to be an Australian. Anyone who has actually lived in Australia can easily see through the fraud. Chances are he/she/it couldn’t tell a meat pie from a taco.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  73. denk says:

    murikkan crimes against humanities….
    Exhibit Ex Yugo.

    Recorded by their own MSM.

    [MORE]

    An Open Letter to Lieutenant General Michael Short

    Commander, 16th Air Force, United States Air Forces, Europe Commander, Allied Forces, Southern Europe

    Dear General Short:

    On 21 October, Reuters reported: “His voice breaking with emotion at a Senate hearing, the U.S. Air Force general who headed NATO’s spring bombing of Serbia lashed out at France on Thursday for repeatedly vetoing proposed targets in Belgrade.” You were also quoted as saying, “This is a personal thing with me.” You explained that your son flew 40 missions in the A-10 in Kosovo and that he was hit by an SA-13, and that, “He called me that night on a secure phone and the first words were ‘Don’t tell mom’.”

    As the wife of a retired Air Force fighter pilot and the mother of two sons, I share your concern for the safety of those whom we love; however, General, just as my husband was a legitimate target when he flew his missions over Vietnam, your son was a legitimate target, unlike the civilians he bombed.

    I now ask you, General:

    Was it your son whose bombs hit a bridge in central Serbia crowded with traffic and pedestrians on a Sunday afternoon, where 17 people were wounded and nine people died, including “a priest with his head blasted away?” (Reuters, 30 May). Or was it your son who, four minutes after the initial attack, hit the bridge again just as help arrived for the surviving victims?
    [typical murikkan M.O., double tapping]

    - Was it your son whose bombs decapitated a Serbian child? “We found the head of a child in a garden and many limbs in the mud. But you don’t want to report that. CNN filmed the bodies, but they don’t show them on television” (The Independent, 29 April).

    - Was it your son whose bombs dismembered Serbian children making it almost impossible to match the children’s torsos with their arms and legs, although several were recognized by their sneakers? (The Guardian, 18 May).

    - Was it your son whose bombs buried people alive under tons of rubble from destroyed apartment buildings?

    - Was it your son whose bombs hit the convoy of ethnic Albanians reducing the victims to ashes, and then have your NATO pimp spokesperson, Jamie Shea, have the gall to deny that NATO pilots, possibly your son, were responsible for this atrocity by blaming it on the Serbs?

    - Was it your son who bombed hospitals, schools, orphanages, cemeteries, churches, 14th century monasteries on the World Heritage list, in a barbaric act to destroy Serbian culture, society and religion?

    - Was it your son whose bombs hit oil supplies polluting the air so that civilians couldn’t breath, as well as water supplies, civilian apartments, civilian factories so as to destroy the quality of life and terrorize those who were not killed? And let us not forget the pollution of the Danube caused by NATO bombs which has affected all the surrounding nations’ international trade costing them millions of dollars.

    - Was it the depleted uranium from the shells of the Gatling Gun on your son’s A-10 that poisoned the soil and the air of the Serbian people so that their children will be born deformed, and rendered the soil unfit toproduce food for the people to eat?

    - Or perhaps it was your son who bombed the Chinese Embassy in another “mistake.

    http://web.archive.org/web/20001201194300/http://www.snd-us.com/Liberty/sj_1758.htm

  74. @peterAUS

    I know where you are coming from, and no the Houthis are not above any of that, just as the VC weren’t. It was/is their homeland. FYI because so many guys bs that they were SF (http://www.specialforcesbooks.com/A241.htm I was no Rambo or war hero, but I understand the addiction to war. It was a long time ago, but I never got over it.
    What did it all mean after it was all over? Regards,

    • Replies: @peterAUS
  75. @peterAUS

    No, I do not have any realistic solutions. What we call capitalism is not the end of history. If the human race survives long enough it might evolve from the archaic state of over-production for its own sake and consumerism, advertising, and war to absorb the excess production and waste of human and finite resources. It would take another set of values to replace GDP and accumulation as the ultimate meaning of life. What that would look like I do not know, but the possibilities are fascinating. John Kenneth Galbraith wrote a fascinating book over half a century ago called the “Affluent Society”. He had some great ideas. People got excited about it for a few years and then it was forgotten.

    • Replies: @peterAUS
  76. @Jeff Stryker

    “there was no way for the West to do any sort of business there.”

    That is why the West is pissed off and wants to destroy Yemen. If they can’t have it then they don’t want anybody to have it. imho.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  77. @renfro

    “Hunt didn’t get the extension because the Yemen parliament didn’t approve it”

    Interesting follow up on that which I have not pursued, nor what happened after or what happened to the oil contract.

    My understanding is that oil had a lot to do with unification in 1990. I think I remember reading that the Chinese and Russians got involved, as well as the US majors.

    One thing I am fairly certain of is that the money ended up in the pockets of Ali Abdullah Saleh and his cronies. The people did get some oil subsidies, but when Hadi raised the price of diesel in 2014 at the insistence of the IMF, the higher fuel prices plus rapid privatization of public employees infuriated the people. They then backed the Houthi-Saleh forces and threw Hadi out.

    That is when Hadi ultimately ended up in Saudi Arabia.

    • Replies: @renfro
  78. @peterAUS

    Urban guerrilla warfare problem in the US cities and this is why the police are increasingly militarized.

  79. @David William Pear

    There are many basket-case countries the US “can’t have”. For that matter there is a Muslim rebellion in the Philippines-supposedly a US possession.

    So why would Yemen take priority over Mindanao or these other “basket case” countries.

    Look at Africa.

  80. peterAUS says:
    @David William Pear

    Good to see such a post here. This site is awash with …..anyway…..having no idea about it.

    I know where you are coming from, and no the Houthis are not above any of that, just as the VC weren’t.

    Exactly.

    More importantly, that’s the new norm of modern warfare.

    At one side The Empire with mind boggling technological advantage; at the other those trying to resist it with mind boggling ruthlessness.
    The local civilian population caught between with, naturally, leaning towards the resistance. If not for any other reason then because of fear of that ruthlessness.

    The problem is that both sides in that conflict spout that moral superiority. It gets pathetic when Western progtards join on the resistance side.

    There is an iron logic behind that type of warfare. But, and the big but, that’s not place for civilized morality, let alone Western middle class sensibility.

    FYI because so many guys bs that they were SF (http://www.specialforcesbooks.com/A241.htm I was no Rambo or war hero, but I understand the addiction to war.

    Well, it takes 60 seconds in face to face chat to recognize the real from fake.
    Online a bit longer but easy. BTW, I wasn’t one of such types. But, worked with them. And, sometimes, having them work for my outfits (or so I say). That’s for the former.

    For the later, well…….personally… I always found medical personnel the bravest in the field.
    I mean..hehe….one can curl behind a big boulder, tune inside and simply pray for all that to stop; a medic has to go into it and help a guy screaming. A long way there and back. And all that done with cool and competent head.

    It was a long time ago, but I never got over it.

    Of course.

    What did it all mean after it was all over?

    Depends on a person, I guess. Some people go in, out like nothing happened. Some fall apart.

    Some, well, find the experience personally enriching and, well, beneficial to handle the life afterwards.
    I mean, if you could go through that, handling the civilian work/life environment should be much easier. Although, sometimes, there are doubts, I guess.

    Like any school I guess. Doesn’t make an idiot smart. It could make a smart man smarter. Better able to get the realities around. Most of the time. Sometimes, though, not easy seeing worms having power over you. Those wiggly types when you lift the rock. Soft, flabby, weaklings making decisions that affect your life. Top corporate management characters you know wouldn’t last 10 minutes in the field.
    Sometimes you just imagine them there, a?

    War is around us.
    Look just at topics being discussed here. The thing is….hehe…that people who have no clue about all that are, most of the time, the most vocal and prolific.
    Funny, in a tragicomic way.

    • Replies: @peterAUS
    , @jacques sheete
  81. @nsa

    NSA

    I suspect many of the self-professed Westerners on this site are Indians or a few Iranians pretending to be middle-aged Westerners. It is clear that many are young, maybe even in their late teens.

    They are more likely to be Muslim than Jewish, however.

  82. peterAUS says:
    @David William Pear

    No, I do not have any realistic solutions.

    Me neither.
    Working on it, or, better, trying to recognize somebody who does. No luck so far.

    If the human race survives long enough it might evolve from the archaic state of over-production for its own sake and consumerism, advertising, and war to absorb the excess production and waste of human and finite resources. It would take another set of values to replace GDP and accumulation as the ultimate meaning of life.

    Agree.

    As for this:

    What that would look like I do not know, but the possibilities are fascinating.

    They are.

    Not optimistic though.Probably the age.

  83. denk says:

    Punishing the population to ‘push’ for a rebellion,
    Drying the pond to deprive sanctuary for insurgents,
    The above are all war crimes forbidden by the Geneva Convention
    .

    On Oct. 8, U.S. fighter bombers carried out what the Pentagon called a “precision strike” against “terrorist leaders” in Falluja, a sprawling city of 300,000 west of Baghdad. For the past two months Falluja has been the target of a bombing campaign. According to the New York Times, the attack wounded 17 people, nine of whom were women and children. The victims were apparently from a wedding party that had just dispersed.

    The Times went on to quote a “senior Pentagon official” who said, “We know what the strike was supposed to hit and we hit it. If a wedding party was going on, well, it was in concert with a meeting of a top Zarqawi lieutenant.” Zarqawi is a Jordanian who has claimed credit for numerous roadside bombings and assassinations in Iraq.

    But according to Article 50 of the Conventions, “The presence within the civilian population of individuals who do not come within the definition of civilians does not deprive the population of its civilian character.”

    In short, the attack violated the Conventions, and the “Pentagon official”—most likely Assistant Secretary of Defense, Paul Wolfowitz— should be arrested and tried for violating international law. Since the attack constituted a “grave breach” of the Conventions, the official could also be charged under the 1996 U.S. War Crimes Act.

    In the same article, the Times also quoted a “senior Bush Administration official” as saying that the bombing was helpful for exploiting “fault lines” in Falluja, and that it would push the “citizenry” of Falluja to deny sanctuary and assistance to the insurgents, “adding “that’s a good thing.”

    The “official” might, indeed, think it was “a good thing,” but it also violated Article 51, which states: “The civilian population as such, as well as individual civilians, shall not be the object of attack.”

    A “Pentagon official” also told the Times: “If there are civilians dying in connection with these attacks, and with the destruction, the locals at some point have to make a decision. Do they want to harbor the insurgents and suffer the consequences that come with that?”

    In other words, terrify the civilian population into cooperating, a strategy that Article 51 explicitly forbids: “Acts or threats of violence, the primary purpose of which is to spread terror among the civilian population, are prohibited.”

    http://web.archive.org/web/20041108003603/http://www.counterpunch.org/hallinan11052004.html

    Why are people still defending the indefensible ?
    USA has been deliberately targeting civilians since ww2.
    QED

    All its prez should be tried for crimes against humanities . [1]
    BUt who’s gonna apprehend uncle sham, that outlaw with the biggest gun, who’s still strutting around as self appointed
    judge, prosecutor and executioner ?

    http://web.archive.org/web/20041108003603/http://www.counterpunch.org/hallinan11052004.html

    [1]
    I wouldnt even dignify those as war crimes, those aint wars but one sided massacre of defenceless soldiers and citizens, in most cases no war was ever declared, just plain naked aggression using false pretext.
    These days they wouldnt even bother for any pretext anymore,
    just attack, invade any sovereign country willy nilly…..
    cuz they can.

  84. @Jeff Stryker

    “Look at Africa”

    It has been awhile since I have, but the US is up to its knees in Sub-Saharan Africa, e.g. the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is probably the richest country on the planet in natural resources. The US supporting génocidaire and Clinton/Obama buddy Paul Kagame. Over 8 million killed.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  85. peterAUS says:
    @peterAUS

    Now, just to post what I think it’s the fundamental difference between us.

    You, I assume, believe if “we” stop our wars/interventions/whatever in M.E/Far East, Islam will stop being a problem for West.

    I believe it will not. It will gather its strength and try to expand.

    Preferably, for them, into Europe and then second choice Russian Federation.
    Far East Islam would also try to expand but “just” into Philippines and China.
    Hehe…thinking of which, no wonder why Americans don’t much give a shit about it.

    So, yes, fundamentally we, I feel, shall disagree there, as: “better to fight them there than closer to home”.

    Now, because the difference in technology is as it is, here we are: “we” bomb their hospitals, they hide in those hospitals.
    They wouldn’t last a minute in open, “fair” fight, and only idiot would try to do that. They can be a lot, but aren’t idiots. The BOOK has been longer around then PNAC. Probably will, too.

    If one happy day Islam somehow changes into something else……….yeah, sure….

  86. @David William Pear

    I suspect the issue with Saudi which comes down to oil production will be far more important than Yemen.

    Stagflation etc. comes from the barrel of an oil drum.

    • Replies: @David William Pear
  87. @Jeff Stryker

    I suspect Saudi has far more problems than stagflation at the moment.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  88. renfro says:
    @David William Pear

    FYI…..you said elsewhere that the US’s war mongering was ‘to steal the wealth of other countries.’

    If that was the case in all our invasions someone neglected to collect the loot.

    In Iraq Total Oil company of France got the bulk of the oil contracts, not US companies.

    Total Oil France is also in Yemen and Yemen just shipped in August 500,000 barrels to China who was the top bidder for crude out of 35 bidders.

    The US will get nothing, zero, zilch in Yemen for helping Saudi in their war on Yemen.
    Saudi Arabia has already set up an oil base in collaboration with French Total in the Southern parts of Kharkhir region near the Saudi border.
    The Houthi claim Saudi has been stealing Yemen oil and I don’t doubt it. MbS will steal anything that isn’t nailed down to help replenish Saudis dwindling treasury.

    What the US leadership tells itself (helped along by special interest ) is that the “status quo” must be maintained for ‘stability’ even when it means protecting states such as Saudi. Our politicians are too stupid to see that this is no longer a strategy for stability.

    In the case of Libya , that was most likely related to oil because Gadhafi was making noises about nationalizing all oil production which would have throw out US companies.

    The US isn’t in the habit of warring for oil or to protect US oil companies because the oil companies themselves are very adept at bribing the right rulers to get what they want unless its crazy man like Gadhafi pissed off over other political slights by the US.

    The other exception was the overthrow of Iran but even there oil was not the original reason , altough some US oil companies operated under the US installed Shah …..it was for the British who never really withdrew from the ME after their ‘empire days’ and convinced Eisenhower that Iran was going communist. It went down like this…
    Iranian President Mohammad Mosaddeq nationalized the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company in order to ensure that more oil profits remain in Iran. After he nationalizes it, Mosaddeq realizes that Britain may want to overthrow his government, so he closes the British Embassy and sends all British civilians, including its intelligence operatives, out of the country. Britain finds itself with no way to stage the coup it desires, so it approaches the American intelligence community for help. Their first approach results in abject failure when Harry Truman throws the British representatives out of his office, stating that “We don’t overthrow governments; the United States has never done this before, and we’re not going to start now.” After Eisenhower is elected in November 1952, the British have a much more receptive audience, and plans for overthrowing Mosaddeq are produced. The British intelligence operative who presents the idea to the Eisenhower administration later will write in his memoirs, “If I ask the Americans to overthrow Mosaddeq in order to rescue a British oil company, they are not going to respond. This is not an argument that’s going to cut much mustard in Washington. I’ve got to have a different argument.…I’m going to tell the Americans that Mosaddeq is leading Iran towards Communism.” This argument wins over the Eisenhower administration, who promptly decides to organize a coup in Iran . [Stephen Kinzer, 7/29/2003]

    You can rant all you want about US war mongering…I agree its bad. But you need to quit being a one note johnny ascribing all of it to greed and imperilism and look at it on a case by case basis. Some of it is just plain stupidity, the influence of allies and little boys in congress who want to play with war toys and pretend to be Churchills at war.

    At any rate it is not ‘America’ doing this, it is ‘The Government’….which at any given time at least 50% of Americans hate.

    • Replies: @David William Pear
  89. @peterAUS

    Congratulations.

    You showed yourself to be truely ignorant in the face of truth.

    I won’t waste your time with a lengthy reply since you clearly belong to the type of people who can not handle opposing views without resorting to childish insults.

  90. @David William Pear

    …I will be glad to discuss it with you intelligently.

    You just made a promise you cannot keep. The thing to do with trolls is mock them if you can’t ignore them.

  91. @Anon101618

    Economic sanctions and trade embargos are barbaric siege warfare against civilian populations.

    Consider that this is the main way that the USA won both World Wars, and that they still form the ideological justification for US imperial dominance, and you’ll understand why it acts the way it does.

    The US and Brit “elite” didn’t only “win” that way, but started the wars that way, and it’s especially clear in the way FDR and his Red handlers intentionally goaded the Japanese militants, a minority in Japan, into attacking Pearl.

    In fact, while people to this day are outraged by that attack, they completely ignore the fact that only 3 months prior to that attack, the “Allies” did something analogous but more criminal by attacking, unprovoked, neutral Persia,sinking it’s entire navy, occupying the country, confiscating its oil industry and establishing the Persian Corridor through which the Red murderer, Stalin was supplied with enough war material for 60 Soviet divisions.

    Furthermore, the Allied “elite” continued starvation blockades on Germany long after they “won.”

  92. @Anon

    Your articles are such a cliche of …

    And your “rebuttal” is a litany of cliches as well.

    Go to Detroit, Baltimore, Chicago,DC and a long list of other US cities and you’ll find out what a primitive backwater is even with access to relatively cheap energy.

  93. @Jeff Stryker

    There are many basket-case countries the US “can’t have”.

    He didn’t say “US”. He said “West.” The distinction is important and it’s not too smart to twist a person’s argument into something he did NOT say.

    FYI, if you include Israel as part of the rest, then maybe you can begin to understand what may be going on.

  94. @peterAUS

    The thing is….hehe…that people who have no clue about all that are, most of the time, the most vocal and prolific.

    Such as yourself. Not only prolific but pathetic and easy to see through too.

    All your yacking about bravery is evidence of your knuckle-headedness. I’ll try to dig up Twain’s comments on physical vs moral bravery, meanwhile you should introduce yourself to Smedley Butler’s thoughts on war.

    “… I spent most of my [33 years in the Marine Corps] being a high class muscle- man for Big Business, for Wall Street and for the Bankers.

    In short, I was a racketeer, a gangster for [crony] capitalism.”

    Major General Butler USMC, War is a Racket, 1935

    http://www.ratical.org/ratville/CAH/warisaracket.html

    Meanwhile here’s something else to chew on.

    …we have invited clean young men to shoulder a discredited musket and do bandit’s work under a flag which bandits have been accustomed to fear, not to follow; we have debauched America’s honor and blackened her face before the world. . .

    -Mark Twain, “To the Person Sitting in Darkness,” (1901)

    http://xroads.virginia.edu/~DRBR/sitting.html

    Note the dates.

    • Agree: Rurik, renfro
  95. @renfro

    Agreed, it is not the US public that wants war.

    The one-note johnny is that the people who benefit from war are not the people paying for it. That is the scam.

    While the US did not get the Iraq oil, the war profiteers walked off with $5 Trillion, and probably much more, including a C-130 with a billion dollars in cash. It is the American people that shelled out the money one way or another. It is the special interests from United Fruit, Standard Oil, Dow Chemical, agri-business, banks, etc. that profit.

    I’m guessing that it has cost $50,000 per US person for the Iraq war alone.

    That is pretty much the story for over 200 years of US history. The so-called spinoffs from military spending for the American people (e.g. Teflon coated frying pans) is peanuts. If the money had been spent for the general welfare of the American people, we would all have universal healthcare, modern mass transportation, public works, secure retirement, etc.

    Your history is correct, but Ike overthrew Mosaddeq so that US oil companies could muscle in on BP. John Foster Dulles was a Wall Street lawyer influence peddler who overthrew countries in the interest of his clients. His brother Allen did it for fun and excitement and to impress the ladies.

    e.g. does any intelligent person really believe that a tiny island like Cuba with 10 million people is a threat to the US, or that it has so much wealth that the average American cannot live the American dream without it. But sugar, tobacco and banana plantations and the mafia, and the politicians they bribe, don’t care how much money the US government spends, to “liberate” Cuba. It is not their money, but they walk away with the profits.

    It is called socialism for the corporations, wealthy families, and gangsters; and capitalism for the US people.

    Well, that is my opinion.

    • Replies: @peterAUS
    , @bjondo
  96. renfro says:

    It is the special interests from United Fruit, Standard Oil, Dow Chemical, agri-business, banks, etc. that profit.

    I don’t disagree with your rant about wars.
    But those above are the entities you should be writing about …..it does no good to just write about the evil US.
    You should hone in on the real culprits, name names so the public knows who to go after…..so they at least know who to watch that is manipulating for wars and can confront their politicians on it.

    The corruption of our politicians is our Real Problem. Cure that and you cure most of our warring…..and other problems. Unfortunately that would require Americans to Unite Against Corruption…..but being team playing sheep they usually only unite against the other team and everyone loses.

    • Replies: @David William Pear
  97. EugeneGur says:
    @Anon

    I’m sure the liberal progressive solution is to airlift the entire population to America

    Yes, certainly, there is nothing else to be done, and every immigrant is a crook and all their businesses are corrupt and criminal enterprises, and there are no corrupt non-immigrant businesses, and the usual crap. You know, Sir, in one short comment you managed to deliver the entire pack of idiotic anti-immigrant prejudices – it is remarkable.

    How about the US stop supporting The Saudi Arabia thugs with weapons? How about lifting the criminal blockade that doesn’t allow food, medicine and necessary supplies to get in?

    The Saudis would’ve never dared to do this to another country if it hasn’t been for the wholehearted support by the US and – should I add? – people like your worthy self.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  98. peterAUS says:
    @David William Pear

    ..it is not the US public that wants war….

    I wouldn’t be so sure about that.

    As a person who’s been in war you could try to see that human activity in its totality.
    It’s not just money for the rich. Too simplistic.

    There are much deeper human issues there. Easy to blame just the “top” for that. Too easy.

    War is COMPLEX human activity.

    I don’t expect people who haven’t been “there” to try to understand it. Or, perhaps only, say, 5 % of perceptive people have that perception without the need to experience it.

    People who’ve been “there” get it much better, deeper. If/when they are intellectually curious, properly educated, well, than you can see those insights into the nature of war and mankind itself. Sometimes uncomfortable.

    I guess you’ve read those classics: “Thin Red Line”, “Young Lions” and “The Naked and the Dead”.

    My point is….until we understand, really, what the war is all about it won’t stop. Or it will, after the M.A.D.

    As for this:

    If the money had been spent for the general welfare of the American people, we would all have universal healthcare, modern mass transportation, public works, secure retirement, etc.

    Probably,but not entirely sure about that.

  99. bjondo says:
    @David William Pear

    It is the special interests from United Fruit, Standard Oil, Dow Chemical, agri-business, banks, etc. that profit.

    And
    the most special of specials would be
    the Toxic Yid Garbage Dump.

    Some refer to TYGD
    as Ersatz Yidrael.

    5ds

  100. gT says:
    @Anon

    America doesn’t want to steal Yemen’s oil, its Saudi Arabia who wants to steal Yemen’s oil – because Saudi Arabia is running out of easy oil.

    Years ago the stories about Saudi Arabia running out of oil and overstating their reserves were prevalent but seem to have disappeared from the news since then.

    But the story is still out there on Google

    https://seekingalpha.com/article/4098775-saudi-arabian-oil-running-will-affect-long-term-oil-markets

    And just like America has got no issues with Israel stealing Palestinian land and killing Palestinians, so America has go not problems with Saudi intentions towards Yemen land and oil and killing Yemenis.

    Its a pity Russia doesn’t pump lots of weaponry into Yemen to increase the costs of the Saudi / US / British / Israeli intervention, because those Yemenis sure like fighting and with all those mountains and rough terrain they can fight forever.

  101. Tyrion 2 says:
    @EugeneGur

    You know, Sir, in one short comment you managed to deliver the entire pack of idiotic anti-immigrant prejudices – it is remarkable.

    How about rather than making America like the Middle East, Middle Easterners stay in their countries and make them great again?

    Or they could just whinge about some variation of of neo-imperialism and achieve absolutely nothing but killing each other…like the last 100 years…

    • Replies: @peterAUS
    , @EugeneGur
  102. peterAUS says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Hehe…..the beauty of that conviction that “my” side is 100 % right and “their” wrong.

    How about shades of gray?

    Like: true, the CULTURES of those places aren’t compatible with having good life for average people.
    BUT, also, the “they have it, let’s get it” attitude from outside doesn’t help either.

    So, in this particular case, yes, Yemen hasn’t been a place to live well. Probably can’t. Not as long as CULTURE of the place changes. Can’t wait……
    At the same time, naked armed robbery, mixed with medieval religious hatred by outside players doesn’t help too.

    True, that type of thinking 80 % people can’t handle. Percentage here is better; around 60 %.

    Great.

  103. @renfro

    I have to agree with you and it troubles me as a writer to just blame the US for this or that war. It is. For instance, it was not the “US” that invaded Iraq, but a small group that drives US foreign policy, which represents a complex small group of special interests that benefit. It takes a lot of propaganda, advertising like selling soap, to rile the US public to back a specific war.

    They play on the heart strings of the public that with all sorts of baloney that it is for human rights, democracy, fear of being attacked, honor, patriotism etc. Almost every war the US has been in is instigated by a false flag operation or exaggerated attack that cannot go unanswered.

    The above is what I find so fascinating about American History, especially the wars, regime changes, and foreign policy. It is like a whodunit. Once one mystery is solved, then it is the usual the same suspects that turn up again and again pushing the American people into another war.

    The American history books are then rewritten to conform to the falsehoods. It is made as boring as possible for kids in school who are made to memorize dates, names and places that have no meaning for them. People lose interest in history and then fall for the same old propaganda over and over again, because they never learn the real history, and it has been quickly forgotten.

    Orwell was very perceptive and he put it all down in his classic novel. To paraphrase: He who controls the present controls the past; he who controls the past controls the future.

    • Replies: @EugeneGur
  104. @peterAUS

    Or ..hehehe……it’s all just “bad Murica” thing around here?

    America leads the world. The fish rots from the head.

    What I have a problem with is that we have long since slipped past being a constitutional republic and have turned into a despotic oligarchic empire. Republics, so long as they function, safeguard the people that instituted it. Empires take their best citizens and burn them as fuel, first to go to new heights of power, and then merely to keep running. By the end of their life they’re filled with serfs begging for barbarians to take over.

    A republic requires a standard rule of law for everyone; an empire requires unlimited power for the rulers, which means law can’t have a standard. A republic requires open debate where it matters most; an empire forbids it. A republic acts selfishly in the interests of its’ people, while an empire undermines the interests of its people in favor of the interests of the ruling clique.

    Our generals used to be fired for failure, and blatant criminality on the part of politicians would earn them a jail cell, a lynch mob, or a bullet. Today, no general has been fired for job performance since WWII despite not winning a real war since WWII, and the examples of openly acknowledged criminality on the part of our government are far too numerous to list.

    We no longer have open debate in our society; see American Pravda for more details. People are commonly fired from their jobs and hounded out of respectable society for saying things that were respectable only 10-15 years ago.

    Finally, there has not been a war that has been in the interests of American citizens since at least 1914. At least the Civil War, as destructive as it was, helped remove slavery, which is cancerous for a republic; and the Indian Wars, full of atrocities and provocations by both sides, removed a threat to the security of actual Americans. Today, the US government screeches about how primitive people on the other side of the world are the biggest threat to our national security, and we better go invade them, but if you question why we’re eagerly importing millions of those dangerous terrorists, you’re a bigoted Nazi who has no place in our society.

    We can’t go on like this. Our society will fall. The most productive members will lose faith and check out, preferring not to try. Our lost moral compass will mean we become increasingly cruel, corrupt, greedy, and uncaring for the future. Criminals will prosper while honest men starve. Meanwhile, like the pied piper, we’ll lead the rest of the world with us, and because we have nukes, this imperial collapse will make the depopulation of Rome look tiny. This is inevitable unless we change our path.

    But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.

    • Replies: @peterAUS
  105. EugeneGur says:
    @Tyrion 2

    How about rather than making America like the Middle East, Middle Easterners stay in their countries and make them great again?

    Perhaps, they would if the US stoped interfering with the Middle East, engineering color revolutions and generally sowing chaos.

    Syria is a good example – it was a peaceful relatively developed secular country until the US got to work on it arming and encouraging every murderous freak to start a rebellion. Libya is another case in point – a prosperous country that not only produced no refugees but absorbed refugees from other Arab countries. But the West had to mess with it, Libya is destroyed and here we go.

    If you don’t want refugees coming to America, the best thing to do is to stop messing up their own countries. How hard is that to understand?

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    , @Avery
  106. EugeneGur says:
    @David William Pear

    it was not the “US” that invaded Iraq, but a small group that drives US foreign policy, which represents a complex small group of special interests that benefit.

    This is a tricky question whether the people are responsible for the wrong their government is doing. I believe they are, as a group. Unless, of course, they are so violently oppressed they have no saying in anything, which is clearly not the case in America.

    I also remember well the patriotic fever surrounding the Iraq war, with banners “We support our troops” everywhere. People literally genuflected before the Army personnel – saw it with my own eyes. Although it was obvious from the very beginning that war started under false pretenses.

    People lose interest in history and then fall for the same old propaganda over and over again,

    True, and yet the good God has given the people perfectly good brains, and they have the obligation to use them. If they don’t want to be responsible for their country and its behavior, they’ll end up being responsible for the crimes their country commits whether they like it or not and whether they know anything about it or not. And eventually there will be hell to pay.

    • Agree: RobinG
    • Replies: @peterAUS
  107. Tyrion 2 says:
    @EugeneGur

    until the US got to work on it arming and encouraging every murderous freak to start a rebellion.

    There seem to be a lot of murderous freaks over there, supposedly only passively waiting to be encouraged.

    If you don’t want refugees coming to America, the best thing to do is to stop messing up their own countries. How hard is that to understand?

    It is absolutely best for America to not mess up Middle Eastern countries, but those countries’ issues are a lot deeper than the sideshow of US involvement.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  108. @Tyrion 2

    Murderous freaks are not passive. Ask their own citizens.

    Europe copes with the refugee crisis. None of them really supported the Iraq war or had anything against Libya. No Atlantic ocean as a buffer zone.

    • Agree: Tyrion 2
  109. peterAUS says:
    @EugeneGur

    This is a tricky question whether the people are responsible for the wrong their government is doing.

    The most important question. The one Internet “chatters” have the biggest problem answering.

    I believe they are, as a group. Unless, of course, they are so violently oppressed they have no saying in anything, which is clearly not the case in America.

    Agree.

    …yet the good God has given the people perfectly good brains, and they have the obligation to use them. If they don’t want to be responsible for their country and its behavior, they’ll end up being responsible for the crimes their country commits whether they like it or not and whether they know anything about it or not.

    Pretty much.

    Of course, that applies only to West, Americans in particular.

    Populace of those fucked up countries, Syria one of them,are not responsible for the state of affairs there.
    As “Tyrion 2″ hinted at:

    There seem to be a lot of murderous freaks over there, supposedly only passively waiting to be encouraged

    those countries’ issues are a lot deeper than the sideshow of US involvement

    It looks as…hahaha…that

    And eventually there will be hell to pay.

    there has been a lot of paying there.

    Yemen included.

  110. peterAUS says:
    @Anon101618

    What I have a problem with is that we have long since slipped past being a constitutional republic and have turned into a despotic oligarchic empire.

    Yes.

    From

    A republic requires a standard rule of law

    To

    People are commonly fired from their jobs and hounded out of respectable society for saying things that were respectable only 10-15 years ago

    .
    More or less agree.

    Finally, there has not been a war that has been in the interests of American citizens since at least 1914.

    Disagree.
    Somebody, one day hopefully, would take a good and hard look at benefits of war for a common citizen. Unlikely it’ll happen here.

    We can’t go on like this. Our society will fall.

    It will transform.

    The most productive members will lose faith and check out, preferring not to try. Our lost moral compass will mean we become increasingly cruel, corrupt, greedy, and uncaring for the future. Criminals will prosper while honest men starve. Meanwhile, like the pied piper, we’ll lead the rest of the world with us, and because we have nukes, this imperial collapse will make the depopulation of Rome look tiny. This is inevitable unless we change our path.

    Pretty much.

    As for this:

    But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.

    Unlikely, IMHO.

    I’d put my house on the previous paragraph.
    Emphases on “the depopulation”. Some cavemen roaming around, if that.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  111. @peterAUS

    The US is separated by two oceans so it won’t really affect the rest of the world. If the US collapses Switzerland will get by. Australia is now firmly in the Asian sphere economically and increasingly culturally. Europe will do business with China.

  112. Avery says:
    @EugeneGur

    {Syria is a good example – it was a peaceful relatively developed secular country until the US got to work on it arming and encouraging every murderous freak to start a rebellion. }

    Syria is a very good example, but aren’t you forgetting a bunch of other guilty parties?
    The attempt to destroy Syria was wholly financed by KSA and other Gulf sheikdoms.

    Next comes Turkey.
    If not for Turkey, the Evil Empire project to destroy Syria would be near impossible, given Turkey’s long, porous border with Syria. The very long border made it very easy to pour in terrorists and weapons into Syria without much trouble. Even Sarin gas was reportedly supplied by Turks to the terrorists for the several chemical attacks and massacres of Syrian civilians by various terrorist groups (….naturally blaming the Syrian government). Turks even openly invaded and grabbed a chunk of Syria, until ejected by Russia.

    Along with those already listed, UK, France, Germany, Israel also were involved in the project to varying degrees.

    And lastly, it was not a ‘rebellion’: it was an invasion by foreign terrorists financed, trained, and armed by those listed.

    • Replies: @David William Pear
  113. Jo A-S says:

    Whilst the article is interesting, indeed, quite reasonable, I do take issue with the author’s apparent belief that the UN is a trustworthy body. Its members are, on the whole, dictators and crooks. In comparison, even Obam’s White House was fairly honest.

    Bosnia? Again, we were on the wrong side. Reading on the subject, the Serbs were, overall, the “good guys.” NOT whiter than white, I know, but better than the muslim faction.

    • Replies: @David William Pear
  114. Lot says:
    @Tyrion 2

    The Yemen War isn’t pointless and despicable, and the Saudis are supporting its internationally recognized government against Iranian backed rebels and Al Qaeda. Good for them!

  115. Tony M says:

    Fine article Mr. Pear, learned a lot from it and from your comments battling the usual-
    suspects, more power to your elbow, Sir.

    Comments including the latest one from ‘Lot’ are despicable inversions of the truth.

    • Replies: @David William Pear
  116. @Lot

    I only saw it from over the Oman border, as it was too dangerous to enter even when I was young, but Yemen is a complete desolate wilderness. A country hovering over the horn of Africa that is as from Palestine as Palestine is from Rome.

    The Saudis want to maintain their border with it. Fine. As does Oman.

    But we can be thankful that it is so geographically isolated. It is not like the war between Muslims and Christians in Yugoslavia. A country on the border of Western Europe.

    • Replies: @David William Pear
  117. @Jo A-S

    UN a trustworthy body?

    I do not know what I wrote to give you the impression that I thought any such thing. The UN was from the beginning and has become even more so a US lapdog and a tool of US imperialism.

    The UN does the bidding for the US. Only on rare occasions does the UN stand up against the dictates of the US. Even Russia and China acquiesce to the US rather than suffer the diplomatic consequences of getting into a brawl with the US.

    On rare occasions when even the powerless General Assembly votes contrary the pleasure of the US they have hell to pay. For example the vote against the US moving it embassy to Jerusalem.

  118. @Jeff Stryker

    Not so geographically isolated that the US is willing to kill millions of its people to force Yemen into the neoliberal new world order. The blowback could affect how much you pay for petrol when you filler up.

  119. @Lot

    You are just repeating the mainstream media story to the dumbed down public.

    • Replies: @Lot
  120. @Avery

    The KSA and other GCC states are the Frankenstein’s monster that US foreign policy stitched together from the body parts of the British Empire.

  121. Lot says:
    @David William Pear

    And you’re repeating the anti-US mainstream theory (bad USA! bad KSA! Good innocent Yemen rebels!) on a Holocaust denial website.

Current Commenter
says:

Leave a Reply - Comments on articles more than two weeks old will be judged much more strictly on quality and tone


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
Submitted comments become the property of The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS
PastClassics
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?
The evidence is clear — but often ignored
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?
Hundreds of POWs may have been left to die in Vietnam, abandoned by their government—and our media.