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Leonard Bernstein and the Jewish Cultural Ascendency
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Introduction

2018 marks the centenary of the birth of Jewish-American conductor, pianist, composer and teacher Leonard Bernstein. This milestone has seen a global bonanza of 2,500 concerts, programs, exhibitions and theatrical productions. Bernstein features prominently in the pantheon of “Jewish geniuses” as designated by the West’s Jewish-dominated cultural and intellectual establishment. Bernstein’s centenary year inevitably yielded hagiography: for his Jewish biographer Allen Shawn, he was not just a “genius” but “a powerful cultural and political voice and symbol, transcending all categories.”[A1]Allen Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014), 6. Mark Horowitz, curator of an exhibition at Philadelphia’s Jewish museum celebrating Bernstein’s “pride of tribe,” fully endorses this view, while for the Jewish music writer for the New Yorker, Alex Ross, Bernstein remains “American music’s dominant figure.”

Bernstein lived during the heyday of the recording industry, at the dawn of the television era and of video recording. He left behind what is possibly the most extensive documentation in recordings, films, and on paper of any musician in history. His archive at the Library of Congress already lists some 400,000 items.[A2]Ibid., 6-7.
(Allen Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014), 6.)
During the 1950s and 1960s Bernstein was not only the best known of all American classical musicians; his fame rivalled that of Elvis Presley or Marilyn Monroe. Attitudes to Bernstein varied dramatically during his lifetime, and many responded negatively to the fact he was so visible, so outspoken, so dramatic, and so politically active on the left.

Famous for his flamboyantly extroverted temperament, Bernstein was a “personality on such a big scale that he would naturally manage to offend many people along the way. … His self-regard and need for attention were also, to be sure, extreme.”[A3]Ibid., 10
(Allen Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014), 6.)
Bernstein’s brash self-confidence and monstrous ego incurred the enmity of many of those he encountered. He “loved to be the center of attention, even if it meant being obnoxious” observed a fellow student at the Curtis School of Music who noted that his “extroversion was extreme.”[A4]Ibid., 35.
(Allen Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014), 6.)
John Rockwell, writing for the New York Times in 1986, observed that “It is quite a remarkable personality, for better and for worse, the defines every aspect of his near-manic existence. There are those who still find him inherently annoying — when he shoots off what he likes to call his ‘big Jewish mouth,’ when he prances and gyrates on the podium, when he seems to squander his compositional gifts in flashy trivia or overwrought excess.”[A5]John Rockwell, “Bernstein Triumphant,” The New York Times Magazine, August 31, 1986. Bernstein’s own children pointed out his unsurpassed ability to become emotional on his own behalf, to “move himself.”[A6]Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 240.

Bernstein’s unusual, extremely emotional, visual presentation was his trademark as a conductor. He conducted with his entire body in a style that led to much criticism and derision over the years. German composer Gunther Schuller, for example, observed that Bernstein was “one of the world’s most histrionic and exhibitionistic conductors.” Schuller saw Bernstein as a musician with “very little discipline and no shame,” whose interpretation of Brahms’ First Symphony contained “too much of an ‘oy-vey’ Weltschmerz to be bearable.”[A7]Quoted in: Eyal Sherf, “Remembering the Musical Genius of Leonard Bernstein,” Haaretz, August 9, 2018.

Bernstein conducting Mahler with the Boston Symphony Orchestra
Bernstein conducting Mahler with the Boston Symphony Orchestra

Bernstein’s conducting style was modelled on Dimitri Mitropoulos, the flamboyant Greek conductor he met while at Harvard in 1937. Under this influence, the art of conducting turned into what Bernstein defined as “an erotic act” involving “a love affair in which you [the conductor] and a body are breathing together, pulsing together, lifting and sinking together. I’m making this sound too lurid or sexual? It is sort of sexual, but it’s with a hundred people.”[A8]Ibid.
(Quoted in: Eyal Sherf, “Remembering the Musical Genius of Leonard Bernstein,” Haaretz, August 9, 2018.)
Perhaps not coincidentally, Bernstein, a promiscuous homosexual, was seduced by the equally wanton Mitropoulos.

Aside from Mitropoulos, Bernstein was mentored and promoted by a succession of Jewish conductors and composers. These included Fritz Reiner and Serge Koussevitzky, the conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Bernstein’s teacher at the Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood, Massachusetts. In Koussevitzky, Bernstein “found a champion and father figure” while for the older conductor “it was the discovery of a surrogate son and potential successor.”[A9]Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 50.Koussevitzky, a Jew who converted to Russian Orthodoxy to advance his career, hoped Bernstein would eventually succeed him as conductor of the Boston Symphony, but worried his homosexual tendencies (which he called “pederastical”) and his Jewish name would harm his chances.[A10]Ibid., 56.
(Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 50.)

Bernstein was appointed assistant conductor at Tanglewood in 1942 where he was known to enter a classroom and “hug, touch, and embrace everyone in sight.” There he worked closely with the composer Aaron Copland who, while 18 years his senior, as a Jewish homosexual communist had much in common with Bernstein, and quickly became more than just a father figure to the “Boston boychik” (as the young Bernstein was known). Letters between them “show that they had briefly been lovers, with Bernstein recalling the time he and Copland had spent together: ‘I’ve never felt about anyone before as I do about you, completely at ease, and always comforted by you. This is not a love letter, but I’m quite mad about you.’”[A11]Ibid., 51.
(Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 50.)
Copland, as promiscuous as Bernstein, though more discrete, was involved in a “sometimes bewildering series of personal relationships with younger men.”[A12]Humphrey Burton, Leonard Bernstein (London: Faber & Faber, 2017), 77. Within musical circles at Tanglewood, Copland was “assumed to show too much favor to young gay and/or Jewish musician-acolytes.”[A13]Allen Ellenzweig, “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” Tablet, November 6, 2012. https://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-arts-and-culture/th...nt-ask

Bernstein with Aaron Copland
Bernstein with Aaron Copland

Another Jewish homosexual communist who bonded with, mentored and promoted the young Leonard Bernstein was the composer Marc Blitzstein. It was Bernstein’s association and collaboration with Blitzstein that first “gave rise to notes on the young musician and his ‘left-wing associations’ in a folder at the Federal Bureau of Investigation.”[A14]Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 44. The FBI were notified by an informant that “80% of the faculty of the Tanglewood group are Communists.”[A15]Barry Seldes, Leonard Bernstein: The Political Life of an American Musician (Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2009), 220.

Conductor of the New York Philharmonic

On November 14, 1943, a twenty-five-year-old Bernstein stepped in for an ill Bruno Walter at a New York Philharmonic concert at Carnegie Hall — an event that effectively launched his conducting career. The press, alerted beforehand, “went wild with praise.” His debut made the front page of The New York Times which gave ecstatic coverage of the event. Bernstein was aggressively promoted by this and other Jewish-controlled media organs: in the two weeks after his debut with the New York Philharmonic he was interviewed and promoted by Life, Time, Newsweek, Pic, Look, Vogue, PM, Pix, Harper’s Bazaar, the New York Times, the Herald Tribune, the Jewish Forward, the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Jewish Day, the New York News, the New York Post, and The New Yorker.[A16]Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 71.

In 1958 Bernstein displaced Mitropoulos as the youngest ever music director of the New York Philharmonic, a position he held until his retirement in 1969. Bernstein’s rise to this exalted position coincided with the Jewish seizure of the commanding heights of American culture. Allen Ellenzweig, writing for Tablet, notes how: “After World War II, it seemed as if American culture high and low had been taken over by the Jews: Danny Kaye in the movies, George Burns and Milton Berle on television, Norman Mailer and Saul Bellow in literature, Arthur Miller in theatre, Jerome Robbins in ballet and on Broadway, Leonard Bernstein on Broadway and in the concert hall.”[A17]Ellenzweig, “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”

In the first half of the twentieth century WASPs still controlled American culture and the American people were generally more ethnocentric and aware of (and antagonistic to) the subversive Jewish influence on American society. The Jewish challenge to the cultural supremacy of the WASP elite (and America’s once powerful Catholic lobby) might, in the absence of active Jewish efforts to prevent it, led to a backlash against undue Jewish influence on American culture and mores. Efforts to forestall such a backlash included the novel Gentleman’s Agreement by Laura Hobson (born Zametkin), and its Academy Award winning film adaptation released in 1947, which decried the “unspoken snobberies of the American suburbs that allowed for ‘restricted’ hotels, country clubs, and golf courses and signaled that Jewishness remained a problematic social marker.”[A18]Ibid.
(Ellenzweig, “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”)

The Jewish domination of the film and television industries around this time transformed the American cultural landscape. Neal Gabler has described how the Jews that ran Hollywood “colonized the American imagination. … Ultimately American values came to be defined largely by the movies the Jews made. Ultimately, by creating their idealized America on the screen, the Jews reinvented the country in the image of their fiction.”[A19]Neal Gabler, An Empire of Their Own: How the Jews Invented Hollywood (New York: Crown, 1988) 6-7. By the mid-1960s the Jews of Hollywood had usurped the WASP cultural elite and became more explicit in their Jewish identification and sympathies — together with their antipathy for the traditional people and culture of the United States. Explicitly Jewish themes began to regularly appear in films and were invariably portrayed in a positive light. The Jewish film director David Mamet makes the unambiguous point that “Hollywood movies are profoundly, genetically Judaic; the product, via the minds of their creators, of certain distinctive racial traits that arose in the ghettos of Eastern Europe and transported themselves to Beverly Hills.”[A20]Adam Garfinkle, Jewcentricity: why the Jews are praised, blamed, and used to explain just about everything (Hoboken NJ: John Wiley, 2009), 137.

Bernstein’s political radicalism

This Jewish takeover of American culture (high and low) was accompanied by a dramatic shift in political sensibilities of the cultural elite. Bernstein had grown up in a Jewish home in Massachusetts where his father, a Jewish immigrant from an ultra-orthodox shtetl town in the Ukraine, held forth on “subjects running from Talmudic meditations and the history of the Jewish people from biblical times to their plight under Nazi power in Europe.”[A21]Seldes, Leonard Bernstein: The Political Life of an American Musician, 9. In Jewish homes in the 1930s, talk frequently centered on “the condition of American Jewry and devotion to President Roosevelt, whom many Jews saw as a bulwark against foreign and domestic fascists such as Father Coughlin, whose broadcasts reached across the nation, and other anti-Semites.”[A22]Ibid.
(Seldes, Leonard Bernstein: The Political Life of an American Musician, 9.)

Bernstein pursued a musical career against the wishes of his father. His paternal grandfather was the last in a long line of rabbis in the family tree. While breaking this family tradition, Bernstein’s businessman father nevertheless remained “devout, intense, rule-bound, sometimes harsh” whose “principle reading matter and point of reference for all things, worldly and unworldly, was the Talmud.”[A23]Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 18. His personality was marked by “consuming ambition and penny-pinching.”[A24]Ibid.
(Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 18.)

Bernstein with father Sam and mother Jennie
Bernstein with father Sam and mother Jennie

Beginning in his young adulthood, Bernstein the younger joined and openly advocated for various communist front groups, beginning with the John Reed Society while an undergraduate at Harvard in the 1930s. This inevitably attracted the attention of the FBI, as did his support for organizations opposing Franco’s Spain, his appearances at rallies and functions with known communists Paul Robeson, Dashiell Hammett, Billie Holliday, Rockwell Kent, and Lena Horne, as well as his membership in the Council on African Affairs, the National Negro Congress, and the National Council of American-Soviet Friendship. In December 1946, Bernstein’s FBI file (which would ultimately run to 800 pages) records a Musicians’ Union informant’s declaration that he was “a communist.”[A25]Ibid., 85.
(Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 18.)

This claim is bolstered by Bernstein’s open support for the Jewish communist composer Hanns Eisler when Eisler was threatened with deportation from the United States as a threat to national security. A committed Marxist, Eisler left Germany following Hitler’s ascent to power, eventually settling in Hollywood where he was nominated for Oscars for writing the music for Fritz Lang’s film Hangmen Also Die (1942) and None but the Lonely Heart (1944). In 1947, Eisler appeared before the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) and, despite the intercession of Bernstein, Albert Einstein and Aaron Copland, was deported to East Germany in 1948 where he remained for the rest of his life, writing music for the totalitarian state (including its national anthem, and the Comintern anthem). Instead of reproaching Eisler for his ardent commitment to a regime and an ideology that destroyed millions of lives, Jewish commentators invariably portray him as the innocent victim of the anti-Semitism of the Third Reich, the HUAC hearings, and the Hollywood blacklist.

As was typical for a generation of Russian Jewish immigrants and their offspring, Bernstein’s political radicalism existed alongside a “staunchly pro-Zionist” outlook. In April 1947, he paid an emotional first visit to Palestine — then a British protectorate with a one-third Jewish population. He arrived in the middle of a tense conflict between rival Jewish groups over how best to achieve the independent Jewish state mandated by the Balfour Declaration. The terrorist Irgun, led by Menachem Begin, battled with those seeking a political solution. There he bonded with members of the Palestine Symphony Orchestra (all Jewish despite the name) and conducted a concert in Tel Aviv consisting of his Jeremiah Symphony, the Ravel Piano Concerto, and Schumann’s Second Symphony. The audience responded “with an overwhelming ovation and tears. With his ability to speak Hebrew, his affinity for the place and its people, and the passionate bond he had created with the members of the orchestra, Bernstein felt himself deeply at home.”[A26]Ibid., 86.
(Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 18.)
Bernstein would conduct the orchestra, later renamed the Israel Symphony Orchestra, frequently without fee for the rest of his life.

Leonard Bernstein with Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir
Leonard Bernstein with Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir

Bernstein was blacklisted by CBS radio and television in 1950, the year he was listed as a dangerous subversive in the pamphlet Red Channels: The Report of Communist Influence in Radio and Television which listed the names of 151 writers, directors and performers who had been members of radical organizations before World War II — over one-third of whom were Jewish. In June that year he was “banned from official State Department functions overseas” as a “loyalty and security risk.” In 1951 his name was placed on a list of those prominent individuals to be placed in detention facilities in the event of a “national emergency.” Shawn observes how this “put him at risk of scrutiny by the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) and to attacks by the anti-communist crusader Senator Joseph McCarthy.”[A27]Ibid., 84.
(Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 18.)
Bernstein had good reason to suspect that, if he wasn’t careful, his entire conducting career and all that went with it would be in jeopardy.

Despite the threat, Bernstein participated in a trip to Washington by delegates from the film and Broadway communities in support of the “Hollywood Ten” screenwriters who had opposed testifying before HUAC. The members of the Hollywood Ten were subsequently cited for contempt by Congress and fired by the studios, and the Hollywood blacklist became official. A prime source of the animus against Hollywood as identified by one member of the House Committee, Congressman John Rankin from Mississippi, was “the large number of Jews eminent in the film industry. … In Rankin’s mind, to call a Jew a Communist was a tautology.”[A28]Ellenzweig, “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”

The “Homintern”

Worried his homosexual activities would prevent his landing a major conducting appointment in the conservative world of classical music, Bernstein married actress Felicia Cohn Montealgre at the Temple Mishkan Tefila in September 1951. They married on the clear understanding that so long as Leonard did not embarrass Felicia publicly, he was free to pursue his homosexual affairs. That the marriage yielded three children led some to assume Bernstein was bisexual. According to one his collaborators on West Side Story, however, “Bernstein was simply ‘a gay man who got married. He wasn’t conflicted about his sexual orientation at all. He was just gay.’ As was customary at that time, Bernstein appeared a devoted husband and father in the public eye, while carrying on a promiscuous homosexual life behind the scenes.”[A29]Georg Predota, “Leonard Bernstein and Felicia Montealegre: A Divided Life,” Interlude, June 28, 2015. http://www.interlude.hk/front/leonard-bernstein-fel...-life/

Bernstein’s marriage was a response to the “Lavender Scare” that coincided with the anti-communist movement of the 1940s and 1950s, when homosexuals were targeted as potential security risks. Thousands of civil servants, uniformed service members, and teachers across the country were fired from their jobs as risks to national security because of public perceptions of moral turpitude and because they could be blackmailed by the Soviet Union. In 1950, the head of the Republican National Committee warned that “the sexual perverts who have infiltrated our government in recent years” were “as dangerous as the actual communists.” Human Events, a newsletter read in power circles in Washington, D.C., declared in 1952: “By the very nature of their vice,” homosexuals “belong to a sinister, mysterious, and efficient international.” A 1951 article in H.L. Mencken’s American Mercury insisted publishing was under homosexual control, producing a literary culture that was “chic, artificial, and possibly effeminate,” thereby abetting a “gradual corruption of all aspects of American culture.”[A30]Ellenzweig, “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”

As concern about international communism often centered on the “Comintern,” the Soviet-sponsored Communist International with representatives around the globe, concern about homosexuals led to an equivalent coinage: the “Homintern.” The “Lavender Scare” impacted on the coterie of homosexual Jews clustered around Bernstein during the 1940s and 1950s, including David Diamond, Aaron Copland and Jerome Robbins. A friend of Bernstein noted how during this time in New York, “They all went to bed with each other but was all very casual. Like a Turkish bath. Anyone who showed up.” Jewish leftist homosexuals like Aaron Copland, Leonard Bernstein, Jerome Robbins, Arthur Laurents, and Lincoln Kirstein developed “mixed communal and professional networks to reach cultural prominence” and “Within cosmopolitan circles, all were discreetly known as transgressing the heterosexual norms of the postwar period.”[A31]Ibid.
(Ellenzweig, “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”)

Leonard Bernstein and Jerome Robbins
Leonard Bernstein and Jerome Robbins

Bernstein bonded with Jerome Robbins, a choreographer with the Ballet Theatre in New York. Born to Russian and Polish Jewish immigrants, Robbins (Rabinowitz) had become “a member of the (then legal) Communist Party in 1943.”[A32]Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 67. Bernstein and Robbins collaborated to produce On the Town in 1945, a show combining elements of classical, jazz, boogie-woogie and blues, which was “the first racially integrated musical on Broadway, starring a Japanese-American, Sono Osato as the all-American girl Miss Turnstiles. On the Town contained pioneering multicultural and race-mixing propaganda which included Black and White dancers clasping hands while singing “New York, New York, a helluva town” two decades before a White woman touching a Black man’s arm on television triggered a scandal. The show also promoted feminism, celebrating “the modern American woman” who was “confident, employed, and sexually bold.”[A33]Ibid., 74.
(Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 67.)

Off the Blacklist

In July 1953 the U.S. Passport Office refused to renew Bernstein’s passport due to the extensive record compiled by the FBI on his radical political affiliations. Desperate to travel to Italy to make his conducting debut at La Scala opera house in Milan, he hired a lawyer known for clearing political reputations—a lawyer who had once been on the side of the investigators. The result was

a humiliating exoneration that must have both relieved him and crushed his self-respect. The long affidavit he signed made light of all the times he had lent his name to a cause or appeared at a function, saying that he had endorsed letters and petitions casually, without knowing what they contained. He admitted that he was mistaken not to have immediately “made a public disavowal” of the associations implied by photos seen in Life magazine or portrayed in the pages of Red Channels. He pronounced himself a “foe of communism.”[A34]Ibid., 120.
(Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 67.)

Signing the affidavit made a mockery of his contempt for the investigations, which he regarded as “a farce” and “part of a strategy to undermine support for legitimate revolutions abroad.”[A35]Ibid., 121.
(Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 67.)
The affidavit made possible his trip to Milan and, after he had given additional assurances, cleared the way for his participation as composer in the film On the Waterfront, written by Budd Schulberg, directed by Elia Kazan, and featuring Lee J. Cobb — each a HUAC informer.

These informants to HUAC were certainly not alone: the film director Robert Rossen (born Rosen) explained to the committee in 1953 why he had joined the Communist Party in the 1930s and remained a member “until revelations of Soviet anti-Semitism disillusioned him. He then named names. Within short order, he was off the blacklist.”[A36]Seldes, Leonard Bernstein: The Political Life of an American Musician, 220. Bernstein’s friend and collaborator Jerome Robbins also named names in testimony to HUAC in 1953 — professionally dooming colleagues he had briefly known in a “theatrical transient group” called the Communist Political Association. Robbins said he joined under the naïve impression that “the Russian Communists were against fascism and anti-Semitism and in favor of artistic freedom.”[A37]Ellenzweig, “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”

With his work for On the Waterfront, Bernstein’s rehabilitation commenced. At the same time his humiliating backdown “fueled his anger in future decades against right-wing extremism and abuses of power.”[A38]Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 121. In 1953, Lillian Hellman, another Jewish communist, approached Bernstein about composing a musical theatre work based on Voltaire’s satirical novella Candide. Hellman was especially taken with a scene from the book set in Lisbon during the Inquisition, which gave her “a particularly ripe opportunity for satirizing the activities of HUAC.”[A39]Ibid.
(Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 121.)

West Side Story

Bernstein’s most popular and culturally significant work is undoubtedly West Side Story (1957) created in collaboration with three other Jews, Arthur Laurents (librettist), Stephen Sondheim (lyricist), and Jerome Robbins (director and choreographer). Robbins had introduced Bernstein to Laurents, whose 1945 Broadway play Home of the Brave, “dealt with anti-Semitism in an army unit during World War Two and had brought Bernstein to tears.”[A40]Ellenzweig, “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”

Many regard West Side Story as the highest peak the Broadway musical has ever attained. Its popularity only really took off, however, with the film version of 1961. West Side Story was originally conceived by Robbins as a story of Jewish-Catholic gang rivalry focusing on conflict during Easter/Passover between an Italian Catholic Greenwich Village family and a Jewish family living on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. In Laurents’ first draft — called “East Side Story” — the Maria character (originally called “Tante,” the Yiddish word for aunt) was a Holocaust survivor who had emigrated from Israel to America. The conflict centered on the anti-Semitism of the (Catholic) Jets and the justified resentment of the Jewish Emeralds.

As Bernstein wrote in his diary in late 1948: “Jerry R. called today with a noble idea: a modern version of Romeo and Juliet set in slums at the coincidence of Easter-Passover celebrations. Feelings run high between Jews and Catholics. Former: Capulets, latter: Montagues. Juliet is Jewish. Friar Lawrence is the neighborhood druggist. Street brawls, double death — it all fits.”[A41]Stephen J. Whitfield, In Search of Jewish American Culture (Waltham MA: Brandeis, 2001), 81. Clues as to the original scheme for the show are captured in Robbins’ original headings which include “Hideout (initiation: Beating up Jews)” and Bernstein’s annotations, which include “Ball or Seder or Motza’e Shabbat” and “Romeo’s death with Tante.” Bernstein even suggested including “a song on racism called ‘It’s the Jews.’”[A42]Devorah Goldman, “Leonard Bernstein’s Multitudes,” The American Interest, September 14, 2018. https://www.the-american-interest.com/2018/09/14/leo...tudes/

The Jewish creators of West Side Story Stephen Sondheim (far left), Arthur Laurents (second from left), Leonard Bernstein (second from right) and Jerome Robbins (far right)
The Jewish creators of West Side Story Stephen Sondheim (far left), Arthur Laurents (second from left), Leonard Bernstein (second from right) and Jerome Robbins (far right)

Ultimately, the musical that became West Side Story drew upon gang violence in New York and Chicago then making headlines. Despite the changed ethnicities of the protagonists, the show remained, for its creators, an unabashed vehicle for Jewish ethnic activism: promoting, most fundamentally, changed ideas what it meant to be an American. Two star-crossed lovers, Tony and Maria, find themselves caught between the rival street gangs: The Jets, a group of Whites who consider themselves the true Americans, and the Sharks, first generation immigrants from Puerto Rico. The musical’s creators “projected Jewish otherness onto the Sharks, seeking recognition as full Americans by the Jets.”[A43]Marjorie Ingall, “Leonard Bernstein: Behind the Music,” Tablet, April 24, 2018. https://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-life-and-religion/2...-music Though the Jewish gang originally contemplated for “East Side Story” ultimately became the Sharks, “the gang retained an inherent Israeli characteristic: a readiness to ‘die defending their turf.’”[A44]Saul Jay Singer, “Leonard Bernstein and ‘East Side Story,’” The Jewish Press, January 21, 2016. http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/features/featur...01/21/ Librettist Arthur Laurents declared “We’re Jews. … West Side can be said to be informed by our political and sociological viewpoint.”[A45]Ivy Weingram, “Leonard Bernstein: American Icon,” National Museum of American Jewish History. https://artsandculture.google.com/exhibit/KgLiDNgrN817Kw

Scene from the 1961 movie version of West Side Story
Scene from the 1961 movie version of West Side Story

Earlier this year, Jewish director Stephen Spielberg announced plans to remake West Side Story. Spielberg’s frequent collaborator, the Jewish playwright Tony Kushner, will write the script. Kushner openly declared himself: “a big believer in identity politics and political correctness. Why shouldn’t we want to be politically correct, if by correct you mean not toeing the party line but toeing the line of history, being on the right side of history, being moral and ethical?”[A46]Goldman, “Leonard Bernstein’s Multitudes.” Writing for Tablet, Rachel Shukert wondered whether Spielberg and Kushner will merely be “content to explore these themes through the distance of the past” or whether they contemporize and deploy them as part of the Jewish crusade against President Trump: “Will we see gangs of MAGA-hatted bullies” she asks, “snapping their fingers dancing in the streets as they attempt to terrorize undocumented immigrants and DACA recipients?” According to Shukert, the Jets, like the White Americans who support Trump, “never really accept the Sharks,” while at the time of West Side Story’s premiere in 1957, “somewhere, far from the West Side, in a leafy upper-middle class suburb of Queens, a bratty little blond boy [Donald Trump] was already planning never to rent to them.”[A47]Rachel Shukert, “Will Spielberg’s New ‘West Side Story’ Be MAGA Vs. DACA?,” Tablet, January 26, 2018. https://www.tabletmag.com/scroll/254175/will-spielbe...s-daca

Bernstein’s Mahler obsession

I have previously examined the tendency of Jewish intellectuals to use their privileged status as the self-appointed gatekeepers of Western culture to advance their group interests through the way they conceptualize the artistic and intellectual achievements of Jews and Europeans. Jews have long used their cultural dominance to construct “Jewish geniuses” to enhance ethnic pride and group cohesion (think Einstein). In this endeavor, Jewish music critics and intellectuals have transformed the image of the Jewish composer Gustav Mahler from that of a relatively minor figure in the history of classical music at mid-twentieth century, into the cultural icon of today. The tendency among Jewish intellectuals has been to overstate and ethnically-particularize Jewish achievement, thereby making it a locus for ethnic pride. Meanwhile, European achievement is downplayed, or where undeniable, universalized and thus neutralized as a potential basis for White pride and group cohesion.

Leonard Bernstein played a leading role in the development of the Mahler cult and the movement of the composer’s music to the center of the classical repertory. The proliferation of performances of Mahler’s music in the United States between 1920 and 1960 can be ascribed to the combined efforts of Bernstein and a coterie of Jewish advocates like Bruno Walter, Arnold Schoenberg, Theodor Adorno, Aaron Copland, and Serge Koussevitzky. Lionizing Mahler as the saintly Jewish victim of European injustice, the Jewish composer Arnold Schoenberg “canonized Mahler as ‘this martyr, this saint’ and in a Prague lecture in March 1912 announced: ‘Rarely has anyone been so badly treated by the world; nobody, perhaps, worse.’”[B1]Norman Lebrecht, Why Mahler? How One Man and Ten Symphonies Changed the World (London: Faber and Faber, 2010), 225. Frankfurt School music theorist Theodor Adorno later took up this theme, affirming that:

Mahler’s tonal chords, plain and unadorned, are the explosive expressions of the pain felt by the individual subject imprisoned in an alienated society. … They are also allegories of the lower depths of the insulted and the socially injured. … Ever since the last of the Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen Mahler was able to convert his neurosis, or rather the genuine fears of the downtrodden Jew into a vigor of expression whose seriousness surpassed all aesthetic mimesis and all the fictions of the stile rappresentativo.”[B2]Adorno, T., “Centenary Address, Vienna 1960,” in Quasi una fantasia — Essays on Modern Music, trans. by Rodney Livingstone (London & New York: Verso, 1963), 88.

Bernstein likewise conceptualized Mahler as a cruelly persecuted and alienated Jew torn apart by dualisms: “composer/conductor, Christian/Jew, sophisticate/naïf, provincial/cosmopolitan — all of which contributed to the musical schizo-dynamics of his texture, and his ambivalent tonal attitudes.”[B3]Leonard Bernstein, The Unanswered Question: Six Talks at Harvard (Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 1990), 313. Bernstein advocated for Mahler with missionary zeal, introducing the symphonies to audiences from New York to Vienna. He considered Mahler “the twentieth century’s musical prophet, whose extremes spoke for the times, and thought his symphonies constituted ‘as sacred a bunch of notes as Brahms’s symphonies.’”[B4]Allen Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014), 175. While all Mahler’s works were available singly on recordings, it was Bernstein who first recorded the complete set of symphonies.

Mahler was not standard repertoire in 1960, and the composer was not part of the generally acknowledged pantheon of great composers. He does not, for instance, feature in the top twenty leading composers compiled by Charles Murray in his book Human Accomplishment. Prior to Bernstein’s advocacy, Mahler’s larger symphonies, nos. 3, 6, 7, 8 and 9 were rarities in American concert halls. Mahler was considered “excessive” and “decadent” by influential critics and performers.[B5]Ibid., 174.
(Allen Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014), 175.)
Shawn notes that:

Early European performances of Mahler had met with similarly mixed reactions. During the Nazi era … a reviewer could simply write that Mahler’s work exhibited “the inner uncertainty and deracination of the superficially civilized western Jew in all his tragedy.” In the postwar years, when anti-Semitic writing was banned, the standard line that Mahler’s was “a tragic case” remained, the cause now being that he was “a man of a more effeminate eastern type … [who] had succumbed to the magic of the German national character.” These supposed characteristics were still noted in mid-century European criticism, which deployed a kind of code for the presumed inherent weaknesses of people of his background (and which resembled those frequently levelled against Bernstein’s music). Mahler biographer Jens Malte Fischer lists them as “eclecticism and triviality … the gap between intention and ability, … the hankering after empty effects… the imitation of all forms and styles… shallowness and saccharine sweetness.”[B6]Ibid., 174-75.
(Allen Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014), 175.)

Many commentators noted the depth of Bernstein’s identification with the composer and described his uncanny feeling while conducting Mahler that he was performing his own music. Bernstein’s own execrable Third Symphony (Kaddish) is said to bear “the imprint of his identification with Mahler in its intensity, overt emotionality, extremes of contrast, and prophetic tone.”[B7]Ibid., 179.
(Allen Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014), 175.)
As Mahler’s symphonies stretched the idea of what a symphony can be, so did Bernstein’s three excursions in that form likewise challenge traditional notions of symphonic structure.

George Gershwin
George Gershwin

Before his ethnocentric infatuation with Mahler, Bernstein had, as a young man, experienced an “almost eerie sense of identification” with the Jewish composer George Gershwin.[B8]Ibid., 38.
(Allen Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014), 175.)
He was particularly taken with Gershwin’s jazz-infused musical language, and his senior year thesis at Harvard “took as its central proposition the bold (an unHarvardian) notion that jazz was the first truly American music to have penetrated into the soul of the people to the degree that it could constitute the foundation of a national idiom.”[B9]Ibid., 42.
(Allen Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014), 175.)
In making his case, “he dismissed many nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American [i.e. gentile] composers in such general terms that one exasperated faculty reader scrawled on the manuscript: ‘What sweeping criticism! I wonder what critics in 1975 will have to say on young American composers of 1938!’”[B10]Ibid.
(Allen Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014), 175.)
Gershwin’s incorporation of jazz elements into his music directly influenced Bernstein’s own compositional style in works like Fancy Free, the early musicals, the Masque section of the Age of Anxiety, and Prelude, Fugue and Riff.

Bernstein became increasingly politicized in the early to middle 1960s, not only in his public life and outlook but also in his musical analysis. This is manifested in his attribution to Mahler of superhuman powers of prophecy. In 1967 Bernstein hyperbolically declared that it was:

only after we have experienced all this through the smoking ovens of Auschwitz, the frantically bombed jungles of Vietnam, through Hungary, Suez, the Bay of Pigs, the farce-trial of [Soviet dissidents] Sinyavsky and Daniel, the refueling of the Nazi machine, the murder in Dallas, the arrogance of South Africa, the Hiss-Chambers travesty, the Trotskyite purges, Black Power, Red Guards, the Arab encirclement of Israel, the plague of McCarthyism, the Tweedledum armaments race—only after all this can we finally listen to Mahler’s music and understand that it foretold all.[B11]Leonard Bernstein, “Mahler: His Time Has Come,” High Fidelity, April 1967.

It was only after the musical world had endured such events that, Bernstein insisted, it could “finally listen to Mahler’s music and understand that it foretold all. And in that foretelling it showered a rain of beauty on this world that has not been equaled since.”[B12]Ibid.
(Leonard Bernstein, “Mahler: His Time Has Come,” High Fidelity, April 1967.)

For Bernstein biographer Barry Seldes, the bulk of the Mahler-consuming public in the 1960s and 1970s were “preoccupied with existential and Freudian reflections on the individual’s isolation and spiritual discontent.” This generation, he contends, felt a need to reconnect with “the artistic, and musical culture of pre-fascist Europe and to express empathy with the victims of the European catastrophes.”[B13]Barry Seldes, Leonard Bernstein: The Political Life of an American Musician (Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2009), 195.

Of course, such a representation of the public’s love of Mahler’s music cannot be taken at face value. Expressions of love of Mahler may well involve extra-musical motivations — not only ethnic pride among Jews, but also, given the highly politicized context in which Mahler was presented as a victim of anti-Semitism, a desire to advertise one’s political rectitude and moral purity. These latter motivations would be common among Jews and non-Jews alike.

Bernstein never failed to take advantage of major events to promote Mahler. Following the 1967 Six-Day War, Bernstein performed Mahler’s Second Symphony with the Israel Philharmonic at an outdoor concert on Mount Scopus in Jerusalem, an event that Yitzhak Rabin described as the single greatest experience of his life. And after the Kennedys were assassinated, Bernstein (inevitably) offered up Mahler as a memorial.

Alongside Mahler, the ethnocentric Bernstein championed other Jewish composers from the podium including, most notably, Gershwin, Copland and Blitzstein. By contrast, he declared “I hate Wagner, but I hate him on my knees” – a grudging acknowledgement of the scale of German composer’s achievement.[B14]Rick Schultz, “The Wagner Problem,” Jewish Journal, April 7, 2010. https://jewishjournal.com/culture/music/78198/ [B15]

Conductor of the Vienna Philharmonic

Bernstein regularly programmed Mahler while conductor of the Vienna Philharmonic. He was offered the chance to conduct the orchestra in 1947 as a symbol of Austria’s “denazification.” Bernstein was reluctant, and it took a massive financial inducement to secure the appointment. While he eventually “fell head over heels for the city itself: its orchestra, its cultural atmosphere, its certain Gemütlichkeit,” Bernstein claimed to be “profoundly disturbed by the anti-Semitism within it.”[B16]Quoted in Liam Hoare, “Leonard Bernstein’s Tense, Torn Love Affair With Vienna,” Tablet, October 2, 2018. https://www.tabletmag.com/scroll/273026/leonard-bern...vienna The sound of crowds shouting in German, he wrote, “makes my blood run cold.” By his own reports the orchestra “was still 60 percent Nazi” at the time of his appointment. Jewish music writer Norman Lebrecht marvels at Bernstein’s ability to succeed as a guest conductor of the Vienna Philharmonic, “triumphing as a Jew in what many regard as the center of anti-Semitism.”[B17]Paul R. Laird, Leonard Bernstein (London: Reaktion Books, 2018), 238.

After his appointment, conflict arose immediately over programming, with Bernstein recalling how “They wanted Bach, Mozart, and Schumann, which is silly.” Bernstein was instead determined to march Mahler back into Vienna as a “second wave of liberation, a musical Marshall Plan.” One of Bernstein’s biographers observes that: “Bernstein’s chief goal in Vienna was to restore the music of the great Jewish composer Gustav Mahler — music that Hitler had banned.”[B18]Caroline Evensen Lazo, Leonard Bernstein: In Love With Music (Minneapolis MN: Twenty First Century Books, 2002), 97.Burton notes how he

tackled three Mahler symphonies in quick succession with the Vienna Philharmonic, beginning with the Fifth, which, like the Third, the following week, had not been performed by the Philharmonic in Vienna since the Anschluss in 1938. As the Wochenpresse tartly observed, “until now the Philharmonic did Mahler only in extreme emergency cases.” Despite their success with the Ninth the previous year, Bernstein felt a wave of hostility from the orchestra toward Mahler’s music. “They didn’t know Mahler. They were prejudiced against it. They thought it was long and needlessly complicated and over-emotional. In the rehearsals they resisted and resisted to the point where I did finally lose my temper because in God’s name this was their composer as much as Mozart was, or Beethoven, who had come from much further away.”[B19]Humphrey Burton, Leonard Bernstein (London: Faber & Faber, 2017), 442.

Despite his apparent success with the orchestra, Bernstein retained an ambivalent attitude to Vienna. He wrote to his parents in March 1966: “I am enjoying Vienna enormously — as much as a Jew can. There are so many sad memories here; one deals with so many ex-Nazis (and maybe still Nazis); and you never know if the public that is screaming bravo for you might contain someone who 25 years ago might have shot me dead.”[B20]Museum Judenplatz, “Leonard Bernstein: A New Yorker in Vienna,” Jewish Museum Vienna. http://www.jmw.at/en/exhibitions/leonard-bernstein-...vienna Bernstein was criticized by several Jewish colleagues for having conducted the former supporters of Adolf Hitler who played in the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, and for having fraternized with the conductors, and unapologetic National Socialist German Workers Party members, Herbert von Karajan and Karl Bohm. This contrasted with the violinist Isaac Stern and pianist Arthur Rubinstein, who had “shunned these former Nazis.”[B21]Ibid.
(Museum Judenplatz, “Leonard Bernstein: A New Yorker in Vienna,” Jewish Museum Vienna. http://www.jmw.at/en/exhibitions/leonard-bernstein-...vienna)

Bernstein conducting Mahler with the Vienna Philharmonic
Bernstein conducting Mahler with the Vienna Philharmonic

In August of 1987, the sixty-nine-year old Bernstein was still conducting the Vienna Philharmonic in Salzburg. On an evening off he sat through a performance of Schoenberg’s twelve-tone opera Moses and Aron with his friend Betty Comden (Cohen) who recalled that:

Lenny told me that he had heard it only once before and was not sure how he felt about it, that it might be rough going, and we might want to wander out at some point. We sat there totally mesmerized and deeply moved. The prologue was a brief re-enactment of Kristallnacht with Jews hunted and cemeteries and synagogues defiled and destroyed. Onstage through the whole opera there was the menorah, overturned and broken, lying on its side. During the Golden Calf scene, they ingeniously used the arms of the candelabra to construct the golden horn of the idol. At the end Lenny turned to me and, visibly shaken, said that that was the opera he wished he had written.[B22]Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 262.

Throughout his life Bernstein’s Jewish identity remained incredibly strong: he repeatedly composed music on Jewish themes and in later years referred to himself as a “rabbi,” a teacher with a penchant to pass on scholarly learning, wisdom and lore to orchestral musicians. Bernstein adopted an Old Testament prophetic voice for much of his music, including his first symphony, Jeremiah, and his third, Kaddish. Music writer David Denby noted Bernstein’s fondness for using his symphonies as sanctimonious vehicles for ethnic and political propaganda:

In his symphonies, a natural lyrical impulse got overtaken by the hectoring political stances that had surrounded him as a young man. Bernstein was influenced first by the popular-front attitudes of the thirties and later by resistance to McCarthyism and the struggles against racism and anti-Semitism, all of which imbued liberalism with a high ethical fervor. The Holocaust and the birth of Israel extended these emotions into a mood of redemptive anger. He was a liberal who took things personally, and he confused “speaking out” with politics. Unfortunately, he began to confuse it with art, too.[B23]Seldes, Leonard Bernstein: The Political Life of an American Musician, 170.

While West Side Story has retained its popularity with audiences, Bernstein’s “serious” compositions for the concert hall have, except for his overture to Candide (and notwithstanding a recent resurgence to mark the Bernstein centenary), fallen out of the classical repertory. Bernstein’s “serious” works were criticized during his lifetime for self-consciously striving for “profundity” while only achieving “grandiose gesture.” One critic scathingly observed that:

The serious music is a barrage of heartfelt emotions, the tortured, longwinded, richly orchestrated ramblings of one man’s public contact with the angst of life, the power of nature, the sorrow of death and pain. All is cast in vicarious musical language on the scale of Beethoven, Mahler and Shostakovich. The sentiment is sincere but commonplace. The art is secondhand. Bernstein’s serious music, at its best, is reminiscent of an exuberant adolescent who, lacking confidence in himself, uses impressive mannerisms, clichés and gestures to pour out his heart.[B24]Ibid.
(Seldes, Leonard Bernstein: The Political Life of an American Musician, 170.)

Radical chic

For all his leftwing activist pretentions, Bernstein lived in grandeur in Manhattan and Connecticut, waited on by an army of liveried servants. He was famously the subject of a scathing article by Tom Wolfe in the New York Magazine in June 1970 which focused on his relationship with the Black Panthers. When, in 1969, twenty-one Panthers were charged with plotting to kill policemen, bomb police stations, department stores and railroad facilities, Bernstein’s wife Felicia organized a legal-defense fundraiser to be held at their Park Avenue apartment. Wolfe attended the event incognito.

Five months later Tom Wolfe’s 25,000-word article “Radical Chic: That Party at Lenny’s” was published which portrayed the evening as a ham-fisted attempt to appear fashionably leftist. It made the event and Wolfe’s catchphrase world-famous and the Bernsteins the object of mockery and derision. Bernstein was even booed by his normally adoring Jewish subscribers at the Philharmonic who were horrified he seemed cozy with a group whose members had made statements in support of the Palestinians. When organized Jewry got wind of the Panthers’ anti-Zionist position, the Jewish Defense League picketed Bernstein’s apartment.

Leonard and Felicia Bernstein with Black Panther representative Donald Cox
Leonard and Felicia Bernstein with Black Panther representative Donald Cox

Despite Bernstein’s ostensible support for the Black Panthers and advocacy for Black musicians, in his tenure as chief conductor and artistic director of the New York Philharmonic from 1958 to 1969 he hired only one African-American musician, the violinist Sanford Allen in 1962.

President Richard Nixon was advised to avoid attending the premiere of Bernstein’s “Mass” on September 7, 1971, a work that contained coded anti-Nixon messages in its Latin text. The White House tapes reveal Nixon later received reports of the “absolutely sickening” events that transpired at the premiere including “Bernstein’s tearful response to the ovation, his embrace of members of the cast, the kisses he bestowed on the men.” Nixon notes Bernstein’s support for the Black Panthers and expresses revulsion at news that Bernstein “is kissing people on the mouth, including the big black guy.” According to Nixon, “Bernstein was the personification of the complete decadence of the American upper-class intellectual elite” and a “son of a bitch.”

French kissing the world

In 1974 Bernstein’s wife Felicia was diagnosed with breast cancer and underwent a double mastectomy. This marked the “beginning of a painful era for the entire family, marked by an erosion in Bernstein’s sense of discretion about his relationships with men.”[B25]Ibid., 234.
(Seldes, Leonard Bernstein: The Political Life of an American Musician, 170.)
Bernstein’s “slow creep toward overt gayness” in middle age was abetted by his manager Harry Kraut, who “threw attractive young men in his path.” On one occasion Bernstein was having sex with a twenty-year-old man in the hallway of his Manhattan apartment while his wife was sitting in the living room. When he met the young Tom Cothran in 1973, he allowed his wife to catch them in bed together. Felicia “detested” Cothran and threatened to “make a public scandal” and New York Society was indeed shocked when Bernstein moved out of his marital home and into an apartment on Central Park South with Cothran. Felicia, distraught at Bernstein’s betrayal, one night “pointed her finger across the table at him and with her biggest scariest actress voice laid a curse on him: ‘You’re going to die a lonely, bitter old queen.’”

The following year when Felicia was diagnosed with lung cancer Bernstein broke up with Cothran and Mr. and Mrs. Bernstein were reconciled. After Felicia’s death a year later, Bernstein “gave free reign to his addiction to alcohol and drugs, and engaged in openly crude homosexual activities.” His wife’s death deprived him of any calming influence and his “intense physicality and flamboyance … became a beast unleashed.” He now felt free to lead an openly homosexual lifestyle and was “frequently surrounded by groups of adoring young men.” Bernstein’s daughter recalls her father starting to act “exuberantly gay and calling everyone darling.” He loved to shock and was notorious for greeting backstage guests wearing nothing but a jockstrap or red bikini brief. Shawn observes that:

Without the rudder of his marriage he became more extreme and more insecure. Even an admirer such as composer Ned Rorem was taken aback by his friend’s self-absorption and need to be reassured and flattered during this time. In public, Bernstein’s physical demonstrativeness – which was not always entirely consensual – was sometimes too much of a good thing. As one old friend put it, “He had his tongue down everyone’s throat – men and women. He wanted to French kiss the world.” Copland, Blitzstein, and Laurents had cautioned him about the destructive and drug-like properties of fame. Writer and composer, Paul Bowles, a friend since the 1930s, told a biographer that fame had made Leonard “smarmy and false.”[B26]Ibid., 243.
(Seldes, Leonard Bernstein: The Political Life of an American Musician, 170.)

Pianist William Huckaby, after performing at a White House recital in the late seventies, was talking with President Carter when he “felt these hands clamped on my shoulders. I was whirled around and engaged in a deep kiss of the French variety and Bernstein was saying, ‘I haven’t heard such virile piano playing for fifteen years. It was magnificent.’ President Carter watched all this with his mouth open and then walked away.” During his last decade, Bernstein was “surrounded by an entourage of beautiful boys, each one as intoxicated and obnoxious as his patron.” Over-indulged by this fawning entourage, Bernstein (who used the car license plate ‘MAESTRO 1’) behaved as he liked. Bernstein’s personal assistant documented Bernstein’s habit of patting his assistants’ crotches.

In her 2018 book Famous Father Girl: A Memoir of Growing Up Bernstein, Bernstein’s daughter Jamie revealed that her father even liked to put his tongue in her mouth as he kissed her. It was designed, she says, to find out “how accommodating they were, how sexy they were, how much impact he was making. My dismay was tempered by knowing he did it to so many others.” She was, nevertheless, confused by her highly-sexed father’s mix of “tenderness and raunchiness.” She felt a “vaguely unclear boundary” about their relationship when she was a teenager, recalling that “It was hard not to feel my father’s sexuality … everybody felt it. Tricky stuff for a daughter.”

The Bernstein family had to put up with the man they called “LB” throwing lit cigarettes at them across the dinner table, calling them “fuckface,” and dumping them in awkward situations. An insomniac who worked mostly at night, Bernstein drank heavily and became addicted to prescription painkillers, “keeping a vast, multi-colored collection of them in a large black leather toiletry case.” He daughter recalls that while her father wore tails to work, he was a slob at home who had a signature smell of “cigarette smoke and flatulence, which would commence at the breakfast table.”

Bernstein with young Jewish homosexual conductor Michael Tilson Thomas in the 1970s
Bernstein with young Jewish homosexual conductor Michael Tilson Thomas in the 1970s

Late in life, Bernstein became ever more focused on teaching and mentoring young people, including the young Jewish homosexual conductor Michael Tilson Thomas – today the music director of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. His late compositions, including A Quiet Place, a two-hour opera built upon his earlier work Trouble in Tahiti, were deemed failures. One reviewer described the plot of A Quiet Place as a “gloomy soap opera about uninteresting characters, with an emphasis on incest and homosexuality.” Critic Donal Henahan wrote, “To call the result a pretentious failure is putting it kindly.”[B27]Ibid., 250.
(Seldes, Leonard Bernstein: The Political Life of an American Musician, 170.)

Bernstein died aged 72 five days after announcing his retirement from conducting on October 9, 1990. His death was caused by a heart attack brought on by mesothelioma, his body ravaged by alcohol, amphetamines and cigarettes. His family deny he was HIV positive at the time of his death.

Conclusion

For the National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia, Bernstein’s lasting cultural legacy, aside from his lifelong commitment to Jewish causes, resides in his “pushing boundaries, breaking down walls, bucking tradition.” Bernstein’s Jewish background and radical political outlook are “absolutely essential to understanding many of his key works.” Careful examination of the subtexts of his works, including West Side Story, reveals “more subversive content” than many have chosen to see. In such works and in his political activism, Bernstein “challenged norms and tried to change the world order.” Alex Ross, the Jewish music critic for The New Yorker, argues that Bernstein’s political stance “once mocked and dismissed, looks different in today’s political climate.”

That Bernstein was a pathbreaker for the Cultural Marxism that now dominates Western culture — and is lauded by Jews as such — is revealed by the fact that two hagiographic Hollywood movies about him are currently in production: The American which is being developed by the Jewish actor Jake Gyllenhaal, and Bernstein which is set to be directed by and star Bradley Cooper. Gyllenhaal, in a statement, said “Like many people, Leonard Bernstein found his way into my life and heart through West Side Story when I was a kid. But as I got older and started to learn about the scope of his work, I began to understand the extent of his unparalleled contribution and the debt of gratitude modern American culture owes him.”

Bernstein’s contribution to modern American culture: promoting multi-racialism, black grievance politics, feminism, and sexual license were, it hardly needs saying, entirely contrary to the group evolutionary interests of White Americans.

Notes

[A1] Allen Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014), 6.

[A2] Ibid., 6-7.

[A3] Ibid., 10

[A4] Ibid., 35.

[A5] John Rockwell, “Bernstein Triumphant,” The New York Times Magazine, August 31, 1986.

[A6] Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 240.

[A7] Quoted in: Eyal Sherf, “Remembering the Musical Genius of Leonard Bernstein,” Haaretz, August 9, 2018.

[A8] Ibid.

[A9] Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 50.

[A10] Ibid., 56.

[A11] Ibid., 51.

[A12] Humphrey Burton, Leonard Bernstein (London: Faber & Faber, 2017), 77.

[A13] Allen Ellenzweig, “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” Tablet, November 6, 2012. https://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-arts-and-culture/theater-and-dance/113152/dont-ask-dont-ask

[A14] Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 44.

[A15] Barry Seldes, Leonard Bernstein: The Political Life of an American Musician (Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2009), 220.

[A16] Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 71.

[A17] Ellenzweig, “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”

[A18] Ibid.

[A19] Neal Gabler, An Empire of Their Own: How the Jews Invented Hollywood (New York: Crown, 1988) 6-7.

[A20] Adam Garfinkle, Jewcentricity: why the Jews are praised, blamed, and used to explain just about everything (Hoboken NJ: John Wiley, 2009), 137.

[A21] Seldes, Leonard Bernstein: The Political Life of an American Musician, 9.

[A22] Ibid.

[A23] Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 18.

[A24] Ibid.

[A25] Ibid., 85.

[A26] Ibid., 86.

[A27] Ibid., 84.

[A28] Ellenzweig, “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”

[A29] Georg Predota, “Leonard Bernstein and Felicia Montealegre: A Divided Life,” Interlude, June 28, 2015. http://www.interlude.hk/front/leonard-bernstein-felicia-montealegrea-divided-life/

[A30] Ellenzweig, “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”

[A31] Ibid.

[A32] Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 67.

[A33] Ibid., 74.

[A34] Ibid., 120.

[A35] Ibid., 121.

[A36] Seldes, Leonard Bernstein: The Political Life of an American Musician, 220.

[A37] Ellenzweig, “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”

[A38] Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 121.

[A39] Ibid.

[A40] Ellenzweig, “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”

[A41] Stephen J. Whitfield, In Search of Jewish American Culture (Waltham MA: Brandeis, 2001), 81.

[A42] Devorah Goldman, “Leonard Bernstein’s Multitudes,” The American Interest, September 14, 2018. https://www.the-american-interest.com/2018/09/14/leonard-bernsteins-multitudes/

[A43] Marjorie Ingall, “Leonard Bernstein: Behind the Music,” Tablet, April 24, 2018. https://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-life-and-religion/260093/leonard-bernstein-behind-the-music

[A44] Saul Jay Singer, “Leonard Bernstein and ‘East Side Story,’” The Jewish Press, January 21, 2016. http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/features/features-on-jewish-world/leonard-bernstein-and-east-side-story/2016/01/21/

[A45] Ivy Weingram, “Leonard Bernstein: American Icon,” National Museum of American Jewish History. https://artsandculture.google.com/exhibit/KgLiDNgrN817Kw

[A46] Goldman, “Leonard Bernstein’s Multitudes.”

[A47] Rachel Shukert, “Will Spielberg’s New ‘West Side Story’ Be MAGA Vs. DACA?,” Tablet, January 26, 2018. https://www.tabletmag.com/scroll/254175/will-spielbergs-new-west-side-story-be-maga-vs-daca

[B1] Norman Lebrecht, Why Mahler? How One Man and Ten Symphonies Changed the World (London: Faber and Faber, 2010), 225.

[B2] Adorno, T., “Centenary Address, Vienna 1960,” in Quasi una fantasia — Essays on Modern Music, trans. by Rodney Livingstone (London & New York: Verso, 1963), 88.

[B3] Leonard Bernstein, The Unanswered Question: Six Talks at Harvard (Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 1990), 313.

[B4] Allen Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014), 175.

[B5] Ibid., 174.

[B6] Ibid., 174-75.

[B7] Ibid., 179.

[B8] Ibid., 38.

[B9] Ibid., 42.

[B10] Ibid.

[B11] Leonard Bernstein, “Mahler: His Time Has Come,” High Fidelity, April 1967.

[B12] Ibid.

[B13] Barry Seldes, Leonard Bernstein: The Political Life of an American Musician (Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2009), 195.

[B14] Rick Schultz, “The Wagner Problem,” Jewish Journal, April 7, 2010. https://jewishjournal.com/culture/music/78198/

[B15]

[B16] Quoted in Liam Hoare, “Leonard Bernstein’s Tense, Torn Love Affair With Vienna,” Tablet, October 2, 2018. https://www.tabletmag.com/scroll/273026/leonard-bernsteins-tense-torn-love-affair-with-vienna

[B17] Paul R. Laird, Leonard Bernstein (London: Reaktion Books, 2018), 238.

[B18] Caroline Evensen Lazo, Leonard Bernstein: In Love With Music (Minneapolis MN: Twenty First Century Books, 2002), 97.

[B19] Humphrey Burton, Leonard Bernstein (London: Faber & Faber, 2017), 442.

[B20] Museum Judenplatz, “Leonard Bernstein: A New Yorker in Vienna,” Jewish Museum Vienna. http://www.jmw.at/en/exhibitions/leonard-bernstein-new-yorker-vienna

[B21] Ibid.

[B22] Shawn, Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician, 262.

[B23] Seldes, Leonard Bernstein: The Political Life of an American Musician, 170.

[B24] Ibid.

[B25] Ibid., 234.

[B26] Ibid., 243.

[B27] Ibid., 250.

(Republished from The Occidental Observer by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Arts/Culture, Ideology • Tags: Jews, Leonard Bernstein, Music 
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  1. As Bernstein was the Jewish’s world’s musical Yang, Lorenzo da Ponte was their Yin.

    Da Ponte’s Così Fan Tutte, ossia La Scuola Degli Amanti (All Women Do It, or The School for Lovers) beautifully and movingly contrasts Cultural Marxism stronger than any work in the West’s cultural canon, though Bernstein’s Gee Officer Krupke doesn’t do a bad job of dissing Cultural Marxism either.

    No need to rant against Bernstein’s non-Broadway life and work. One merely has to listen to Bernstein’s Mass to dismiss him as quickly as the Jets kissed off Officer Krupke in West Side Story. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j7TT4jnnWys

  2. with (((Mahler))) – a one-trick pony who wrote only symphonies & a couple of symphonic song cycles – (((Bernstein))) had some strong material to work with. Mahler was a great symphonist…but not a great composer.

    the 1st and 2nd symphonies are rock solid, and #’s 3, 5, and 7 have lots of good in them. Though in every case there are stronger performances than Bernstein’s: (((Leinsdorf))) for 1 & 3, (((Klemperer))) for #2, etc.

    and I’ll give Bernstein some credit as a conductor. His and Robert Casadesus’ performance of the Saint-Saens 4th piano concerto – alas, now copyright lawyer’d off Utube – is powerful and lucid, just astonishingly perfect. He also championed some relatively un-played non-Jew composers – Carl Nielsen, for one – tho w/o the success he had with Mahler.

    off the podium, Bernstein was – as so well documented by Sanderson – the archetypal

    Subversive Jew. In fact (like Soros) a modern day

    Jew of Malta

  3. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    Often an ostentatious buttcrack at the podium, and particularly poor at conducting military music,

    (https://www.amazon.com/Leonard-Bernstein-Conducts-Great-Marches/dp/B0090S4BZ8/ref=sr_1_2?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1545706694&sr=1-2&keywords=bernstein+marches

    (I had the earlier release as a kid: stunk on ice) )

    Bernstein was a great music educator.

    Who can forget this?

    I sent this to Ray Davies’ kid. She was gassed!

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  4. guitarzan says:

    I kinda like classical music, but the little bit of stuff I can find on Detroit radio is often just plain annoying to me. This article illuminates why my local listening choices are so limited.

  5. CBTerry says:

    I’ll have to go back and read this article slowly, but just skimming it brings much into focus. While I like Mahler’s first symphony it is nothing special (Wagner’s only symphony, hardly ever played, is infinitely superior) and most of his works I find forgettable at best. I recall hearing a pretentious piece while in a classical store in Ann Arbor, and based on what I knew, concluded that it was Mahler’s 8th, a piece I had never heard. I checked the CD and was right. I’ve never tried to listen to that one again. I’ve tried several times to “get into” Mahler’s 9th and was relieved when I learned that the great Sergiu Celibidache cared so little for Mahler that he never conducted a single piece by him.

    Which is not to say the Mahler was not a great conductor. Almost certainly he was. But the same cannot be said for Tilson Thomas. I’ve never cared for anything I’ve heard by him. Joshua Bell’s recording of the Tchaikovsky concerto is ruined by Thomas’ inept conducting.

    Hard to say if Bernstein championed Thomas because he was Jewish or because he was homosexual; I suspect the latter, not that those are mutually exclusive. Bernstein certainly championed some great gentile artists like Zimerman and Gould, although admittedly they were (or in Zimerman’s case, are) so gifted that they did not need Bernstein in their corner.

    For all the above, Bernstein was flamboyantly entertaining and appealed to the masses (not that that should matter, but ticket sales do). He has some good recordings (his Sibelius not among them). His popular works have some nice tunes.

    Far harder to explain the success of Eugene Ormandy, a boring mediocrity (or perhaps imbecility) who spent four decades running Leopold Stokowski’s glorious Philadelphia Orchestra into the ground.

    When it comes to great Jewish conductors, I like Barenboim and Levine, at least when the latter is not making Schubert sound like Berlioz’s Roman Carnival Overture. Particularly in the case of Levine, was his success at all attributable to his being Jewish or sexually / morally depraved? [Levine makes Bernstein look like a monk.] Sort of interesting that both Barenboim and Levine are excellent Wagnerians, perhaps spiritual heirs to Hermann Levi. I’m amazed at how deep resentment of Wagner is among Jews. They seem to think he founded National Socialism. I had an Israeli friend insist that she cannot listen to Wagner because he was played in concentration camps even though even mainstream historians say he was not (she’s my age and couldn’t possibly know first hand, but swears she’s heard from unimpeachable earwitnesses back in Israel). Perhaps Barenboim and Levine were so talented that they ascended the heights despite their love for Wagner.

  6. @Haxo Angmark

    with (((Mahler))) – a one-trick pony who wrote only symphonies & a couple of symphonic song cycles – (((Bernstein))) had some strong material to work with. Mahler was a great symphonist…but not a great composer.

    Haxo, behave yourself. Sibelius was a great symphonist and composer, Mahler wasn’t. It was only in the 1960s, with the collapse in standards, that Mahler started to be played regularly. As radio station Classic FM puts it:
    Many find the helter-skelter rides through Mahler’s music uniquely exhilarating. For others the effect is nauseating.

    As regards composition, Bernstein was always a minor composer. As a conductor, he was always a tedious, over the top buffoon, who usually detracted from the music.
    Bernstein may be World Famous in America.Fortunately, I don’t live in America, so I will miss nearly all this commemorative crap.

    • Replies: @Haxo Angmark
    , @utu
  7. @CBTerry

    Which is not to say the Mahler was not a great conductor. Almost certainly he was.

    You are certainly right on that point. Mahler conducted Rachmaninoff ( as pianist ) on his first North American tour and Rach had nothing but praise for Mahler’s care and diligence in conducting his ( Rach’s ) work.

    • Replies: @CBTerry
  8. @Verymuchalive

    Sibelius and Mahler once had a conversation on what a symphony “should be”:

    Mahler: ” a symphony must encompass the world”

    Sibelius: “no, a natural landscape is sufficient”

    and I think each succeeded quite well on his own terms; Mahler 1,2,3,5,7 are well constructed and for the most part inspired musical psychodrama. Ditto Sibelius 1-5 as nordic landscapes; 6 is more a lightweight sinfonietta and #7 is one movement…because Sibelius had flat run out of inspiration, and shortly thereafter stopped composing altogether.

    overall, I’d rate Sibelius the superior composer because he wrote terrific music in more than one form: in addition to the symphonies, numerous symphonic poems and orchestral suites, plus one of the 3 definitively great violin concertos, and much else.

    “Bernstein…always a tedious, over-the-top buffoon”

    evidently you didn’t listen to the Saint-Saens I linked to above. Bernstein’s versions of the Schuman symphonies are also excellent and, in general, he was reliable with German, French, American, and Nordic standard repertory pieces. With other music – Russian & Italian, for instance – messy and unsatisfactory.

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    , @vinteuil
  9. well, you’re evidently online:

    youtube has tens of thousands of live and from disc classical music videos, standard and non-standard works. Here’s your concert for today:

    http://youtube.com/watch?v=OO1c2PAiWuu

  10. CBTerry says:
    @Verymuchalive

    I’m complimented that you quoted me and mortified over my typo! I need to grow thicker skin.
    I did not know about the Rach / Mahler connection, thank you. Klemperer was gaga over Mahler as a conductor, but I wonder if part of K’s enthusiasm was to downplay the tremendous influence of Furtwangler, who totally overshadowed K in Europe. Last year, maybe 2, I saw (simulcast) Simon Rattle conduct Tristan at the Met. Rattle studied Mahler’s copy of the score and said that Mahler’s markings opened up the piece.

  11. utu says:
    @Verymuchalive

    What is it about Sibelius and Masoni music?

    • Replies: @Timothy Denton
  12. Whatever his faults, Bernstein was a great conductor, a GREAT conductor, no two ways about it. His Beethoven symphony cycle with the Vienna Philharmonic is one of the greatest Beethoven cycles, with his interpretation of the 9th rising to the level of Furtwangler’s 9th. Just listen to the mediocre fare trotted out by the likes of Simon Rattle today and then decide for yourself. Yes he was flamboyant on the podium, but he did bring excitement and show biz to the world of classical music, thus helping slow its declining appeal.

    His leftism or socialism was of the old kind that stood up for the underdog, the weak, the oppressed. I don’t see how he can be accused of cultural Marxism, his unfortunate homosexuality notwithstanding. He paid a price for his political views; that he had to compromise at some stage should not be used to trash his genuineness and sincerity.

    Just look at the classical music landscape today, how barren it has become! Not a single giant of the likes of Furtwangler, Walter, Klemperer, Karajan, Mravinsky. Bernstein was the last in the line of great conductors, let us remember (and honor) him as such.

    • Replies: @Prester John
  13. Servenius says:

    Reading about this repugnant, filthy, and monstrously bloated creature (Bernstein) sickened me. In so many ways, Jewish “cultural” influence on language, the arts, and in the media generally has been to bring “culture” down to the level of the gutter.

    • Agree: jacques sheete
    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    , @Druid
    , @renfro
  14. @Servenius

    Agree. Even without knowing about his rampant homosexuality Bernstein struck me as a repugnant exhibitionist–and a mediocrity to boot.

    • Replies: @jacques sheete
    , @Druid
  15. @guitarzan

    YouTube is a great source for classical music. Start with French mystic and impressionist Claude Debussy. Finnish composer Jean Sibelius has been mentioned in these comments; his symphonies and tone poems are worth a listen.

  16. CBTerry says:

    I like some Bernstein’s recordings and dislike others. Classical listeners, myself definitely included, have an unfortunate tendency to lionize and demonize artists, judging them are all superb or awful. Even poor artists have some good recordings and great artists some turkeys.

    The best way to judge a conductor is while listening on the radio because that is so often blinded. I was listening to a performance of Sibelius’ 5th that was so bad that I almost laughed. When it ended and I learned that it was Bernstein, I’m thinking, scratch him off the Sibelius list.

    There is a rumor (per Karjan’s biographer the source is Edge Leslie), that after a performance of Sibelius Karajan told Bernstein that he had spent 10 years popularizing Sibelius and that Bernstein had undone all his work in one hour. The biographer doubts that this story is true, but it does show that dislike of Bernstein’s Sibelius is not rare.

    But if you like Bernstein’s Sibelius, then fine. Enjoy it.

    Glenn Gould had a famous relationship with Bernstein (that was not contentious as some believe) but Gould did say that he rated George Szell (whom Gould actually did dislike) to be the better conductor.

    That there are no great conductors today may be true, but it may be an artefact of senescence. I am far too old to learn and admire new coductors like I could in my youth. I will say that anybody who lists great conductors and does not include Celibidache is fortunate, because they have a treasure chest waiting to be opened (given that Celibidache eschewed recordings, I only know about him because of an eccentric mentor). I liked Giuseppe Sinopoli, his early death was a blow to music. And I’ve heard some amazing Shostakovich from Semyon Bychkov. Incidentally, a successor as Music Director of the Grand Rapids Symphony Orchestra is David Lockingon, currently laureate. I’ve never heard Lockington conduct, but I have heard him perform some of his own chamber music compositions, and as a composer he is not easily dismissed.

    • Replies: @annamaria
    , @baythoven
  17. Anon[121] • Disclaimer says:

    Lots of informative material in this essay BUT the Jewish Angle goes too far.

    Yes, many Jews got a leg-up in the system due to connections and favoritism from fellow tribesmen. Leonard Bernstein is a perfect example of this. His Jewishness and homosexuality certainly didn’t hurt him in the business. His only lasting contribution to the Arts was score for WEST SIDE STORY, which is schmaltz but of a high kind.

    As for Aaron Copland, there’s no denying that APPALACHIAN SPRINGS is a genuine American masterpiece and a deeply moving portrait of Protestant America. Also, even though communism was a disaster wherever it came to power, maybe it was not the worst thing in non-communist nations. It’s like we wouldn’t want to live in a Christian Theocracy but Christianity in secular nations have provided balance to materialism and temporalism.
    Because of their higher IQ and neurosis, Jews are natural elitists and eccentrics. Therefore, without something like Judaism or Communism(or Christianity as conversionary religion for Jews), Jews tend to abandon all inhibitions and surrender to excesses of self-absorption and self-indulgence. For this reason, communism(at least in non-communist nations) had a restraining effect on Jewish egotism. Jews of communist persuasion felt an inner pressure to care about the People, the masses, the workers, and etc. The Brotherhood of Man thing.
    But this was also true of Protestantism and its work ethic in American history. The natural propensity of American History has been Winners over Losers, the land of opportunity where anyone can go from rags to riches, a kind of Social Darwinism. Winners win, losers lose, and that’s that. Globalism is this kind of Americanism on a worldwide scale.
    Protestantism, in contrast, suppressed overt egotism and reminded generations of Anglo-Americans to be concerned with spirituality and morality as well as with materialism and individualism. Then perhaps, Copland’s admiring portrait of Protestant early America had something to do with his communist ethos. One thing for sure, communism restrained homo tendencies that are naturally capitalist, elitist, and egotistical. Same was true of Pasolini, an Italian homo whose communism kept him REAL to some extent. But with the fading of communism, look how Jewish homos just became ridiculous overripe fruits. Commie homos believed there was something higher than homo narcissism: Justice for the Masses. In contrast, globo-capitalist homos believe in only one thing: Juice for the Asses.

    As for Mahler, he was a true giant. Along with Sibelius and Shostakovich(and maybe Prokofiev), he embodied that most interesting borderline between Romanticism and Modernism, with fullness of passion and proclivity for adventurism. I appreciate Sanderson’s anti-PC dissection of Jewish influence and connection, but let’s not reduce all Jewish achievements to incestuous tribalism. Mahler was a great great artist.
    While some Jewish figures clearly relied on Jewish networking for prominence and momentary success, there’s no denying the explosion of lotsa great Jewish talent in the 20th century.

    Also, Jewish critics in the past have done much to promote non-Jewish artists as well. The great reputations of John Ford and Howard Hawks owe to many critics and scholars, many of who happened to be Jewish. Jewish critics had high regard for Ingmar Bergman, Carl Dreyer, Andrei Tarkovsky(despite his deep Christo-National-Familial Conservatism). And many Jewish critics had high praise for D.W. Griffith until recent times. Pauline Kael routinely referred to BIRTH OF A NATION as a great work.
    And even Leni Riefenstahl was enjoying a revival in the 60s and 70s in artistic circles, which was precisely why Susan Sontag felt a need to attack her in the structuralist essay Fascinating Fascism where she argued that the neo-worship of the Powerful African Negro was just a reconstitution of Aryan Supremacist themes.

    Also, the reputations of certain Jewish artists came to rest more on test-of-time than Jewish cultural ‘nepotism’. Many of Kubrick’s works were roundly dismissed, often by Jewish critics. THE SHINING had many detractors, but it’s one of those works that grew larger over time. And we mustn’t fall for the fallacy that just because there was key Jewish support for a Jewish artist, the reputation owes mainly to such favorable attention. After all, things of little value fade from the scene, no matter how highly they were praised in their time. No matter how much Jews praise something, it will be forgotten if it sucks.

  18. @Anonymous

    I sent this to Ray Davies’ kid. She was gassed!

    Mixolydian or not, “You Really Got Me” is just noisy, fake-American trash. Davies was at his best when most English. “Dedicated Follower of Fashion” nails people like Bernstein. Being banned from the US for five years probably helped a lot.

    Like most modern and postmodern “artists”, Bernstein was at his best when he was being silly, and tedious when serious.

    • Replies: @CBTerry
  19. @syonredux

    Did you know that Charles was Burl’s fifth cousin? And James Merritt Ives was their cousin, along with Frederick Law Olmstead.

  20. CBTerry says:

    Appalachian Spring is wonderful, particularly the recording with the original orchestration featuring the dynamic duo of Ani and Ida Kavafian (shout out to Interlochen Arts Academy!).

    However, a necessary qualifier: Copland did not write any of the tunes that make it so endearing.

    • Replies: @annamaria
  21. Perhaps it’s time for an update of Wagner’s Judaism in Music.

    • Replies: @Olorin
  22. llloyd says: • Website

    It should be possible to consider that the great European classical composers left their posterity no where to go. Rather like the great Greek classical artists. Works after them could only be patische. Who could top Beethoven? Then by natural process of history, the classical composers went back to the roots of music. Gypsy, Negro spirituality, white working class fiddling. The Jews are first rate at that. Mein Kampf actually gives some back handed tributes to Jewish music. It describes it as primitive and derrivative. Exactly. The Jews lost it with rap except as their money producers.

  23. CBTerry says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Spot on. A silly, guilty pleasure: Natalie Dessay singing Bernstein’s Glitter and Be Gay. At her peak nobody could do crazy / glamorous — or those high notes — better than Natalie.

  24. @Haxo Angmark

    I did say that Bernstein ” usually detracted from the music”. I should have added – except when he actually did a good job. Regardless, that didn’t stop him being a tedious, over the top buffoon.
    As regards Mahler, there seems no doubt that he was a great conductor, one of the finest of his era. We have Rachmaninoff and other composers to testify to that.

    In their famous exchange, Sibelius said: ” I admire the symphony’s style and severity of form, as well as the profound logic creating an inner connection among all of the motives,” wheras Mahler said: “The symphony is like the world; it must embrace everything.”

    All artistic forms, like the Symphony, have their own framework and logic and Sibelius grasped them intuitively. Mahler didn’t. I often think of Mahler as a forerunner of post-Classical composers like Malcolm Arnold. They can produce some excellent movements and single pieces, but the whole work is disjointed and of disparate parts. Arnold’s Guitar Concerto is a case in point. The finale, the Rondo is one of the finest of its kind. The 1st and 2nd movements are a mish mash and most guitarists only play the Rondo.
    You are right about the much greater variety of Sibelius’ music. As well as the forms you mentioned, Sibelius also produced a lot of top class incidental music for plays – Peleas and Melisande for example. His only rival amongst the great composers in this department is Purcell.
    He also wrote a lot of piano music, championed by the likes of Ashkenazy, as well as songs and chamber pieces, the last now neglected.

    • Replies: @CBTerry
  25. CBTerry says:
    @Verymuchalive

    I am not familiar with Arnold, but your description of the disjointed whole certainly fits Mahler.

    Your comment on Purcell just reminds me of the wealth of music written before Bach, who may well have been the greatest of all. Spending our time on past masters cannot help but give much needed perspective on what is truly great music.

    As for Bernstein the conductor, I was thinking — how much was even him? When he would come to Ann Arbor, Detroit’s big shot music critic (whom I am not about to name) would rave about his performances. But according to my savant-level friend who knew more about classical music than anybody I’ve ever met or even known of, Bernstein would just send in his assistant to rehearse the orchestra. Bernstein would only show up for the performance.

  26. Mulegino1 says:

    J.S. Bach conducted his chamber music by pounding a ruler on the floor with one hand and playing the harpsichord with the other.

    Leonard Bernstein is the quintessential beneficiary of Jewry’s nepotism and ethnocentric narcissism. The conductor can be good, even great. But he can never turn a musical sow’s ear into a silk purse.

    That is the reason that Schoenberg will never be the equal of Wagner or Mozart. Serious music- at its inner core- is pure form and cannot be manipulated in order to deceive the masses as is the case with the popular crap, which relies upon beat and the cult of celebrity.

    There is plenty of good folk music which is organic in origin. Jewry, having little aesthetic taste, knows nothing about good organically grown culture, only about building upon distorted and ugly forms of celebrity driven bacilli.

    • Replies: @annamaria
  27. ‘…He arrived in the middle of a tense conflict between rival Jewish groups over how best to achieve the independent Jewish state mandated by the Balfour Declaration…’

    It’s almost tedious how even those who would decry Jewish and Zionist influence wind up unconsciously imbibing and parroting the propaganda.

    The Balfour declaration did not ‘mandate a Jewish state.’ It referred only to a ‘Jewish National Home’ — and everyone at the time, including the Zionists, agreed this in no way meant or implied an independent state. Chaim Weizman assured all and sundry of this at Versailles. All that was desired or intended was a Jewish community in Palestine, with its own schools, newspapers, economic cooperatives, etc. No independent state. No sirree.

    Moreover and in any case, the Balfour Declaration didn’t ‘mandate’ anything. It referred to a territory that wasn’t even held by Britain yet, and merely observed that His Majesty’s government ‘looked with favor’ on the establishment of such a National Home.

    I’ll readily agree I ‘look with favor’ on the concept of you suddenly coming into a million dollars. That by no means implies that I feel obliged to give it to you, or even do anything to help you get it. However, I’ll certainly look benignly on if you happen to acquire it.

  28. @Anon

    ‘…Jews of communist persuasion felt an inner pressure to care about the People, the masses, the workers, and etc. The Brotherhood of Man thing…’

    Witness the loving attention they lavished on the kulaks, etc.

    • Agree: RVBlake
    • Replies: @Anon
    , @36 ulster
  29. @CBTerry

    But according to my savant-level friend who knew more about classical music than anybody I’ve ever met or even known of, Bernstein would just send in his assistant to rehearse the orchestra. Bernstein would only show up for the performance.

    Thank you for that information – it’s not something you read in the biographies or laudatory reviews. It is consistent with Bernstein being bored with the mundane aspects of conducting. He was a Showman who only turned up for the Show. He was drinking heavily in his last decades and his personal life was a mess, so these were obviously contributory factors

    Malcolm Arnold composed the scores for 100 films, including such classics as Bridge On the River Kwai.
    His Guitar Concerto starts promisingly and then loses its way. Some critics see the influence of Django Reinhardt ?! in the second movement, the Lento, but I think that’s a bit far fetched. Anyway, the third movement, the Con Brio, is a Rondo in traditional Spanish style and is a classic of the guitar repertoire. You’ve probably heard it without knowing the title.
    Overall, it’s like the composer has cannibalised 5 or 6 works and thrown them into one concerto.

  30. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says: • Website
    @Colin Wright

    Witness the loving attention they lavished on the kulaks, etc.

    Kulaks were seen as the rich class.

    Today, Jewish globalists carry out mass killings in service of America’s kulak class on Wall Street and Hollywood.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  31. @Anon

    ‘Kulaks were seen as the rich class.’

    Kulaks were seen as what they were; the leaders of the peasantry.

    To crush and enslave the peasantry, the kulaks had to be destroyed.

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  32. 36 ulster says:
    @Colin Wright

    I believe that Anon’s comment was based upon the premise that in a democratic society, Communist movements appealed to class identities and to some of the squishier adherents of Christianity. But once in power the humanist mask would come off and the true misanthropic nature would reveal itself. Hence the treatment of the kulaks and other Wrongthinkers in the Soviet Union. Italian voters tended vote Communist in municipal elections (particularly in the industrial and academic north) due to the well-deserved reputation for corruption of the Christian Democrats. In national elections they tended to be wary of Communist-led governments, and thus voted CD, Socialist (PSI) or other parties.

  33. 36 ulster says:

    A really great tour de force, this. The influence of Bernstein and the role of American Jews in classical music are woven together rather well. I had no idea that the commenters had such in-the-weeds knowledge of the field. Sadly–or wisely–I realize that, as much as I enjoy most sub-types of classical music, I have much to learn.

  34. Olorin says:
    @CBTerry

    But according to my savant-level friend who knew more about classical music than anybody I’ve ever met or even known of, Bernstein would just send in his assistant to rehearse the orchestra. Bernstein would only show up for the performance.

    FWIW, I heard a similar story from someone who repaired certain instruments for members of the Philadelphia Orchestra and other classical ensembles.

    Bernstein, like honorary Jew Zubin Mehta, was a showman, a performer. Compare their “conducting” performances to this:

    Shred-enza starts at 6:45.

    I’m probably one of the few people alive who can remember where I was, what I was doing, and what I did next when it was announced that Papa Richter had died.

  35. Wally says:

    Bernstein would never get the accolades he gets if he were gentile and heterosexual.

    The guy was an embarrassing clown who wrote absurdly derivative, utterly inconsequential music.

    A la Einstein & so many others, another fake ‘genius Jew’.

    • Replies: @Reuben Kaspate
  36. George says:

    “Leonard Bernstein and the Jewish Cultural Ascendency”

    Any culturally ascendent Jews around these days? Or actually culturally ascendent anyone.

  37. how best to achieve the independent Jewish state mandated by the Balfour Declaration.

    Weird how even in this critical article it is assumed that the Balfour declaration said anything about a jewish state.
    The words used were ‘national home’, what legally means nothing.
    King Saud at the time interpreted it as a jewish province in Palestine.

    As far as I know in the Mandate GB got over Palestina after WWI there also was nothing about a jewish state.
    Mandate legally at the time was temporal rule until independence.
    This of course was a fig leaf for colonialism, but nevertheless, legally temporal rule.

    In the memoirs of first British High Commissioner Samuel one also finds nothing about a jewish state, on the contrary, Samuel blames Weizmann and other radical zionists for their intentions to make Palestine exclusively jewish.
    The Rt. Hon. Viscount Samuel. P.C., G.C.B., G.B.E., Hon. D.C.L. (Oxford). Hon. Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford, ‘Memoirs’, London, 1945

    Pity few here read German, a book about Galician jews who went to Vienna at the end of the 19th century, railways made many jewish middlemen superfluous, describes jewish political (?) activities.
    Hödl writes that any Galician jew in Vienna, the assimilated Viennese jews had seen with horror their brethren arrive, was member of two or three jewish organisations, with weekly meetings.
    One might think that impoverished migrants had better things to do.
    Klaus Hödl, ‘Als Bettler in die Leopoldstadt, Galizische Juden auf dem Weg nach Wien’, Wien, 1994
    Bettler = beggar

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
  38. @Colin Wright

    A kulak just was a farmer, with a farm.

    • Replies: @jacques sheete
  39. @Colin Wright

    Chaim Weizman assured all and sundry of this at Versailles. All that was desired or intended was a Jewish community in Palestine

    An excellent liar, Weizmann, see my comment

  40. tac says:

    HAHAHA! The author is disillusion …. Bernstein was no genius–far from it: MEDIOCRITY personified!

    Now, in the halls of Jewish composers Felix Mendelssohn can be argued to be the best of the Jewish musicians (although not a trend setter by any means, competent for sure)–a child prodigy:

    Violin Concerto in E minor:

    [MORE]

    Venetian Gondola Song Op 30 No 6:

    Venetian Gondola Song Op 19 No 6:

    Variations Serieuses Op 54:

    But you have the famous wedding march:

    Now compare that to Franz Schubert (Franz List’s transcription) but I could go on endlessly about a real genius, Franz Schubert! :

    • Replies: @CBTerry
  41. tac says:
    @Olorin

    Ahhh JS Bach–one of the greatest composers that has ever blessed us with his Genius–unlike the author sponsored Bernstein. May I indulge in a few of Bach’s works for the readers here:

    Brandenburg Concertos full:

    [MORE]

    The Goldberg Variations played by Glenn Gould:

    Violin Concertos:

    Toccatas played by Glenn Gould:

    Suite No 3 BWV 1068 (so-called Air on Strings):

    Fugue in G minor (played on organ):

  42. tac says:
    @Olorin

    Shred-enza starts at 6:45.

    I suppose this is your cynical ploy of what one would term a ‘cadenza’. LOL….

  43. J1234 says:

    Bernstein succeeded in making his influence and his politics felt in popular music. One of the great unacknowledged myths of pop music in the 1970’s was that of Janice Fink, a protege (of sorts) of Bernstein who was renamed Janice Ian. A whole generation of pop music fans took Janice’s song At Seventeen to heart. They were led to believe that he lyrics, “love was made for beauty queens” and not for “ugly ducklings like me,” came from first hand experience. They were sure that she spent most of her high school years as a social reject, a lonely recluse in her room waiting desperately for phone calls. They presumed that the heartbreak and pain of that early experience created the thoughtful song that Janice wrote and sang. But it was affectation.

    In reality, Janice spent her high school years – and earlier – appearing on the Ed Sullivan Show and working on a music career that was being nurtured by the most famous classical musician in the world – Leonard Bernstein. So she wasn’t exactly the wall flower that the song implied she was, and, as a result, not exactly what you would call unpopular, either. At age fourteen, she told her parents she was changing her strange and ugly last name to further her music career (don’t try this at home, kids) and wrote and recorded her song Society’s Child, which was about a white teenage girl who was impregnated by a black guy. Bernstein used his influence to force the song onto play lists on rock stations, largely because it reflected his politics and world view, and so it became a minor hit for Janice.

    This was about ten years before At Seventeen came out, so the public had mostly forgotten about the bold and prodigious 14 year old Janice Ian when the “quiet and reflective” Janice Ian regained the spotlight. I think At Seventeen was the song of the year, or received a grammy or something.

    • Replies: @Reuben Kaspate
  44. Mulegino1 says:
    @Olorin

    The first movement of the 5th is the greatest moment of the Brandenburg concertos, one of the sunny summits of our civilization! Pure joy out of a culture from which the cultural toxicity of Jewry as an influence has been excised.

    • Replies: @Anon
  45. Kingfelix says:

    Really, if you are going to debunk a genius, try to choose someone who patently isn’t one, Jewish or not.

  46. @jilles dykstra

    The first error that struck me in the passage you quote was the use of the word “mandated”. The Balfour Declaration was clearly drafted to avoid any mandate to anyone to do anything definite.

    Your description of the Galician Jews in Vienna makes them sound rather like the young Hitler from his account in Mein Kampf of his years before 1914 in Vienna.

  47. Anon[436] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mulegino1

    Who were the Jews, or what were the elements of Jewish culture, whose influence had been excised to allow pure joy from the culture of which Bach was a part?

    • Replies: @Mulegino1
  48. vinteuil says:
    @CBTerry

    Bernstein’s Sibelius was very hit & miss (like everything else he did). But at his best, he could be great. There’s a live VPO 7th where he keeps both himself and his orchestra under firm control and turns in a shattering performance:

    The ebb & flow of tension leading up to each of the three times that Thor throws his hammer (6:37, 12:49, 20:38) is just tremendous.

  49. …I’m making this sound too lurid or sexual? It is sort of sexual, but it’s with a hundred people.”

    What’s with these cats and “sex”, anyway? Maybe the mohel shouldn’t have molested their foreskins.

    Here, courtesy of our very own UR, is another pervert obviously obsessed with perverted”sex” with little girls; hundreds of them. It’s a must watch for those who believe gubbermint exists to protect us peons.

    http://www.unz.com/video/democracynow_perversion-of-justice-the-shocking-story-of-a-serial-sex-abu/

    Without government, who’d protect the pervs???

  50. mp says:
    @Haxo Angmark

    the 1st and 2nd symphonies are rock solid…

    Mahler had nothing too interesting to offer. No.2, for instance, needed an editor, badly. If honed down to half an hour or so, its repetitiveness and bombasity would be less annoying. If it’s “rock solid” I guess that can only mean that it sinks quickly to the bottom of the musical barrel, like a stone in water.

  51. vinteuil says:
    @Haxo Angmark

    …Ditto Sibelius 1-5 as nordic landscapes; 6 is more a lightweight sinfonietta and #7 is one movement…because Sibelius had flat run out of inspiration, and shortly thereafter stopped composing altogether…

    No, no, no. Among other things, there’s nothing “lightweight” about the 6th. Ralph Vaughan Williams considered it Sibelius’ greatest, and I tend to agree. And the idea that the 7th is in one movement “because Sibelius had flat run out of inspiration” is flat out absurd.

    “The Silence of Järvenpää” had nothing to do with a loss of inspiration. It had everything to do with…other things. It all makes for a very sad story.

    • Replies: @Haxo Angmark
  52. As I aged, I grew to loathe Leonard Bernstein’s behavior as an individual, but I remain grateful for his Young People’s Concerts (I was one of the young then) and my introduction to the work of Charles Ives (2nd symphony) and Lukas Foss (Time Cycle) in my teens.

    As for Theodore Adorno and the Frankfurt School in general, their nefarious influence on Western culture and civilization can never be overestimated.

  53. @ThreeCranes

    …and a mediocrity to boot.

    I think they know it too and for some of them it contributes to their common obsession with “being somebody.”

    His personality was marked by “consuming ambition…

    Many give over-the-top exhibitionists a bad name, and they seem to be in our faces 24/7/365. We goyim would do well to develop an acute sense of garbage detection and avoidance if not outright suppression.

    American culture? Please don’t call it culture.

  54. @Anon

    “After all, things of little value fade from the scene, no matter how highly they were praised in their time. No matter how much Jews praise something, it will be forgotten if it sucks.”

    Exactly. The works of Saul Bellow and Norman Mailer come to mind.

    • Agree: Che Guava
    • Replies: @Che Guava
  55. @jilles dykstra

    A kulak just was a farmer, with a farm.

    Pardon another display of my ignorance, and correct me if I’m wrong again, but weren’t they generally the more successful farmers, such as those rich enough to hire help? Also, wasn’t the word used by the Bolshies, as an insult basically meaning “tightwad” or “cheapskate” which gave the Bolshies an excuse to exterminate another part of the potential competition?

    I believe the point is significant.

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
    , @Anon
  56. Anonymous[297] • Disclaimer says:

    Great article.

    The parallels between modern organised Jewry and ‘MAESTRO 1’ during his twilight years are unmistakable. If feels like we’re all getting groped and crotch-grabbed by a gaggle of eternally wounded, self-centered, undeserving degenerates. Who would have thought that failing upwards breeds hubris and decline.

    • Agree: jacques sheete
  57. anon[393] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    The jewish thing,Its not overdone although to many of us who were raised not to be racially conscious (because jews) its uncomfortable to read no matter how red pilled we now are.
    What these sort of pieces whether written by Ron Unz or Kevin Macdonald really understate is the lost opportunity. Whats happened is the greatest civilization that has ever been by orders of magnitude- the european, a civilization thats risen numerous over millennia to be globally hegemonic has been usurped by jews continually over the past two centuries.The theft is bad enough the ingratitude awful, but what has been lost is what europeans would have otherwise done in that occupied space.Its not a matter of whether or not jews played fair which they didnt, thats beside the point, its simply untenable that a people as great as the european should be ruled by another and the world should be deprived of our fruits. whatever the jew talents let him practice them in his own land and we our own.
    what has happened is a people whos central genetic strategy is trust and openness has been targeted by a people whose central strategy is cohesion and parasitism. theres nothing inherently wrong i either strategy a species lives by any means it can both have the seeds of their destruction in them and one will be colonized if not carefeul the other will kill its host – ok both have happened but could still be undone, the jews must go, its too bad really it might have been ok if they were happy contributing and controlling a proportionate share or assimilated but they are incapable they must go. fortunately they have again gone to far and almost destroyed us and we are again waking up so what always happens will again happen and the jews will say poor us we are always picked on this time however i doubt we will let a single one stay in our lands and they and their arab cousins cna entertain each other from now on.

  58. wayfarer says:

    Americans call them hillbillies, rednecks, or white trash. I call them neighbors, friends, and family.

    source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._D._Vance

    CCR-Susie Q

  59. All I know is, this endless “Centennial Celebration” year has sounded like a hundred years of cats being strangled — both his own compositions and the endless interviews with his remaining family. Is it finally safe to turn the radio back on? I wonder in dread who else might be turning 100 in the next year or two to haunt the classical world.

    I will give Lenny his due as a conductor — that Shosty’s Fifth is still the best.

  60. wayfarer says:

    [It’s very bad practice to regularly clutter up comment-threads with totally off-topic videos. Perhaps you would be much happier leaving for a different website.]

    • Replies: @wayfarer
  61. vinteuil says:
    @Haxo Angmark

    the 1st and 2nd symphonies are rock solid, and #’s 3, 5, and 7 have lots of good in them. Though in every case there are stronger performances than Bernstein’s: (((Leinsdorf))) for 1 & 3, (((Klemperer))) for #2, etc.

    Leinsdorf in the 1st & 3rd? Seriously?

    No – for 1 & 3, it’s Horenstein. For 2 I’ll go along with Klemperer. For 4 it’s Szell. For 5 & 6 it’s Barbirolli. For 7 it’s Klemperer (a truly wild & crazy performance of a truly wild & crazy symphony). For 9 it’s Walter, preferably in the miraculous restoration of his 1939 VPO performance by Andrew Rose at Pristine Classical – but, failing that, his early 60’s Columbia recording will do.

    The 8th has never quite been done justice in any recording I know of. Horenstein ’59 and Bernstein ’66 probably come the closest to the necessary sense of occasion, but both fall short sound-wise.

  62. Che Guava says:
    @VirtualAnon34

    Not that I ever got far into the aptly named *Bellow*, too convoluted, fake, and dull by far.

  63. wayfarer says:
    @wayfarer

    It is now time for me to move on. I am through, posting at UR.

  64. @jacques sheete

    In my understanding the word kulak was just a bolsjewist propaganda trick to expropriate any farmer with a farm and land.
    Do suppose these farmers had employees.

  65. @J1234

    Maybe she wrote “At Seventeen” for another Janis… Joplin!

  66. @anon

    The greatest talent of the Jew is to recognize that he hasn’t got any and to use the genuine article for his material benefit even it doesn’t belong to him…

    • Replies: @Ilyana_Rozumova
  67. @utu

    Sibelius was Grand Master of the Lodge of Finland and Sweden. That may be the reason he composed Masonic music.

  68. Mulegino1 says:
    @Anon

    Christian civilization and culture had been healthily immunized against the Jewish collective for well over a thousand years. The Jews of that period were safely ensconced in their shtetls and their leaders were arguing over matters of moment such as whether it was permitted to kill a flea or a louse on the Sabbath.

    • Replies: @Jake
  69. Growth from Greek to Italy. From Italy to Germany, from Germany to Jews, down worth.

  70. Miggle says:
    @anon

    […] the jews must go, […] i doubt we will let a single one stay in our lands and they and their arab cousins [can] entertain each other from now on.

    That’s cruel. Not to the Jews but to the Palestinians.

    And the Arabs are not their cousins. They are Europeans, the Arabs are Semites.

    The Jews must NOT go. They have nowhere to go. Simply ban non-consensual genital mutilation.

    Someone just wrote here or nearby (maybe Mondoweiss) that the number of U.S. Jews today is only a fraction of the number of Tel-Aviv-based terrorists, three million versus nine million or something like that. American Jews are disappearing fast.

    So, befriend them. Love them.

  71. For me only Verdi is worth listening to. Maybe Puccini, Berlioz, and Tchaikovsky is worth listening twice. All the rest is only Flight of the bumble bee. West side story was not worth listening even once. Strauss was at least innovative.

    • Replies: @tac
  72. MBlanc46 says:

    I knew thae he was bad. I didn’t realize how awful he was.

  73. @seeing-thru

    Well, his reading of Beethoven’s Fifth (and Ninth) are still Numero Uno IMHO.

    • Replies: @Montefrío
  74. @Miggle

    The Jews must NOT go. They have nowhere to go.

    When they got equal rights in the 19th century the idea was that they would disappear through assimilation.
    Had they done that, they could have remained where they were
    In theory the possibility still exists

  75. Miggle says:
    @Miggle

    Sorry, I got the numbers wrong.

    There are roughly 6.5 million Jews in Israel. There are roughly 5.7 million Jews in America.

    Second-hand quote by Philip Weiss on 5 Jan 2019, his article, ‘NYT’ runs article about US Jews abandoning Israel that calls two-state solution ‘a cruel joke’.

  76. Jake says:

    “In 1950, the head of the Republican National Committee warned that “the sexual perverts who have infiltrated our government in recent years” were “as dangerous as the actual communists.” Human Events, a newsletter read in power circles in Washington, D.C., declared in 1952: “By the very nature of their vice,” homosexuals “belong to a sinister, mysterious, and efficient international.” A 1951 article in H.L. Mencken’s American Mercury insisted publishing was under homosexual control, producing a literary culture that was “chic, artificial, and possibly effeminate,” thereby abetting a “gradual corruption of all aspects of American culture.”[A30]”

    All of that was true then. And those supposedly were the good ole days.

    And this is the time when everybody needs to understand how gay the world of elite Britain had become no later than the Victorian era. America’s WASP Elites became as queer friendly as their Brit peers starting in the Gay (18)90s. Like their gay friendly Brit WASP peers, the gay friendly Yank WASPs began calling for birth control with a focus on seeing the whites they most despised have smaller families. And like their pro0gay Brit WASP elite peers, the pro-gay Yank WASPs were decidedly pro-Semitic.

  77. Jake says:
    @Mulegino1

    And then the Reformation changed all that, with each subsequent revolution (Anglo-Saxon Puritan, French, Bolshevik) making it worse.

    • Replies: @Mulegino1
  78. @Reuben Kaspate

    The greatest talent of the Jews is to recognize what will make money and what will not.

  79. Fascinating article. Many things I never knew and I’m sure will change what I think next time I hear the score of West Side Story.

    My siblings and I were exposed to all kinds of music growing up. Our parents’ insistence on us learning a musical instrument opened to us the world of so-called classical music. We also listened to big-band jazz, country/western, pop and rock’n’roll, Tejano, conjunto, mariachi, and Gilbert and Sullivan. Singing in the men and boys choir of the Roman Catholic Church we attended introduced me to Gregorian chant and other types of good, liturgical music.

    My mother always insisted we watch the Leonard Bernstein Young Peoples’ Concerts whenever they were broadcast on CBS. The four of us generally found them boring and thought Bernstein was a pompous ass although I’m pretty sure we didn’t articulate the sentiment in that way to our parents.

    • Replies: @jacques sheete
  80. bjondo says:

    scratch a jew artist
    find
    much ado ’bout nuthin’

    • Replies: @bjondo
  81. @Prester John

    Toscanini tops ’em all. Perhaps I say that because his recordings were those from which I learned about Beethoven, but I like to believe I’m objective and would place von Karajan second. Bernstein shone with the moderns, but Boulez shone more brightly. Not sorry to be missing the centennial.

  82. bjondo says:
    @bjondo

    i should apologize
    jew entitled to greatness
    as well as welfare

  83. Interesting article. Although I don’t share the author’s obsessions (misojudaism, gay scare) & I am absolutely not qualified to give an informed opinion on the subject (my musical education is close to zero & I’m basically a barbarian re this field), I’ll address a few issues..

    I think that Mahler was a great composer & I’ve enjoyed some of his works. The same can be said about other composers not many seem to enjoy (Bruckner, Hildegard of Bingen, Gesualdo da Venosa, Faure, ..). On the other hand, I don’t care about operas.

    Bernstein- I didn’t know he composed anything. Alright, I’ve learned something… He looks like an important promoter & educator of music & I guess his legacy will remain there. His Jewish-gay angle is interesting, but I am not too fascinated by it.

    What I am fascinated with is his energy. There are people who have boundless vitality (sometimes helped by drugs) & Bernstein is one of them. How he managed to do so much, spend so much time wasting his life on weird obsessions & live so long?

    As R.L. Stevenson said: professor of energy, for such types.

    Great explorer, adventurer, translator…. Richard Francis Burton was one of them (perhaps gay, too). How such people have these almost super-human reservoirs of energy is, at least to me, truly intriguing. There are true geniuses with endless amounts of energy (Caesar, Napoleon, Euler, Grothendieck,..), while others are comparatively lazy (Descartes, Einstein,..).

    As for social setting, 60ies/70ies was a remake, just with more nihilism & perviness of roaring 20ies & jazz age. Bernstein’s politics was, from what I’ve read, typical irresponsible leftism- but, this is another question.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
  84. anon[374] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    fortunately they have again gone to far and almost destroyed us and we are again waking up so what always happens will again happen and the jews will say poor us we are always picked on this time however i doubt we will let a single one stay in our lands

    this time someone else will be writing the narrative, someone else will control the media

  85. CBTerry says:
    @tac

    “We’ll go to the little boy’s room and find out who the real Jew is” — Bobby Fisher, when a reporter accused him of being a self-hating Jew. At least that’s the way I remember it; I can’t find his actual words anywhere.

    But I was able to find his 1984 letter to the Encyclopedia Judaica, in which he wrote, “I am not today, nor have I ever been a Jew, and as a matter of fact, I am uncircumcised.”

    As he did on the chess board, Fisher went right for the jugular. Jews can’t claim that circumcision is the most important covenant and then claim that a proudly uncircumcised person of Jewish ancestry is a Jew.

    And please don’t argue that one can be a Jew and not be religious. Of course! Most Jews are not religious — but they still circumcise. It is not a covenant with God, but a covenant with other Jews, a covenant of Jewish tribal identity.

    I agree with rabbis who argue that Judaism cannot exist without circumcision. I also wonder how much the covenant explains about Jews. What type of person would be filled with joy hearing their son scream while his genitals are being mutilated? https://parenting.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/05/31/i-enjoyed-my-sons-bris/
    Some traditionalists even insist that the ritual requires the mohel sucking the blood from the penis.

    I have learned that Jews honestly believe that they are a persecuted minority in the United States, even as . . . insert a million counterexamples here. Just today I learned that the first bill before the new Senate will be trying to make divestment in Israel a crime.
    https://www.democracynow.org/2018/12/18/glenn_greenwald_congress_is_trying_to

    I can’t help but believe that participating in the mutilation of their sons does not establish a remarkable ability for denial, for not seeing obvious truths, for not noticing blatant contradictions in thinking.

    What does this have to do with Felix Mendelssohn?

    Mendelssohn was not a Jew.

    In 1809 Christendom existed. Christians considered circumcision to be a bloody, barbaric practice. Jews who left Judaism left it for Christianity (unlike today where there exist only palimpsests of Christianity amidst a Judaized culture). Although Mendelssohn was from a most prominent Jewish family, his parents had left the tribe, and — like Bobby Fisher — he was almost certainly not circumcised.

    Because he was brilliant (albeit, as you said, not a trendsetter — his style was to be overwhelmed by the colossal genius born four years later in Leipzig) Jews have claimed him as their own. In doing so they have ironically been aided by Adolf Hitler (whom Wilhelm Furtwangler supposedly referred to as “that goddamned Austrian”) who banned his works as decadent.

  86. @CBTerry

    I was attracted to classical european music as a boy when I heard first Handel’s Messiah, then Beethoven’s sixth symphony.

    I hated the Catholic church in which I grew and walked out as soon as I could..yet kept going back for Christmas eve mid-night mass, because the nearby cathedral had a solid choir and did justice to the Messiah

    Later on I really got into Beethoven not from a technical angle but just listening and beefing up on general knowledge of him and his work. I have never lost interest in the Sixth symphony, the Pastoral’ which of course all you people know. Beethoven made natural sense to me, a celebration of ordinary social life, ordinary people

    then Beethoven’s Ninth which is probably one of the most incredible musical achievements of all, probably never to be surpassed

    I then ‘discovered Joseph Hayden and get into him when I have the time, usually around Christmas which matters only as a time of getting together with people I know, some of whom I see few and far between

    but there I have determined to stay with European classical music. I heard Bernstein many years ago and it was a jumble to me. seemed to me he was celebrated because he was Jewish, could do something and whether it was good or not they made him into a hit. he was not good.

    Handel, Hayden and Beethoven seemed by far the best to me and I could afford to leave the rest.. left them I have

    • Replies: @CBTerry
    , @Old Palo Altan
  87. Leonard Berstein has been a major influence on my life. His young people’s shows influence my love for classical music. His musical West Side Story encouraged us to form a street gang called the Jets and drive the PRs out of our neighborhood.

  88. anon[538] • Disclaimer says:

    James Levine was soooo very feted as director at Metropolitan opera.
    Something about him seemed creepy to me. I even complained when he was interviewed for 45 min. in the middle of an HD presentation. I was roundly hissed.

    It wasn’t the wheelchair.
    Nor his avoirdupois.
    Something about the whole package. I initially ascribed the feeling to Jews being Jews and overdoing it.
    Then — the pedophilia.
    https://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/how-power-works-the-james-levine-case/
    Aha.
    Somehow, you can’t hide ugly.
    And, he’s gone.

    Don’t let the door hit you —

    The new guy at Metropolitan Opera is also gay.
    Seems to be a requirement for admission.

    I don’t think Donald Palumbo the magnificent choral master at Met is gay —

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @CBTerry
  89. Druid says:
    @Servenius

    Totally agree. Overrated, like Hollyweird!

  90. Druid says:
    @ThreeCranes

    They get famous because their Jewish brethren promote them over others. Nepotism? The tribe has to reign supreme always

  91. @CBTerry

    There was a program about Mendelssohn on British television around the time of his 200th anniversary. Some stupid Jew gabbled learnedly to us that only a Jew like Mendelssohn could have written the oratorios Paulus and Elijah because only Jews know the Old Testament.

    Their ignorance is matched only by their arrogance -or should I simply call it chutzpah.

  92. Anon[253] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    James Levine’s version of New World Symphony is the best by far. So, I give him that.

  93. @Ilyana_Rozumova

    The greatest talent of the Jews is to recognize what will make money and what will not.

    It’s not a talent; it’s lack of inhibition. Anything for a shekel.

  94. CBTerry says:
    @Ben Sampson

    Life is short, listen to what brings you pleasure.
    It’s only music. It took me over fifty years to learn that civilization is more important than culture.

    • Replies: @Ben Sampson
  95. @Enemy of Earth

    …Gregorian chant…

    Awesome stuff.

  96. CBTerry says:
    @anon

    Levine is a creep (he is worse than you think: https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2018/03/02/cleveland/cn2Sathz0EMJcdpYouoPjM/story.html ) but I would be lying if I did not say that I often find his Wagner to be riveting.

    My all-time favorite performing artist is Sviatoslav Richter. I know practically nothing about his personal life and given what I know of his proclivities I’d like to keep it that way.

  97. @Olorin

    Many thanks for this.

    I first heard these concerti live at Berkeley in around 1968; the ensemble was Harnoncourt’s at the very beginning of its career (at least in the USA). The harpsicordist was Herbert Tachezi and he was sensational, if a bit metronomical.

    Richter is magnificent beyond words – both as a musician and as a man. So, too, is his ensemble.

    What a contrast to the morally and physically hideous types who have usurped their places, in Germany also alas.

  98. @Bardon Kaldian

    Thank you for confirming it for those of us who already suspected it; id est, that people who think Mahler was a great composer are people who don’t know anything about music.

    (Stop frowning Vinteuil; I don’t mean you).

    • LOL: vinteuil
    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  99. @Ben Sampson

    Which Catholic Church did you hate: the real or Pre-Vatican II one, or the ersatz horror now ruled by the counter-Pope Francis?

    I would suppose it must have been the first, because the modern counterfeit is not worth anyone’s hate, but only derision and disdain.

    • Replies: @Nonny
    , @Ben Sampson
  100. Bernstein’s rendition of Liebestod from Wagner’s opera Tristan and Isolde, is the most beautiful rendition of all. In the mid 1920’s, one Ernst Hanfstaengl played Hitler the Liebestod to get him to relax. If Bernstein and Hitler only knew.

  101. @anon

    anon wrote:

    Whats happened is the greatest civilization that has ever been by orders of magnitude- the european, a civilization thats risen numerous over millennia to be globally hegemonic has been usurped by jews continually over the past two centuries.The theft is bad enough the ingratitude awful, but what has been lost is what europeans would have otherwise done in that occupied space.Its not a matter of whether or not jews played fair which they didnt, thats beside the point, its simply untenable that a people as great as the european should be ruled by another and the world should be deprived of our fruits.

    Sicut Judeis non
    https://messianicjewishhistory.wordpress.com/2015/09/15/15-september-1199-papal-bull-sicut-judaeis-re-issued-by-innocent-iii-otdimjh/

    . . .The most fundamental and well-known document in this matter is the Sicut Iudaeis bull (Constitutio pro Iudaeis). The bull was first promulgated in 1120 by Pope Calixtus II and later re-issued by several different popes.6 It reaffirms the theological principle of the doctrine of Jewish Witness as the basis for

    extending protection to the Jews and for the prohibition against abusing them or their rights, despite their obstinacy and refusal to recognise the truth. They must not be forcibly converted, but anyone who has converted to Christianity may not renege and resume being a Jew. Naturally, all of the above is applicable only providing that they do not plot against Christians and Christianity.

  102. @anon

    What we are coming to understand is the depravity forced into our homes in the form of hijacked “culture”

    I grew up the only gentile on my block, I distinctly remember how hyper sexualized (((They))) made their children at under 10-years-old. These kids would talk about penises and vaginas as if they were GI Joe figures. It always disturbed me even as a kid.

    In one parent’s house there hung a life-size painting of a nude man over the dining room table – the subject had a distinct likeness to the father who was a NYC teacher and school psychologist. Their children always invited other kids to play in the dining room under that painting – the family’s intelevision game console was conveniently in that room. Even at 7-years-old I knew there was something depraved about this and never went back into that house.

    Sexual perversion is a jewish tradition. Another of my “neighbors” was a meek yarmulke wearer who had a secret hobby: staring into our windows and those of his own tenants. Seems this good jew would sneak into his tenant’s apartment and rifle through their things as they slept and turn the faucets on. This same pervert we are convinced broke into our tenant’s apartment and climbed into bed with her in the Summer of 1980. He would vandalize our cars and when we got a German Shepherd in the winter of 1983, he would hit the puppy with a slingshot.

    The German Shepherd put a stop to this pervert’s hobbies. It is now obvious that he was looking into our windows at night and the dog’s barking scared him off. My mother was a stunningly beautiful woman, and we often had her two nieces living with us after their mother died. The nice jew’s proclivities would not let a watchdog stop him, so he tried to poison him.

    My mother witnessing him sprinkle draino on his food in June 1983. She pulled the food away from the dog before any harm was done and confronted the nice jew who quickly ran into his home. We called the police, but as everyone knows about NY police, you have to call the rabbi to call them or they won’t show up. A year of court hearing and a nice jewish mediator decided that the gentiles would keep their dog inside and the nice jew wouldn’t poison him.

    Perversions are the untold jewish customs. When my cousins lived with us the elderly jew on the opposite side of the dog poisoner always wanted to teach them to play tennis. A pervert jew with his hands on prepubescent and adolescent girls was too much for my mother to even allow and she forbade it telling her nieces that the man was a pervert.

    When I read this article about Bernstein it fits so well with all my experiences dealing with jews as a kid. Vulgar self aggrandizing perverts and degenerates. Imagine we have been unwittingly letting this shit into our homes for generations.

    A poisoning of our culture so complete that we cannot be freed of it. Think of all the harm this has done in every sphere of our existence. Their war against us has raged for so long that we now find ourselves pushed out of our homelands, our institutions as they lecture us from the forefront of the axis they have built to destroy us. An Axis of Perverts, Communists, jews and the admix of ethnics all aligned against everything “white”.

  103. ariadna says:

    Bernstein must have hated to death the white Southern Tom Wolfe for so masterfully and mercilessly skewering him in Radical Chic and Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers, a scathing satire that extends to the whole jewish ‘elite.’ Sadly for us and fortunately for TW’s legacy it is not dated at all; one can re-read it, perhaps even appreciate it more now than some (most?) of us were capable to absorb in 1970 when it was published.

    • Replies: @ariadna
    , @jacques sheete
  104. ariadna says:
    @ariadna

    PS Tom Wolfe died this past May but the MSM did not mourn his passing as they did that of , say, ethnic novelist Phillip Roth, who died the same month.

    • Replies: @Anon
  105. @vinteuil

    3o years of silence, 1928-57?

    no, Sibelius closed his Magic Book because he had reached the last page.

    and good on him for doing it.

    as compared to say, Dvorak who, post 9th Symphony/Cello Cencerto, keep right on for another 20 or so opus numbers…and all uninspired note-spinning.

    • Replies: @Ilyana_Rozumova
    , @vinteuil
  106. @Anon

    Along with Sibelius and Shostakovich(and maybe Prokofiev) …

    What is this new abomination of omitting the space before a parenthesis? I see it constantly in Unz.com comments and even in articles. It reminds me of the British hipster-ism of spelling “12 miles” or “twelve miles” in text as “12mi.”

    Come on, people! English is a tongue of majesty, not a sandbox for you to make mudpies in because you can. Save your pidgin English for texting if you must use it.

  107. baythoven says:
    @Olorin

    I adore Karl Richter also, though that hardly demonstrates his conducting skill (as compared to, say, his sublime Christmas Oratorio). And as a performer, he leaves a greater legacy as an organist.

    To Mulegin01: I’m fine with the statement that “The first movement of the 5th is the greatest moment of the Brandenburg concertos.” But it is hardly “peak Bach”, as some of the organ works are.

  108. baythoven says:
    @Olorin

    I cheer Zubin Mehta for his recordings of John Knowles Paine, whom I regard as AMERICA’S GREATEST COMPOSER.

  109. Mulegino1 says:
    @Jake

    True- but Luther’s revolution was an exception, and JS Bach was a devout Lutheran,

    • Replies: @Anon
  110. Wally says:
    @Hamilton Guelph III

    What, no ebonics?

    You be rayciss.

  111. Nonny says:
    @Old Palo Altan

    Would you explain the difference to the non-Marianites among us?

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
  112. Nonny says:
    @Hamilton Guelph III

    Typos happen. Why the great fuss over such a trifle? No majesty there.

    • Replies: @jacques sheete
  113. baythoven says:
    @baythoven

    One more effort in expanding people’s “Bach window”:

  114. IstvanIN says:

    anon[393] • Disclaimer says:
    January 6, 2019 at 1:59 pm GMT •

    what has happened is a people whos central genetic strategy is trust and openness has been targeted by a people whose central strategy is cohesion and parasitism.

    That statement is so succinct and spot on. But how do we wake people up before it is too late?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @jacques sheete
  115. annamaria says:
    @CBTerry

    Jaap van Zweden’ Dallas period was absolutely fabulous. As for the New York’s period — the time will show.

  116. Anonymous[171] • Disclaimer says:
    @IstvanIN

    By informing them and organising politically.

  117. baythoven says:
    @CBTerry

    Sinopoli was really great.

    Haven’t time for it all? Then cut to the slow movement. 19:11

    • Replies: @CBTerry
  118. Dube says:
    @Hamilton Guelph III

    What is this new abomination of omitting the space before a parenthesis?

    Thanks, also noted here, frequently.

    Perhaps there are only so many strokes allotted to a lifetime, and so….

  119. Dube says:

    A man I know who has been a classical music radio programmer for some decades has enjoyed these comments but wishes that the evaluations of the works and conductors were explained in some terms beyond just approval or disapproval. Surely the ability is here to do so.

  120. Mulegino1 says:
    @baythoven

    Correct- “Peak Bach” would be the B Minor Mass and St. Matthew’s Passion, particularly the “Sanctus” in the former and “O Mensch Bewein Dein Sunder Gross” in the latter.

  121. baythoven says:
    @baythoven

    Oops. I duplicated. This was the intended second selection:

  122. tac says:
    @Ilyana_Rozumova

    Have you given Bellini’s ‘Bel Canto’ style any hearings?:

    [MORE]

    Norma: ‘Casta Diva’:

    Dopo l’oscuro nembo:

    Ma rendi pur contento:

    Ah, non credea mirarti…:

    Ah! Non credea mirarti:

    Norma: ‘Mira, o Norma’:

  123. CBTerry says:
    @baythoven

    Oh I know his Schumann #2! Agreed and thanks.

  124. @Nonny

    “Marianites?” If by that you mean that Catholics worship Our Lady, then you know even less about Catholicism than you think you do.

    The Church before Vatican II was recognisably, in worship, in doctrine, in ethos, exactly the same Church which it had been from the time of the Apostles.

    The Church then miserably “modernised” itself during the Second Vatican Council, which took place under Pope John XXIII from 1962 to 1965. This process was undertaken with some care, and the full implications of the changes in liturgy (abandonment of Latin first, then a complete remaking of the Mass in 1969, followed by changes in all of the sacraments), in doctrine (surrender to the Jews, to the democratic spirit, which was nevertheless coupled to an extreme enhancement of the powers of bishops over their own clergy, and the pope over the bishops), and to modernity in general.

    The ethos of the Church in the past was always to teach the world and to aggressively preach the Faith to all peoples and nations. This was turned on its head with the ecumenical movement, with its emphasis upon “dialogue” rather than the cool but insistent presentation of Truth.

    This self-immolation has now reached its apogee with the pontificate of the open heretic Francis, who is an utterly miserable creature, loathed (as they have learned to know him) every bit as much by his allies as by his opponents (otherwise knows as “Catholics”).

    Luckily, 2019 is already shaping up to be the year which might see the end of him. The clerical abuse scandal, in which he is deeply implicated, is about to sweep away the false facade of the rich and arrogant episcopate in the USA via an earthquake of RICO like legal actions on the part of state and federal justice departments, and he, Francis, is not going to escape the tsunami to follow.

    The historic Catholic Church was a force to be reckoned with. It was coherent, it was a force for high culture, it was also a body which was capable of producing saints, and did so on a regular basis.

    It was loved, and it was hated. Today there is nothing there to love, nothing there to hate. One need only sit back, with derision for what it is and (if one loved it) sadness for the disappearance of what it was, and watch it continue to self-destruct.

    • Replies: @Anon
  125. @CBTerry

    was just mentioning. what you said seemed relevant to what I had to say..no ill will intended

    (correction:Joseph Haydn)

    • Replies: @CBTerry
  126. @ariadna

    Your comments sound interesting. Now, for the benefit of us curious, but uncouth clods with lots to do, would you mind providing a link or two, if possible?

    Thanks much in advance.

    • Replies: @ariadna
    , @renfro
  127. @Nonny

    Typos happen. Why the great fuss over such a trifle? No majesty there.

    Masterful response!

  128. @Hamilton Guelph III

    What is this recurrent abomination of acting as proof reader? I see it constantly in Unz.com comments, and as off topic and smug as it sounds, I ask whether it’s anything more than attention seeking behavior.

    • Replies: @Hamilton Guelph III
  129. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Colin Wright

    Thanks for telling the truth about the Balfour letter.

  130. Johan says:
    @Anon

    ” Jews of communist persuasion felt an inner pressure to care about the People, the masses, the workers, and etc. The Brotherhood of Man thing.”

    The subjective motivations of individuals are outside of the reach of objective determination.
    Generalized though it can be roughly perceived that some people are sympathetic to communism for humane reasons, they are often high achievers (not among so called oppressed classes), and i’d say often extremely naive as of the reality of communism.
    On the other hand there are the low achievers and or the envious who like to cut off the head of everything which is above them by forming an utopia of equality where everyone has roughly the same, is the same, and thinks the same. Then there are the clever demagogues and power mongers who play on the envy of the low achieving masses, stirring the latent hatred of the latter in order to set them up against the high achievers.
    Bernstein obviously was a high achiever and, as a personality, not very much into the kind of deadly equality and subjugation of the individual which is the communist utopia.., so that it is probably naivety combined with humane intentions which lead him to see communism as a solution for various problems.

  131. @IstvanIN

    But how do we wake people up before it is too late?

    An excellent, but nevertheless eternal, question.

    PS: It’s been too late for some time now.

  132. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @jacques sheete

    Kulak didn’t imply successful. It just meant a small farmer, maybe a tenant, maybe owned the land before the revolution. The Kulak distinction the Bolsheviks created was owner ship of animals. There was also the implication that somehow the Kulaks cheated other small farmers somehow.

    The Bolsheviks destroyed Russian agriculture with their badly run collective farms. A Kulak was also any farmer who didn’t want to give his machinery tools livestock seed and labor to the Bolshevik collective shave lsbor farms

    That was the reason for the Bolshevik attacks deportations to the gulag and massacres. The farmers resisted being driven to the collective farms and being forced into slave lsbor by Jewish sissy city boys who didn’t know what they were doing

  133. Faraway says:

    French famed author André Gide wrote in his diairy in 1914: “It seems to me that this tendency to constantly emphasize the Jew, preferring him and taking a special interest in him, this predisposition to recognizing in him talent, even genius, stems from the fact that a Jew is particularly sensitive to Jewish qualities” (André Gide, Œuvres complètes, Gallimard, 1933, tome VIII, p. 571).

    • Replies: @renfro
  134. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @ariadna

    Philip Roth, the creepy pervy wanker who wrote about his repulsive self? That Philip Roth?

    Loved Tom Wolfe, loathed Roth.
    Our autobiographer Jeff Stryker reminds me of Philip Roth with his endless whining about his fall from AnnArbor to the slums of Detroit but remaining superior to the White trash thugs in the White trash slums of Detroit.

    And then, redemption, his escape from White trash America to the New Jerusalem of Asia.

  135. annamaria says:
    @Colin Wright

    “…the Balfour Declaration didn’t ‘mandate’ anything. It referred to a territory that wasn’t even held by Britain yet, and merely observed that His Majesty’s government ‘looked with favor’ on the establishment of such a National Home.”
    — Thank you for the reminder.

    • Replies: @SolontoCroesus
  136. @Old Palo Altan

    at that time I did not know what I do now about religion including Christianity. I hated the catholic church I knew, that I grew in.
    it was full of racism and class consciousness just like the society around me. if you were brown-mixed towards white skin..if you were Chinese, Indian and actual white you were regarded in the church and outside of it.
    and it was not North America I am talking about..I did not grow up there.
    all the priests were white and Italian. and one day before first communion when we went to confession the priest for confession was a tall Irishman who was very young..but mid-twenties I guess now
    instead of taking our confession he made us play rung and catch and who got caught would be brought to him in the presbyter room to be spanked. I was caught and dragged there but freaked out when he bent me over. I scrambled away and ran home.
    now I have an idea of what all that probably meant. but there was a lot more.

    that was on a Saturday afternoon. on Sunday I made my first communion and was supposed to take communion a second time on Tuesday morning. I did not go for communion then because I had sinned in the meantime and had to confess but had no opportunity to do so. but I saw my friends, the others boys with whom I grew up with who had also sinned taking communion like if nothing happened. they had sinned but it was nothing to them.

    we were 6 and 7 years old and look already how we were. I was stunned. they knew and they did not care. and that is what I discovered about the Catholic church and subsequently all religion..the deep hypocrisy they all represented..actually existed in

    subsequently things happened in my life which left me rudderless and without authority early in my life. I could do as I pleased and I simply stopped going to church by 12.. because no one could make me go. the church did not like discovered, was there to control m..bot to save me.

    [MORE]

    I am from a formerly slave and colonized country, no jobs, no education, no chance. and there was the Catholic church right in the middle of it as cause. that was an inescapable fact for anyone with any common sense..especially some one with Black skin, young and male

    seek a job and the prospective employer wants good recommendations..I was not thankfully a juve with a record..so I tried a tactic..went to the parish priest and and asked. he exclaimed: I DON’T KNOW YOU!! which was true. he slammed the door in my face..a white man, a foreigner.

    “But wait!” I tried. “I am so and so, my family is known as Catholic, they go to church all the time..I went to Catholic school. let me tell you who I am. I have not been to church for a couple of years now but this is who I am. I was always top of my catechism class, I am first ‘communioned’ and confirmed!”

    the door remained shut..and dead silent. 14 years old in front of a deaf and dumb door…needing work, a simple messenger’s job @ ten dollars a week

    that is what I found the Catholic church to be..punitive and unforgiving, hard of heart..in fact no heart all. and racist beyond description, no compassion at all for the Black skin..for sure the young male Black skin

    that’s why I hated the Catholic church..the Catholic Church I knew directly, personally, by experience. that Church taught me what it was/is. ultimately I even stopped going to hear the Messiah at Christmas.

    I came to see quickly that Jesus story was a non-starter and communion was nonsense..symbolic cannibalism. but there was a spirit in all of that I could not deny and I subsequently came to see that spirit as originally African, from whence the story that became Christmas and Jesus was pilfered, plagiarized and given to us all as the silly story of Christmas..the birth and resurrection of Jesus

    now I make no distinction about the periods in Catholic evolutionary history. Catholicism is ridiculous, parasitical, its social existence inconsistent with the collective interest of ordinary people the world over..ORDINARY PEOPLE! ..all of them, all of us.

    its a class thing really: the Church, all religions, are arms of elitist dictatorship of the people. out in the streets in revolutionary flight the people ought to make very short work off it..religion organized religion as a whole. I hated my Catholic Church in the old days. I now see the Catholic church comprehensively, as I have described it..an enemy of the people..and it is in my practical social interest to work towards its elimination

    and there is music in there too..revolutionary music..real revolution not of the manipulated Khazar kind, hopefully we hear such music soon.. in a huge cascading, descending din.

  137. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Old Palo Altan

    Have you ever read Malachi Martin’s books? If you have, what’s your thoughts on them?

    • Replies: @bjondo
    , @Old Palo Altan
  138. annamaria says:
    @Mulegino1

    “…Schoenberg will never be the equal of Wagner or Mozart.”

    — It was not for nothing that Taruskin called dodecaphonic music the collapse of time and space. Schoenberg took the noble polyphonic technique and led it to an ugly dead end.

    According to Forkel, the great Bach would first discuss with his students the beauty of music, before proceeding to technicalities of voice-leading which explain the beauty. The dodecaphonic music skipped the introduction and settled with timbral / register variations for the expense of spiritual depth and the true mastership.

    “Lenni” was a gifted musician but nowhere he was great. Where he was great was self-promotion. His dirty self-indulging behavior encouraged other perverts (French kisses to children – really?) His slobbery and shamelessness, in combination with nepotism, reinforce the stereotype of an influential Jew. Not a particularly nice case for celebration.

    • Replies: @Mulegino1
  139. annamaria says:
    @Olorin

    Thank you. Bach, the glory of German civilization!
    Karl Richter’ recording of all Brandenburg concerti is uplifting. He was a powerful and honest musician.

  140. annamaria says:
    @CBTerry

    Agree. Copland was a gifted and skillful compilator.

  141. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hamilton Guelph III

    So there’s supposed to be a space between the parentheses and the word?

    What’s the correct form for quote marks? .” Or “.

    • Replies: @Dube
  142. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ben Sampson

    Well, you certainly have your reasons.

  143. bjondo says:
    @Anon

    MM,
    agent for jew;
    traitor to catholics/christians.
    his writings good for trash liner;
    his grave good to spit on.

    5ds

    • Replies: @Anon
  144. vinteuil says:
    @Haxo Angmark

    Sibelius’ silence 1928-1957 was not a crisis of creativity, but of confidence.

    There were three main factors:

    (1) His works were received ecstatically in England & the U.S., and taken up by the greatest English & American conductors – Beecham, Stokowski, Barbirolli, Koussevitzky, etc. In at least one survey of American concert-goers, he surpassed even Beethoven in popularity. His followers feverishly speculated concerning whether & how he could possibly surpass the sublime perfection of the 7th Symphony. So the pressure as he worked on his 8th was intense.

    (2) Meanwhile, in continental Europe, where he had never really broken through, the Second Viennese School & their partisans, like (the infinitely vile) Theodor Adorno (may he both rot & burn forever in Hell) were on the rise among the “Intelligentsia” – and they singled out Sibelius, for destruction, as the “worst composer in the world” – a campaign which was, shamefully, assisted by America’s most powerful music critic, the disgusting pervert Virgil Thomson, and one of America’s most talented composers, the quintessential commie-pinko-fag Aaron Copland.

    (3) …all of which fed into Sibelius’ long-standing problems with alcohol.

    The rest was silence.

    • Replies: @Che Guava
  145. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:

    I always thought the gangs in West Side Story were 3rd generation Italians vs 1st generation PRs. My favorite song was America sung by the Hispanic singer. Also I liked officer Krupke.

    Over all, I didn’t like it. It was a sappy love story with sappy Bobby Darin type love songs Even in my teens I thought it was a liberal whitewash of dangerous thugs. I love ballet, but thugs doing ballet??? I thought at the time it was a very feminine show, the exact opposite of the standard Romeo and Juliet stories in many cultures. Most of the stories are ultra macho, with the whole macho male thing of defending one’s culture territory and women against the other.

    The boys in the gangs just seemed so girly and harmless. Come to think of it, all the guys in the Jerome Robbins movies were sissy and girly. Contrast Jerome Robbins men dancers with Fred Astaire. He was very thin short and incredibly well groomed. But he was a real adult man, not a girly sissy boy.

    Lots of men ballet dancers are gay. But they manage to be very masculine and powerful when playing a powerful frightening man of which there are many in ballets.

    My brothers and sons were more macho at age 5 than the sissy effeminate men dancers in West Side Story. The real problem with the script is that there is no real animosity no buildup to Tony’s death. The suppposed dangerous gangsters behaved like a high school gym class divided into teams by the teacher.

    And then boom, Tony’s killed.

    Only thing I remember about Bernstein’s glorification in the media was that the publicity claimed Felicia was some kind of South American aristocrat great lady, not an ordinary American.

    • Replies: @Anon
  146. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:

    These comments are what I love about Unz. No matter what the subject the breadth and depth of knowledge is breathtaking. It’s not just the knowledge of music but the conductors!! I am totally impressed by your knowledge. You guys are awesome!

  147. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @bjondo

    Sounds reasonable. I really don’t remember many details.

    • Replies: @bjondo
  148. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mulegino1

    Problem with Luther was his emphasis on the Bible and reading thinking mediating and obsessing about it led to Calvin, Knox snd the rest of the lunatics. Read the Bible and every village idiot can figure out what each myth and fable means and create hid own sect.

    • Replies: @Che Guava
  149. @Ben Sampson

    Phew!

    But what you recount tells me that you would actually be quite at home in NewChurch: it is as anti-white and anti-European (with all that that implies) as you are.

    • Replies: @Ben Sampson
  150. @Ben Sampson

    You sound like 75% of the Unitarians I know ( 2 spaces the other 25% are ex-Jews 2 spaces ).

    snide aside —
    First, I feel your pain, and it’s not just black or brown people, or poor people, who experienced what you did.

    But second, many of the greatest adherents to the rock-solid message of Jesus; the beauty that by fair means or foul the Catholic institution created and supported, like the music, art, architecture and courtly mythology of the medieval era that focused on Mary and the elevation of womanhood, were also profoundly disdainful of the Roman Catholic institutional church, even as they bent their massive talents to celebrating the underlying spiritual message of Jesus and Christian spirituality that, some say, was entrusted to Roman Catholicism to preserve.

    In this category include Dante, Machiavelli, and Verdi: all abhorred Roman Catholicism but preserved, maybe even created, the highest forms of Christian spirituality.

    From my point of view, the soul of Christianity is within the aesthetic. Perhaps that is why Leonard Bernstein is emblematic of a destructive force in the Catholic / Christian worldview.

    One last thing — can’t seem to dismount from my hobby horse: look at what was destroyed by Allies in World War II: major and ancient centers of Catholic and Christian aesthetic expression in architecture– the Benedictine monastery at Monte Cassino was reduced to rubble; Rome became the playground and center for dominance of FDR’s hegemonic ambitions; in the post-war era in Germany, Jewish-dominated occupying forces eradicated the art and music that expressed the German ethos and replaced it with “modernism” — i.e. Jewish preferences.

    • Replies: @Che Guava
    , @Dube
  151. Che Guava says:
    @Anon

    You may likely reading a litle more history, Zwingli, Calvin, Knox, Luther later than two of those, the other, much later. It would be nice if know idiots who are knowing naught would refrain.

    However, those of us who are having basic powers of observation, are easily able to see the habitual lies.

    • Replies: @Anon
  152. Che Guava says:
    @vinteuil

    (((Copland))), just look at his dull face, moronic, even sub-moronic.

    I have vague memories of listening, at times I had been fooled by the Jewish chorus ‘dis is dah great compoiser’, into listening, it is all dull and easily forgettable.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @vinteuil
  153. Anon[253] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Stanley Kauffmann called it the best musical ever. Pauline Kael hated it. She thought musicals should be fun and zany, not weighted down with social significance.

    The movie hasn’t aged well overall, but there are some killer songs: the ballad ‘Maria’, the dance number ‘I like to be in America’, rock n roll ‘Jet Song’, and ‘Tonight’. And ‘Officer Krupke’ is pretty good pop satire.

    https://wondersinthedark.wordpress.com/2014/09/03/24-west-side-story/

  154. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Che Guava

    I know all about Calvin Knox and the rest of the lunatics obsessed with the genocide violence sex and treachery of the Jewish bible.

    • Replies: @Nonny
  155. Anon[253] • Disclaimer says:
    @Che Guava

    (((Copland))), just look at his dull face, moronic, even sub-moronic.

    They say Mozart was ugly as hell too. The fact is Copland did compose ‘Appalachian Spring’, one of the truest and greatest American masterpieces.

  156. Che Guava says:
    @SolontoCroesus

    This is cheap on your part. To use Monte Casino as an example, sure, it is one, but not representative, and the destruction by US ground forces was not necessary.

    Also, they were hardly heroic (some were, but their opponents, much more so), they were a bunch of vulgar fools.

    As in Asia, too.

    • Replies: @SolontoCroesus
  157. @Anon

    I actually got to know the man fairly well when I lived in New York City in the early ’90s.

    He was good company, but one never knew how much of what he recounted was actually true. The suspicion was always there that his very Irish gift of the gab was getting the better of him.

    The same is true of his books, except perhaps for the Final Conclave, which was the first book of any importance which revealed to a wide public the reality of what had happened to the Church at Vatican II.

  158. vinteuil says:
    @Che Guava

    Unfortunately, Copland was the second closest that America came to producing a great composer. Besides Appalachian Spring, there’s also Billy the Kid, Rodeo, the Red Pony film score, and a few other bits & pieces.

    Samuel Barber came even closer to greatness.

    • Replies: @Che Guava
  159. @annamaria

    Perhaps the confusion is that the British granted themselves a mandate over Palestine, having wrested the region from the Ottoman empire in WWI, not least through the treachery of Lawrence of Arabia.

    Under cover of this mandate, the British promised what it did not truly possess to several different parties, including zionists.

    Shortly before the first world war ended, Rabbi Stephen Wise, Louis Brandeis, Felix Frankfurter and other Jewish leaders formed the American Jewish Congress —>

    “The American Jewish Congress* [AJC] was founded in 1918 as leaders within the American Jewish community, consisting of Jewish, Zionist, and immigrant community organizations, convened the first American Jewish Congress (AJCongress) in Philadelphia’s historic Independence Hall. Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, Felix Frankfurter, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis, and others joined to lay the groundwork for a national democratic organization of Jewish leaders from all over the country that would broaden Jewish leadership and present a unified American Jewish position at the Paris Peace Conference in 1919.” https://ajcongress.org/about

    Although “Jews” had no state and no actual party in the war, the AJC delegation, numbering over a dozen members, had an out-sized influence on Versailles proceedings. (In addition to AJC’s representation of “Jewish interests,” Bernard Baruch ** was forcefully omnipresent in Woodrow Wilson’s delegation in Paris. It should also be noted that Lloyd George, at Versailles on the British team, had been legal council to Chaim Weizmann and the zionists he represented. )

    In The Transfer Agreement, Edwin Black writes:

    “A delegation cutting across Committee and Congress lines finally did assemble at Versailles. But the Committee split off from other American Jewish groups negotiating Jewish rights when–in the Committee view– the proposed rights went “too far.” Specifically, when Versailles mapmakers were redrawing boundaries based on religious, linguistic, and other ethnic affinities, popular Jewish sentiment demanded to be counted among other minority groups targeted for self-determination. That meant a Jewish homeland for Jews in Palestine–Zionism.

    Committee leaders [i.e. German Jews – ed.] were repulsed by Zionism. In their view, a refuge in Palestine would promote Jewish expulsion from countries where Jews lived and enjoyed roots. Anti-Semitic regimes could point to Palestine and claim, “You belong there in your own nation.” However, majority Jewish sentiment won out at Versailles, assuring a Jewish homeland in Palestine, with stipulations preserving Jewish rights in other countries.

    American Jewish Congress leaders returned from Versailles in triumph. They had helped create a Jewish homeland, as well as secure international guarantees for minorities in Europe.

    [No history of WWII is anywhere near complete if it fails to unpack the ramifications of the above paragraphs, and of Louis Brandeis’s subsequent directives with respect to German Jews. – ed]

    * AJC was a new organization, supplementing the pre-existing American Jewish COMMITTEE, which was made up of mostly German Jews of substantial means, who were less amenable to zionism. As alluded to in the above, extensive quote, it is crucial to recognize that zionism was a very new concept in international Jewry; that it was highly contentious, even amounting to a civil war between various Jewish groups and factions. The Brandeis-Frankfurter-Wise faction had the ear of the highest authorities in US government, and carried the day. And the subsequent century.

    ** Fun facts:

    “In 1916, Baruch left Wall Street to advise President Woodrow Wilson on national defense and terms of peace. He served on the Advisory Commission to the Council of National Defense and, in 1918, became the chairman of the new War Industries Board. With his leadership, this body successfully managed the US’s economic mobilization during World War I. In 1919, Wilson asked Baruch to serve as a staff member at the Paris Peace Conference. Baruch did not approve of the reparations France and Britain demanded of Germany, and supported Wilson’s view that there needed to be new forms of cooperation, as well as the creation of the League of Nations. “

    and

    In the 1920s and 30s, Baruch expressed his concern that the United States needed to be prepared for the possibility of another world war. He wanted a more powerful version of the War Industries Board, which he saw as the only way to ensure maximum coordination between civilian business and military needs. Baruch remained a prominent government adviser during this time, and supported Franklin D. Roosevelt’s domestic and foreign policy initiatives after his election. ”

    and

    “When the United States entered World War II, President Roosevelt appointed Baruch a special adviser to the director of the Office of War Mobilization. He supported what was known as a “work or fight” bill. Baruch advocated the creation of a permanent superagency similar to his old Industries Board. His theory enhanced the role of civilian businessmen and industrialists in determining what was needed and who would produce it. Baruch’s ideas were largely adopted . . .” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_Baruch

    Meanwhile,

    “[Walther Rathenau] held senior posts in the Raw Materials Department of the War Ministry and became chairman of AEG upon his father’s death in 1915. Rathenau played a key role in convincing the War Ministry to set up the War Raw Materials Department (KRA), of which he was put in charge from August 1914 to March 1915 and established the fundamental policies and procedures. His senior staff were on loan from industry. KRA focused on raw materials threatened by the British blockade, as well as supplies from occupied Belgium and France. It set prices and regulated the distribution to vital war industries. It began the development of Ersatzkaisertum raw materials, developing supply chains to bring peace and for regime change within Germany.[7] KRA suffered many inefficiencies caused by the complexity and selfishness encountered from commerce, industry, and the government itself.[8][clarification needed] sic https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walther_Rathenau

    Amazing coincidence: Baruch was in charge of US war economic matters in World War I and World War II; Walther Rathenau was in charge of critical German war economic matters in World War I.

    Next, cycle back to Edwin Black’s Transfer Agreement as he discusses the fear in the hearts and psyches of the German people and leadership engendered by the Jewish Declaration of Economic War against Germany, noting especially Black’s blasé assessment of the causes of the starvation that cost 800,000 German lives in WWI
    [nudge nudge: Black implicitly holds Rathenau responsible for mishandling the German economy and causing the starvation]:

    “The deterioration of the once powerful German economy really began in World War I, when German military and political leaders simply did not calculate the economic effects of a prolonged war [The activities of Chaim Weizmann in Britain were a major factor in the prolongation of the war. see The Balfour Declaration, by Leonard Stein (Weizmann’s aide and companion) – ed] The Allied blockade cut off Germany’s harbors and most of her land trade routes. Trade was decimated. Industry could not export. War materiel and civilian necessities, including food, could not be imported.
    [Madeleine Albright would have approved. The tactic was so successful that it’s being deployed against Iran. See Nima Shirazi, Hurting, Hanging, Suffocating & Starving: The Inhumanity of Iran Threat Rhetoric -ed]
    Before the blockade was lifted, 800,000 malnourished German civilians perished. Actually, the blockade created less of a food shortage for Germany, which was 80 percent food self-sufficient before the war, than did the short-sighted policy of pulling Germans off the farms to fight without compensating for the reduced food production. But the popular perception among Germans was that they had been starved into submission, defeated not on the battlefield but by political and economic warfare and connivance, by what became known as the “stab in the back.” “

    Where did those horrible Huns ever get that ridiculous idea?

    Rathenau retained a prominent role in German affairs during the Weimar years, until his assassination in 1922. Perhaps because Rathenau considered himself “German first and then a Jew,” and occasionally sought to distance himself from his Jewishness, he is not heralded by international Jewry nor the legions of Jewish writers — his name does not appear in the index to Black’s book, and biographies are scant. Rathenau’s assassination did not rise to a casus belli in 1922, although, as Gilad Atzmon records in From Esther to AIPAC,

    “In 1969, Rabbi Prinz confessed that ever “since the assassination of Walther Rathenau in 1922, there was no doubt in our minds that the German development would be toward an anti-Semitic totalitarian regime. When Hitler began to arouse, and as he put it ‘awaken’ the German nation to racial consciousness and racial superiority, we had no doubt that this man would sooner or later become the leader of the German nation.”[13] “

    When Hitler did, indeed, become Germany’s leader, Rabbi Stephen Wise resurrected Rathenau grief and condemned Hitler for having put flowers on the grave of the assassins who died in the act of killing Rathenau.

    • Replies: @annamaria
    , @jilles dykstra
  160. @Che Guava

    Ouch.

    I’ve been called worse things than Cheap, Che Guava, but you’re going to have to come up with more support than, “not representative.”

    Allies bombed their way up the entire Italian peninsula, causing far more death and destruction in Italy (as in France) than Germans did. Rick Atkinson has stated that the Italian campaign was, in many ways, unnecessary and ill-conceived; more Americans died in Italy than in other European theaters.

    Germany was deliberately targeted for destruction of its legacy architecture, Dresden being the most often remembered of this policy, although it was at the tail end of the 131 German cities that Allied firebombers rendered uninhabitable, much of its ancestral and sacred architecture unrecoverable.

    But I was thinking most especially of information contained in Cora Sol Goldstein’s Capturing the German Eye: American Visual Propaganda in Occupied Germany
    https://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/C/bo6161622.html
    Goldstein details how American occupying forces carried on psychological warfare against the German people for approximately five years post-war, with the declared purpose of reshaping their interior landscape — their very psyches were to be cleansed of “Nazism” or even of German cultural awareness, and in their place were planted the weed-seeds of obsessive guilt, in addition to “modernism,” especially in art, as well as admiration for Americanism and consumer culture. Her words, not mine.

    That seems to me to fit Lemkin’s definition of cultural genocide.

    • Agree: Che Guava
    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    , @annamaria
  161. @SolontoCroesus

    And, worst of all, it worked.

    • Replies: @SolontoCroesus
  162. Bernstein was a genius and a great american but he didn’t have any sense of moderation or proportion and he destroyed himself steadily. There is one long profile in the New York Times Sunday Magazine wherein he finishes a conducting job, exhausted. He goes backstage and immediately starts sucking on an oxygen tank. After about ten minutes, recovered, he lights a cigarette.

    Not a guy anybody wants to emulate I would think.

    At least he didn’t set himself on fire like Richard Pryor.

  163. annamaria says:
    @SolontoCroesus

    Thank you for providing this excellent educational material.

    The rapaciousness and abject immorality of the tribe have transpired in the announced plans to demand reparations from the Middle Eastern countries, including the war-torn Libya, Syria, and Iraq: https://www.rt.com/news/448252-israel-compensation-jews-arab-states/

    Gila Gamliel, Israel’s Minister for Social Equality, who is coordinating the effort, said that the time had come to “correct the historic injustice of the pogroms [against Jews] in seven Arab countries and Iran, and to restore, to hundreds of thousands of Jews who lost their property, what is rightfully theirs.” …

    Israel would seek $35 billion from Tunisia and $15 billion from Libya. Compensation will also be sought from Morocco, Iraq, Syria, Egypt, Yemen and Iran.

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  164. Mulegino1 says:
    @annamaria

    His slobbery and shamelessness, in combination with nepotism, reinforce the stereotype of an influential Jew. Not a particularly nice case for celebration.

    About as trenchant description of the “celebrated Jew” as I have ever read. Kudos!

  165. @Old Palo Altan

    I’ve had a begonia for over 12 years. Recently, it was left unwatered in a very cool location for over a month. Stems and leaves drooped limply over the sides of the pots, and it looked like it had passed the point of no return.

    But 4 or 5 days of gentle watering and a bit of heat have nearly completely renewed the plant; one leaf died, that’s all. Reasonable to anticipate it will produce flowers in early summer.

    One wishes and hopes that the German people can water and warm themselves back to health and vigorous growth.

    De’ corsi affanni compenso avrai,
    la tua salute rifiorirà.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
  166. annamaria says:
    @SolontoCroesus

    “Germany was deliberately targeted for destruction of its legacy architecture, Dresden being the most often remembered of this policy, although it was at the tail end of the 131 German cities that Allied firebombers rendered uninhabitable, much of its ancestral and sacred architecture unrecoverable.”
    — That was similar to cultural genocide conducted against Russia after the Bolshevik revolution. https://fee.org/articles/the-staggering-toll-of-the-russian-revolution/

    With Lenin’s decree of January 20, 1918, nationalization of the church’s property began: cathedrals, churches, church grounds, and all buildings owned by churches were looted, and valuables (gold, silver, platinum, paintings, icons, historical artifacts) were either stolen by Communist atheists or sold to the West via government agents, communist sympathizers, and fellow travelers such as American business tycoon Armand Hammer, who met Lenin in 1921.

    • Replies: @SolontoCroesus
  167. @annamaria

    You are breaking my heart, annamaria.

    It is hard to imagine how anyone, or group, can be so evil.

    Thank you for all you contribute to the UF comment section.

  168. @annamaria

    In the early fifties, the Palestinians having been expelled, Israel lacked peasants to work the land.
    Deals were made with Arab countries: we the jews, you their property.
    Giladi is one of those telling the story.
    Mossad placed bombs in jewish quarters in these Arab lands.

    There of course still is the Palestinian ownership of 97% of Israel within the 1967 cease fire lines, and 100% outside, not to speak of destroyed Palestinian villages and little towns.

    In order to prevent paying compensation to the Palestinians it was decided to make propaganda about the properties jews had lost in the Arab countries.
    Sephardic rabbi David Shasha was hired for this propaganda.
    When he discovered what was expected of him he quit, and started the Sephardic Newsletter on internet.
    The Newsletter was because he was unable to find a job, ostracised.
    An honest and intelligent man, Shasha, I read the Newsletter for some time, it was great how Israeli propagandists as Pipes and Lewis were debunked.
    It does not exist any more, as far as I know, merged with other USA non asjkenazi publications.
    For those who do not know, neocons etc all are asjkenazi jews, from E Europe, probably non semitic, descendants of the Khazars who around 900CE went from paganism to judaism.

    What Israel now is doing baffles me, the Israeli position in the world never was as bad as it is now.
    But Israel also is trying to squeeze money out of Poland, and even the Amsterdam public transport announced payments for holocaust victims or survivors.
    For the time being my idea about the jewish problem is confirmed again, no idea about socially acceptable behaviour.

    • Replies: @annamaria
  169. @SolontoCroesus

    Where did those horrible Huns ever get that ridiculous idea?

    What is the horrible idea behind this long comment, partly true, partly lies, partly omitting important facts ?

  170. @jilles dykstra

    What’s partly true, what’s partly lies, what important facts are omitted, jilles?

    I’m not gonna offer any responses until properly Mirandized.

    — ok, this one: the “horrible idea” is that Germans were “stabbed in the back.”

    In my opinion, Germany was, indeed, betrayed by people who had previously sought their aid, or at least, by ostensible members of the same group to whom Germans had extended security and even assistance in establishing a colony in Palestine.

    To make it less abstract: start with the recognition that there was a kind of civil war between Jewish factions. German Jews represented one faction, were anti-zionist. Ship of Fools tells an interesting story: German Jews were not unhappy staying in Germany; they did not feel threatened until (in my opinion) zionist agents turned up the heat to scare them into leaving.

    Eastern European Jews were passionately zionist, were represented by Chaim Weizmann (from Byelorussia), Rabbi Stephen Wise (Hungarian Jew, passionate zionist, more capable of lying than Trump hisseff’ — while the Rabbi was working to scare German Jews into abandoning Germany for Palestine, his daughter was touring Stalin’s Russia and hobnobbing with Bolsheviks — it’s in Wise’s Letters); Louis Brandeis — a curious cat — ultra zionist but not passionately so, more like a PacMan who could not stop himself from gobbling up a terrific business opportunity; Felix Frankfurter. an even more curious cat: married (unhappily) to a Presbyterian depressive, befriended and supported by Brandeis and thereby eager to please LDB, getting his sense of relevance and purpose out of being a Big Shot deal maker under Brandeis’s tutelage.

    The non-German Jews had no compunctions about betraying the loyalties of German Jews to their own ‘homeland,’ and German leaders were not unaware of these tensions: Herzl had attempted to play Ottomans against Germans for support of zionist settlement, and Chaim Weizmann worked the same game, playing Germany against the British for whichever would come up with the best deal for the Jewish zionist project. Weizmann bet on the British and won.

  171. @SolontoCroesus

    Perhaps the AfD will provide the gentle watering you (and I) hope for.

    But surely you should have found some Wagner to provide the musical accompaniment to your thesis?

    This perhaps:

    • Replies: @vinteuil
  172. Nonny says:
    @Anon

    Please give and example of the lunacy of the “lunatics”. Were Calvin and Knox genocidal, or are you expressing hatred of the Bible and any Bible-based belief system?

  173. @Old Palo Altan

    Don’t worry, I don’t have a high opinion on people hooked on music. To me, many- not most- of them seem to remain perpetual adolescents. Here I’m going against Confucius & Plato & Popper re music aesthetics & along Hegel & Heidegger.

    Insoluble dilemma.

    • Replies: @annamaria
  174. annamaria says:
    @jilles dykstra

    “But Israel also is trying to squeeze money out of Poland, and even the Amsterdam public transport announced payments for holocaust victims or survivors.
    For the time being my idea about the jewish problem is confirmed again, no idea about socially acceptable behaviour.”

    — In short, Jews as a tribe suffer unordinary density of sociopaths. Add to that the indoctrinated immorality towards non-Jews, which deforms a person’s character. Perhaps this is why so many Jews avoid living among other Jews. Apart from the religious fanaticism of Haredim that demands ethnic cohesiveness (see some parts of Brooklyn), the Jews are quite happy to live a non-Jewish life and away from the Jewish State. Moreover, Israeli and Russian Jews prefer emigration to Germany to living in the Jewish State.

    The influx of the Soviet Jews to Israel was a consequence of a desire to escape the USSR; when having a choice, the emigres would strongly prefer the US and Canada. They were and are economic migrants.
    https://www.haaretz.com/1.5471218

    Sixty years after the beginning of the “Final Solution,” Jews apparently feel better about living in Germany than in the Jewish state.

    https://www.haaretz.com/1.5177308
    https://forward.com/news/4029/germany-is-moving-to-end-mass-immigration-of-jews/

    German authorities presented the new restrictions on Jewish immigration to Germany’s two national Jewish organizations… As put forth, the restrictions effectively will end the wave of migration that has brought almost 200,000 Jews and their relatives to Germany from the former Soviet Union…

  175. @Old Palo Altan

    you read me wrong! no church for me.

    your New Church reads like it will have a giant bureaucracy besides itself for opportunities to make bobol and corrupt all over the place..for get the white hate and anti-european

    nutten for me man save a real honest to goodness democracy, based on general ownership of the means by the people who work in them who will decide on them and on all society in their various nationalism

    and in that I would be free to myself and by myself. save when I have to work..free man!

    earn a living, love a good woman..defined as a woman I like and want..some children, good food preferably that I prepare myself..even grow myself

    I have had a lifetime of Europeans and now I must end up using my mind hating you guys.. which is not so bad, not time consuming as I can keep that to myself and avoid you guys.

    but join a church too and spend my time there hating you guys actively?

    are white people worth all that?
    nah! I don’t think so. I don’t want to even have to bother with you guys, to spend my time with you, such as you are…among you and about you

    keep the church. come lets make a revolution and a democracy then we can go our separate ways. fuh real

  176. Dube says:
    @Anon

    I hope this settles it. Hamilton noticed the frequent omission here at Unz(and not elsewhere) of the space between opening parenthesis and the preceding word(like this). Do you see it?

    That’s all. But text editors tend to be a finicky bunch.

  177. CBTerry says:
    @Ben Sampson

    None perceived, my apologies if I suggested otherwise! And yes, “Haydn” is frustratingly easy to mispell.

  178. renfro says:
    @Servenius

    True.
    And I tend to dismiss all the Jewish greats and geniuses claims because the Jewish media and press never lets the public see the non Jewish greats and geniuses.

    Same thing for writers…Phillip Roth for instance?….total twisted navel, non redemptive garbage.

    • Replies: @Ivan
  179. Dube says:
    @SolontoCroesus

    From SolontoCroesus #158:

    From my point of view, the soul of Christianity is within the aesthetic. Perhaps that is why Leonard Bernstein is emblematic of a destructive force in the Catholic / Christian worldview.

    From leonardbernstein.com:

    Bernstein and Schwartz envisioned MASS not as a concert piece, but as a fully staged, dramatic pageant. They mixed sacred and secular texts, using the traditional Latin liturgical sequence as the fundamental structure and inserting tropes in contemporary English that question and challenge the prescribed service, as well as meditations that demand time for reflection. They took the Tridentine Mass, a highly-ritualized Catholic rite meant to be recited verbatim, and applied to it a very Jewish practice of debating and arguing with God. The result was a piece that powerfully communicated the confusion and cultural malaise of the early 1970s, questioning authority and advocating for peace.

    Any thoughts on the success of this work, whether as polemic or as art?

  180. ariadna says:
    @jacques sheete

    & jacques sheete:

    Radical Chic and Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers
    by Tom Wolfe
    Publisher Farrar, Straus & Giroux
    Publication date 1970
    Media type Print (Hardback & Paperback)
    Pages 153
    ISBN 0-553-14444-8

    PS. I take it that being a self-professed “uncouth clod” implies you have “lots to do” and can’t look up stuff yourself.

  181. Dube says:

    From SolontoCroesus #158:

    From my point of view, the soul of Christianity is within the aesthetic. Perhaps that is why Leonard Bernstein is emblematic of a destructive force in the Catholic / Christian worldview.

    From leonardbernstein.com:

    Bernstein and Schwartz envisioned MASS not as a concert piece, but as a fully staged, dramatic pageant. They mixed sacred and secular texts, using the traditional Latin liturgical sequence as the fundamental structure and inserting tropes in contemporary English that question and challenge the prescribed service, as well as meditations that demand time for reflection. They took the Tridentine Mass, a highly-ritualized Catholic rite meant to be recited verbatim, and applied to it a very Jewish practice of debating and arguing with God. The result was a piece that powerfully communicated the confusion and cultural malaise of the early 1970s, questioning authority and advocating for peace.

    Any thoughts on Bernstein’s Mass, whether as polemical or aesthetic success?

    • Replies: @SolontoCroesus
  182. @jacques sheete

    What is this recurrent abomination of acting as proof reader? I see it constantly in Unz.com comments, and as off topic and smug as it sounds, I ask whether it’s anything more than attention seeking behavior.

    Obviously you and the English language have a serious disagreement. Now I’ll wait here while you type — since you don’t seem to care for writing — “You’re an elitist! Nya nya nya!”

  183. renfro says:
    @Faraway

    “It seems to me that this tendency to constantly emphasize the Jew, preferring him and taking a special interest in him, this predisposition to recognizing in him talent, even genius, stems from the fact that a Jew is particularly sensitive to Jewish qualities”

    That isn’t where their preoccupation with themselves comes from.
    Read Herzl’s diaries he kept while promoting Zionism and you will understand.
    Jews wanted and want what Herzl described as being in a position of….. ”receiving our visitors with aristocratic benevolence”’….and to be admired.
    iow Jews wanted to be ‘somebody’…..to have gentiles and the world see them as aristocrats and some sort of nobility among men.
    As we see now the opposite happened…they didnt become ‘benevolent ‘ or aristocratic , their zionism turned out to make them seen as midget Nazis and parasites instead.

    https://archive.org/stream/TheCompleteDiariesOfTheodorHerzl_201606/TheCompleteDiariesOfTheodorHerzlEngVolume1_OCR_djvu.txt

    • Replies: @anonymous
    , @anonymous
  184. renfro says:
    @jacques sheete

    Here JS…you can read the entire text of Radical Chic at the NY mag

    http://nymag.com/news/features/46170/

    • Replies: @Che Guava
  185. renfro says:
    @Miggle

    So, befriend them. Love them.

    (sigh.)……..Do not let the scorpion hitch a ride on your back…..remember what happened to the frog.

  186. @jilles dykstra

    Your critique is valuable, jilles.

    What did you find “partly true, partly lies, partly omitted” in my over-long comment?

  187. @Dube

    I don’t know the work.
    I’ll do some research and get back to you.

    Other Jewish artists and culture critics have opined on- and created art based on Catholic cultural icons and have generally been disrespectful, disdainful, or have misconstrued the target in a way to enhance Jewish visions of Jewish superiority — Jewish appropriation/misinterpretation of Verdi’s oeuvre, especially Nabucco, comes to mind. I’ve observed this too many times, so I’m inclined to be skeptical of Bernstein’s work.

  188. Che Guava says:
    @renfro

    IIRC (and I do recall it, history of posts will confirm), I was first to posting to negate Bernstein’s ‘Radical Chic’, several other topics, the same kind of thing pour moi on others.

    Am not caring if others are claiming to be first (other than I) to noticing these phenomena, but many posters are very cheap.

    Am not to expect particular respect, but am irritated by, mainly ‘Anon’ commentors here, about two-thirds Zio-trolls, much of the remainder, Mud-slime trolls.

  189. It is all puzzle. It cannot be solved until somebody finds out why Babylon king did find it necessary to import Jews.

  190. Che Guava says:

    Bernstein, West Side Story, and that was full of cliches and copies (in the movie) from Romeo and Juliet (earlier film).

    I suppose that donkey-faced Copland threw in a little of his ‘sound of N.Y. as a modern city’ in, in parts. That is pretty boring, shuffling chords, a crescendo at the end of every line.

    Otherwise, what is there? Not much.

    It is interesting that they were all fudge-pilers. Had not known that before.

  191. L Bean says:

    What’s hilarious is that Copland, Bernstein, and those that followed them in the Hollywood film score tradition is that they ALL use themes from 19th and early 20th c European opera. Wagner! They are slagging Wagner, of course, because if their audience ever became familiar with Wagner they’d see that their heroes are actually thieves.

    Seriously, these “American” composers to a man are aping old opera themes. Everyone uses Verdi(Hollywood composers especially, to this day) for both the boisterous build-ups and weepy dramas. Wagnerian-influenced love themes are in practically every classic film. And Copland himself paints his scenes in Wagnerian. Riotous! Down to the sunrises and birdsong etc. Copland must have been a really twisted figure to know privately. I see some late-era Puccini in his more intimate/small scenes. It’s like, cribbed almost. Also what CHUTZPAH, since Puccini was still alive into Copland’s adulthood – Copland figured, hey we run this scene. We’ll make it so no one knows who did what first, only that we are doing it *now*.

    As for jazz being important to them, that was all just marketing – nothing in their sounds is like jazz, it’s more euro-oompa folk/gypsy, which can be said to be a type of jazz, but that’s stretching it when Bernstein et al are claiming a direct influence in their “American” compositions. They are glomming on to recognizable snippets from old jazz standards for … page views. These dudes are the original clickbait mongers. It’s balderdash. It’s either jazz, or it’s a commercial for breakfast cereal. There is no jazz lite.

    Anyway actual jazz musicians/composers, like Jelly Roll Morton, will say that they got a lot of their musical inspiration from Classical music/opera, from listening to live performances – Jelly Roll says he used to listen to Donizetti, Verdi operas as often as he could – New Orleans was the US stronghold for European musical culture for more than a century before NYC was even competently maintaining a scene. And since NYC is only a recent participant as far as American music history goes, one can see how it would be New Orleans that would be the place to authentically carry on the tradition of an intrinsic musical culture. In early jazz one can definitely hear snippets of the European musical tradition. Sorry Lenny! There is no “pure” musical genre, no matter how much these vultures would like to advertise an affiliation with. “We identify with the jazz made by the darkies” Sorry but even jazz has Wagnerian influence, boychik!

    As a young person with little musical knowledge but exposure to a broad variety, I always just viscerally avoided music from people like Aaron Copland, Bernstein – all of the Broadway musicals and their corresponding “films”. It took me some years to realize Mahler wasn’t all that. I thought I was missing something. I kept trying. There was still nothing there.

    • Agree: Che Guava
  192. Che Guava says:
    @vinteuil

    What about Henry Parsch (I am not sure of the spelling)? His work was very interesting.

    De Souza? Sure, he was only composimg anthems, but did it surpassingly well.

    As for later, after the Jewish takeover, little is of interest, I agree, nothing much

  193. @guitarzan

    Get ahold of the Mozart operas, and any Bach. Baroque music in general, e.g. Monteverdi, John Blow. Screw this typa drivel.

  194. anonymous[538] • Disclaimer says:
    @renfro

    “It’s a lucky thing for me that I’ve had no social life here. I
    would have spent myself being scintillating at dinner parties.”

    – T Herzl the Humble

  195. anonymous[538] • Disclaimer says:
    @renfro

    Try this at home:

    Word search,

    The Complete Diaries of Theodore Herzl:
    https://archive.org/stream/TheCompleteDiariesOfTheodorHerzl_201606/TheCompleteDiariesOfTheodorHerzlEngVolume1_OCR_djvu.txt

    “blue eyes” 2 matches
    “master race” 0 matches
    “anti-Semiti_ 82 matches
    “hate_ ” 4 matches

    Mein Kampf:
    http://childrenofyhwh.com/multimedia/library/Hitler/mein-kampf.pdf

    “blue eyes” 0 matches
    “master race” 0 matches
    “antiSemiti_ 2 matches
    “hate_ 71 matches

  196. Ivan says:
    @renfro

    Having a tin-ear for classical music, I’d let others judge Bernstein, but about Phillip Roth I agree with you. Scatological poop, masturbatory excrescences are his stock in trade. And they are not even enjoyable. Hell if the Nobel Committee was going for stuff like this, they could have a far more worthier contender in Thomas Pynchon, who apart from from his sexual reveries is actually a great writer.

  197. strange flows eh

    for all these years, ever since I was 18 I always loved the Berlin Philharmonic conducted by Herbert Von Karajan with Beethoven’s work. nothing else compared.

    I think I liked a version or the sixth conducted by someone by the name of Henry Lewis. that appealed to me but I had little money and could afford only Von Karajan. I had a little portable electric player with small built-in speakers

    now that I see that Bernstein was fully homosexual, which is as human sexual chord I have little sympathy with, all of a sudden it became crucial that I know Von Karajan’s sexuality. I loved the mans work but left it at that. I knew he had been a Nazi but I never held that against him. I moved on. I knew nothing of his life otherwise..did not think it was necessary.

    but even where I was in the far colonial boonies we could not escape Bernstein..where calypso and reggae held sway. Bernstein’s flamboyant news got through, as well as snitches of his music that I heard that never caught my spirit

    but it was not that I was looking for classical music. I heard it on the radio on Sunday night programs and Beethoven stuck. but not before Handel did! I got a copy of the Messiah..I don’t remember by whom. then I lucked into the sixth and was hooked forever. I wore it out on my lil’ player. even my buddies who heard me constantly playing the sixth, all who were even more neanderthall than I, came to see that light. the sixth has outlived the Messiah in my soul

    but I thought this time. today, to see if Von Karajan was homosexual… and thank the christian god he was not..he was a rabid heterosexual. I like that!

    Von Karajan remains unsullied in my pantheon…the part where I hold white people who have been human, lived/live human lives and did/do work in their lives that contribute to the general good, to general human advancement. it is not an empty archive.

    Fidel Castro is in there although he regarded himself as part Black. I don’t mind regarding Castro as white.. and note his most prominent place in my white pantheon

    but in searching Von Karajan I thought to look up Henry Lewis as well..and what do you know..Henry Lewis was a Black man, an African American.

    all these years and I did not know that fact. and in coming to know it I am incredibly pleased. no wonder I was attracted to his Sixth. the spirit of it connected. I will go look for his music now. I have earned some money in my life regular money i.e..I can afford to buy records now.

    no one can dislodge Von Karajan in my soul but I can add what is also good, spiritual.

    they say Von Karajan was cold perfection, precise and heartless. I read some comments, like 9 to one in favor of Bernstein, in blog comparative just now, between Bernsten and Von Karajan. so I concluded that most of those commenting were Jewish, upholding their boy in the face of the impressive Von Karajan.

    I have never had any emotional difficulties with Von Karajan. I found him..find in him spirit, emotion

    and mind you all..you must be aware that I am no expert on euro classical music..just recording here my limited experience with the part of it I know and have loved since I was 18..in fact since I was a little boy if we factor in the Messiah in church, when I had to go to church..one of the parts of that experience I actually enjoyed

    I like this thread. I don’t care for Bernstein in any way shape or form. but there is talk here that makes sense and expands my knowledge. I am glad I came around

    • Replies: @vinteuil
    , @Ilyana_Rozumova
  198. as a matter of fact I am starting an orgy here. I am going to go into Beethoven especially the sixth by different conductors to see what they all have to offer.

    I will start with Von Karajan again, but Henry Lewis too and Sergiu Celibidache

    if this be the last post I make on this thread..or any other thread for a while… you all can be assured that music occupies the time I spent here for the next while

    • Replies: @vinteuil
  199. annamaria says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    “I don’t have a high opinion on people hooked on music.”

    — Do you think this is related to your self-admitted ignorance about music? Perhaps you need to ponder for a minute on why you differ from “Confucius & Plato & Popper re music aesthetics & along Hegel & Heidegger.” Add to the list the names of Nietzsche, Langer, and Scruton.

    • Replies: @Che Guava
    , @Bardon Kaldian
  200. and Marilyn Horne died today..this morning. incredible!

  201. vinteuil says:
    @Ben Sampson

    I am no expert on euro classical music.

    No one would ever have guessed.

  202. vinteuil says:
    @Old Palo Altan

    I’ll be in Budapest, 13-16 June, next, for Adam Fischer’s Ring Cycle.

    Interested?

    I think he’s just a fantastically talented conductor.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
  203. Che Guava says:

    To find the best (or preferred) performances is an interesting thing, I am agreeing on von Krajahan for Beethoven, probably much more.

    If ever in South Korea, Seoul, go to the national hall of national music, a student show. Part will be the court music (still a dispute because our govt. was stealing as much as possible, but the Korean version is real, more so than Japanese).

    Part will be syncretic, with korean instruments mixed in with western, and the twice I have been
    to the show, they (and the very young composers) did it very well.

    Part is samul nori, percussion, very exciting patterns.

    It is interesting how the U.S. Occupation Forces, both here and in Korea, are largely (but never co mpletely) invisible now. Sure, the Px and all of the useless women-in-uniform keep them happy in their bases, most of the time.

    They should just go away!

    • Replies: @vinteuil
  204. Che Guava says:
    @annamaria

    … none of the names you are listing has any direct connection with music, or even interesting writing on it.

    Strange.

    • Replies: @annamaria
  205. vinteuil says:
    @Che Guava

    You’re Korean?

    I had no idea.

  206. vinteuil says:
    @Ben Sampson

    Karajan? Celibidache?

    They’re both about equally bad, in Beethoven.

    Soft attacks, poor articulation.

    Celibidache stigmatized Karajan’s Beethoven as “Chocolate Beethoven” – but he was just as bad.

    • Replies: @Ben Sampson
  207. @CBTerry

    Celi did conduct the Kindertotenlieder.

    Lots of ill-informed abuse of Mahler here. Likely just typical anti-semites that haunt these pages, not people with any real knowledge of classical music.

    • Replies: @CBTerry
  208. @CBTerry

    Early critics of Beethoven considered his 3rr symphony – the Eroica – to be disjointed, cacapohonous, bloated, and overlong as well. Early critics often aren’t the best, and it often takes time even for the greatest of works to find their place in the repertoire and be accepted by both the general public and critics alike.

    • Replies: @CBTerry
  209. @vinteuil

    ok! so what do you think of Henry Lewis’ sixth?

  210. annamaria says:
    @Che Guava

    “none of the names you are listing has any direct connection with music, or even interesting writing on it.”

    — “Che Guava,” who are your favorite writers on music?

    In case you have never heard about these great books:

    Friedrich Nietzsche, The Birth of Tragedy from the Spirit of Music

    Susanne Langer, Philosophy in a New Key — a great philosophical tractate on music

    Roger Scruton, The Aesthetics of Music — the best on the aesthetics of music written by a philosopher and composer

    • Replies: @Ivan
    , @Che Guava
  211. CBTerry says:
    @EmitFlesti

    Thanks, I am not familiar with that but will look into it.
    I remember hearing a couple songs way back on the radio by Mahler that I liked. And as I said I like his first symphony and his 4th has some beautiful movements. But his large symphonies don’t work for me, perhaps just my lacuna.

  212. CBTerry says:
    @EmitFlesti

    True, but . . . .

    There are probably few people on this thread who have heard Mahler’s 9th Symphony, first movement, more than myself. I was never able to draw a bead on it, and that was not for lack of trying. Additionally, that I was able to identify his Symphony of a Thousand without ever having heard it before would indicate that I had good (amateur listening) knowledge of his music.

    Mind you, this was a time when my friends in college (Asian, for those keeping ethnic score) were telling me how great Mahler was, so I was trying to fit in.

    I had heard of Mahler and Bruckner as being similar, but the former being far more poetic while the latter was stodgy. Well, it took me one listening of Bruckner’s 3rd Symphony [yes, 3rd] to be entranced (not that I could get any of my friends to agree).

    I’m also not sure that you are accurate about Beethoven’s Eroica. The contemporary criticisms that I remember reading were in regard to its being “atonal,” pretty funny to our ears (or to anybody — like Beethoven himself — who was aware of what Bach had done). Beethoven achieved superstardom within his own lifetime, so for what it is worth, the bulk of opinion, general and critical, was almost certainly supportive. And frankly, it is easy to find terrible reviews of great music. The hilarious Skeletons From The Opera Closet has an entire chapter devoted to them.

    I will listen to his Kindertotenlieder, which I suspect I will like. Perusing the web just now, I think I have this CD somewhere in storage and that I liked it:

    I’ll see what happens.

    And as I said before, it’s only music.

  213. @Ben Sampson

    Karajan was Austrian. He was not a Naci. His carrier was long after WW2

    • Replies: @Ben Sampson
    , @CBTerry
  214. Che Guava says:
    @annamaria

    Point taken, as the next commentor was saying (post 220), a good reply, but I am no fool on the point.

    I would posit Plato, Aristotle, Wagner, others I have read, including a very small selection of rock journalists who are worth reading.

    Personally, I prefer to listen to music, making up my own mind, and read about sound and the structure of sounds and music. So, the writing of Helmholtz, the Italian Futurists, in Art of Noise, also Russolo’s writing of his more western-music background work, and Marinetti’s writing about his startingly ahead of the time radiophonic works, among many others. Of course, also by the later writers on Pythagoras’ ideas of sound and music.

    About the structure of Korean court music, arguments about whether it originated there or here (it is certainly from the Korean peninsula, not Japan).

    Given the chance, I would like to read your first and third suggestions, but have read many quotes from the first.

    Saudi Arabia’s influence on Malay culture would like to eliminate the gamelan players, but if one has an ear, and participates a few times, it is easy to work out its genius, one does not need a treatise to see it.

    Etc.

  215. @annamaria

    Good points. I tend to agree with “non-musical” way of thinking (Kant, Hegel, Heidegger); also, I’m open to other venues of thought: http://gen.lib.rus.ec/book/index.php?md5=94381B24EA4A2CEC253E060AB538FD25

  216. @Ilyana_Rozumova

    Herbert Von Karajan was born in 1908..lots of time to have been a Nazi

    yes he was Austrian and in clear and close enough proximity to the Nazis

    now I wasn’t there myself to see what was going on, so I don’t know directly. but there are reports that appear to establish that he was in fact a Nazi

    I don’t care at all if he was or not a Nazi Ilyana…not in the least. this is 2018. I like the fact the he was heterosexual and that he produced great music..defined as music I like

    there are times I like to talk..so thank you for giving me an opportunity to rant back to you.

    hahahahaha

  217. @vinteuil

    I don’t travel much these days, but I shall certainly keep it in mind, and, in the meantime, explore this conductor’s work.

    Thanks!

  218. Che Guava says:

    Oh, you are such a wonderful halfwit. If you were having two halves of a wit to rub together, you may be entertaining, but on the lack of that, just a bore.

  219. vinteuil says:

    Seriously – think about it.

  220. CBTerry says:
    @Ilyana_Rozumova

    Hitler was also an Austrian. Karajan was a member of the NSDAP, which is why Goebbels promoted him over Furtwangler, who refused to join the party. Goebbels gave Karajan’s career a jump start.

    Reading Roger Vaughan’s compulsively readable biography of Karajan, I got the impression that Karajan was not political beyond his own self-promotion. He would not be the first nor last conductor with an outsize ego.

  221. @CBTerry

    You are very mistaken. Read Richard Osborne’s thoroughly researched biography of Karajan — Roger Vaughan was a nobody Karajan tolerated briefly because of his knowledge of sailing, which the maestro was keen on.

    Karajan did in fact join the party; that much is true. He had no other option if he wanted to have a career as a conductor, at which he was extraordinarily gifted from an early age. There is no evidence that Karajan had any leaning toward the Nazi ideology. He cared about music, first, last, and always.

    Karajan spent most of the war living obscurely in poverty. Hitler didn’t like him, perhaps because Karajan’s first wife was part Jewish. Karajan was given a clean bill of health by the strict de-Nazification commission, then worked his way up in European classical music circles, mainly in Austria and England. It is absurd to say that “Goebbels promoted him over Furtwangler.” It was Furtwangler, not Karajan, who conducted the Berlin Philharmonic during the war years, and only after Furtwangler’s passing in the 1950s did Karajan succeed him.

    Was Karajan ambitious? Ambition should be made of sterner stuff; he was pushed to the sidelines during some of his prime years for not being a Nazi favorite. It’s easy for you to play the moral exhibitionist at a long distance in space and time from the environment Karajan had to survive in. Despite ankle-biting critics like Roger Vaughan, Karajan did take his rightful place in the artistic pantheon of his times and I, for one, am damned glad of it.

    • Replies: @CBTerry
    , @Ben Sampson
  222. CBTerry says:
    @Square Wheeled Hot Rod

    I do not understand your vituperation and personal attack. While my remarks may be mistaken, I thought I was civil. I would expect the same from you. Am I expecting too much?

  223. Vojkan says:

    A lot of sugar is not enough to make a great cake. Mixing all four basic flavours in a meal doesn’t make it French cuisine. We react to stimuli of our senses. Certain harmonies and certain musical phrases have a certain effect on our mood. Throwing a lot of them in a piece doesn’t make a great musical composition.
    Though I have some musical education, I definitely don’t pretend to be an expert. I have a preference for Bach, Beethoven, Brahms and Rachmaninov but I love the works of many other classical composers. Mahler is not one of them, I never felt connection with his music. I own records of music directed by Cluytens, Karajan, Mravinsky, Szell, Kondrashin and many others. There are pieces I have multiple recordings of. There are performances I like more than others. There are performers I like more than others, David Oistrakh for the violin, Sviatoslav Richter for the piano, Rach nr2 by Richter is my favourite. I like Zimerman too, but I prefer the Bösendorfer sound to the Steinway sound, it’s a matter of taste.
    Though I probably have somewhere some recording by Bernstein, like with Mahler, I never really felt any connection with his music or his directing. The way I see it, he had three essential talents, he was Jewish, gay, and liberal. That definitely outweighs any musical talent, however immense, any would-be challenger of his position could have had.

  224. @CBTerry

    I’m circumcised,born Catholic. I’ve never given it too much thought, but my assumption was that all Catholics, at least American ones, are and were circumcised. Does anyone know why?
    I agree, it’s barbaric. Still, I wonder how that ‘makes’ a Jew (and not a Catholic?), and what kinds of traumatic effects it may or may not have on a person’s life. Does it make one a psychopath?

    ‘I can’t help but believe that participating in the mutilation of their sons does not establish a remarkable ability for denial, for not seeing obvious truths, for not noticing blatant contradictions in thinking.’

    I just read this so haven’t given it any thought really, but it seems absurd.

  225. @Square Wheeled Hot Rod

    now this is terrifically helpful to me. I knew of this CBTerry but not deeply enough to have expressed as you have. thanks man..you have made me feel even better about someone I have known and respected for a long time

    the first time I heard the Berlin Philharmonic with Karajan, playing Beethoven’s sixth, I was hooked.. line and sinker. it has remained so to this day, and I am talking like 45 years ago

    I have enjoyed everything I have heard conducted by Karajan. and all I read of him described a pretty regular person. I always took him to be, regular, normal etc. that is why I double checked right here to make sure..that he was not homosexual for certain

    were he, Karajan homosexual.. would have been a disappointment indeed, a fact I would have had to take some time to adjust to

    • Replies: @CBTerry
  226. CBTerry says:
    @Ben Sampson

    Do you enjoy Karajan’s Tchaikovsky?

  227. Having been a professional musician most of my life playing bassoon and organ, I once thought a great deal about Bernstein’s recordings. In retrospect I think they are mostly poor interpretations of the great works. These are interpretations according to Bernstein. It’s as if Lennie was going to show you how it all was supposes to sound.

    His recordings are just one person’s interpretation. I think what he had in mind was that his interpretations would be definitive and would set the world ablaze with the right way.

    Nothing could be further from the truth.

  228. I’m glad to have read this article about the phony talent and betrayer of causes. He seems to have hurt those who loved him and cared only for his ambitions and lust. No matter his accomplishments, and they seem to be mediocre at best, he seems to have been a failure as a human being. Even his flirtation with the Black Panthers seems to have been for his own aggrandizement. Yuck!

  229. anonymous[180] • Disclaimer says:

    May I say this —- so many young fools posting on this thread, and people who lie, and people with hatred in their hearts!

    Humanity ….

    If you are one of the people who have said evil and untrue things on this thread, do yourself the best favor you can, and reflect: pray to God, who forgives. It is perhaps too much to ask yourself why you were untruthful and evil-hearted: so simply ask for forgiveness for your lies, or the things you said as true, not knowing if they were true or not … in your sinful insolence.

    That which is good reveals itself in beauty, and as for that which is not good ….
    look not too long into the abyss, my poor friends, for fear that the abyss will look back!
    You have my prayers, and the prayers of my guardian angel, and the prayers of so many others, supporting you in your journey from ignorance!

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