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Leaders are routinely confronted with philosophical dilemmas. Here’s a classic one for our Trumptopian times: If you make enemies out of your friends and friends out of your enemies, where does that leave you?

What does winning (or losing) really look like? Is a world in which walls of every sort encircle America’s borders a goal worth seeking? And what would be left in a future fragmented international economic system marked by tit-for-tat tariffs, travel restrictions, and hyper-nationalism? Ultimately, how will such a world affect regular people?

Let’s cut through all of this for the moment and ask one crucial question about our present cult-of-personality era in American politics: Other than accumulating more wealth and influence for himself, his children, and the Trump family empire, what’s Donald J. Trump’s end game as president? If his goal is to keep this country from being, as he likes to complain, “the world’s piggy bank,” then his words, threats, and actions are concerning. However bombastic and disdainful of a history he appears to know little about, he is already making the world a less stable, less affordable, and more fear-driven place. In the end, it’s even possible that, despite the upbeat economic news of the moment, he could almost singlehandedly smash that piggy bank himself, as he has many of his own business ventures.

Still, give him credit for one thing: Donald Trump has lent remarkable new meaning to the old phrase “the imperial presidency.” The members of his administration, largely a set of aging white men, either conform to his erratic wishes or get fired. In other words, he’s running domestic politics in much the same fashion as he oversaw the boardroom on his reality TV show The Apprentice.

Now, he’s begun running the country’s foreign policy in the same personalized, take-no-prisoners, you’re-fired style. From the moment he hit the Oval Office, he’s made it clear at home and abroad that it’s his way or the highway. If only, of course, it really was that simple. What he will learn, if “learning process” and “President Trump” can even occupy the same sentence, is that “firing” Canada, the European Union (EU), or for that matter China has a cost.

What the American working and the middle classes will see (sooner than anyone imagines) is that actions of his sort have unexpected global consequences. They could cost the U.S. and the rest of the world big time. If he were indeed emperor and his subjects (that would be us) grasped where his policies might be leading, they would be preparing a revolt. In the end, they — again, that’s us — will be the ones paying the price in this global chess match.

The Art of Trump’s Deals

So far, President Trump has only taken America out of trade deals or threatened to do so if other countries don’t behave in a way that satisfies him. On his third day in the White House, he honored his campaign promise to remove the U.S. from the Trans Pacific Partnership, a decision that opened space for our allies and competitors, China in particular, to negotiate deals without us. Since that grand exit, there has, in fact, been a boom in side deals involving China and other Pacific rim countries that has weakened, not strengthened, Washington’s global bargaining position. Meanwhile, closer to home, the Trump administration has engaged in a barrage of NAFTA-baiting that is isolating us from our regional partners, Canada and Mexico.

Conversely, the art-of-the-deal aficionado has yet to sign a single new bilateral trade deal. Despite steadfast claims that he would serve up the best deals ever, we have been left with little so far but various tariffs and an onslaught against American trading partners. His one claim to bilateral-trade-deal fame was the renegotiation of a six-year-old deal with South Korea in March that doubled the number of cars each U.S. manufacturer could export to South Korea (without having to pass as many safety standards).

As White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders put it, when speaking of Kim Jong-un’s North Korea, “The President is, I think, the ultimate negotiator and dealmaker when it comes to any type of conversation…” She left out the obvious footnote, however: any type that doesn’t involve international trade.

In the past four months, Trump has imposed tariffs, exempting certain countries, only to re-impose them at his whim. If trust were a coveted commodity, when it came to the present White House, it would now be trading at zero. His supporters undoubtedly see this approach as the fulfillment of his many campaign promises and part of his classic method of keeping both friends and enemies guessing until he’s ready to go in for the kill. At the heart of this approach, however, lies a certain global madness, for he now is sparking a set of trade wars that could, in the end, cost millions of American jobs.

The Allies

On May 31st, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross confirmed that Canada, Mexico, and the EU would all be hit with 10% aluminum and 25% steel tariffs that had first made headlines in March. When it came to those two products, at least, the new tariffs bore no relation to the previous average 3% tariff on U.S.-EU traded goods.

In that way, Trump’s tariffs, initially supposed to be aimed at China (a country whose president he’s praised to the skies and whose trade policies he’s lashed out at endlessly), went global. And not surprisingly, America’s closest allies weren’t taking his maneuver lightly. As the verbal abuse level rose and what looked like a possible race to the bottom of international etiquette intensified, they threatened to strike back.

In June, President Trump ordered that a promised 25% tariff on $50 billion worth of imported goods from China also be imposed. In response, the Chinese, like the Europeans, the Canadians, and the Mexicans, immediately promised a massive response in kind. Trump countered by threatening another $200 billion in tariffs against China. In the meantime, the White House is targetting its initial moves largely against products related to that country’s “Made in China 2025” initiative, the Chinese government’s strategic plan aimed at making it a major competitor in advanced industries and manufacturing.

Meanwhile, Mexico began adopting retaliatory tariffs on American imports. Although it has a far smaller economy than the U.S., it’s still the second largest importer of U.S. products, buying a whopping $277 billion of them last year. Only Canada buys more. In a mood of defiance stoked by the president’s hostility to its people, Mexico executed its own trade gambit, imposing $3 billion in 15%-25% tariffs against U.S. exports, including pork, apples, potatoes, bourbon, and cheese.

While those Mexican revenge tariffs still remain limited, covering just 1% of all exports from north of the border, they do target particular industries hard, especially ones that seem connected to President Trump’s voting “base.” Mexico, for instance, is by far the largest buyer of U.S. pork exports, 25% of which were sold there last year. What its 20% tariff on pork means, then, is that many U.S. producers will now find themselves unable to compete in the Mexican market. Other countries may follow suit. The result: a possible loss of up to 110,000 jobs in the pork industry.

Our second North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) partner (for whose prime minister, Justin Trudeau, there is “a special place in hell,” according to a key Trumpian trade negotiator) plans to invoke tariffs of up to 25% on about $13 billion in U.S. products beginning on July 1st. Items impacted range “from ballpoint pens and dishwasher detergent to toilet paper and playing cards… sailboats, washing machines, dish washers, and lawn mowers.” Across the Atlantic, the EU has similarly announced retaliatory tariffs of 25% on 200 U.S. products, including such American-made classics as Harley-Davidson motorcycles, blue jeans, and bourbon.

Trump Disses the Former G7

As the explosive Group of Seven, or G7, summit in Quebec showed, the Trump administration is increasingly isolating itself from its allies in palpable ways and, in the process, significantly impairing the country’s negotiating power. If you combine the economies of what might now be thought of as the G6 and add in the rest of the EU, its economic power is collectively larger than that of the United States. Under the circumstances, even a small diversion of trade thanks to Trump-induced tariff wars could have costly consequences.

President Trump did try one “all-in” poker move at that summit. With his game-face on, he first suggested the possibility of wiping out all tariffs and trade restrictions between the U.S. and the rest of the G7, a bluff met with a healthy dose of skepticism. Before he left for his meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un in Singapore, he even suggested that the G7 leaders “consider removing every single tariff or trade barrier on American goods.” In return, he claimed he would do the same “for products from their countries.” As it turned out, however, that wasn’t actually a venture into economic diplomacy, just the carrot before the stick, and even it was tied to lingering threats of severe penalties.

The current incipient trade war was actually launched by the Trump administration in March in the name of American “national security.” What should have been highlighted, however, was the possible “national insecurity” in which it placed the country’s (and the world’s) future. After all, a similar isolationist stance in the 1920s and the subsequent market crash of 1929 sparked the global Great Depression, opening the way for the utter devastation of World War II.

European Union countries were incredulous when Trump insisted, as he had many times before, that the “U.S. is a victim of unfair trade practices,” citing the country’s trade deficits, especially with Germany and China. At the G7 summit, European leaders did their best to explain to him that his country isn’t actually being treated unfairly. As French President Emmanuel Macron explained, “France runs trade deficits with Germany and the United Kingdom on manufactured goods, even though all three countries are part of the EU single market and have zero tariffs between them.”

Having agreed to sign on to a post-summit joint statement, the president suddenly opted out while on his flight to Singapore, leaving his allies in the lurch (and subsequently slamming the Canadian prime minister as “very dishonest” and “weak”). In that communiqué, signed by the other six summit attendees, they noted, “We strive to reduce tariff barriers, non-tariff barriers, and subsidies… We acknowledge that free, fair and mutually beneficial trade and investment, while creating reciprocal benefits, are key engines for growth and job creation.”

The Pushback

The fallout domestically from the coming trade wars could be horrific if Trump truly makes good on his promises and refuses to back down, while the countries he’s attacking ratchet up their own responses, whether in terms of tariffs or simply a refusal to buy American goods. According to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, up to 2.6 million American jobs could be threatened if, in the process, the U.S. also withdraws from NAFTA.

Even American CEOs are now running scared of the CEO-in-chief. A recent survey conducted by the Business Roundtable lobby group, chaired by JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon, revealed that their “economic outlook index” had declined this past quarter from a record high, the first drop in two years. According to the report, nearly two-thirds of the CEOs surveyed considered trade policy a “serious risk.” Rather than planning future corporate hiring sprees, as Trump might have us believe, their fears of future trade wars actually seem to be curtailing job-expansion plans.

European leaders at the G7 summit admitted that, despite their own role in escalating global trade tensions, the coming wars “would hurt everyone.” And therein lies the danger and the disconnect. Thanks largely to Donald Trump, the leaders of the key countries on the planet could now proceed to destroy trade relationships, knowing full well that the results will hurt their workers and damage the global economy.

A recent report by Andy Stoeckel and Warwick McKibbin for the Brookings Institution analyzed just such a future trade war scenario and found that, if global tariffs were to rise just 10%, the gross national product (GDP) of most countries would fall by between 1% and 4.5% — the U.S. GDP by 1.3%, China’s by 4.3%. A 40% rise in tariffs would ensure a deep global recession or depression. In the 1930s, it was the punitive U.S. Smoot-Hawley tariff that helped spark the devastating cocktail of nationalism and economic collapse that culminated in World War II. This time, who knows what The Donald’s tariffs will spark?

The End Game

When trade wars escalate and geopolitical tensions rise, economies can be badly damaged, leading to a vicious cycle of aggressive responses. And here’s the remarkable thing about the power of America’s imperial presidency in 2018: Donald Trump could unilaterally slow, alter, or under certain circumstances even shut down various elements of global trade — and if he manages to do so, there will be a price to pay in jobs and in this planet’s economic stability.

Catalyzed by tweets, denunciations, insults, and the tariff-first shots of his administration, our allies will undoubtedly try to trade more with each other to close gaps that his trade wars open. Ultimately, that will hurt the U.S. and its workers, especially Trump’s base. For instance, German carmaker BMW, Japanese carmaker Toyota, and other foreign car companies employ 130,000 people in the United States. If, in response to new tariffs on their products, they were to begin moving their operations to France or Mexico in retaliation, it’s American workers who would lose out.

But make no mistake: American allies, who rely on the staggeringly powerful U.S. market, will lose out, too. Weighed down by tariffs, their products will become less competitive here, which is what Trump wants. However, that won’t necessarily mean the end of trade deficits; it could just mean less trade everywhere, a situation that should bring to mind the global depression of the 1930s. And if you think Donald Trump is already a threat to world stability, imagine what might happen after years of economic duress. As was the case in the 1930s, when volatile conditions made it easier for dictators like Adolf Hitler to convince people that their economic woes stemmed from others, the path to a fire-and-fury world remains grimly open.

In Washington, Donald Trump’s unique version of the imperial presidency seems to be expanding to fill any void as alliances like the G7 that were once so crucial to the way the United States dominated much of the planet and its economy are being diminished. The question that should make anybody nervous is not yet answerable: What’s the end game?

The global economic system first put in place after World War II was no longer working particularly well even before President Trump’s trade wars began. The problem now is that its flaws are being exacerbated. Once it becomes too expensive for certain companies to continue operating as their profits go to tariffs or tariffs deflect their customers elsewhere (or nowhere), one thing is certain: it will get worse.

Nomi Prins is a TomDispatch regular. Her latest book, Collusion: How Central Bankers Rigged the World (Nation Books), was just published. Of her six other books, the most recent is All the Presidents’ Bankers: The Hidden Alliances That Drive American Power. She is a former Wall Street executive. Special thanks go to researcher Craig Wilson for his superb work on this piece.

(Republished from TomDispatch by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Economics, Foreign Policy • Tags: China, Donald Trump, Free Trade 
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  1. anonymous[965] • Disclaimer says:

    >The question that should make anybody nervous is not yet answerable: What’s the end game?

    Economic autarky. Which is well achievable, on a relative basis.

    The USA is the world’s 3rd-largest state by population. 4th-largest by land mass. Full of natural resources, including even rare earths, uranium, coal, copper, steel, natural gas, oil, timber, etc., etc. We can grow our own wheat, raise our own cattle and chickens, grow our own cotton for our own clothing, etc. We have all the human resources we need, including the world’s largest population of Whites and we remain the only state which had the technical ability to place men on the moon. On top of all of that, we are separated from any meaningful powers in the world by oceans on either side – America’s Hat and America’s Zapato don’t count, economically or technologically or militarily speaking.

    Really the only reason that many of these third-world powers have anything is because the (((global capitalists))) have allowed them to, by hollowing out the USA for their own profits.

    Let’s take a long look at America’s Hat. Roughly 10% of the US’ population. Less than 10% of the US’ GDP. Without the cooperation of the (((capitalists))), America’s Hat would be nothing more than an exporter of raw materials; materials which the US could generate should they choose to. They now have an “auto industry” but it started with companies like GM using (((trade agreements))) as a way to employ Hatters as low-wage, 3rd-world labor to replace Union workers in Michigan; the “Geo” line of vehicles, rebadged Suzuki designs, assembled in America’s Hat, and sold as GM “American” vehicles. Nowadays, America’s Hat is an assembly point for pass-through materials and vehicles from China.

    Similarly, America’s Zapato has little to nothing of value for US. Oil, but we have that anyways. Their primary exports are poverty and crime, and welfare leaches, and much of the Zapato’s GDP is in the form of remissions from illegal aliens living here. Again, their “auto industry” exists only so that (((capitalists))) – in this case, primarily Ford – can do the same things that GM did in America’s Hat.

    Finally, China. It’s on the other side of the world. We don’t need them, and they don’t need us. The history of our “trade” with them has been essentially them ripping us off by selling us cheap plastic shit for the last 40 years so that we can save a few pennies while cutting off our own nose to spite our face, and killing our own industrial base while also descending into crass (((consumerism))).

    Trump’s agenda is going to Make America Great Again. There already has been a trade war going on, and it’s been (((capitalists))) and foreign countries at war against the USA; well, listen up: the USA is now officially joining the war, for the first time.

  2. Judeo-globalist (((Nomi Prins))) recaps the usual “free trade lifts all boats” nostrum.

    in fact, since the DC Treason Gang began signing on to massive FT deals, U.S. has accumulated:

    a $4 trillion trade deficit with communist China,

    a $2 trillion trade deficit with Europe,

    and a $150,000,000,000/year trade deficit with Mexico.

    ‘Murka’s overall annual trade deficit is now c. $1,000,000,000,000/year.

    with its productive economy thus gutted, ‘Murka now buys stuff by

    issuing debt and printing money. With the debt held by hostile entities like China
    and assorted (((Rothschild))) Central Banks. The latter, prime engines of White-genociding
    globalization, are particularly evil.

    • Replies: @denk
    , @ThreeCranes
    , @Dutch Boy
  3. If Trump’s actions lead to the breakup of the yankee imperial system, it is all to the good. I’m not sure autarchy could work because the last 50 years of globalism have hollowed out the US industrial structure and the system has grown even more corrupt locally as it has globalized. I think Trump’s motives are actually good, though he doesn’t really have a workable program to restore the US to pre-imperial success. The system he is destabilizing is far more odious than the author, whom I have agreed with in other instances, lets on.

  4. nickels says:

    Here’s the problem with liberal economists, even the ones who are smart enough to see through neoliberalism:
    “The international economic order is killing everyone!! What we need is more globalism!!!”

  5. “His supporters undoubtedly see this approach as the fulfillment of his many campaign promises and part of his classic method of keeping both friends and enemies guessing until he’s ready to go in for the kill. ”

    First, i am not sure what my position is on tariffs, almost every other nation uses them extensively, except for the US.

    So I have to reject the suggestion that whatever this president in regards to balancing out trade is something I would embrace, unless i understood the details. I have not checked lately, but if our imports continue to exceeds our imports, it doesn’t really matter what the tariffs are.

    Second, i think the income gap and shrinking middle class is the result of artificial manipulation of wealth that began before the 2007 collapse, but the economic dip was more like several huge scoops dredger. i think the bailouts shorted any correction that should have occurred. And i have to admit to being very concerned by this president’s talk about rich people running government. Mt selection for president is apparently oblivious that most people in government, especially the WH have been rich along with leadership in Congress —- there’s no evidence that rich people have any corner on economic accounting save how it benefits then and trickles out to the rest of us. Three for three of the last major economic retractions have been at the hands of rich people engaging in very dicey /illegal behaviors and other rich people supposed regulators, either turning an eye, asleep at the calculator or willful participation – not a single accreditor has gone to jail by my count — too big to fail has a lot of different guises one of them is the size of those involved being so large in number business as usual might have to a stand still by the arrests. But some guy standing in his backyard talking on the phone can get shot for looking suspicious — law and order — broken windows. Sure a broken windows policy is the rule of the day says Mrs MacDonald, unless the windows are on the 70th floor, than its all black slapping and sighs of relief.

    No. This president was elected with the idea of sweeping this kind of imbalances out. Imbalances in immigration, lobbying, use of military force in foreign policy.

    I think you mistake my vote for carte blanche, idol worship — they are not the same thing. And that’s where I came in and where I remain, regardless of the sinister juvenile tactics of friend or foe. The free=trade you are talking doesn’t exist anywhere on the planet, save in the board rooms of financial services, economic think tanks and classrooms.

    My issue is not with rich people, but with accountability. i would like to be rich — well wealthy.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  6. The US has a trade surplus with Canada and Mexico. How does a trade war with these nations address a deficit with China? Angering allies (you can add the EU, UK, Australia and Japan to this list) is seriously stupid

    • Replies: @Wally
    , @Precious
  7. @anonymous

    BORDER TREATMENT

    I lived in Canada and knew a Canadian who was arrested walking through the US border illegally. He spent 6 months in a detainment facility.

    Strangely the US government is MUCH more stringent with Canadian immigrants than it is with Mexicans.

    Very few Canadians enter the United States illegally.

  8. @EliteCommInc.

    I’ve not lived in the United States in 19 years but for some reason the economy and quality of life seemed to go into the toilet when George Bush was elected. Permanently.

    There was a surplus in the Clinton era.

    Anybody who could walk or talk had a decent standard of living. You never saw the homelessness you see now.

    • Replies: @EliteCommInc.
    , @Cronus
  9. Biff says:
    @anonymous

    Really the only reason that many of these third-world powers have anything is because the (((global capitalists))) have allowed them to, by hollowing out the USA for their own profits.

    Tell that to the Guatemalans who had their elected government overthrown at the behest of United Fruit company, Iranian government at the behest of British Petroleum, the hundreds of thousands dead Timorese who just happened to be in possession of loads of oil. The dozens of others up until the 2009 coup of the Honduras government at the behest of two mining companies. Wall Street is rich because it knows how to steal – not the other way around as you suggest.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  10. @anonymous

    I spent a few years in Canada, where I attempted to immigrate to no avail (Even though I obtained a degree there and working visa).

    Answer me here-

    1) Why is the US/Canadian border stringently enforced and Canadians who sneak over it as a joke (I knew one) subjected to 6 months in detention facilities? Mexicans are deported instantly, then they return, then they are deported again. But the US border enforcement with Canadian whites is serious business. First offense, 6 months in Immigration jail and second offense 5 years. Canada does not want blacks or Mexicans or trailer trash so of course they screen Americans and George Bush had to get a pardon for drunk driving.

    2) If you are an American in Canada or a Canadian in the US and your license is run and warrants come up, you are arrested immediately. Why is this not the case with Mexicans who enter the Southwest?

    3) Why is the Canadian/US border so stringently enforced compared to the porous border with a Third World country?

  11. @anonymous

    ANON

    I don’t want to flood the commentary system with low-quality posts but you COULD NOT PAY most Canadians to live in the United States. A few skilled ones work in the US and some actors like William Shatner move to California but that is all.

    • Replies: @bjondo
    , @Wally
  12. denk says:
    @Haxo Angmark

    With the debt held by hostile entities like China

    Yet another hallucinating murkkan.
    Poor dear, you need your med…..

    https://sputniknews.com/columnists/201806181065526366-america-its-own-worst-enemy/

  13. Wally says:

    The solution is simple.
    Those who have unfair trades policies against the US should just end them.
    Good riddance to a system that disadvantages US workers.

    And while we’re at it, no more freebies to parasite ‘Israel’.

  14. What now is called trade war in the good old days was protectionism.
    France fared well under protectionism, that is the idea of a large part of the French voters.
    They prefer job security to the promised land of economic growt.
    Alas, the euro makes this impossible.
    Macron tries to escape the dilemma by trying to join all debts of all euro countries.
    As foreseen, Merkel is nog going to give German sovereignty away, also not controlling the EU by subsidising southern countries.
    Globalisation, the competition of anyone with anyone worldwide, plus replacing political power with money power.
    Economics, a horrible science, you cannot have anything at the same time.
    How Trump’s protetionism will cause a world wide depression, I still do not understand.
    This depression will come, is my idea, when the derivates bubble bursts.
    It will be interesting to see what happens, but not a nice sight, when Deutsche Bank goes under.

    ” As was the case in the 1930s, when volatile conditions made it easier for dictators like Adolf Hitler to convince people that their economic woes stemmed from others, the path to a fire-and-fury world remains grimly open. ”

    As Schacht demonstrated, under Hitler, after throwing Versailles in the waste paper bin, was able to reduce, without any foreign help, German unemployment from six to one million in just three years, Hitler was completely right.
    The period was 1933 1936.
    To see things in perspective, in 1940 or so Germany had a population of some 44 million.

  15. Foreign Trade Partners Target the Constituency

    China and Mexicans are intentionally going after produce because these are the people who voted for Trump.

    China and Mexico won’t put tariffs on software or Hollywood. These people don’t vote for Trump.

  16. @Biff

    Indians from Central America then flee to the US from the Dictatorships backed by Wall Street or the US government. This was especially true in the Reagan Era.

    Filipinos flooded the US when we had backed Marcos and then we had to fly him to Hawaii and put him up at the taxpayers expense.

    The average US man-on-the-street has to deal with the ramification of this garbage. We don’t enjoy it.

  17. You really think that the US wanted to deal with all the damn Indian primitives from Central America because Ronnie back the Creole/Ruling Elite whose right-wing dictatorships basically dedicated themselves to starving the Indians?

    Today as a result the jungle Indian primitives roam American with machete.

    Filipinos seem to be less violent and aggressive but we have wasted billions on that country only for its economy to be run by Chinese half-breeds anyhow.

    • Replies: @denk
  18. @Jeff Stryker

    no, it was there. In NYC they just moved them off of Broadway into darker corners as did other major cities. The tech bubble did breath some life into the economy until it became clear that it reach exceeded its grasp and the entire system popped, more than once.

    Furthermore the seeds that flourished into the economic retraction in 3007 were planted during the Clinton presidency and before. But it was during his tenure that the rules for financial institutions were foisted aside.

    And there is this — there was no surplus. Do the numbers and you discover some rather shady accounting practices, in which money /debt is moved around like musical chairs. Most telling is that the surpluses were based on projected outcomes of the economy. we use to,”don’t count your chickens before they hatch.”

    WH finance gurus were counting hen houses that didn’t exist and did not materialize. That is why in less than a year in office Treas Sec Snow(?) was expressing concerns about the economy.

  19. Greg Bacon says: • Website

    Maybe their is a method to Trump’s alleged madness. If you understand the present world, you’ll know Trump is just a figure-head, the ones pulling his strings remain in the background, out of site.

    And since those TBTF Wall Street casinos are in worse shape now than in 2007, with laundering the illegal Afghan opium/heroin profits keeping them afloat, then maybe his handlers want Trump to run the economy off the rails, so they can blame the next crash on Trump’s policies and not Wall Street greed.

  20. Brabantian says: • Website

    Speaking of no clothes, here is Oxford PhD, Bloomberg author, and UK Cambridge University lecturer on economics Dr Victoria Bateman, displaying her ‘feminist art protest’ garb with full Cambridge University support at a university event

  21. ELITE

    Yes, the inner-cities had more problems with crackheads than today in 1995 and New York looked like Chicago in 1987.

    But overall the middle-class is WAY worse off in 2018 than it was in 1998.

    Bush was a terrible president and the Iraq War more or less bankrupted the United States. Face the facts there.

    I will concur that illegal immigration was the result of NAFTA.

    But the US much more resembles a second-world country today than in 1995. Far more people are poor.

  22. IOW – You’re jewish, want globalization to proceed apace, and the friggin dumb goyim won’t do what’s in your interests – as usual. Thus, 3000 words of pilpul.

    We’re good. thanks. Pilpuled out myself. Can’t eat another bite. Have you seen the deals on El Al? Fantastic. Take a gander.

  23. Mishra says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    The answer to all of your questions is that the Power Elite in America want the nation to be filled with third-world dross; warring tribes forever at one another’s throats. Divide et impera.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  24. Mishra says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    A relatively trivial point, but “second world” refers to the former Soviet Bloc and other communist countries. It didn’t mean halfway to third-world status. But I surely grant that halfway to third-world status is right about where the USA is now. And we’re not even pausing at this particular juncture.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  25. “Proceeding Apace”

    The madness that befell America from 1967 on because of the liberals faded away in 1982 or so when Reagan came into office.

    Similarly, I think we have reached the point where the Left no longer has any genuine influence over the majority of people who voted for Trump. There’s been a conservative backlash all over the world.

    Nobody is truly purchasing what the Left the bill of goods liberals want to sell.

    In order to have power people have to be willing to listen to you. If they don’t give a shit and change the channel, you have no capacity to manipulate their behavior. So it is happening with the MSM.

  26. fnn says:

    Our second North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) partner (for whose prime minister, Justin Trudeau, there is “a special place in hell,” according to a key Trumpian trade negotiator…

    That’s Peter Navarro, a life-long liberal Democrat.

  27. Am I the only one who cried bingo between strems of loughter when this guy finaly
    brought up Adolf Hitler?

  28. @Haxo Angmark

    Exactly. Her entire argument is predicated on a wrong assumption; that the U.S. has balanced trade relations with these nations.

    And, like a typical woman, she can’t understand why the men of one nation (USA) would feel uncomfortable with relying on another nation (China) for the manufacture of its everyday consumer products.

    For women today stuff just magically appears. They don’t care how it works, the science behind it or about how to maintain or repair it. They don’t realize that men think seriously about how to make the world what it is. In fact, they despise or pity serious-minded men, accusing them of “mansplaining” when he tries to tell her about checking the oil in the car while he’s gone for three months, working abroad. They like men who don’t bring up such downer subjects as maintaining machines. Carefree men, like her Father was (hah!, if she only knew how hard he thought and labored to insulate her from stress while she was growing up).

    Nomi Prins comes across as a spoiled moron.

    • Replies: @denk
  29. @Brabantian

    Okay, you can put your clothes back on now.

    I’m beginning to understand why Muslims make their women dress up in a potato sack with eye slits.

  30. Cronus says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    Funny you say that on a comments section of an article opposing tariffs and shilling for free trade. GATT 1994 update and the creation of the WTO was pushed and implemented by Clinton’s team, although to be fair I suspect either Bush or W would have done the same if given the chance.

    Here’s a 1994, 9 minute clip in which British billionaire (((Sir James Goldsmith))) , in an interview with Charlie Rose, opposes GATT 1994 and also debates and verbally destroys the then Chair of the US President’s Council of Economic Advisers during the Clinton Administration, Laura Tyson, a profoundly ignorant woman or a corporate shill as time has shown, defending as she was that US companies were either moving or in the process to move production offshore for other reasons than cheaper labour.

    A little background on Sir Goldsmith. This man was no ordinary billionaire. He single handedly kept the UK out of the eurozone, and this is not an overstatement.

    At minute 1:10 starts the fun and continues in part 2

    And here is a book written by the man, which I cannot recommend highly enough. If you click on it and buy, commission goes (hopefully) to help this site.

    https://www.amazon.com/Trap-James-Goldsmith/dp/0786701854/?tag=unco037-20

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
    , @Anon
  31. denk says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    Filipinos seem to be less violent and aggressive

    Filipinos are generally jovial folks.

    but we have wasted billions on that country

    murkka wasted almost 3M of pinoys during the Filipino murkkan war genocide, 1899-1902.

    only for its economy to be run by Chinese half-breeds anyhow.

    Any idea when will the CIA get to bump him off ?

  32. @denk

    The Spanish enslaved the Philippines for 400 years (And indeed the 5 % who own everything are Spanish “Mestizos” today) and the Japanese also slaughtered millions.

    China can have the Philippines for all I care. They own the economy anyhow. They also are responsible for the drug war because they make meth.

    Filipinos are generally pleasant but some of them are ruthless and of course when I was there meth transformed some of them into dangerous tweakers. I’d say their crimes tend towards theft and con as oppose to balls-out aggression and violence we see with blacks or Muslims.

    • Replies: @Wally
    , @denk
  33. @denk

    “wasted 3 million Pinoys”

    But liberated the place from the Japanese…

    “CIA bump him off”

    Yeah right, the CIA would have liked to have killed Castro and Kim Jong…there’s only so much they can do.

    I don’t think the CIA cares a whit if Duterte kills “tweakers” and he himself has to appease the Chinese-Filipino merchant community so the meth they make will continue to flow into the Philippines.

    • Replies: @denk
  34. bjondo says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    These Canadians love wars for Israel and we can’t get rid of them: Frum, Steyn, Dubowitz. Probably more. 6 months detention would not be enough for them.

  35. @Cronus

    On the New World Order-level I suspect that Globalists sacrificed the Rust belt to give Asia a middle class.

    Sure, a bunch of folks with GED’s in Southern Ohio or Pittsburgh end up unemployed and overdosing on heroin pills or out of their minds on meth but Asia has a middle class so it is a rational transaction.

    Of course that is getting a bit conspiratorial.

    I suspect the shareholders were simply greedy as shit. Anyhow, outsourcing started in the 1980′s and NAFTA coincided with the internet which allowed supply chains so these to things were what really triggered globalization.

    • Replies: @UrbaneFrancoOntarian
  36. @Mishra

    I know Nehru intended the phrase to mean that but it is now synonymous with the degree to which your country is poor in terms of infrastructure etc.

  37. David Rockerfeller and his Zionist cabal aka the Rothschilds etc. deindustrialized the U.S. so that America would adapt into the Zionist NWO aka OWG and Trump is just another of the Zionist puppet POTUS in a long line of puppet POTUS that serve at the orders of the Zionist NWO bankers and by the way they own Trump as they hold the paper on everything Trump supposedly owns.

    Trump is acting under the direct control of the Zionist bankers and all the bullshit he spews out daily as the bull in the china shop is under direct Zionist control. The Zionists are never going to let America be an industrial nation again, that ship has sailed and by the way the actual unemployment in the U.S. is around 20/25%, the Zionist owned MSM lies about everything.

    Orwell gave a us a view of our future and that is a Zionist boot smashing us in the face.

  38. denk says:
    @ThreeCranes

    why the men of one nation (USA) would feel uncomfortable with relying on another nation (China) for the manufacture of its everyday consumer products

    .

    how does it make China a ‘hostile entity‘,

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
  39. @Mishra

    The United States does not screw around with Canadians who walk across the border as a lark. There was a jogger who was detained doing it accidentally.

    US-Canada border laws are stringently enforced.

    Yet a Mexican can cross the border 4 time illegally and kill Katie.

  40. denk says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    murkka ‘liberated’ the pinoys from the Spanish only to colonise them for the next century and wasted 3M in the process.

    True to form,
    You ‘liberated’ the pinoys from the jps only to colonise them by proxies for the next 70 years,through the Marcos, the Aquinos, Arroyo….

    CIA would have liked to have killed Castro and Kim Jong…there’s only so much they can do.

    CIA has toppled several dozens of democratically elected foreign leaders since ww2.
    They’r currently busy at several ‘regime change’ projects in Honduras, Nicaragua, Venezuela…etc etc

    Duterte knows damn well what kind of people he’s taking on.

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/04/duterte-plane-explodes-cia-180405092504754.html

    The man got balls.
    That wont do, uncle sham only want pussies
    like Macron, May, Turnbull for concubines.

    Philippines under ‘Chinese half breed’,

    Relax…
    YOu can bet The Company is working on his demise right now,
    elementary Watson.

    hehhehe

  41. Wally says:
    @Steve In Oz

    The trade surpluses with China are being addressed. Pay attention.
    It’s the impediments placed against US goods & services that are important here.

    The US needs to aggressively attack those impediments wherever they are.

  42. All this is just Trump’s standard (in fact, only) negotiating tactic. He threatens something dire or, at least, something he thinks his opponent will regard as dire. Slapping on tariffs, wanting Putin back in the G7, threatening to leave NATO, for example. When his opponent seeks talks, as is the established practice in international affairs, Trump interprets that as capitulation and makes a “sweet” offer so as to lure his opponent further into his trap, or so he thinks. Then he suddenly backs out of the whole deal, citing some flimsy pretext, and ups the ante. He then repeats that process as often as he has to until he has completely crushed his opponent. Trump’s problem is that he has no Plan B. If countries don’t capitulate, he has nothing left but to carry out his dire threat. If a first round of sanctions doesn’t cause his opponent to capitulate, all he can do is slap on another round of sanctions. Or capitulate himself!
    Trump is undoubtedly wrecking the US. If he stays in office until 2025, there’ll be very little left. Other than Israel, the rest of the world is probably not all that sorry to see that happen but would prefer a slow, soft landing to a sudden crash. American hegemony rests on Bretton Woods, the dollar as world reserve currency. The current American “business model” is based on it. If Trump destroys US credibility, that is to say, US power, then the dollar goes under and merely trying to destroy the euro won’t change that. Once the dollar goes under, the US economy implodes, Soviet-style, setting off at the same time a worldwide economic crisis of 1929 proportions. What that will lead to is anybody’s guess.

    • Replies: @Escher
  43. Wally says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    Is that why I see so many transplanted Canadians residing in the US?

    And do note that most Canadians live very close to the US border.

  44. Wally says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    said:
    “the Japanese also slaughtered millions.”

    Proof?

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  45. Ms. Prins wants to prevent a depression. Perhaps she should warm up by demanding the tides cease, then forbid the sun to rise. Having accomplished those simple tasks she might be able to prevent a depression.

    Donald Trump, the “Golden Golem of Greatness” as Kunstler has tagged him, is not my idea of a great leader, but what is happening is happening for reasons far beyond the control of our “leaders”.

    Have no doubt, the next “depression” will not take the form of the “Great Depression”. We are no longer an agricultural nation, and people are not going to resort to growing vegetable gardens in the streets or raising chickens on urban high-rise rooftops. The government will step in and take “control”, if “control” is given a very broad meaning.

    As far as international trade is concerned, Peter Zeihan has some very astute observations. You can get it in the first few minutes.

    • Replies: @map
  46. Anon[158] • Disclaimer says:

    “The US has a trade surplus with Canada and Mexico.”

    We have a trade deficit with both countries, especially Mexico.

    “I’ve not lived in the United States in 19 years but for some reason the economy and quality of life seemed to go into the toilet when George Bush was elected. Permanently.”

    CAFTA, housing crisis, Chinese trade deals, massive tax cut for the rich, and the Iraq War. Obama followed it up with more free trade. These are the people who now attack Trump.

    “There was a surplus in the Clinton era.”

    Clinton benefited from H.W.’s tax increase on the rich + tech boom.

    “Anybody who could walk or talk had a decent standard of living. You never saw the homelessness you see now.”

    NAFTA hadn’t taken full effect yet. But he did help give us GATT and WTO.

    “Why is the US/Canadian border stringently enforced and Canadians who sneak over it as a joke (I knew one) subjected to 6 months in detention facilities?”

    1. They are white and whitey is bad.
    2. Liberals are afraid that some of them might have kids in the US; half of them will vote republican.

    “Mexicans are deported instantly, then they return, then they are deported again.’

    They aren’t white. They will have kids in the US; almost all of them will vote democrat. See how that works?

    “Those who have unfair trades policies against the US should just end them.”

    Just cancel NAFTA.

    “And while we’re at it, no more freebies to parasite ‘Israel’.”

    That would be a dream come true. Unfortunately, it will never happen.

    “How Trump’s protectionism will cause a worldwide depression, I still do not understand.”

    The Ruling Class is afraid their profits might go down 0.001%. Therefore, they promote baseless fear mongering.

    • Replies: @another fred
  47. @denk

    DENK

    The US does not care enough about the Philippines to depose Duterte and the “elites” were Spanish-Mestizos or Chinese-born tycoons with ties Spain and China.

    The Company won’t do shit to Duterte and don’t care if he kills 1,000,000 meth freaks. Americans just don’t care about the Philippines.

    The “ruling elite” always had blood ties to Spain and China, none of them were Pil-Ams.

    I lived in the Cebu for 3 years and detested the place (It was a work contract). I know the country well.

    • Replies: @denk
  48. @denk

    DENK

    I’m not patriot and usually tell foreigners overseas I am Canadian (I’m not) so I do not have to hear about the envious garbage of people like you who’d go to the United States tomorrow if someone offered you a Greencard.

    So save your politics for someone else.

    They’re typical anti-American Asian drivel.

    • Replies: @denk
  49. @Wally

    Canadians don’t walk across the border illegally.

    Try doing it, or vice versa.

    Believe me, that border is enforced.

    And furthermore, if you are Canadian and have A WARRANT in Canada the US cops will deport you and ban you from returning. And vice versa.

    Canadians cannot immigrate illegally six times to US and then shoot someone.

    Sure, lots of Canadians reside in the US. Jim Carrey and Bill Shatner among many. But they are not in the US illegally.

    • Replies: @Wally
  50. @Wally

    “Proof?”

    Look up World War II and the Japanese Occupation of Philippines on your own for Pete’s Sake.

    “Canadians live close to the US border”

    That is because the soil is arable and it is warm enough to support human life. Get North of Lake Superior and it is nothing but Native Americans and Inuit.

    I lived in North Bay, Ontario and believe me, that is cold.

    Kitchener and Southern Ontario have a climate like Northern Ohio on the shores of Lake Erie. People are going to congregate their.

    Asians, for example, have zero desire to live North of Toronto or Vancouver.

  51. denk says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    The Spanish enslaved the Philippines for 400 years (And indeed the 5 % who own everything are Spanish “Mestizos” today) and the Japanese also slaughtered millions.

    Since when did the jp and Spanish become the moral compass of USA. , aka ‘the world’s oldest democracy‘ ?

    China can have the Philippines for all I care. They own the economy anyhow. They also are responsible for the drug war because they make meth.

    You did sound bitter that after ‘wasting billions in Philippines’ its now under ‘Chinese half breeds‘. ?

    China is helping Philippines in its war on drugs.

    http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/09/02/1619678/china-helps-build-drug-rehab-center

    http://english.cctv.com/2016/10/20/VIDEARyp715EKbH5DjR1hOqg161020.shtml

    http://www.businessinsider.com/afp-china-offers-philippines-weapons-for-drug-war-2016-12

    https://www.rappler.com/nation/174305-china-philippines-aid-drugs-terrorism

    Filipinos are generally pleasant but some of them are ruthless and of course when I was there meth transformed some of them into dangerous tweakers. I’d say their crimes tend towards theft and con as oppose to balls-out aggression and violence we see with blacks or Muslims.

    By now its common knowledge that ….
    ‘moslem jihadists’, AQ, ISIS, BOKO HARAM, even the Abu Sayaff in Ph are murkkan patsies created to justify the phony ‘war on terror’.

    Elementary watson

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  52. @Anon

    The Ruling Class is afraid their profits might go down 0.001%. Therefore, they promote baseless fear mongering.

    The Ruling Class has an inkling of how thin the ice is and how deep the abyss beneath it is. Since Nixon closed the gold window in 1973 (an act made necessary by Kennedy and Johnson) the Ruling Class has known that a loss of confidence in the game would result in a crash of stupendous proportions. It is not possible for wealth to go down steadily without the bottom falling out.

    Look up and understand the term “inverted balance sheet”. Minsky was right.

  53. @denk

    “how does it make China a ‘hostile entity‘”

    Human nature. It’s sad but true that when one party is dependent upon the other, the one with the upper hand exploits that to their advantage.

    Making stuff requires not just IQ and talent. There’s a positive feedback loop involved where those who make stuff become ever more proficient while those who don’t face a formidable cliff if they hope to catch up; which is precisely why the USA, Germany and Britain enjoyed hegemony over the 2nd and 3rd world countries for so long.

    Now the shoe is on the other foot. But more interesting, Veblen pointed out that the workforce in a technical society is forced to deal with measurement, standards and critical evaluation, all of which force the worker to attend to the world on its terms. The workers in a technical economy, dragged out of their nativist subjectivity, acquire an adult understanding of their place in an orderly world. They are less easily fooled by bulls*t and hype, less prone to superstition and fantasy, their understanding more grounded in the Laws of Nature and the world as it is.

    Now if this is true–and recent event suggest that it is–then we in the USA are in for some tough times ahead. There’s already evidence that our people are increasingly swayed by superstition and fantasy, viz, belief in myths surrounding e.g. Trayvon Martin = sweet innocent black boy, Barack Obama = greatest president in American history, white men = slave drivers whipping black males, “millions” of black males lynched over the last 100 years, war on transgender amounts to holocaust and so on.

    People this deluded can’t be reasoned with. This does not bode well for the nation.

    • Replies: @denk
  54. @Wally

    You have any idea what the climate is like too far north of the American border?

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
    , @Wally
  55. @denk

    CONFUCIUS

    “Patsies”

    Duterte does not seem to feel that way. He’s waged war against their Muslim occupied cities. Comically requesting US assistance 2 weeks after telling the US to go to hell…that’s a Filipino for you. Complains about the U.S. and then sticks his hand out.

    Americans don’t give a shit about the Philippines and detest them. Myself included, though I was employed there.

    “Bitter”

    The Chinese have not “now owned the economy”…Fuji Chinese have owned the economy for decades. So why should America give the country taxpayers money when the Chinese are tycoons there. Let the Fuji Chinese run the economy. Although those who hate Jewish domination should visit the Philippines to see what happens when Spics and Slopes get a country to run.

    “Chinese helping the Philippines with drugs”

    Filipinos are too poor and dim to even run a meth lab, so in that respect Chinese mad scientists are useful in fueling the drug war.

    “Oldest Democracy”

    That would be Greece.

  56. map says:

    Amazing what Nomi Prins does not understand.

    Here is the basic GDP equation:

    GDP = C + I + G + (X – M)

    The variables in the parentheses are Exports minus Imports.

    Notice that, if this quantity is negative, it will subtract from GDP.

    Meaning, if you import $3 trillion and export $2 trillion, your GDP shrinks by a trillion dollars.

    What happens if you have a full blown trade war that ends all trade? Your GDP goes up by $1 trillion, as you substitute for the imports you were foolishly bringing in.

  57. @denk

    Trump loves Duterte.

    Only a Chinese Fuji moron trapped in the hermit kingdom would believe such Fake News.

    I understand, you’ve never been outside Asia and your Kleptocrat ministers in China want you to see CIA under the bed.

    The last time the US involved themselves in the Philippines was when Marcos had to be evacuated to Hawaii with his prostitute wife minus her shoes.

    On the tax payers dollar.

    For all the average white man cares the People’s Power could have done what they wanted to them.

    • Replies: @denk
  58. denk says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    green card ?

    LOL

    You must be a newbie here, Do I sound like an anglophile ?

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  59. @Andrew E. Mathis

    “North of the Border”

    Drive 500 miles North of the Minnesota border and you are at the treeline/Tundra and Inuit.

    Most white Canadians cluster on the banks of Lake Erie on Southern Ontario shores where the temperature is about the same as Northern Ohio or Montreal, which is about the same temp as upstate New York.

    Canada is notorious for its recent Asian/Middle Eastern/Indian immigration but none of these people live outside the major cities.

  60. denk says:
    @ThreeCranes

    Moral of the story…..

    murkkans who brand China as ‘hostile’ , an ‘enemy’ are classic robber crying robbery.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  61. map says:
    @another fred

    The only depression that will be caused is the one by the Federal Reserve. Here, I will make a prediction: when the Federal Funds Rate goes to 3.00%, the economy will slide into a recession. 3% is the current rate on 30-year Treasury bonds. This will invert the yield curve.

    In fact, yield curve inversions are primary evidence of Federal Reserve manipulation of interest rates.

    • Replies: @another fred
  62. @anonymous

    They now have an “auto industry” but it started with companies like GM using (((trade agreements))) as a way to employ Hatters as low-wage, 3rd-world labor to replace Union workers in Michigan;

    Canada had an auto industry 100 years ago, but GM was allowed to buy it up. It was called McLaughlin Buick. Wages in Canada and the US have always been comparable, and Canada was and is more heavily unionized than the US. It wasn’t GM that started the debacle, it was Toyota. They used the WTO to challenge, successfully, the Canada-US Auto Pact, which effectively protected the Big 3. The WTO was Clinton’s baby. If you want to spell that (((Clinton))), be my guest.

    Canada is the way it is today, because of a “conservative” Prime Minister arse kissing Reagan with the FTA and NAFTA. I predicted 30 years ago that Canada would become a shit hole by hitching our wagon to the (((American))) dream, and no one has convinced me that hasn’t come to pass.

    By the way, the US capability for drone strikes and other live “smart” bombs is due to the Canadian technology of MacDonald-Dettweiler. You wouldn’t have put a man on the moon had it not been for the aeronautical engineers flooding to NASA with the cancellation of the technologically advanced (and superior) Arrow in 1959, produced by A.V. Roe.

  63. schrub says:

    On the other hand, there is this article by Max Keiser that Trump might just end up being the savior of us all.

    https://www.rt.com/business/430645-trump-china-us-debt-keiser/

    China can hurt America in trade war six ways from Sunday

    According to Keiser, after taking the helm as president, Donald Trump realized it was vital to reduce defense spending to pare the huge US debt.

    “He looked at the geo-political chess board and saw that – the low hanging fruit, in terms of saving money – is America’s huge military spending in South Korea,” said Keiser, stressing that after the historic summit with North Korean leader Kim Jing-un the US would start pulling military presence out of the region.

    The US president is currently arranging deals with Saudi Arabia and Israel, in preparation for the US pulling out of the Middle East as well, Keiser added, highlighting that Trump had previously signaled to Germany that the US would to cut its military presence in NATO there too.

    “That brings us to China, and the ‘nuclear option’ they have of dumping US treasuries to financially attack America. This is their one big play. Trump knows it, and he’s been protecting the US against it,” the financial commentator said.

    Downsizing the Pentagon, according to Keiser, will shrink US debt, diminishing the possibility of a Chinese financial attack via the dumping of US bonds.

    “By reducing its debt load, the US becomes a smaller target, and less exposed to the skyrocketing interest rates that would accompany a Chinese multi-trillion Treasury bond dump,” Keiser said. “Additionally, China’s internal debts are harder to cut without causing a more generalized, across-the-board economic wipeout – giving rise to severe, unpredictable social unrest.”

    The commentator said that cutting the Pentagon budget in half will cut the stock market in half and cause a short and sharp recession in the US. However, the economy can rapidly recover if Trump “allocates part of the defense-spending-cut dividend to stimulus programs, pushing credit opportunities for small and medium-sized enterprises and infrastructure spending.”

    According to Keiser, China’s stock market will also be cut in half. However, the country’s government, in the absence of a fully-developed consumer economy, will have to “fall back on its tried and true Mercantilist policies of exporting its way to growth by pegging its currency at below market rates – which means holding, not selling US dollars.”

    “In the end, Trump wins. China’s growth rate is cut sharply, (but it keeps going without a revolution). Germany is free to partner with Russia in a post-NATO world (long overdue, IMO) and over in the mid-East, the oil is running out – so they’re transitioning to solar,”

    President Donald Trump is cutting US military spending to be less exposed to the skyrocketing interest rates that would become unavoidable when China opts to dump US Treasury bonds, Max Keiser has told RT.

    “To understand US trade policies – and in particular Trump’s policies on China – from Trump’s point of view you have to think like Trump,” the host of RT’s Keiser Report explained. “When Trump took office, he inherited the biggest debt load that any country had ever accumulated. He also inherited a military budget that eats up 50 percent of America’s annual tax revenues of $1.5 trillion.”

    “That brings us to China, and the ‘nuclear option’ they have of dumping US treasuries to financially attack America. This is their one big play. Trump knows it, and he’s been protecting the US against it,” the financial commentator said.

    • Replies: @renfro
  64. @denk

    You’re either a Chinese or an Indian, with an outlying chance of being a Slav.

    I’m new here, yes. Time on my hands.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  65. @denk

    DENK

    You’re family probably ran to Singapore or Hong Kong to get into an English colony. You’re a slope, but not a Chi-Com. My guess is you are living in a FORMER Brit colony right now, not the Fuji province.

  66. @Curmudgeon

    BORDER STATE OPINION

    Newfoundland was going to be Canada’s Detroit whether Mulroney love Reagan or not.

    As for “shit-holes”, I think Canadian Natives (Whom I quickly learned to be wary around in Northern Ontario) were going to exhibit similar social pathology to blacks no matter what.

    Nor is East Vancouver rough because of the United States.

    Only so much can be laid on the US.

  67. denk says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    Trump loves Duterte.

    The deep state wants to charm PH back after’ that obama debacle…….fix it for ya.

    Only a Chinese Fuji moron trapped in the hermit kingdom would believe such Fake News.

    LOL
    only a dumbed down murkkans still cant figure out Trump/obama/bush….dont decide stuff, they just do as what their puppet masters told them.

    fuji

    first you say Im from China, the next moment its jp ?
    wrong on both counts.
    heheheh

    I understand, you’ve never been outside Asia and your Kleptocrat ministers in China want you to see CIA under the bed.

    Jeeze…
    I quoted one source from Manila, two from USA and one insider info , a whistle blower’
    from the murkkan embassy in Manila
    .

    The last time the US involved themselves in the Philippines was when Marcos had to be evacuated to Hawaii with his prostitute wife minus her shoes.

    that’s just the tip of an iceberg.
    dont have time for it now, appointment
    with zhou gong.

    Here’s a must read…
    Your loathing of the pinoys are noted, but
    Do you know why Duterte doesnt seem to like murkkans either.. ?

    https://aboutstuff-stuff.blogspot.com/2016/04/story-of-dutertes-unpleasant-encounter.html

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  68. Wally says:
    @Andrew E. Mathis

    said:
    “You have any idea what the climate is like too far north of the American border?”

    Yes, I do. It varies significantly.

    Given your logic, all people in the US would live in year round warm, southern climates rather than where the jobs are. Yet they do not.

    US population density

    • Replies: @Andrew E. Mathis
  69. Dutch Boy says:
    @Haxo Angmark

    He even recycled the preposterous Smoot-Hawley tariff caused WWII canard. Trump is right – we have been in a trade war for decades and have been losing (which is the only possible result if you don’t fight back).

  70. anon[286] • Disclaimer says:

    A lot of opinion, not a lot of facts. China, Canada, Mexico and the EU all impose hefty tariffs on certain US products that they want to protect, while US is the only country that does not impose tariffs or at least impose much lower tariffs. Also he needed to impose tariffs from Canada and EU because the Chinese have been shifting their steel and solar panel production to these countries to avoid the tariff, but everything was still Chinese made.

    At the G7 Trump proposed that all countries reduced all their tariffs to zero for all products, and the G7 countries immediately cried foul, why? Because they all have industries that they want to protect. But the US is not allowed to do the same? With “allies” like these, who needs enemies?

    There are aspects of Trump’s policy I do not care for, namely what the heck are our troops still doing in Syria, Yemen and Africa? I didn’t support ripping up the Iran deal at first but it sounds like he just wants a better deal. Obama was being stupid and overpaying Iran to stop nuclear proliferation. Frankly if Iran wants to start making nuclear weapons and take out Israel, it’s their problem, not ours.

    But the trade spat is not Trump’s fault, it is our trading partners’ fault. They’ve been robbing us blind for decades. It’s time to stop the gravy train. We finally have a president with enough balls and brains to call out these “allies”. It’s time for America to look out for America for a change. This author can go stuff it. I’m sick of people criticizing Trump just to look fashionable.

  71. TheJester says:

    Mexico, for instance, is by far the largest buyer of U.S. pork exports, 25% of which were sold there last year. What its 20% tariff on pork means, then, is that many U.S. producers will now find themselves unable to compete in the Mexican market. Other countries may follow suit. The result: a possible loss of up to 110,000 jobs in the pork industry.

    Nomi,

    My guess is that about 100,000 of those potential people out of work in the pork industry due to tariffs are Hispanic workers from Mexico. Oh, you didn’t do your homework on the slaughterhouses in rural Kansas and Oklahoma? Those jobs used to be high paying union jobs for Americans. Now, they’re minimum wage jobs for Mexicans.

    However, there is perhaps an unexpected good side to the tariffs. Without work, maybe the Hispanic workers in the slaughterhouses will go back to Mexico. Once our borders are secure, perhaps the union jobs will come back without the continual flood of Hispanic immigrants functioning as anti-union scab labor.

    Same for the poultry industry …

    A take away: Perhaps the invasion from south of the border is singularly responsible for the rapid decline … perhaps the end … of the union movement in America. Rural America, especially, is in bad shape. Perhaps uncontrolled immigration is the constituent cause.

    MAGA!

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
  72. @Jeff Stryker

    There are several factors at play in my view

    the constant with ever increasing speed wealth concentration to fewer and fewer citizens

    and the process aptly and correctly described in the video above by mr goldsmith gatt, nafta and the wto protocols have not increased wealth creation to more US citizens as touted

    illegal immigration has exacerbated the disparities

    and we have engaged in mass employment of women — for which the benefits have flowed upward — the result of careless implementation without regard for impact on the traditional model of income attainment and support — predominantly male —

    The economic implosion had nothing to do directly with 9/11 and the US response that further exacerbated a reasoned financial response

    Pres. bush’r policies of tax cuts while increasing government spending and lowering the value pof the dollar to encourage investment and spending may not have been helpful but was not the cause of infertile fields created several decades before.

  73. ohmy says:

    Everyone misses the point. The authors remark; “.. made it easier for dictators like Adolf Hitler to convince people that their economic woes stemmed from others, … “. needs a more in depth analogy. The Germans didn’t need a “dictator” to point out Germany’s problems came from the outside, basically the Versailles agreement. Hitler’s response was to remove the vampire Central Bankers from Germany’s throat. He did this by issuing a sovereign German Mark backed by the value of the German worker and the resulting huge increase in GDP. Fiat, interest based currancy. is a front loaded scheme, which produces nothing yet benefits the few and, penalizes the many. Once Hitler threw them out it took only 4 short years to take Germany from being a bottom feeder to become the top earning nation in Europe. This was Hitler’s crime, which was no crime at all. Trump should follow Germany’s blueprint and get rid of the bloodsucking Federal Reserve corporation and replace it with a state bank and an interest free dollar.
    Now to do this he has to avoid Hitler’s mistake. To avoid being killed Trump needs to coordinate the arrest and detention of everyone and, anyone related to the central banks and, he must do it in 72 hours or less. Difficult but not impossible.

  74. Kinda wish Jeff Stryker would return to gayporn instead of being a stereotypical dim bulb racist here. Engaging in eugenics or raw racism in lieu of any knowledge of history and political economy is tantamount to ball gargling a train load of bankers/monopolists/war profiteers. False consciousness, anyone?

    But maybe I am too harsh on Jeff Stryker. Deep down he’s already dead and his shell exists only to anonymously blame irrelevant scapegoats. Maybe he’s into interracial cuckold porn too, but I’m not the judgmental type.

    At this point I am glad our ruling 1% overlords are slowly self-destructing. It’s not as if the bottom 99% is educated and/or organized enough to combat them.

  75. CanSpeccy says: • Website

    Let’s cut through all of this for the moment and ask one crucial question about our present cult-of-personality era in American politics: Other than accumulating more wealth and influence for himself, his children, and the Trump family empire

    No evidence provided. This is the sort of crap, ostensibly about economics, that one has come to expect from someone who, as we have seen an earlier piece, is unaware of the difference between QE and Fed balance sheet reduction. It makes one realize that there is as much independently produced nonsense on the Internets as in the corporate media.

    And if the author has even a scrap of evidence that, as President, Trump is “accumulating more wealth for himself”, let’s hear it.

    • Replies: @anon
  76. It seems to me almost every country waged war many years ago with trade and our bipolar relationship between greed and generosity. Trade needed a reset, and we finally have a President strong enough to face our 21st century issues. Stop berating the man, he is doing the best he can considering the swamp is nasty.

  77. @Jeff Stryker

    How come illegal immigration is a result ox NAFTA? Should it not have had the opposite effect as there would be more jobs in Mexico

    • Replies: @anon
  78. @Wally

    There’s still a pretty strong correlation between the harshness of the climate in the US and where people live — very few where the winters are the worst (Great Plains and Southwestern Desert). I think the big difference is the persistent rejection of urbanization in the South for the first 175 years or so. That and the massive exodus of blacks in the early 20th century left population densities there less than in the urban centers of the north and Midwest.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  79. anon[317] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous

    Under duress, under the specter of a new reality , under the intolerable adversity, the tired wounded wolf ( US) is trying to turn itself into a vegetarian goat . Will the miracle happen again ( since the sighting of the land by Columbus? )
    Na won’t . The wolf is going to die .

  80. anon[317] • Disclaimer says:
    @Wizard of Oz

    NAFTA destroyed mom and pop businesses, small farmers, and introduced lebarlization of banking destroying the micro finances .

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
  81. anon[317] • Disclaimer says:
    @CanSpeccy

    Trump is being bribed in Indonesia by Chinese to save ZEE.
    Trump has been oiled by Sheikhs of Qatar , UAE and Saudi.

    He is a thug and can be bought by you if you had few hundred millions

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  82. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @anon

    Trump is being bribed in Indonesia by Chinese to save ZEE.

    Don’t be so pathetic. If you want anyone to believe what you’re saying you need to provide a basis for your allegations. Otherwise you might as well join all the other morons saying Fu!k Trump.

  83. MarkinLA says:

    After all, a similar isolationist stance in the 1920s and the subsequent market crash of 1929 sparked the global Great Depression, opening the way for the utter devastation of World War II.

    AFTER ALL – as though it is a proven fact and not an unsubstantiated assertion. Of course so many people believe this lie it has become the truth. Smoot-Hawley took effect after the Depression was well underway when a large segment of Americans were flat-assed broke in a society with very little in the way of welfare or a social safety net. Where were these people going to get the money to buy the products needed to ramp up manufacturing production? Who was going to buy more than the basic necessities when you didn’t know who was going to be the next guy to get axed?

    From what I have read, industrial production was falling almost a year before the stock market crash. The only course of action then was to cut production and lay people off. It leads to falling consumption when everybody is doing it. How in a market based system do you get out of this tailspin?

  84. Anon[318] • Disclaimer says:

    Google search for Nomi Prins high school yearbook turns up nothing.
    That is very suspicious to me. Her nationality is “American” so where did
    she graduate? Let’s cut to the chase and point out that she is European jewish.
    To whit: “Jewish (from the Netherlands): ornamental adoption of Dutch prins ‘prince’.”

    This is her 2017 new year’s greeting: “Happy New Year! May yours be peaceful, safe and impactful!”
    In other words, we have a peacenik, safe space sissy and community activist.
    I’m a pureblood Ashkenazi myself and I can smell them a mile away. Especially the Saul Alinsky
    “rules for radicals” types that spawned Barry Soetoro and Michelle Robinson.
    This is where Nomi is coming from: “She was also a member of Senator Bernie Sanders panel of top economic experts .” That and a Tom Dispatcher; definitely a globalist pinko.
    When the rubber meets the road there are two choices for jews; your allegiance is either
    to the Anglo-Saxon nation founded by T. Jefferson and other patriots, or you are a traitor.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  85. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says: • Website
    @Cronus

    Is she a member of the Tyson chickens family? Could that possibly, possibly why she advocated open borders and cheap labor?

  86. A. T. says:

    European Union countries were incredulous when Trump insisted, as he had many times before, that the “U.S. is a victim of unfair trade practices,” citing the country’s trade deficits, especially with Germany and China.

    At the G7 summit, European leaders did their best to explain to him that his country isn’t actually being treated unfairly. As French President Emmanuel Macron explained, “France runs trade deficits with Germany and the United Kingdom on manufactured goods, even though all three countries are part of the EU single market and have zero tariffs between them.

    According to the following article:

    ”The Donald Trump claim that that Canada runs a $100 billion surplus with the U.S. is incorrect. [...] But there are other regions that have a large trade advantage vis-à-vis the U.S. The European Union runs a $100 billion surplus and China $375.”

    Real and Fake Threats to U.S. Vital Interests

    https://ahtribune.com/us/maga/2305-fake-threats.html

    Interesting: the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, with the US/UK friends in Ukraine and in Georgia demolished by NATO in 2008:

    EBRD holds landmark Annual Meeting in Jordan

    King Abdullah II’s speech to the Board of Governors

    https://www.ebrd.com/ebrd-annual-meeting-2018

  87. renfro says:
    @schrub

    1. ”According to Keiser, after taking the helm as president, Donald Trump realized it was vital to reduce defense spending to pare the huge US debt.”

    2.”President Donald Trump is cutting US military spending to be less exposed to the skyrocketing interest rates that would become unavoidable when China opts to dump US Treasury bonds, Max Keiser has told RT.”

    Why on earth is this guy lying about Trump cutting US military spending?…..anyone can easily find the defense budget increases under Trump .

    Trump added more than $200 billion to the projected levels of defense spending for fiscal years 2017 through 2019. He proposed a FY 2018 budget of $639 billion. This represented an increase of $56 billion, or 10 percent, over the proposed FY 2017 budget.

    As part of the recent deal to keep the government open, Congress agreed to increase the FY 2018 defense budget to $700 billion—an increase of $108 billion, or 18 percent, above the proposed 2017 budget—and the FY 2019 budget to $716 billion.
    This means that since Trump took office, the defense budget will have grown by $133 billion, or 23 percent.

  88. @Lumpenproletariat

    Why do people like you come to this site if you do not want to politically incorrect stuff. And I am far from the only poster who has expressed it.

  89. @Wally

    Canada is not a third world country so the immigrants that move to the United States have both human and monetary capitol.

    I have no problem with William Shatner or Jim Carrey moving to Hollywood.

    Indian primitives from the bottom of Latin America’s racial caste system swinging machetes in a park is a different story.

    That is immigration from Canada vs Mexico.

  90. @Andrew E. Mathis

    Immigrants to America ARRIVED in the Northeast from NYC to New York BECAUSE of post-Civil War industrialization.

    The Italians and Polish and Jews for example, are synonymous with the Northeast but not Alabama because they originally immigrated to work in the factories. Blacks from Mississippi of course migrated Northwards in the war years.

    This is the “Albion’s Seed” source of the tension between the South/US interior and the Northeast/West Coast. The Anglo-Celtics who originally settled the country have been marginalized by the wheeler-dealer Beltway white Yankees with non-British ancestry who clustered there post-Civil War years. Now 100 years later they are at the source of the centers of power on an East to West axis.

    I’m part of the late 19th century and early 20th century wave of German immigration to the Northeast (Like Trump) and the Civil War, Reconstruction etc has nothing to do with my American heritage. This is WHY whites from the North and South share so little in common even genetically. We have “furrin” sounding names-Olafsson, Terranova, Kuklinski etc.

  91. @denk

    I never said you were “Jp” (Jap)

    Like most Asians you are similar to the bar girl who thinks the American drunk in the girly bar loves you or will remember you.

    Neither Trump nor Obama gave much of a thought to Philippines.

    Its a basket case corrupt Malay dirt world whore shack run by a syndicate of Chinese and Spanish half-breeds.

    • Replies: @Miro23
    , @denk
  92. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Anon

    “She was also a member of Senator Bernie Sanders panel of top economic experts .”

    So there’s a reason to thank Hillary for stopping Bernie.

  93. CanSpeccy says: • Website

    That is immigration from Canada vs Mexico.

    There seems to be a color bar on immigration to the US. Specifically to exclude white people. Back in the 80′s I was short-listed for a job in the US, but to be appointed the employer had to confirm with the State Department that there was no qualified American to fill the position. I’m pretty smart, but apparently not smarter than every American in my field, so I was found ineligible.

    Perhaps it was the same then for people other than those from mostly white countries. but even now when every democrat and liberal in America seems to be screaming for an open border it seems to be very difficult for most Canadians to enter the US to take employment. Canadian students undertaking summer jobs and internships in the US, for example, are often given a hard time at the border, even when they have properly completed all the fairly complex formalities — so much so that unless the get an offer from Google or Apple or some such storied company, most are not much interested in working in the States.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  94. @Jeff Stryker

    Canada does not want blacks or Mexicans or trailer trash so of course they screen Americans and George Bush had to get a pardon for drunk driving.

    Have you not been paying attention to what Trudeau Jr. has been doing? Blacks from Nigeria are literally flying to the USA and then crossing the border ‘irregularly’, then blending into the country, getting free healthcare and dental care. Their asylum ‘claim’ will take more than 10 years to resolve, are they ever leaving? No.

    White people have to go through all the proper channels. But our immigration laws are no longer strict at all. In my city, there are thousands of Indian students flooding in. These are not the .001% of Indians that have previously been allowed to immigrate. These are dirty, smelly, rude and lazy Indians.

    I had a positive impression of Indians until recently – now I see why their country is such a shithole. And keep in mind these new Indians are still in the 1% – just not the .001%.

    Bottom line: whites follow the rules and it is strict. Everybody else ? Come on in, grab what you can, take everything not boarded down. Fuck the white taxpayer in the azz.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  95. Miro23 says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    Neither Trump nor Obama gave much of a thought to Philippines.

    It’s a basket case corrupt Malay dirt world whore shack run by a syndicate of Chinese and Spanish half-breeds.

    They might give some thought to the Philippines. It’s a vision of where the corrupt dirt world whore shack of the US is heading.

  96. @Lumpenproletariat

    LUMPEN

    “You like dat Red Pill truth up your ass, doncha’?”

    I don’t know the human genome well enough to really discuss race on the genetic level, my observations are man-on-the-street empirical.

    And true enough.

    My grandmother’s condominium in Detroit was worth $400,000 in 1986 and when we took it out ot be sold 20 years later it was worth $70,000″. Nobody wanted to live there and the city bought it. My brother told me that was a miracle. By then the Germans and Irish and Polish and Jews had moved out and the neighborhood was no longer white. This was Greater Detroit, mind.

    As for the Southwest, the Mexicans who come to the United States are not Argentinian whites, of whom I have known many and who are fine people.

    The word Hispanic is a misnomer put on Indian primitives whom the Andalusian white overlord ruling elite wish to be rid of. If not for the US Latin America would be one long revolution between the Indians and the Spanish ruling elite.

    These are truths. A red-pill suppository.

    If they are offensive, why would you be on a racial realist site.

  97. @Jeff Stryker

    Sure, a bunch of folks with GED’s in Southern Ohio or Pittsburgh end up unemployed and overdosing on heroin pills or out of their minds on meth but Asia has a middle class so it is a rational transaction.

    How bad is the opioid crisis, really? I understand that things aren’t great economically there, but are the people of those regions still not proud people? I don’t see any traces of such a ravaging disease like drug abuse when I visit those areas.

    Is this some sort of silent affliction? White men need to man up and face the real world. I find their cowardice disgusting.

  98. @CanSpeccy

    DETROIT HERE-

    Ontario is happy to use Americans to do really grungy jobs like tobacco-picking or tree-planting on temporary work visas but the same goes for us Yanks who think Canada is a fairly decent place to live.

    I even graduated from a Canadian college as well as doing skilled labor there. But the Canadian government wanted Lebanese, South Asians and not German-Americans.

    In the case of Immigration Canada this does make a modicum of sense-US blacks have been small-time troublemakers in border cities and even in Toronto as pimps.

  99. MarkinLA says:

    Well if you have a few bucks and need to virtue signal with your new clothes:

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/whats-hot/retailers-are-selling-i-really-care-jackets-in-response-to-melania-trump-to-raise-money-for-immigrant-families-—-and-theyve-already-sold-out-twice/ar-AAz1XYL?ocid=spartandhp

    Now you don’t need to spend all day on the computer typing out how much you care and how much like Hitler people who don’t are.

  100. @UrbaneFrancoOntarian

    Nigerians yes, Detroit blacks with US citizenship on the Windsor border? No.

    Ontario actually has dealt with US blacks to a degree-they entered the border cities and even Toronto to pimp.

  101. @Curmudgeon

    This country is fucked man. Literally millions of non white foreigners pouring over the border. They are all legal too – it’s an invasion. Legal immigration can be just as bad as illegal immigration. Look at the demographics in 2001, even from 2006, or if you want to feel depressed look at the 1991 census. The demographic change is astounding. The USA is nothing compared to what’s happening here.

    Unlike the USA, the 2nd gen are more fucked up than the 1st gen. If they grow up in a predominantly white area they assimilate nicely, but there is not enough whites left to go around. So they grow up in ghetto negro cultures and they are turning out to be disastrous. I may prefer a 40% white America to a 60% white Canada (We are currently at 73%).

  102. @UrbaneFrancoOntarian

    URBANE

    Hardcore cokeheads in Ontario actually MOVE to the United States where crack and cocaine are cheaper and more plentiful-I knew a peeler bar DJ who could not WAIT to get to Detroit when he got a job in a peeler bar over the border. Ditto the strippers, who will eventually end up in US clubs simply to smoke crack or smash cocaine.

    Likewise the US scag monkeys or career dealers on the West Coast of the US eventually end up in Painville and Wasting in East Vancouver. If you talked to homeless there a good 20% of them are NOT Canadians but Americans junkies who have drifted to Vancouver because the scag is plentiful.

    Canada was largely spared the crystal meth epidemic that swept through the rural US in the 90′s and has also been spared Oxy-Cotin. Sure, there are some junkies but not to the extent of the post-industrial towns in Ohio or Appalachia.

    Two reasons-

    1) Canada never had hicks. Most your white population live in cities or suburbs. There are some rednecks in Alberta or Newfoundland but by and large your population is urban. The US has more rural poverty in general.

    2) Your economy was always more diversified and not the single-economy of somewhere like Detroit.

  103. @UrbaneFrancoOntarian

    “Disgusting cowardice”

    Natives in Canada actually get away with more than they can in the United States. I don’t know why, but in Ontario they tend to do things that would flat-out get them killed in the US and although they CAN live in border states they tend to avoid them because they know that white Americans are far more brutal to them than Quebecers, for example. Show me a First Nations who goes over the border to New York and acts towards whites the way he would in Ontario.

    I’d say the same is true with East Indians in Brampton. Conceivably a white man can be abused or attacked by South Asian punks there. In the US, this would not happen. US whites are often accused of being racist but Asians tend to mind their manners slightly more. In Canadian cities they are more inclined to do what they please.

    One aspect of this is the US police approach. The cops in the US are much more aggressive and indeed racist. This detracts from the quality of life but holds immigrant groups in check to some degree. RCMP or OPP are more civil than the redneck cops in the US.

    • Replies: @UrbaneFrancoOntarian
  104. Weaver1 says:
    @denk

    Since whites supposedly cause all problems and have never done anything but evil, then you’d think the entire world would like the idea of Europe and the US minding their own business.

    Yet everyone wants advantageous trade and foreign aid from the US/Europe. No one wants true sovereignty.

    I’m all for sovereignty, btw. If that means China conquers the pinoys, then China conquers. Nothing to do with me. True noninterventionism means allowing the rest of the world conquer one another as they will.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
    , @denk
  105. streber says:

    Subject: My response to Nomi Prins article in Tom Dispatch (link at the end)

    The one dimensional, Nomi Prins article was negative to Trump

    “Blah, blah, blah.
    because of the possible Smoot-Hawley boogieman lurking in our future.
    I’m scared and you should be also.
    Hitler.
    Blah, blah, blah.”

    The great benefit of The Don’s antics is that he is putting pressure on the suffocating, revolting and growing monster that resides in Brussels along with pressure on NWO puppets like Frau Merkel, and soy boys Macron & Trudeau.
    Trump is not isolated in his revulsion.
    Wit recent and unfolding events in Italy, Austria, Hungary.
    (article just pub’d on ZH .. https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-06-22/12-european-states-revolt-against-merkel-macron-plan-reform-europe )

    Last fall Trump cut off the free money gravy train going to Pakistan, a hostile, corrupt country that has bled the USA for decades.
    Pak is now undergoing a currency crises .. http://spearheadresearch.org/index.php/researchopinions/beware-of-devaluation

    Mexico is, now, a failed state which, along with the Progressive wing of the Dem party, openly advocates and assists in the ongoing invasion of the USA.
    Trump will destroy them.
    As a small but tasty side dish concurrently being served, the Socialist paradises of Venz & Nicaragua, allied with China, are being destroyed now.

    What the one-dimensional politicos, pundits & chattering class fail to understand is The Don survived handsomely in NYC real estate while dealing with corrupt politicians, corrupt unions, Mafia & gangsters (all one and the same).
    Trump is no empty suit Obama, or IQ challenged Bush the younger.

    As to the “China, China, China” drivel by Prins, check this 5 min vid (enjoy with headphones) .. http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/21602/if-you-still-dont-think-chinas-navy-is-a-serious-threat-watch-this-video?xid=thedrive-amp-fbshare
    As a former Navy pilot I love this vid & the discipline displayed, but…
    How much longer you want to economically aid and abet that?
    China is still a financial paper tiger. These so-called trade wars will wreck them.

    Standby for interesting times.

    streber out

    The Prins article…

    http://www.tomdispatch.com/blog/176439/tomgram%3A_nomi_prins%2C_what%27s_the_end_game

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
    , @denk
  106. @anon

    I don’ t understand eithrr the mom and pop businesses or the micro finances points at all. How did that work?

    As for small farmers I assume that was from price competition. But what kind of small farming? Not dairy I presume.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  107. @Weaver1

    Most Filipinos would eat through someone’s anus to get to a white country and some Filipino women literally do.

    When I lived in the Philippines my neighbor was a Filipino woman engaged to a US Marine of Polish descent. Being from Detroit, I’m friendly with Polish-Americans and got talking to them both.

    The Filipino woman made no bones AT ALL of just wanting to leave the Philippines.

    Chinese-Filipinos and Spanish Mextizos are the only people who like living in the Philippines. Wild horses could not drag them away.

    I live in Asia because there are no blacks and Mestizos due to their inability to travel and lack of initiative. So it is a nice enough place for a white working middle class Bachelor.

    But for a Filipino things are different.

  108. @Wizard of Oz

    Micro-business get wiped out in rural and exurban cities by Wal-Mar. If you live in New York City, is harder to just drive to Wal-Mart and buy cheap. So you go to corner stores.

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
  109. @streber

    I don’t think there was ever a worse president than Bush. We cannot gauge Obama because Bush was such a moron that he trashed the US.

  110. @Jeff Stryker

    Well that has been going on progressively throughout the world for at least 60 years but are you saying Walmart’s power to buy cheap because of volume was significantly enhanced by NAFTA?

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  111. @Jeff Stryker

    Isn’t Amy Chua, the famous Tiger Mother, ethnic Chinese from the Philippines?

    Also, there is a little ambiguity.in your remarks about Mestizos remaining in the Philppines but your living in “Asia” to avoid Mestizos. Presumably you mean almost anywhere in Asia other than the Philppines????

  112. @Jeff Stryker

    Have some children buddy. Bachelor isn’t good enough. Need to replenish the white race.

  113. @Jeff Stryker

    Yeah I respect Americans because they’re not pussies like whites in western Europe and Canada.

    Alot of the 2nd gen South Asians are trash – their parents are Ok but there’s not enough whites for them to assimilate into. So they revert to some black thug mentality.

    The funny thing is that Muslims and Sikhs are now fighting in the streets of Toronto and Brampton. The violence is getting so bad that even decent brown people are turning against immigration.

    The country is fucked – and as I said just look at the census from 2001 to see how rapid our demographics of shifted. Very sad. I just hope trump let’s all white Canadians in.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  114. denk says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    Like most Asians you are similar to the bar girl who thinks the American drunk in the girly bar loves you or will remember you.

    YOu’r really juvenile.

    Neither Trump nor Obama gave much of a thought to Philippines.

    I thought Trump loves Duterte ?

    Yeah sure, Obama was so indifferent he even crawled back to Duterte after the man called him a ‘son of whore‘. LOL

    Obama didnt enjoy it one bit but the deep state wanted Ph as forward base against china so badly, it sent the prez for change back to Duterte , screaming and kicking.

    hehehhe

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/obama-meets-with-philippine-president-despite-sob-slur/

    .You’r really full of it, no point continuing.

    But before that, Here’s another whopper.

    China the hermit kingdom !

    ROFLMAO

    Do you even know how much of the world’s travel industries from Seoul to jp, Paris etc etc depend on the armies of Chinese tourists and ….
    unfortunately, China itself is swarmed by tsunami of foreigners, mainly many fukusIndians and their assorted CIA/RAW/MI6 operatives.

    I guess coming from the USA where < 1/3 have passports, your sojourn to Cebu make you a savvy' worldwide globetrotter ?

    heheheh

    P.S.

    i use jp as abbreviation for japan/japanese,

    YOu of cause would rather use that jap slur.

  115. @Wizard of Oz

    Would I rather walk past a Spanish-Filipino “mestizo” in a nice Manila neighborhood as oppose to Mestizo Aztecs in Phoenix or Los Angeles in a dark alley?

    Definitely the former.

    In Latin America the Mestizos was the product of soldiers of fortune or other dregs of Spain while the Spanish Mestizos are the descendants of nobleman who were awarded land grants by Spain and are wealthy.

    On some genetic level, Aztecs are more violent and mean-spirited than Filipinos.

    There is no SJW on the street when they decide to target you. It is the same with Detroit. White liberals would no more live there than Alabama Klansman. When your life is at risk, all PC goes out the window.

  116. @Wizard of Oz

    Who’s going to kill you? Aztec Mestizos in LA or a Spanish-blooded Filipino elite? Would you rather walk past blacks in a city or a bunch of Asian youth?

    For the working middle class American guy, Asia is MUCH safer.

    In the space of a year in Phoenix, living in a run-of-the-mill apartment complex I had run-ins with 3 random Cholos. Unlike blacks, who are sort zoned to specific places, Cholos pop up anywhere with random violence.

    I rate Red Indians erroneously known as and North American blacks as the most dangerous people on planet earth. When I visited London, the locals warned me about South Asians. A Paki is a JOKE compared to living in Phoenix.

    As for Chau, she belongs to the Fuji ethnic merchants with the stranglehold on the Philippines-they are the ones who make meth in the bargain.

  117. @Wizard of Oz

    NAFTA? possibly? I was 2o in 1994 and what I noticed was not the importation of cheap goods but of narcotics and Latin American drug cartels.

  118. denk says:
    @Weaver1

    Since whites supposedly cause all problems and have never done anything but evil,

    You say that, not me.

    Not all whites are born equal, the Swedes harms nobody, violence and sinophobia is an anglo thingee, .

    Thts not a pov, they declare it right here in the Unz.

    I’m all for sovereignty, btw. If that means China conquers the pinoys, then China conquers. Nothing to do with me.

    China doesnt like to conquer anybody, it doesnt want to be conquered either.

    true noninterventionism means allowing the rest of the world conquer one another as they will.

    jeeze,
    the English language is being genocided on a daily basis and nobody gives a damn,
    hehehhe

  119. @denk

    CHINKY-DENK

    …Duterte crawled back to the Americans 2 weeks later when fighting broke out with a Muslim-occupied city in Southern Philippines and Obama rightfully told him to go f*ck himself. That is typical of a rolly-polly orc of a Filipino who criticizes Americans and then sticks his hand out.

    “Japanese”

    Oh, Jeez…do we have to here about the Rape of whatsit again? Yes, I know a tiny island of dwarfs invaded your huge country and committed atrocities and your pissed off at the Japs for it…

    “Sinophobia”

    Well your heroin dealing street gangs and industrial spies have been a problem in the West.

    “Indians”

    Yep, your a Singaporean.

    • Replies: @denk
  120. @denk

    DENK

    Jp vs JAP as an insult-

    …you’re a typical Asbergers Chinese male.

    “Anglo thingee”

    That must be why every Chinese fled to Hong Kong when it was British.

    “Indian CIA agents…”

    You probably allege that USA screwed with the Singapore immigration policy to admit Indians in order to break the Chinese hegemony.

  121. denk says:
    @streber

    To paraphrase uncle Charley [rip]….

    I would say that if China did not engage in a military buildup after watching the United States go bomb and missile crazy during the past 70 years and the new ‘eight nations alliance‘ sending gunboats up the Yangtze, it would be derelict in its duty.
    But let’s keep this in perspective. The Chinese have about 20 ICBMs; we have thousands. Their defense expenditures are somewhere around $50 billion; ours, in excess of $ 5 trillions. They’ve two outdated carriers, we’ve 12 including nuclear, another one coming up….
    ….

    http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/2001-04-22/news/0104210037_1_war-with-china-military-buildup-fight-wars

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  122. @UrbaneFrancoOntarian

    FRANCO

    Quebecois stand their ground a bit more but overall Anglo-Canadians are just polite middle-class white folks like the Midwestern folks who were ill-prepared for the feral do-as-they-please South Asians, Africans, Lebanese, Chinese who flood into their country regarding them as soft fools from a country where even the soft fools are rich.

    Much is said about “deplorables” in the United States but these immigrants make a mental note not to screw around. If the US has a trigger-happy police force the immigrants fear them and adhere to white mores a bit more.

  123. @denk

    Chinese cannot take over the economy or sell crystal meth like they do in Philippines so the US has to be more wary.

  124. denk says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    I just call out your B.S. that obama./trump both ‘dont give a damn about Ph.

    good try shifting the goal post again, your typical M.O, shifty as a snake.

    you’r now officially into my bozo file,

    but before that, here’s another whopper...

    Chinese mad scientists helping the pinoys to process drugs

    You’r really full of it ……

    P.S.
    fyi,
    if this is a boxing match, where there’s a referee, see ?]
    you’d have been declared koed dozens of times already.

  125. Yee says:

    denk,

    Don’t bother with “Jeff Stryker”, he’s just an idiot with an argumentative personality. I’m familiar with him from another site. He lack the basic understanding of geo-politics to talk with you.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
    , @denk
  126. @Yee

    YEE

    That’s uncalled for, Yee. We’ve known one another for more than a year. I’ve never insulted you.

    You’re quite intelligent to be able to identify me so many months after I banned from Robert’s site.

    But I cannot help but feel a bit disappointed that you feel that critically about me.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  127. @denk

    “Process”

    I did not write the word process.

    Nor can it be denied that Duterte turned around and pleaded for American assistance in retaking the Muslim-held city in the Southern Philippines.

    Which was rightfully denied to Duterte.

    As for any interference in the drug war itself, thankfully the US is put of the UN Human Rights Commission so thankfully this is no longer our problem.

  128. denk says:
    @Yee

    In my lexicon,

    A grinder is someone who doesnt know that he’s being koed and wont let go.

    A shifter is someone who keep shifting the goal post.

    either type will grind you down if you get entangled .

    I tried to educate Jeff Stryker at first, always do, even successfully reformed some misinformed posters in the Guardian , who thank me for that.
    then I realise Jeff is a shift/grinder two in one and consign him in my bozo file.

    hehhehe

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  129. Never saw the word ‘fair’ in any textbook on economics.

  130. @Jeff Stryker

    YEE

    To be honest, I feel as if we are almost old friends. You and I have seen a bit of recent history come to pass.

    Nor do I disagree entirely with the Chinese perspective.

    You’d like the US to simply leave your country alone because the US is run by an ill-tempered uncle type.

    .

  131. @denk

    hehehe

    yes, you’ve got me there.

    especially the bit about Indians working for the CIA and MI-6. That is a complete KO, there.

  132. @denk

    “Don’t give a damn about the Philippines”

    Well they did not leap up to assist Duterte when he requested assistance in retaking that Muslim-occupied city in the Southern Philippines.

  133. @jilles dykstra

    In simple economic terms a country has deficit or surplus in terms of trade. Rare that everyone is “even Steven”.

  134. @jilles dykstra

    Then you ave never read anything that discusses the fundmental principles of capitalism

  135. Anonymous[152] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    That’s the first I’ve heard of this.

    Usually, from first hand experience as well, the Canadian border is much more lax and Canadians are hassled much less than Mexicans.

    Your experience seems to be much more along the lines of hyperbole and I don’t believe it myself.

    Besides, we don’t want subversive and SJW Cannucks staying in America. I would much rather see them deported harshly anyway. So even if you are correct, I don’t care if Canadians are mistreated in the slightest.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  136. Anonymous[152] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    Haha. Bitter much?

    Let me guess, you are a balding middle aged white guy with no wife or family of his own. So nothing to do but bitterly comment at Unz.

    How very typical of you.

  137. @Anonymous

    I’m not necessarily defending Jeff here, but seeing that you’re yet another anonymous commenter accusing someone else of being old and single, “typical” is really the very last concept you should be drawing the commentariat’s attention to.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  138. @map

    The Fed will probably be the trigger for what is coming, but they are not responsible for the business cycle, nor for human nature, which is why we have the unstable situation we live with now.

    The Fed has helped create this monstrosity at the behest of the Congress, the Humphrey-Hawkins act, and various Presidents of the US (essentially all of them since 1960). Before that the Fed’s job was to “take the punch bowl away”, i.e. keep speculation from getting out of hand. The Fed changed course because the Congress dictated that change. The butcher’s bill will be high.

    I don’t think the Fed was a good idea, but it is silly to make it a whipping boy for things it had no control over.

    • Replies: @another fred
  139. Well, well, Mr./Ms./whatever Nomi Prins: I read you perfectly. As a matter of fact I can predict a lot about you: You rooted for Clinton, despise Trump, loved Obama; you strive to make the world a gender-free, border-free, tariff-free space populated exclusively by mixed-race people; and you probably march in gay pride parades. Am I correct?

    As to economics, economic history, and politics: you perhaps possess a PhD in Economics or Finance. Your advanced education managed to insulate you totally from reality for you clearly know nothing about mercantilism as an economic strategy; you don’t even know that every (EVERY, no exceptions) advanced economy in the world today developed its industry and commerce under protective tariffs; that when trade balances go all lopsided things need to be changed; and that sometimes short-term discomfort has to be endured to avoid long-term bankruptcy. But then how could you know such things? Your liberal professors taught you all along that money is free and the taxpayer can be squeezed for any and all items on the liberal wish-list.

    I often wonder how some folks manage to carry foolishness, mendacity, liberal totalitarianism, economic fanaticism, and love of globalist gulag all in one package.

  140. @TheJester

    Precisely. And Smithfield Foods (largest pork processor in on the planet) is now owned by the Chinese. Southeastern NC is covered in commercial hog and turkey farms and hog and poultry shit lagoons that regularly spill into the Neuse and Cape Fear River basins. And yes Mexicans, Central Americans and even Haitians abound in those labor markets.

  141. @seeing-thru

    “I often wonder how some folks manage to carry foolishness, mendacity, liberal totalitarianism, economic fanaticism, and love of globalist gulag all in one package.”

    Cognitive dissonance theory says that the denial of reality probably “leaks” out and causes some sort of cognitive distortion somewhere, but I don’t know Ms Prins, so we can let that lie.

  142. @another fred

    “…and various Presidents of the US (essentially all of them since 1960).”

    Barring Jimmy Carter. I didn’t like a lot of what he did, but he did try to get speculation under control (he was too late, the country would not take the pain). That attempt is a large part of what cost him a second term.

    • Replies: @Escher
  143. @Anonymous

    Yes, we must keep Canadians out-look what a Quebecois did to Katy. I mean the Vermont border is a dam war zone because of Canadian bacon cartels.

    Better that our illegal immigrants be like Machete.

  144. @Anonymous

    I won’t derail threads but I am 44 years old and not balding yet. I’ve lived most of my life overseas where I eventually married an Asian woman and have 2 children.

    Because Detroit is a shit hole I left early in adulthood and did not follow the typical white working middle-class route of immediately starting a family because that would have trapped me in the rust belt.

    No regrets there, I have felt very lucky to live overseas and not be around blacks or Mestizos in Detroit or Phoenix.

    • Replies: @Escher
  145. denk says:
    @anonymous

    The USA is the world’s 3rd-largest state by population. 4th-largest by land mass. Full of natural resources, including even rare earths, uranium, coal, copper, steel, natural gas, oil, timber, etc., etc. We can grow our own wheat, raise our own cattle and chickens, grow our own cotton for our own clothing, etc. We have all the human resources we need, including the world’s largest population of Whites and we remain the only state which had the technical ability to place men on the moon. On top of all of that, we are separated from any meaningful powers in the world by oceans on either side

    you just stop short asking that 21trillions question,
    that elephant in the room…..
    what do we need that MIC for‘ ?

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-03-19/21-trillion-national-debt-growing-36-faster-us-economy

    https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2014/01/big-money-behind-war-military-industrial-complex-20141473026736533.html

  146. @Buster Keaton’s Stunt Double

    BUSTER

    “Old”

    I’m 44, old by the standards of some posters. My working life has been spent overseas and I now live in Asia. Though not the Philippines.

  147. Anon[281] • Disclaimer says:

    “Is a world in which walls of every sort encircle America’s borders a goal worth seeking…what’s Donald J. Trump’s end game as president?”

    The sad thing is that at least half of the couples I see in Chicago my age are interracial. The real end game is to preserve at least something about this great country my ancestors built, as we are getting washed away in the annual flood of millions of immigrants.

    We would also like to stop apologizing to every other race. We would like to hold our heads high. We would like to be able to live for ourselves, rather than for a GDP number, a universalist service-oriented moral system, or the empowerment of the poor little black and brown people who just need a white hero to raise them up.

    For whatever reason, the self-sufficiency that comes from losing any material dependence on other countries seems to be a step in that general direction. So does stopping immigration of unassimilable peoples of completely different race, culture, and heritage.

  148. Stop picking on us old single people ——

  149. @seeing-thru

    you don’t even know that every (EVERY, no exceptions) advanced economy in the world today developed its industry and commerce under protective tariffs

    How about “nope”.

    Singapore? Negligible tariffs for the whole of its history. (I guess perhaps by ‘advanced economy‘ you meant ‘economy without a bunch of slanty-eyes stanking up the place with their foood ‘n’ setch ‘).

    And to claim that the West ‘developed their industry and commerce under protective tariffs‘ is typical protectionist ignorant hogwash, specifically designed to hide the reality: that many countries forced their consumers to subsidise inefficient, uncompetitive industries – going against comparative advantage and advantages to specialisation..

    It’s like saying that professional rugby layers develop their careers with protective hamstring injuries; the overwhelming majority of professional rubgy players will have had a hamstring injury, but it didn’t cause their success: they succeeded in spite of the injury. Likewise, economic development doesn’t proceed because of constraints on trade: economic development proceeds largely though technological change, which happens despite protectionism.

    Tariffs and other forms of protectionism, work to the detriment of consumers, always and everywhere.

    Genuinely free trade is always and everywhere superior – even as a response to protectionism by trade counterparties. Even politicians know that – they only bray the stupid talking points of protected industries, in order to appeal to the ignorant.

    And well played, trying to give the impression that somehow having a PhD in a subject (e.g., Economics) should be seen as a shortcoming. That’s some real down-home Cracker-Barrel shit, right there – a genuine celebration of ignorance-as-virtue.

  150. @Anon

    “Interracial”

    Do you suppose the daughters of the Jewish/WASP elite will have interracial relationships? Or that Trumps or even limousine liberals daughters will be raising a Barack Obama alone while some black walks zipping his fly up with no intent of paying a dime?

    That is about as likely as Vincente Fox’s daughter marrying an Indian.

    Like Brazil or Cuba a small white elite will remain European while the lower-class whites like the Portuguese vagrants deported to Rio from Lisbon beget a poor, desperate, uneducated, black or Mulatto population.

    Above them will be a Mestizo population-Mexicans or whites married to Mexicans-who will qualify for as middle-class by being the gatekeepers for the small white elite.

    Here is the difference. In Portugal, it was a result of the male dregs of the Portuguese population deported to Brazil for being vagrants or criminals. IN the US it will be the Protestant Evangelical girls from the sticks whose values and ethics are determined by Reality TV shows.

    At any rate here is the 21 st century US caste/race pyramid

    WASP Elite/Jews/Asian Billionaire immigrants

    Technical class of Jews/Eurasian children of White Males and Asians/ethnics

    Mestizos with Indian blood

    Blacks and Mulatto kids of white female “rubes” and US blacks

  151. @Anon

    “Interracial couples”

    If the guy is white and his wife is Japanese, they are probably alright.

    But what America will really be dealing with is a load of poor Anglo women raising a Mulatto because Tyrone won’t pay for his kids.

    Strangely, this will not affect Jews. A few Jews will marry Italians or Irish whites but none of them will end up being the single mothers at the welfare office. Believe me. It won’t happen.

    As for Latinos, who are fleeing the tiny white elite-run Banana Republics, they are a mixed-race of born from the bastardy of 17th century white men from Spain having kids with dim Aztecs and Indian primitives. So they are already MIXED.

  152. Well,

    what Singapore does is to impose a very high tax rate for its citizens to pay for services.

    The idea of free trade has plenty of methods to get money to pay for government and what it provides.

    Furthermore, Singapore is a very tiny state, so making the call that tariffs are all bad by comparing western societies or any developed or developing nation based on a single state, such as singapore is a bit of a misdirection by way of false comparison.

  153. @Kratoklastes

    “Genuinely free trade is always and everywhere superior – even as a response to protectionism by trade counterparties. ”

    Could you give us a few examples of where “genuinely free trade” has been a long term, systematic and successful economic practice for a reasonably large nation (i.e.–no Grand Cayman Islands)? Please be genuine about it.

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
  154. Yee says:

    Jeff Stryker,

    When you spew idiotic comments you’re an idiot. You have good observations in many other topics, though. And I generally don’t have a problem with you.

    The US meddle in Southeast Asia pretty much the same way it does in Latin America – popping up dictators, crackdown on left wingers, coups and instate puppets etc., the standard procedures. Trying to put such facts as Chinese govt propaganda is just foolish.

    You were appalled at the raw capitalism you’ve seen in the Philippines or Southeast Asia and blame it on the Chinese there. Has it ever occurred to you that after anyone remotely leftwing has been killed or jailed, naturally the place would become a paradise for the capitalists? Chinese in Southeast Asia didn’t do that, it’s the accomplishment of the US. It’s not like the US make much of a secret of it. You know what the US has done in Latin America, right? We know what they have done in Asia. Why do you find it hard to believe?

  155. @Yee

    YEE

    I live in Asia and I am married to an ethnic Chinese woman. You know that. I’m not ENTIRELY ignorant.

    I did not say that Chinese have anything to do with the suppression of political dissidents in the Philippines.

    The problems in the Philippines between rich and poor have NOTHING to do with the United States, Yee. They simply don’t.

    You cannot blame the stupidity and greed of Filipinos on people in Washington DC. The US did not elect Duterte and he clearly does not love Washington so what he does with Left-Wing dissidents is not subsidized by the United States. That is just untrue.

    When Chinese remind me of the purported war crimes of the United States somewhere, I have to bring up the fact that Japan and other countries also committed horrific crimes.

  156. MarkinLA says:
    @Kratoklastes

    Tariffs and other forms of protectionism, work to the detriment of consumers, always and everywhere.

    So, the idea is to make sure local businesses continue to thrive so that local people have jobs. This is called a trade-off in case you didn’t know. There is no absolute maximal position. Economists think the maximal position is to have the highest GDP. People doing the work think otherwise.

    As for economics and economists, how often have they been right? Shouldn’t something trying to call itself a science have a better track record than what we’ve seen from them?

    Likewise, economic development doesn’t proceed because of constraints on trade: economic development proceeds largely though technological change, which happens despite protectionism.

    Talk about a load of shit. This may be true in industries that aren’t capital intensive but for modern technological based industries, protectionism makes sure native industries are not strangled in their crib as could easily be done in areas like ICs and the automotive industry. The reason why Japan took control of the memory chip market in the 80s was because Japan’s MITI backstopped their industry and protected them against losses while Intel almost went out of business because as a private entity they didn’t have the financial strength to survive the loss of market share.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
  157. denk says:

    We all know that war mongers in the usg who generated lots of wars , thus pushing up the MIC stock values, all retired into director boards of the death merchants, a cosy job that do nuthin but comes with a big fat pay check.

    Apparently CIA/NSA spooks who push the fear porn on Huawei/ZTE as CCP outfits ,thus sabotaging the Chinese companies foreign deals, also ended up in the payroll of CISCO, arch rival of Huawei etc.

    economic warfare masqueraded as national security ?

    anyway….
    kill off a competitor and push the yellow peril meme up another notch to scare the sheeples,
    one stone kills two birds.

    heheheheh

  158. denk says:

    21 TRILLIONS MIA into the pentagon’s bottomless pit ?

    Can this be real ?

    Absolutely mind boggling. !

    https://www.truthdig.com/articles/the-pentagon-cant-account-for-21-trillion/

  159. @Yee

    Hmmmm . . .

    I would need some example(s). Tad suspicious where this is headed.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  160. @EliteCommInc.

    The degree to which the US “props” up South East Asia dictators is an exaggeration. Duterte was not elected by the CIA, for example.

    • Replies: @ElitecommInc.
  161. @Kratoklastes

    I am hardly in a position to argue with deeply held articles of faith, such as total faith in the universal benefit of free trade, total faith in the virtues of a globalist world order, etc. but at least can endeavour to place some facts on record. Further, I would urge you to read up, even a little bit, on the economic history and economic policies of the US, England, Germany, France, and Japan from circa 1870 up to WW1. Also read up on the period from the onset to WW1 up to the start of WW2 because a lot happened in that period – the abandonment, partial reinstatement, and then again the abandonment of the gold standard, the tug of war between the free traders and the protectionists, and the relative rise and fall of different economies. It is in that period that the US cemented its overwhelming competitive advantages in the world economy, England was finally dethroned as the leading economic center of the world, and the shift happened in US thinking from protectionism towards free international trade. England could not erect any protective barriers (for reasons too detailed to discuss here) and its industry soon started to wither.

    What Trump is trying to do is to stop the withering away of American manufacturing to avoid the fate that befell England. The US, because of its large size, access to domestic raw materials, highly skilled workforce, overwhelming technological lead, large population, surplus food production, etc. is more in a position to restructure its economy to favor domestic industry than either England could have done or what Germany or Japan can do today. Forget irrelevant and inconsequential city states and small islands. This is a race among the industrial and technological powerhouses of the world.

    Before you cite Singapore as a counter-example, do keep in mind that small city states have neither industry, nor technology, no agriculture, and simply do not count in the overall world economic context. These are “user economies” – users of technology, users of world industrial production, users of world food production, and users of global trade pathways. These are smart users, let us admire them, for they are making best use of their small size. The problem is the US is not small, it is an over-sized state that needs domestic manufacturing, agriculture, banking, finance, and trade if it is to enjoy long-term prosperity.

    It is amazing that a man like Trump, with very little claim to high intellect or vast knowledge, is showing a grasp of issues that don’t seem to penetrate the skulls of ideological economists of today. No doubt short term pain – perhaps lots of it – lies ahead if this trade war goes ballistic; but if the restructuring of American economic policies can be intelligently (AND patiently) managed, it could be the best escape route from the ruin that surely les ahead when the trillion dollar deficits and foreign loans come knocking on the door.

  162. Precious says:
    @Steve In Oz

    The US has a trade surplus with Canada and Mexico. How does a trade war with these nations address a deficit with China?

    Simple, China took advantage of NAFTA by shipping its goods through Mexico and Canada to the USA. By cutting off this loophole, China no longer has a way to continue its decades long trade war with the USA.

    • Replies: @denk
  163. @MarkinLA

    the idea is to make sure local businesses continue to thrive so that local people have jobs. This is called a trade-off in case you didn’t know

    That’s some weak sauce.

    As our own Fred Reed once said:

    “…the less you know, the greater the number of things that are plausible, because there are fewer facts to get in the way”

    For people who don’t know shit about economics, “protective” tariffs seem swell, because all they see is the most obvious effect: they are completely oblivious to what Bastiat called “That Which Is Not Seen“.

    Arguments in favour of tariffs are very much like arguments in favour of deliberately breaking windows (to help the glaziers). They ignore everything that happens outside of the protected industry.

    They are also very similar to the arguments for minimum wages, which deliberately ignore the fact that wage floors create unemployment; the people earning minimum are better off than they would be in its absence, but the army of unemployed are permanently priced out.

    A tariff is like a “price floor” for the protected good. It has very similar effects to a wage floor.

    There’s a concept known as ‘general equilibrium’ (GE), in which highly-trained people think a bit harder about things than you do.

    In GE, the effects of artificial distortions in one industry are ‘traced through’ the production and final goods chain, to attempt to get a handle on the effects on other industries, on final demand, and on the economy overall – including the overall impact on demand for labour.

    You see, industries that use protected goods as inputs, also employ people; often the total employment in the “uses [X]” part of the economy, is larger than the employment in the uncompetitive “produces [X]” industry.

    The protection of the [X] industry will raise costs in the industries that use [X] as an input, and will have deleterious effects on the demand for labour in those industries (the change in the demand for labour in [X]-using industries may be small or large depending on the share of [X] in total cost – but the effect will be negative in aggregate and may exceed the jobs ‘protected’ in the [X] industry).

    GE analysis goes further than “tariffs on imported [X] help maintain/encourage employment in the [X] industry“: that’s the most obvious target of the protection racket, but it’s nowhere near the only economic effect (and generally, the sum of the other, negative economic effects, exceeds the localised benefit to protected industries).

    Steel’s a good example, because it’s almost entirely used as an input into other industries, so there’s no requirement to go through the consumption side of things – the direct impact of higher steel prices on household budgets is negligible.

    Think about what it means for industries that use steel as an input.

    Once the tariff[1] is applied, firms in industries that use steel pay higher prices for their steel inputs, which reduces the profit-maximising output level of the firm, and causes them to shed labour, while also raising the final price of their output.

    The extent of the impact on costs (and therefore production, and therefore labour demand) depends on the steel-intensivity of the production process (and also on labour-intensivity – but I’m trying to keep this to less than ten pages, so take it as read that there’s no upside).

    So if you “protect steel jobs” with tariffs, you endanger jobs in steel-using industries (e.g., car manufacturing)… at which point the car manufacturers start calling for their own “protective tariffs” (because higher steel prices make domestically-produced cars more expensive, while imported cars don’t face that problem).

    And lets be clear: tariffs are only ever applied if the domestic production cost of the good (steel, say) is higher than the world price (i.e., the price of the cheapest import). It doesn’t matter whether the foreign producers are subsidised, or ‘dumping’ or whatever – if foreign governments want to beggar their societies by giving other nations steel at below production cost, that’s right neighbourly.

    The tariff on imported steel will not help exports of domestically-produced steel, because domestically-produced steel has already proven that it can’t be competitive in world markets unless it’s protected.

    However the higher cost of steel as an input to motor vehicle and heavy machinery manufacture, will definitely harm exports of those things (and all things like them).

    Tariffs are an indirect subsidy to inefficient, non-competitive industries: they are usually the result of intensive, expensive lobbying by an industry that is already an oligopoly for its output, and a local oligopsony for labour (i.e., steel mills are very significant sources of employment in “steel towns”).

    One thing that is a near-certainty for tariff-protected industries: returns to capital rise, at the expense of the broader economy. They are a wealth-funnel, and like all political mechanisms they funnel wealth upwards; any localised benefits to labour are incidental to the main game.

    And, as the Australian experience has shown: if you put a tariff in place to protect an ‘infant industry’, it’s impossible to wean the infant off the tariff.

    And you also don’t get any reciprocal loyalty from the industry: pretty much as soon as tariffs on cars were significantly reduced, all car manufacturers abandoned production in Australia.

    GE analysis generally bears out mathematical axioms regarding constrained optimisation, namely:
    for any piecewise-smooth function,
    ★ the addition of a constraint reduces the achievable [local] maximum (otherwise the constraint is non-binding and unnecessary);
    ★ the removal of a constraint enables a higher [local] maximum; and
    ★ the global maximum never includes any binding constraints.

    To reduce that to a sentence: an unconstrained maximum is greater than or equal to a constrained maximum, and is equal only if the constraint is non-binding.

    Now it might well be that people who know fuck-all about economics, but ‘feel’ like “something should be done” about their particular hobby-horse, are so smart that they can overturn a foundation of the mathematics of constrained optimisation: I would consider that pretty unlikely. (Don’t try to make the case that businesses are not trying to maximise profit subject to a set of constraints – that would just make the argument descend in to hand-waving bullshit).

    [1] A similar logic holds for a subsidy or quota, although the mechanisms are different: subsidies reduce household budgets directly (because they’re funded from taxation or debt), and quotas raise prices in the same way as tariffs, but with no revenue to the government. They are economically equivalent in their effect.

    • Replies: @EliteCommInc.
    , @MarkinLA
  164. @Jeff Stryker

    correct that comment was intended for Yee . . . .

    I am curious where he or she is headed. While i am not sure we are in sync, i do agree that the us takes a lot of hits about foreign leaders that it need not take and this is more accurate after the cold war . . .

  165. @Kratoklastes

    The less you know about the real world the m ore inclined you are to advance absolutes about something as complex as economic theory.

    Sure, in theory free markets make sense on paper everyone benefits from the sale of this or that at salable price.

    Problem: people, lie, cheat, steal. and make unintentional mistakes all the time. So to balance out against the random chaos created by any number of the previous and more — states and communities entertain market controls one of those controls is tariffs. The US has been one of the friendlies low tariff states and have been exceedingly generous to our treading partners. NAFTA is a prime example, the economic fortunes of mexico rose some 500% (GDP) we sent industry south on the assumption among many, that it would empower mexcico to hire its own citizens and cease exporting them illegally to the US.. — problem wealth creation ion mexico has remained where it has always resided in those that already have —-

    Might want to examine the trade impacts of our generosity —

    https://www.thebalance.com/trade-deficit-by-county-3306264

    to pretend that other states can protect their markets and the US does nothing reciprocal is just a fanciful way of pretending “free trade works” all by itself. It doesn’t. It never has.

    laugh — for the last twenty years free trade lobbyists have ruled the roost and yet the wealth has not spread to the greater population, rather is has narrowed upward.

    You are correct in theory all subsidies interfere with real factors in economic interaction but because it buffers actual apply demand — but that is the case with government spending , taxes regulations, inspections, bureaucracy all — but until

    every state is ready for a system in which no one interferes top protect their employment and wealth creation —–

    let’s just say theory is nice but but minus real world dynamics of broken transportation, disruption from strikes, illness, war, over spending . . . . and a myriad of other events that send a states finances reeling —

    two plus two equals four, but johnny lost his two to franks ten . . . because frank is much larger with more resources. That is the dog eat dog mercantilism and without managers the wealth spiral upwards would be moving far faster to fewer people.

    but then i am not an economist obviously — but argument that we need more free trade to fix free trade on the pose that we have never really had free trade — so let’s have it ignore the consequence of “free trade” – it’s very costly to millions

    • Replies: @Miro23
  166. denk says:
    @Precious

    the USA using terrorism, regime change, arm twisting to kill off Chinese competitions on international markets surely is the most pernicious form of trade war ????

  167. @denk

    And employing Indians in CIA or M-I6 (James Bond anyone?) to infiltrate, right?

    Chinese ethnic business cartels are the ones propping up Marcos, Suharto etc. Not the United States.

    Unsurprisingly there is eventually a backlash like the one in Indonesia in the late 90′s.

  168. @denk

    Chinese were the ones killed in Indonesia for propping up Suharto, not Americans, though they probably had donate him AID because the Chinese tycoons are to stingy to let any wealth “trickle-down”.

    Ditto Marcos, whoever.

    Yee is going to get on now and really bite my head off but most of the worst dictators are bribed/funded by local Chinese ethnic cartels in business.

  169. Escher says:
    @Michael Kenny

    The USD is not (yet) in danger of being dethroned, no matter how much Trump charges around like a bull in the world trade China (pun unintended) shop, as long as it is the dominant means of payment for oil.
    Should be interesting how the Iran situation plays out in the next few months.

  170. Escher says:
    @another fred

    Isn’t that what Volcker did right after Carter left, by hiking interest rates?

    • Replies: @another fred
  171. Escher says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    You could have moved to the Mountain states or Pacific NW if you wanted to escape Mestizos and Blacks.

  172. @Escher

    And do what for a living? My degree is not in agriculture and Asia was a booming market for my skill-set.

    You are more likely to find a job moving overseas to get away from urban blight than moving to a small city or Podunk state where the young people are always moving to the cities.

    The difference is that the cities in Asia are a) less expensive and b) the women are not totally consumed by SJW and c) some semblance of an economy exists.

    What are you going to do in a small town?

  173. @Escher

    I’m not enamored of rednecks and Amerindians either.

  174. @Escher

    Volker was appointed by Carter with the understanding that inflation was to be stopped. He began raising interest rates before the election which brought on the recession and cost Carter the election. Reagan re-appointed Volker in 1983 after the recession was over, but then “fired” him (did not re-appoint) him later.

    It can be argued that Carter only appointed Volker with this task because inflation was ruining the country, but at least he had the courage to do it. Ironically, Volker had a lot to do with killing the convertability of gold (not that I think a gold standard is an absolute cure-all, but it does lend some discipline).

    Reagan admitted that increasing spending without the cuts in other areas to balance it was “the worst thing I did”, which at least shows he partly understood what he was kicking off.

    Now we have Modern Monetary Theory (MMT). MMT will work, but they (whoever is in charge) will eventually have to balance things too, and when they do so by fiat they are going to have to have lots of power because there will be lots of pain.

    Lots of power in just a few hands – what could possibly go wrong?

    • Replies: @EliteCommInc.
  175. @another fred

    “Volker was appointed by Carter with the understanding that inflation was to be stopped. He began raising interest rates before the election which brought on the recession and cost Carter the election.”

    President Carter lost the election because for 222 days every night the US citizen listened to daily reminder that us citizens were held hostage and that the rescue attempt was an abject failure. The recession from interest rates rise in response to inflation did not help matters. But pres carter’s credibility was so damaged by Iran — even a growing economy would not have helped.

  176. @EliteCommInc.

    CARTER YEARS

    Mariel Boatlift did not help.

  177. Yee says:

    Jeff Stryker,

    Don’t you find your view foolish? At the time when the US was willing to fight 2 wars in Asia to contain communism, dictators came out to kill leftwingers but it was the Chinese who were propping them up not the US? And LonNol and Marcos went and lived in America as soon as they lost power, too.

    Honestly, I thought you were bright….

  178. Yee says:

    ElitecommInc,

    When you see the same M.O, you know you have the same killer, simple as that. Latin America and Southeast Asia have the same M.O.

    There’re many of tools to rule the world, the ME way, Latin America way, Germany way, Africa way, colour revolution way etc., the ultimate goal of course is the US rules the world, the rich rules the US. Perfect. For them, I mean.

    • Replies: @EliteComminc.
  179. @Yee

    YEE

    Don’t you think the average American is tired of the consequences of this? The endless flow of refugees into our country. The fact that we have to support some vile scum like Imelda Marcos on our tax money in our country after she is finally overthrown. The thousands of Latin American refugees who flee these despots.

  180. @Yee

    YEE

    It was not China but ethnic Chinese business people that tended to prop up a particular dictator simply for material reasons.

    Also, these are not “Chinese” exactly. They are people whose grandparents were born in Southeast Asia that identify as Chinese.

    • Replies: @EliteCommInc.
  181. @EliteCommInc.

    correction 444 days . . . . I have no idea where 222 came from excuse me.

  182. @Yee

    Well,

    I thought you were going to be more specific. Since you chose the generic route — No.

    The US had allies in the days of the cold war. We supported states who challenged communism. That those states engaged in nefarious activities was their business. china, russia most stayed have partners they may not approve of bit some greater end is the price.

    Jut to be clear vietnam was not a civil war and its leadership fell to invasion. I understand that it is a popular motif to blame the cia for the actions of certain leaders, nut usually, it’s just thoae leaders. I would agree that the US has engaged in supporting murders of certain leaders, but a long look at history demonstrates that the us is successful on rare occasion in such matters

  183. MarkinLA says:
    @Kratoklastes

    Blah, blah, blah, blah. Economics is a pseudo-science. Therefore it produces NOTHING of real value but worthless BS that is used to push government policies that benefit some small class of people.

    We have had free trade for a long time now. If it was working like economists said it would, people would be hugely supportive of it, yet they are not. That is the proof in the pudding not some idiot’s PhD thesis.

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
  184. Yee says:

    ElitecommInc,

    “We supported states who challenged communism.”

    Then you should have no problem with what I said to Jeff Stryker, “The US meddled in Southeast Asia pretty much the same way it did in Latin America – propping up dictators, crackdown on left wingers, coups and instate puppets etc.,”

    As for your justifying such acts, I have little interest to discuss it. Every killer has a reason ready to tell the judge why he must kill, but in international politics, no fair trial available. Perhaps it was right to prop up dictators, perhaps it was right to found Al Qaeda, perhaps it wad right to invade oil producing countries…. believe what you want to believe, just admit facts the US have done. I’m not going to fault an American supporting his government.

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
  185. @Jeff Stryker

    As a cohesive power structure your suggestion here sound suspiciously like — well, nonsense. The only ethnic chinese people i am aware note their heritage from china and reside largely along the border regions of neighboring states.

    In fact, there remains some contention between vietnam over china after the last conflict about how ethnic chinese were treated,

    So i have two objections

    1. territoriality and
    2. if they are getting kicked around by the countries they inhabit as in vietnam — they are not propping up anyone.

    so based on the data no such powerbase exists in my view.

    sounds like a cover story for chinese geopolitics “it’s not us, it those claiming to be us”

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  186. @Jim Bob Lassiter

    Australia had free trade colonies before federation in 1901 but Victoria’s protectionism largely won over the free traders and the post WW2 immigration to a low unemployment industrialising country to man the high cost car and other highly protected manufactuting was seen by about 1980 to have about run its course as a way of growing the economy. Australia has now had decades of negligible tariffs and so far a flourishing economy with high minimum wages for its 25 or 26 million people.

  187. @Yee

    “Founding” Al Qaeda is just silly. “Creating many of the features of the environment in which it grew” might be justified.

  188. @MarkinLA

    Then the proof of the pudding could be found in the support for low tariffs and other protective barriers of many more Chinese than Americans who oppose that. True the Chinese like others openness to trade even more than their own country’s but when push to shove they would prefer free trade.

  189. @EliteCommInc.

    No, it sounds like you’ve never been out of the West and have not lived in Southeast Asia like I have. So you are simply revealing the lack of awareness of the untraveled.

    I spent 3 years in Philippines doing business and so I had close contact with the Chinese-Filipinos who as a group run control 90% of the economy.

    Indonesia even more so. They always support a particular regime. Marcos, Suharto etc.

    • Agree: Miro23
    • Replies: @Miro23
    , @EliteCommInc.
  190. Miro23 says:
    @EliteCommInc.

    — for the last twenty years free trade lobbyists have ruled the roost and yet the wealth has not spread to the greater population, rather is has narrowed upward.

    Free trade is rather like two manufacturers side by side outside your local town. One has high cost labor, health insurance and pension costs – the other low cost labor and low health and pension costs.

    Result that the high cost factory either shuts down or outsources all its production to the low cost factory.

    Outsourcing is preferable for the owners/managers of factory 1 because although they ditch their labor force, at least they keep their own jobs + profitability may increase (if they can maintain their sales channels).

    The “Economics” explanation of this is that everyone benefits through lower priced products and overall manufacturing efficiency increases. The problem is that the US gets empty factories, loss of skilled work, trade deficits and cheap consumer items. while China gets new factories, skilled work, trade surpluses and the same cheap consumer items (thanks to US volume).

  191. Miro23 says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    No, it sounds like you’ve never been out of the West and have not lived in Southeast Asia like I have. So you are simply revealing the lack of awareness of the untraveled.

    I spent 3 years in Philippines doing business and so I had close contact with the Chinese-Filipinos who as a group run control 90% of the economy.

    Indonesia even more so. They always support a particular regime. Marcos, Suharto etc.

    Exactly the point of Joe Studwell’s excellent and very well informed book, “Asian Godfathers: Money and Power in Hong Kong & South-East Asia”. https://www.amazon.com/Asian-Godfathers-Money-Power-Southeast/dp/0802143911

    Overseas Chinese in S/E Asia maintain ethnic Chinese international networks, try to blend in with the local majority ethnic power structure, and make every effort to enter into corrupt relationships with ethnic leadership for their own commercial advantage.

    Sounds familiar?

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  192. @Miro23

    CORRELATION-

    Like the dwindling WASP elite in the Beltway and the Jews, the Chinese have a fairly rocky relationship with the Spanish-blooded landowning Mestizo elite in the Philippines.

    In Cebu, where the Spanish influence is strongest, this is particularly acute.

    Also, the Chinese immigrants DID fight alongside the Filipinos for the independence against Spain.

    Similarly, the Indonesia massacre was a result of propping up Suharto’s despised policies.

    The difference is that the US is geographically vast.

  193. @Miro23

    You are fine until you begin making comments about how everyone benefits. Let’s get you out of your test book –

    i only need one example to put this to bed

    trade deficits —

    imbalanced trade is a perfect indicator that not every one benefits. Singularly missing from your academic 101 analysis is that the owners who don’t reinvest in the communities in which they have outsourced and the inverse are exampled by the growing income gaps in which the money flows up as opposed to 360 360 360 360 . . . Which explains why the wealthy of mexico are all too happy to send their citizens north to the us , who in turn send the lion’s share of their illegal economic gotten money back to mexico — there’s the textbook and then there is reality. And in reality, the notion of free trade foes not exist and never will as neither does the certainty that everyone benefits from outsourcing, illegal immigration or free trade —- mercantilism will pretty much guarantee that someone will lose.

    I won’t bother discussing the underground economies and what that does to real economic valuations.

    education is a wonderful thing, but it’s value beyond knowledge itself must be to the real impact on real lives of real people in the real world —– our NAFTA agreements were predicated on certain expectations by the partners in the agreement — mexico has failed in meeting theirs and that disadvantages the people of the US.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
  194. @Miro23

    You are more than welcome to explain your theoretical economics lessons to the people of detroit, Appalachia, Mississippi delta, Arkansas outback of compton where manual skills have to compete with people who can evade fare wage practices via illegals bidding against those who have to abide by business rules . . .

    again I appreciate knowledge, but you have no real concept , in my view how that knowledge operates in the real world, based on your responses.

    Better for everyone — obviously, you are unaware of the titanic shifts that have taken place in europe.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
  195. @Jeff Stryker

    http://factsanddetails.com/southeast-asia/Philippines/sub5_6d/entry-3887.html#chapter-3

    I will make no claims to having lived for any length of time in such places as the Philippines. But that is not the gambit being played here. The gtambit is the level of influence and I suspect your view by experience is tainted by experience.

    There is no indication that ethnic chinese are ruling anyone anywhere. As indicated above they dont have the numbers or the powerbase, despite this supposed economic control you claim to have witnessed. The chinese immigrant in the phillipines

    based on this one article alone — I must remain where i came in — the supposed ethinic chinese powerbase of proppping up said governments is dubious by historical record of their role in Philippine history.

    And the distrust and would lend to that not ever being the case. I will take the historical record over your experience view.

    The attempted sale here is rejected –

    http://factsanddetails.com/southeast-asia/Philippines/sub5_6d/entry-3887.html#chapter-2

    http://factsanddetails.com/southeast-asia/Philippines/sub5_6d/entry-3887.html#chapter-3

    Nice article below might want to read betrween the lines — chinese control — not on a bet.

    http://chinabusinessphilippines.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=352:filipino-chinese-community-and-new-chinese-immigrants-&catid=3:colloquy&Itemid=61

  196. No disrespect for anyone’s experience, but when it is contradicted by the data sets — especially to historical records I will side with history. The ethnic chinese in the philipines are not in any disproportional control of anything in politics or the economy.

    Even your own comment strongly contradicts your advance here.

    “Overseas Chinese in S/E Asia maintain ethnic Chinese international networks, try to blend in with the local majority ethnic power structure, and make every effort to enter into corrupt relationships with ethnic leadership for their own commercial advantage”

    1. it’s talking about the underground criminal activity.

    2. they are attempting to blend in as to influence
    3. you are extrapolating more than the evidence supports to make a case contradicted by history

    In fact the only position you have that has any salience at all is that some number of cinese immigrants fought in various conflicts, but this ignore the conflicts with chinese pirates — ohh there’s that criminal elements which history indicated got defeated or beat back to having little or no influence.

    No doubt in short order you’ll be telling me blacks are innately criminal.

    The issue on the south china seas is not etnic chimese it’s china and the contentions over unclos – and the un ruled against china as to the rules of unclos.

    https://www.rt.com/news/419278-chinese-military-bases-duterte/

    fault of ethnic chinese — indeed.

  197. MarkinLA says:
    @Wizard of Oz

    Just because a country NOW has free trade policies after decades of protectionism isn’t the same thing as always being for free trade. The US had protectionism to industrialize and when politicians were bought off by US multinationals looking for cheap labor abroad, jumped on the free trade bandwagon. No doubt Germany, which protected her industries in the late 1800s, would prefer a free trade world so they can export more German goods.

    Austrailia, just like the US, may tire of it’s free trade experiment. However, Austrailia is less dependent on manufacturing than the US so can afford to carry on longer.

  198. MarkinLA says:
    @EliteCommInc.

    I think you missed his point. He was not arguing FOR free trade just pointing out the reasons given by economists as why it is good. That the only place these benefits show up in real life is in somebody’s PhD dissertation or on the blackboard of an economics class is irrelevant to economists.

    Economics professors are mostly third rate mathematicians who simply weren’t good enough to be mathematicians. However, they labor under the delusion that if they “prove” something, it must be true for all time and in all cases, just as a theorum in math.

  199. MarkinLA says:
    @EliteCommInc.

    our NAFTA agreements were predicated on certain expectations by the partners in the agreement — mexico has failed in meeting theirs and that disadvantages the people of the US.

    Here is where you are wrong. NAFTA is working EXACTLY the way the people who were pushing it in the US wanted it to. It was always a vehicle for US multinational corporations to get cheap labor. There were never any conditions on Mexico that were ever to be enforced so as to keep the labor costs down. If Mexicans have to work in toxic environments without safety gear like Americans before unionization, then that is a feature not a bug.

    When NAFTA was being ratified, illegally, there was a saying, NAFTA is all about three things – American capital, Mexican labor, and Canadian resources. NAFTA should have been ratified like a treaty since it is mostly about the property rights of a foreign owner of a facility and not about tariffs or trade. However, the US government pretended it was about trade only so it didn’t require the impossible to get 2/3 Senate ratification. US courts went along and the challenge by the United Steel Workers of America was thrown out by a lower court and the SCOTUS would not hear it.

    NAFTA was sold to the voter with a duplicitous propaganda campaign about foreign competitors stealing contracts from American companies through bribery and other under the table dealings condoned by those foreign governments and we needed free trade to level the field and get our fair share. Most people could see right through this and that is why Clinton had a hard time getting it passed. In addition, that was the last gasp of Democratic Party support for American unions. Dick Gephardt was one of the leading opponents with Perot and Buchanan.

    • Replies: @EliteCommInc.
  200. @MarkinLA

    Mexico has failed to enforce border regulations — primary goal was to reduce illegal immigration —— such behavior has only increased.

    Furthermore,

    us job creation failure

    good grief

    • Replies: @EliteCommInc.
    , @MarkinLA
  201. @EliteCommInc.

    Nafta failures:

    https://en.news-front.info/2017/10/25/nafta-a-third-failure/

    http://www.coha.org/the-failures-of-nafta/

    http://texia.co/3111-2/

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-11-28/nafta-s-ugly-reality-u-s-mexico-wage-gap-is-actually-widening

    failed to distribute wealth across the spread as opposed top increasing the Mexican income gap —

    Nice try —-
    he was defending free trade and doing it from a textbook as opposed to real life or he would or should have noted the differences

    Your sloppy defense attempt is hereby dismissed. I do not his final sentence — no need to explain what i ave already acknowledged as though I needed the course – I could certainly use more school — but the comments were intended as critique in my view — with throw away at the end about factories – which supported my initial point. That NAFTA, free trade has not been the boon for the US as promised, because it has been based on lobbyist defense and advocay as opposed to actual impacts.

    I am going to ignore the gymnastics of turning this into we agree but b ut we agree by going this route —–

    your making for no reason

  202. MarkinLA says:
    @EliteCommInc.

    GHWB was told by Mexican government officials (according to long ago VDARE article) that eliminating corn subsidies would cause out of work farmers to head to the US. GHWB basically said that he knew it and would look the other way. He did it to get Salinas to sign on. Mexico was the last country to sign on to NAFTA. GHWB was the worst President we had on the border. So any agreement on paper was just window dressing that both parties knew meant nothing.

    • Replies: @EliteCommInc.
  203. @MarkinLA

    Two simple responses

    1. no excuses for violating us sovereignty . . . it’s time mexicans took responsibility for their citizens and its long past time for mexicans to fight for a grater share of mexico’s vast wealth. they are intelligent, hard working people, they should fight for their share as people in other countries — corn subsidies is hardly the cause for the income gap and wealth strangulation of the mexican elite and government — corn subsidies — good greif we shouldn’t need to subsidize anything in mexico — you might want to spend time looking at mexico’s vast resources and wealth —

    corn subsidies — oy veh

    2. my great appreciation for president bush did not prevent me from challenging the rationale of wars for regime in either invasion and it certainly didn’t prevent from admonishing a careless and dangerous immigration policy.

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