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Corey Stewart’s Virginia Victory Raises Question: Does Conservatism Inc. Even Have A Constituency?
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The victory of Corey Stewart in the Virginia Republican Senate primary has led to the greatest outbreak of Main Stream Media wailing since Donald Trump won the GOP nomination for the presidency. The hoaxsters over at Rolling Stone whined, “Virginia Republicans Are Rallying Behind A True Bigot: Corey Stewart.” [by Tim Dickinson, June 14, 2018] Vox explains to its audience of bugmen that the new GOP nominee is an “alt right hero.” [Virginia Republicans just nominated an alt-right hero to run for Senate, by Jane Coaston, June 13, 2018] And CNN, trying to be as objective as it can be, simply says Stewart “built his public image on championing Confederate symbols”. [Corey Stewart, Confederate symbols defender, wins GOP nomination in Virginia Senate race, by Eric Bradner, June 12, 2018]

Yet despite wailing from journalists, Stewart is hardly outside the mainstream, especially on the Confederate monument issue. According to a study published in January 2018, a plurality of Virginia voters support keeping the Confederate monuments where they are, with 49 percent arguing for the status quo and 33 percent saying they should be removed, either by being relocated to museums or presumably destroyed [VCU Poll: Nearly half of Virginians want Confederate monuments left in place, by Ned Oliver, Richmond Times-Dispatch, January 9, 2018]. And GOP Establishment favorite Ed Gillespie, largely because of pressure from Stewart, also defended Confederate monuments at the last minute during the 2017 Virginia gubernatorial primary. It’s journalists who think the status quo is beyond the pale that are being extreme.

Stewart is also described as “provocative” partially because of his attacks on MS-13. [Senate GOP hopeful Corey Stewart ties gang to safety threat in Virginia, by Antonio Olivo, June 2, 2018] However, Gillespie did the same in his race, and President Trump is doing the same even now.

The popularity of Stewart’s message is shown by how he overcame practically the entire organized Conservative Movement, including the numerous nonprofit staffers in Northern Virginia who promote an ideology of “limited government” while spending their entire lives either working for the government or in politics. [Corey Stewart wins GOP Senate nomination in nail-biter, by James Antle III, Washington Examiner, June 12, 2018] Corey Stewart’s main opponent, Nick Freitas, enjoyed the endorsement of the National Rifle Association. [Stewart snubbed: NRA endorses Nick Freitas in U.S. Senate primary race, Inside Nova, May 10, 2018] He also was backed by Americans for Prosperity [Americans for Prosperity endorses Nick Freitas in Virginia Senate GOP primary, by David Sherfinski, Washington Times, June 5, 2018]. The neoconservative Weekly Standard’s spin that Stewart “narrowly avoided an upset” conceals the reality that Stewart was always fighting against vastly more powerful forces [Corey Stewart Narrowly Avoids Freitas Upset in Virginia Senate Primary, by John McCormack, June 12, 2018].

Though the MSM seems to regard him as a provocateur, Corey Stewart is no gadfly. Unlike Gillespie, Stewart is a former elected official, chair of the Prince William County Board of Supervisors. He is a notable Republican elected official in the increasingly Democratic territory of northern Virginia. He also clearly has the loyalty of his constituents—Stewart trailed in the election results for most of the night until Prince William County reported and pushed him over the top.

The difference: everyone seems to know that, unlike Ed Gillespie, Corey Stewart actually believes what he is saying. Gillespie even admitted in a conversation with David Axelrod that he wanted to run aids on tax cuts and “criminal justice reform” (i.e. letting more criminals out of prison) but that wasn’t “going to move numbers and help me win” [Ed Gillespie Is Sad He Was Forced To Run Racist Ads in Virginia’s Governor’s Race, by Ed Kilgore, New York Magazine, December 12, 2017]. In other words, Gillespie likely had no intention of defending Confederate memorials or dismantling MS-13 if he made it to the governor’s mansion. Stewart will fight for these causes if he makes into the Senate, so naturally he has far stronger opposition.

The real attacks against Stewart seem to be guilt by association [Watch: VA Senate Candidate Corey Stewart Calls Anti-Semite Paul Nehlen ‘Hero’ by Kassy Dillon, Daily Wire, June 4, 2018]. The charge is coming mostly from the Minicons surrounding Ben Shapiro, who have been relentlessly attacking Stewart [Corey Stewart Takes Virginia GOP Senate Primary By A Hair, by Ian Mason, Breitbart, June 12, 2018].

Shapiro ran straight to Vox to denounce the Republican nominee after his victory, smirking that Stewart’s nomination is “politically stupid” and “ends with the nomination of utterly unpalatable candidates who toxify the party as a whole.”

Of course, Shapiro said essentially the same thing about President Trump, denouncing the then-candidate for “tacit appeals to racism,” among other things [Shapiro: I Will Never Vote For Donald Trump. Here’s Why. By Ben Shapiro, Daily Wire, March 4, 2016].

Shapiro of course is quite comfortable with discussing what he evidently regards as the necessity of population transfers of Palestinians from Israel. Somehow, he displays a sudden ignorance of demographic realities when it comes to what is ostensibly his country.

Such complaints from talking heads aren’t terribly important—after all, in the end, the real constituency of a Professional Conservative is Leftist reporters whom Beltway Right politicos rely upon to give them recognition.

Yet Stewart’s opponent also tried to label him a “racist.” Nick Freitas sounded a John Kasich like note by sanctimoniously denouncing “racism” and “hate” during the GOP primary debate. “If we are to continue our party’s legacy, we must reject Corey Stewart’s dog-whistling of White supremacists, anti-Semites, and racists,” he preened [Senate candidate Nick Freitas unloads on rival Corey Stewart: “Time we defeat the hate mongersby Patrick Wilson, Richmond Times-Dispatch, June 6, 2018].

Stewart fired back forcefully but fairly, decrying how Freitas was using the “Leftist tactics of CNN” but still saying he had “a lot of respect for him” and looked forward to working with him in the future. He also struck a classy note after his victory.

Dan McCarthy, former Editor of The American Conservative, now editor at ISI’s Modern Age, accurately noted that the defeat of Freitas, who had been backed by Rand Paul, showed Donald Trump had defeated the “libertarian moment.”

He wrote:

Anti-government sentiment was most powerful with Republican voters as an expression of anti-elitism and resistance to a government run by a liberal Democrat like Barack Obama. Emphasizing cutting government on principle, as libertarians did, would never be as effective as emphasizing fighting the liberals, with or without shrinking the state. Trump was not the most anti-government candidate, but he was the most anti-left. The libertarian position, by contrast with Trump, seemed like just a more thoroughgoing version of what every other supposedly conservative Republican believed about cutting government.

[How Donald Trump eclipsed the ‘libertarian moment,’Spectator, June 13, 2018]

Yet much of the Beltway Right, not just libertarians, seems committed to simply recycling the old slogans. What’s more, they seem to be determined to make sure the GOP continues to lose, rather than making the transformation to a National Conservative party that can generate enough white turnout to win in rapidly changing states like Virginia.

Already, the National Republican Senatorial Committee is refusing to spend money on the race, obviously hoping to throw it just as the GOP Establishment did in Alabama[Senate GOP shuns Stewart in Virginia, by Burgess Everett, Politico, June 13, 2018].

Many in both the GOP and Conservatism Inc. have no stake in political victory, preferring to either carry water for their corporate donors or parasitically profit off grass-roots outrage while not doing anything to combat the Left.

Of course, President Trump is different. He’s already endorsed Corey Stewart.

More importantly, President Trump is still the leader of the GOP, and Stewart’s victory shows the nationalist message is increasingly taking hold among the grassroots. The real question is whether Conservatism Inc. even has a real constituency anymore—and if not, if the new nationalist movement can build (or subvert) the institutions needed to replace it.

(Republished from VDare by permission of author or representative)
 
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  1. Mishra says:

    Yes, the Republican Establishment is wholly obsolete. However, this doesn’t matter in Virginia, where the wholesale importation of third-world immigrants (and the legalization of felon voting by MacAuliffe) have turned this once red state blue forever.

    • Replies: @Macumazahn
    , @EliteCommInc.
  2. Gen. Kong says:

    Oh, it has many constituents. They’re lots of funny-looking old dead white guys with names like Franklin, Jackson, Hamilton, Lincoln and Washington with a banksta-green pallor. Billions and billions, as the late Carl Sagan liked to hear himself say.

    • LOL: Mishra
  3. @Mishra

    I think you missed it – the Virginia Supreme Court has struck down that felons voting shit that scumbag McAuliffe tried to foist off on us.

    • Replies: @Mishra
  4. I laugh when people suggest Stewart is some kind of “white supremacist” because of his stance on the Confederate battle flag. Stewart is from Minnesota, for crying out loud, and is essentially an exurban “Yankee carpetbagger” living in the territory known as Occupied Northern Virginia.

  5. TheBoom says:

    Stewart’s defeat of the establishment is an example of what is in store for whites. Populists can win in a blue state but only in the primary. The rise in populism and nationalism among whites is being outpaced by immigration. Thus Ryan and the massive amnesty bill.

    There is a lot of optimism on the right about gen z but by the time they are making an impact, it will be too late most likely due to more red states turning blue thanks to immigrant hordes.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @MarkinLA
  6. Slightly off topic, but I seem to remember Jim Webb being a “Confederate Symbols Defender,” running for the United States Senate from the Commonwealth of Virginia a few years ago, and this not being much of a big deal. What have I missed?

    • Replies: @Jake
    , @Anon
  7. Virginia racial politics brings to mind these questions:

    What happens when sovereign debt secessionism hits its stride amongst the young?

    What happens when the demographic time bomb meets the monetary extremism Minsky Moment?

    Minsky Moment:

    A Minsky moment is a sudden major collapse of asset values which is part of the credit cycle or business cycle. Such moments occur because long periods of prosperity and increasing value of investments lead to increasing speculation using borrowed money.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minsky_moment

  8. Jake says:
    @Alec Leamas

    Well, you missed that the Neocons, who hated Webb for having left the Republican Party because he knew that Neocon foreign policy ideas are both insane and immoral and have always been nastily anti-white Southern, again made common cause wth the left-most half of the Democrats to make certain that the only attitude allowed in public regarding anything to do with the Confederacy was intense opposition.

  9. artichoke says:

    Corey (Stewart, Gardner, Booker), hard to keep them all straight, but it’s important because they’re nothing like each other.

  10. MarkinLA says:

    the “libertarian moment.”

    I missed it. Can somebody please tell me the date and time when that 5 second period was?

  11. MarkinLA says:
    @TheBoom

    Thus Ryan and the massive amnesty bill.

    Does not compute. The amnesty from Ryan will just accelerate the problem. Ryan is catering to the cheap labor donor class.

    • Replies: @Mishra
    , @Anon
  12. joe webb says:

    comment on NYT article on Stewart. a little humor here, ok?

    Subject: Fw: NYTimes.com: Republicans in Primaries Absorb Lesson: Cross Trump at Their Peril. (. “flaccid”GOP cucks ). useful article

    ‘The chairman of his board, Mr. Stewart has praised white nationalists and made racially inflammatory comments about intraparty rivals. Earlier this year, he stood outside the state capitol assailing Republican legislators for being “flaccid,” adding, “I feel sorry for their wives.”

    hee hee. Speculation: does a cuck ever get hard enough to Build the Wall, instead of bending over for Wall Street/Globalism? Do cowards and grifters quaff their niagras/viagras?

    Do their wives, seriously now, see them as wimps?

    Joe Webb

    —–

    After a series of contests in which loyalty to President Trump was a clear litmus test to voters, Republicans are reckoning with his transformation of the party.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/13/us/politics/republicans-trump-midterms.html

  13. Ray Weaver says: • Website

    And the DEM MSM Antifa Rich DEM oligarchs Gloria Allred ACLU SPLC ADL already sahapenning the knieves for the general elections….remember judge Moore in Alabama.????

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
  14. Mishra says:
    @MarkinLA

    It reads better if you replace “thus” with “cf:” –I think that’s what he meant anyway.

  15. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alec Leamas

    Things change. The CBC is now the equivalent of Hitler’s swatzika sp?
    flag according to the Jews who rule the country.

    As soon as the Jews slay one enemy, they immediately create another.

  16. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @MarkinLA

    Saw a rumor somewhere that Ryan plans to challenge for president in 2020.

  17. The GOP need to take a leaf out of the UK tories book. Prevent the membership from having a final say on candidates. That way, the banker candidate always wins. That, and ensure the more left colour party DOES allow the membership that right, and they will always return loons like Corbyn who will ensure banker wins in perpetuity.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
  18. @Anon

    Many rumours of that. Still a young man (when it comes to politics, at least). Spending a couple of years raising funds, making connections, friends in finance, pharma, etc etc.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
  19. Tiny Duck says:

    I feel like Virginia can’t be this ignorant and racist, but literally nothing shocks me anymore.

    I live in NoVa. This guy is going to get his clock cleaned so hard. We’re a blue state now. Him being elected is due to an insanely low turnout and total apathy by the deceased #VAGOP. This thing is finishing. Corey Stewart has NO shot. None.

  20. Dan Hayes says:
    @Roger Cliftonville Acton

    Roger Cliftonville Acton:

    Is it too much to expect or hope that Ryan will descend into well deserved political obscurity with Eric Cantor’s descent being the role model?

  21. MarkinLA says:
    @Anon

    No doubt his fundraising will make Heb’s look like peanuts. However, nobody will vote for him. However, under the rules, the candidate gets to keep the unused money from his last campaign. I bet this is how the Kochs will give him his payday.

  22. MarkinLA says:
    @Ray Weaver

    Moore was scuttled by his own party.

  23. MarkinLA says:
    @Roger Cliftonville Acton

    The Dems had a fix (superdelegates) in their primary to keep Bernie out. The GOP thought money was their fix and Heb was a shoo-in. If the GOP goes to superdelegates now the party would self-destruct now that the voters feel they finally have some say.

  24. Sam J. says:

    What if instead of the Democrats winning elections they are just stealing them? I think the Alabama elections were stolen. Maybe this one was too.

    • Replies: @Macon Richardson
  25. @Mishra

    It’s not felons.

    it’s immigration.

    good greif

  26. Anonymous[317] • Disclaimer says:

    Once, I lived in Virginia. What I see is that everywhere not just in America but all over the globe people have discovered that party allegiance is the same as wasting your vote; the party system is a
    divide and conquer device..used to control voting outcomes

    Example, consider a state with 1501 voters..

    everyone likes the candidate, and there is no divide and conquer interference
    votes for the popular for the the candidate’s winner the
    total candidate opponent own vote

    1501 votes 1500 0 1 for self 1501 the popular candidate

    Everyone hates the candidate.. but the party system is divided;
    the Republicans are for the hated dreadful candidate while t
    he Democrats are against the hated dreadful candidate
    everyone agrees the candidate is dreadful, voting out follows

    1501 votes 750 for 750 against 1 for self hated dreadful wins 501 to 500

    Without the divide and conquer interference introduced
    by the Pharaohs in charge of the two parties, the election
    outcome of hated, dreadful is quite different from what
    the voters actually wanted.

    1501 votes 0 1500 against 1 for hated dreadful loses 1 vs 1500.

    Around the globe the voters are confused by the party line voting.

    The less divide and conquer influence (abort/no abort, guns/no guns, religion, race, welfare/no welfare, immigration, you name it, the less the voters are able to elect their best choice.

  27. Art Deco says:

    Dan McCarthy, former Editor of The American Conservative, now editor at ISI’s Modern Age, accurately noted that the defeat of Freitas, who had been backed by Rand Paul, showed Donald Trump had defeated the “libertarian moment.”

    Modern Age has long been a quasi-academic journal. It’s sort of disconcerting that ISI cannot recruit an academic to edit it, or does not care to recruit one.

    I wouldn’t equate Freitas (a veteran who worked in local businesses) with Gillespie (who is a professional lobbyist and campaign hack and gives evidence of having his finger ever in the wind). What’s distressing about Freitas’ is that he gives evidence of sharing certain templates with the major media. I suspect that’s so of Capitol Republicans by default and they shiv their own candidates because they confuse media chatter and public opinion (see Roy Moore and Todd Akin). What’s appealing about Trump is that he isn’t intimidated by the media or controlled by them. Contrast with the dithering mess known as Paul Ryan.

  28. Ed says:

    Conservative Inc is at best a regional ideology and it can’t win national elections any longer. Bush 43 saw to that. Corey may surprise what’s not mentioned is that he performed well in Northern Virginia. NoVa provided his margin of victory and then some.

    • Replies: @ATBOTL
  29. Ed says:
    @Anon

    In 2024, sure his kids will be grown. I don’t see him challenging Trump in 2020, he’s not that type of guy.

  30. JamesinNM says:

    Don’t like Corey Stewart? Then pack your bags and go to the Congo.

  31. ATBOTL says:
    @Ed

    Conservatism Inc. is a Southern ideology: Free trade, cheap labor and endless wars. People often forget that.

    • Replies: @Ed
  32. Ed says:
    @ATBOTL

    More of a Yankee mercantilist ideology. South only moved to Republican relatively recently. Clinton won WV and Carter swept most of the South.

    If Ryanism was to break into a viable 3rd party doubt it would gain much traction in the South against a Populist Trumpist party and Democrats.

  33. @Sam J.

    Do you just think that or do you have any evidence of it.

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