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Chinese President Xi Jinping: What Is His Background?
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Xi Jinping, brother Xi Yuanping, father Xi Zhongxun in 1958
Xi Jinping, brother Xi Yuanping, father Xi Zhongxun in 1958

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In a well-governed country, those who discuss policy must be in accordance with the law; those who carry out official matters must be regulated. Superiors evaluate actual performance; officials carry out their work efficiently. Words are not permitted to exceed reality. Actions are not permitted to overstep the law.

In a disordered country, those who are praised by the multitudes are richly rewarded though devoid of accomplishments. Those who stick to their duties are punished, though free of guilt. The ruler is in the dark and does not understand. Worthies do not offer proposals. Officials form factions; persuasive talkers roam about; people embellish their actions. Those who are taken to be wise devote themselves to artifice and deceit; high officials usurp authority. Cliques and factions become widespread. The ruler is eager to carry out projects that are of no use, while the people look haggard and worn. Huainanzi, 221 BC.

In 1980 Deng Xiaoping set 2020 as the completion date for his Reform and Opening program–a 40-year overhaul of China’s economy.

On June 1, 2021 President Xi will announce that all Deng’s goals have been reached and a basic xiaokang society established: no one is poor and everyone receives an education, has paid employment, more than enough food and clothing, access to medical services, old-age support, a home and a comfortable life–a claim no other country can make.

Godfree-1

Lee Kwan Yew, Singapore’s Prime Minister for 30 years, said the primary responsibility of a government leader to “Paint his vision of the future to his people, translate that vision into policies which he must convince the people are worth supporting and, finally, galvanize them to help him implement them,”

A month after becoming President, in 2012, Xi painted his vision for Two Centennials: to fix inequality (‘socialist modernization’) by 2012 and to transform China into ‘a great modern socialist country, prosperous, strong, democratic, culturally advanced, harmonious and beautiful’ by 2049. American Nobelist Robert Fogel agrees that China will be prosperous: its economy will be twice the size of Europe’s and America’s combined in 2049.

Because he must paint China’s new vision, colleagues granted Xi ‘core leader’ status in 2017 and amended the constitution in 2018 so he and PM can serve another term and make sure the new era gets off to a good start. Since he will be around until at least 2027, it may be a good idea to get to know him before our media intensify their attacks on him. Here’s a short bio.

People who have little experience with power–those who are far from it–tend to regard politics as mysterious and exciting. But I look past the superficialities, the power, the flowers, the glory, the applause. I see the detention houses, the fickleness of human relationships. I understand politics on a deeper level.–Xi Jinping⁠, President of China.

Though wages had been doubling each decade for a generation, by 2009 local corruption was impacting faith in the national government and the Party needed a Confucian junzi–a combination of Bill Gates and Nelson Mandela–to retain its Heavenly Mandate. Ever-vigilant, the U.S. Embassy in Beijing was investigating a high born reformer who had triumphed over injustice yet remained compassionate, sincere, persistent and modest:

U.S. EMBASSY C O N F I D E N T I A L
SECTION 01 OF 06 BEIJING 003128
SIPDIS. 2009 November 16, 12:20 (Monday)
SUBJECT: PORTRAIT OF VICE PRESIDENT XI JINPING: ‘AMBITIOUS SURVIVOR’ OF THE CULTURAL REVOLUTION .

Unlike those in the social circles the professor ran in, Xi Jinping could not talk about women and movies and did not drink or do drugs. Xi was considered of only average intelligence, the professor said, and not as smart as the professor’s peer group. Women thought Xi was ‘boring’.

The professor never felt completely relaxed around Xi, who seemed extremely ‘driven’. Nevertheless, despite Xi’s lack of popularity in the conventional sense and his ‘cold and calculating’ demeanor in those early years, the professor said, Xi was ‘not cold-hearted’. He was still considered a ‘good guy’ in other ways. Xi was outwardly friendly, ‘always knew the answers’ to questions, and would ‘always take care of you’. The professor surmised that Xi’s newfound popularity today, which the professor found surprising, must stem in part from Xi’s being ‘generous and loyal’.

Xi also does not care at all about money and is not corrupt, the professor stated. Xi can afford to be incorruptible, the professor wryly noted, given that he was born with a silver spoon in his mouth. In the professor’s view, Xi Jinping is supremely pragmatic, a realist, driven not by ideology but by a combination of ambition and ‘self-protection’.

Xi knows how very corrupt China is and is repulsed by the all-encompassing commercialization of Chinese society, with its attendant nouveau riche, official corruption, loss of values, dignity, and self-respect, and such ‘moral evils’ as drugs and prostitution, the professor stated. The professor speculated that if Xi were to become the Party General Secretary, he would likely aggressively attempt to address these evils, perhaps at the expense of the new moneyed class.

Xi inherited his silver spoon from a remarkable man. When the Japanese invasion interrupted his father’s schooling in 1933, Xi Zhongxun established a rebel area, commanded its army, expanded its territory, became a general at nineteen, provincial governor at twenty-two, the new Republic’s youngest Vice-Premier and one of the Revolution’s Eight Immortals. After escaping imprisonment by the Nationalists, Zhongxun was sentenced to death by fellow Communists for his outspokenly liberal views when Mao, emerging at the end of the Long March, reached his redoubt in Shaanxi Province in 1936 and pardoned him. Zhongxun spent the next twelve years alternating between governing and rescuing beleaguered armies. A superb negotiator–whose conversion of a rebel leader Mao compared to a famous conciliation in The Romance of the Three Kingdoms–he was widely loved and admired for his competence, outspokenness and honesty.

American journalist Sidney Rittenberg, a friend in the 1940s, recalled, “Xi Zhongxun took me with him a number of times traveling in the countryside among the villages and he knew whose baby was sick and whose grandpa had rheumatism and so forth, and he would go to these homes and talk to them and they loved him. He was always getting into trouble because of his plebeian style and democratic way of thinking. He was a very good man in my opinion, probably the most democratic-minded member of the old Party leadership. I just hope that a lot of this rubbed off on the son”.

Zhongxun’s non-ideological, pragmatic outspokenness got him jailed again, for seven years, during the Cultural Revolution. Rehabilitated, he was assigned to govern destitute Guangdong Province and Deng Xiaoping joked at his farewell, “The Government has no funds but we can give you favorable policies”. Finding Guangdong’s government blocking residents’ flight to neighboring Hong Kong–where wages were a hundred times higher–he risked re-imprisonment by proposing a special economic zone for private enterprise. After furious debate, Beijing approved his plan and he stabilized Guangdong, stopped the exodus, liberalized the economy and built China’s first free enterprise zone which, today, attracts Hong Kong graduates seeking better pay. His first son, Jinping, was born in Shaanxi Province in 1953 and grew up listening to his famous father’s stories, “He talked about how he’d joined the revolution and he’d say, ‘You’ll certainly make revolution someday’. He’d explain what revolution is. We heard so much of this our ears grew calluses”. In a Confucian land, Jinping’s high birth brought high expectations: “The primary duty of a son is to live an upright life and to spread the doctrines of humanity in order to win good reputation after death and thus reflect great honor upon his parents” The Book of Filial Duty⁠.

Young Xi’s life in the public eye began inauspiciously. During the Cultural Revolution the twelve year old was paraded as an enemy of the people wearing a metal dunce cap and a placard around his neck before being sentenced to prison. But the juvenile detention center was full so he was sent to poverty-stricken Liangjiahe village as part of Mao’s “Up the Mountain and Down to the Countryside” campaign to educate privileged youth about rural life. When his tearful family farewelled him, “I told them if I didn’t go I wasn’t sure I’d survive”. His older sister stayed and, persecuted by radicals, committed suicide two years later.

He would spend seven years growing to manhood in Liangjiahe, sleeping on brick beds in flea-infested cave homes, enduring the peasants’ life of hunger and cold, ploughing, pulling grain carts and collecting manure. “Just after I arrived in the village beggars started appearing and, as soon as they turned up, the dogs would be set on them. Back then we students, sent down from the cities, believed beggars were bad elements and tramps. We didn’t know the saying, ‘in January there is still enough food, in February you will starve, and March and April you are half alive, half dead’. For six months every family lived only on bark and herbs. Women and children were sent out to beg so that the food could go to those who were doing the spring ploughing. You had to live in a village to understand it. When you think of the difference between what the central government in Beijing knew and what was actually happening in the countryside, you have to shake your head”.

Liangjiahe’s farmers rated the city boy six on a ten-point scale, “Not even as high as the women,” he said. “I was very young when I was sent to the countryside, it was something I was forced to do. At the time I didn’t think far ahead and gave no thought to the importance of cooperation. While the villagers went up the slopes and worked every day, I did as I chose and people got a poor impression of me so, after a few months, they sent me back to Beijing and I was placed in a study group. When I was released six months later I thought hard about returning to the village and talked to my uncle who had been active in revolutionary work in the 1940s. My uncle told me about his work back then and about how important it is to cooperate with the people you live with and that settled it. I went back to the village, got down to work and learned to cooperate. Within a year I was doing the same work as people in the village, living as they lived and working hard. The hardship of working shocked me, though eventually I could carry a shoulder pole weighing more than a hundred pounds up a mountain road. People saw that I had changed”. The only reliable light was provided by old kerosene lamps and the village had neither running water nor electricity. There was no school but he was ‘always reading books as thick as bricks,’ villagers recall. He began to lead small projects like reinforcing riverbanks and organizing a blacksmiths’ cooperative and constructed the first sewage system in the county, “The pipe from the pond was blocked and I unblocked it. Excrement and urine flew all over my face”. From plans sent by his mother he built a methane digester that gave Liangjiahe reliable light at night and eventually the county named him ‘a model educated youth’–a prerequisite for admission to university during the Cultural Revolution–and awarded him a motorcycle which he exchanged for a two-wheeled tractor, a rice mill and a submersible pump.

After repeated rejections because of his father’s imprisonment he was admitted to the Communist Party in 1974, the village elected him Village Party Secretary and, at twenty-two, his political career was launched. The following year he was accepted by Tsinghua University and a dozen villagers walked the twenty miles with him to the railhead, “It was the second time I cried there. The first time was when I got the letter saying that my big sister had died”. “Experiencing such an abrupt change from Beijing to a place so destitute affected me profoundly,” he later recalled.

He returned to Beijing to greet a father who, released after seven years in solitary confinement, was unable to recognize his grown sons and recited a familiar Tang poem: Returning to my home village after years of absence, My brows have grayed though my accent is unchanged. Children who meet me don’t recognize me. Laughing, they ask, what village do you come from? After graduation from Tsinghua his father’s old comrade-in-arms, Geng Biao, made him Personal Secretary to the Minister of National Defense and the twenty-four-year-old spent three years in uniform, studying the vast military he was destined to command.

His father urged him to enter government while friends and classmates were going into business or studying abroad so he left Beijing to begin a twenty-five year apprenticeship administering villages, townships, cities, counties and provinces across the country. Along the way, he picked up a PhD for a dissertation on rural marketization. Like his father, he was effective, diligent and versatile and left a trail of prosperity behind him as he rose through the ranks. Posted to backward Zhengding County, Hebei Province in 1982, he demonstrated the paternal flair for economic development: learning that a TV production of The Dream of Red Mansions was scouting locations, he persuaded the county to employ local craftsmen to build real mansions instead of temporary sets. Fees from the production company paid most of the construction cost and, as soon as shooting ended, he turned the set into a tourist attraction that still hosts a million paying visitors each year and has been the backdrop of hundreds of productions.

Promoted to the governorship of Fujian Province, he upgraded its Internet, networked the provincial hospitals’ medical records and made government transactions accessible on line. He sent officials to work in villages throughout the province and set up citizens’ committees of to supervise village Party Committees–an innovation Beijing legislated nationally as The Organic Law of Villagers’ Committees. He was the first governor to crack down on food contamination and created the first provincial environmental monitoring system. Today, Fujian’s pristine environment attracts high tech startups. Appointed Zhejiang Provincial Party Secretary in 2002, he fundraised fifty percent of the five hundred million dollar cost of the twenty-two mile Hangzhou Bay Bridge, the world’s longest, from local businesses. “Private funds have infiltrated all walks of life here,” he told a visitor, echoing his father.

Earnest, blunt to the point of rudeness and a workaholic, his track record ranked high in Beijing’s annual surveys. He was, in the words of U.S. Treasury Secretary Hank Paulsen, “The kind of guy who knows how to get things over the goal line”. Like his father, he possessed immense energy for work, as Taiwanese businessman Li Shih-Wei, who saw him regularly, told The Washington Post, “When we discussed my problems he would listen closely, track the issue and try to find solutions. His working efficiency was pretty high–quite rare among the officials we encountered there. Meetings were usually in the government cafeteria, not the fancy restaurants most officials chose. His lifestyle wasn’t luxurious”. Xi encouraged initiative with policies like ‘special procedures for special cases’, and ‘do things now,’ urged officials to meet people face to face and set an example by meeting seven hundred petitioners in forty-eight hours.

A regular at farmers’ markets, on fishing boats and down coal mines, he became a local celebrity for being the first local Party Secretary to visit all the villages in Zhengding County, a performance he repeated everywhere he governed and, after becoming President, visited all of China’s 33 provinces, regions and municipalities. His only recorded outbursts were over corruption. According to one Zhejiang official, Xi ‘kept his reputation wholesome and untainted by allegations of corruption’ and, under a pen name, contributed hundreds of earnest opinion pieces to local dailies: “If we remain aloof from ordinary people we will be like a tree cut off from its roots. Officials at all levels must change their style, get close to ordinary people, try their best to do good things for them, put aside the haughty manner of feudalism and set a good example”. In an essay on graft he said, “Transparency is the best anti-corrosive and as long as we embrace democracy, go through a proper procedures and avoid ‘black’ case work, fighting corruption won’t be just empty words”. “How important the people are in the minds of an official will determine how important officials are in the minds of the people. Officials should love the people in the way they love their parents, work for their benefit and lead them to prosperity”.

He waited twenty years to give his first public interview, and his advice⁠ was prosaic, “Politics is risky. Lots of people who’ve experienced failures reproach themselves: ‘I’ve helped so many people, I’ve done so much and all I get is ingratitude. People don’t understand me. Why must it be this way?’ Some colleagues who started when I did gave up their jobs for such reasons. But if you have a position somewhere, if you stick to it and continue your work then, in the end, it will produce results. The essence of success is to fasten onto your assignment and continue working. I’ve come across many difficulties and obstacles. That’s inevitable. Going into politics is like crossing a river. No matter how many obstacles you meet there is only one direction, and that’s forward”.

In 2007, after Shanghai officials looted its pension fund, he was assigned to clean up the giant city, a sinkhole of iniquity for centuries. He turned the governor’s mansion into a veterans’ home, promoted green, sustainable development and pushed Shanghai to become a leading financial center–drawing a relieved headline⁠4 in the People’s Daily: ‘Glad to Hear Some Good News from Shanghai at Last’. Today, Shanghai’s pension fund is in surplus, its police are noted for their honesty, its courts a preferred international forum and its education system the best in the world. In 2008 Xi produced a flawless Beijing Olympic Games, on time, on budget and without a hint of corruption–while coordinating the military, police, bureaucracy, localities, diplomacy, security, logistics, media and the environment–a feat that made him a leading contender for the presidency.

In a patriarchal society, fond memories of his father could only help.

Though our media refer to Xi as ‘President’ (President Trump called him ‘the King of China’), China has no such office and no Chinese official resembles an American President, about whom Lincoln’s Secretary of State, William Henry Seward, observed, “We elect a king for four years and give him absolute power within certain limits which, after all, he can interpret for himself”. While American Presidents hire and fire their administrative teams, make war, pardon, imprison or assassinate enemies Chinese leaders, even Mao, are board chairmen only. They can set agenda and direct discussion but, ultimately, must follow to the votes of the seven-man Steering Committee, none of whom they chose or can dismiss–and virtually all Steering Committee decisions are unanimous.

Xi’s primary leadership responsibilities were spelled out in the Twelfth Five Year Plan which, as a member of the Politburo Standing Committee for the previous five years, he helped draft: double national wages and pensions during his tenure, clean up corruption, reform the military, pass a stalled Social Security bill and, by December, 2020, deliver the Party’s xiaokang promise: ‘a society in which no one is poor and everyone receives an education, has paid employment, more than enough food and clothing, access to medical services, old-age support, a home and a comfortable life’.

Xi’s style fits the Chinese mold: his speeches are businesslike, soft-spoken, non-confrontational and his first presidential address was retail politics, “People expect better wages, higher quality medical care, more comfortable homes and a more beautiful environment”. He invited the Carter Center to help expand democratic participation in policy-making, called for a greater role for the constitution in state affairs, strengthened Congressional participation in interpreting the constitution and generating citizens’ involvement in the legislative process. Promising to tackle corruption, he quoted Confucius, “He who rules by virtue is like the North Star, which maintains its place and the multitude of stars pay homage,” and placed responsibility for integrity squarely on official shoulders. His most sensational political gesture was lunching at the communal table in a Beijing dumpling restaurant and chatting with customers for twenty minutes without security.

Though not as precocious as his father, he proved comparably effective. The piecemeal, outdated, inconsistent legal code and judicial unpredictability he inherited had undermined people’s faith in the legal system. He reformed the legal system, abolished laogai re-education through labour, eliminated local government interference in the courts, called for transparency in legal proceedings and professionalization of the legal workforce and the Supreme People’s Court agreed to broadcast its proceedings live. He formed cross-jurisdictional squads of officials to coordinate corruption investigations, gave them independence, filed a million disciplinary cases and prosecuted a hundred ministers, generals, senior executives, university chancellors and private CEOs.

Abroad, he turned the Shanghai Cooperative Organization, SCO, into the largest political confederation on earth, uniting half the world’s people and four nuclear powers–Russia, China, India and Pakistan–in a single security zone. In 2013 he offered to finance the Belt and Road Initiative, BRI, a ten trillion dollar program of roads, railways, telecommunications, energy pipelines and ports integrating the Eurasian continent from Barcelona to Beijing into a seamless, secure, integrated market.

In 2017 he broke ground on Jing-Jin-Ji, an 82,000 square mile green megacity with the population of Japan. It will integrate Beijing’s financial, regulatory and research strengths with Tianjin’s port and Hebei’s technology using seven hundred miles of new rail lines, scheduled completion in 2020. In 2017 he initiated the transition to a dàtóng society by endorsing Social Credit, a transparent, publicly owned system ranking the creditworthiness of government departments and officials–from President down–businesses and citizens. More carrot than stick, it provides increasingly valuable benefits, from low-interest loans and no-deposit rentals to visa-free travel, with rising public reputation.

In 2018, the system blocked a developer’s attempt to fly first class to London and provided a tourist-class seat because he had persistently ignored court orders to pay his subcontractors.

The Future

Because 2020 will mark the successful conclusion of Deng Xiaoping’s 1980 Reform and Opening program, it will be Xi’s responsibility to “Paint his vision of the future to his people, translate that vision into policies which he must convince the people are worth supporting and, finally, galvanize them to help him implement them,” which Lee Kwan Yew described as the primary responsibility of government leaders.

A month after becoming President, Xi described his Goals for Two Centennials: to spend 2020-2035 fixing inequality (‘socialist modernization’) and spend 2035-2049 transforming China into ‘a great modern socialist country, prosperous, strong, democratic, culturally advanced, harmonious and beautiful’. According to American Nobelist Robert Fogel, China will certainly be prosperous: in 2049 its economy will be twice the size of Europe’s and America’s combined.

Because he must paint China’s new vision, colleagues granted Xi ‘core leader’ status in 2017 and amended the constitution in 2018 so he and Premier Li could serve more than two five-year terms, a move was greeted with some alarm. Li Datong⁠, a prominent Party member and real estate developer, wrote, “I am a Chinese citizen, and a voter in Beijing. You are delegates chosen by us, and you represent us in political deliberations and in political action–and you represent us in exercising the right to vote. As I understand it, the stipulation in the 1982 Constitution that the national leaders of China may not serve for more than two terms in office was political reform measure taken by the Chinese Communist Party and the people of China after the immense suffering wrought by the Cultural Revolution. This was the highest and most effective legal restriction preventing personal dictatorship and personal domination of the Party and the government and a major point of progress in raising the level of political civilization in China in line with historical trends. It was also one of the most important political legacies of Deng Xiaoping. China can only move forward on this foundation, and there is emphatically no reason to move in the reverse direction. Removing term limitations on national leaders will subject us to the ridicule of the civilized nations of the world. It means moving backward into history, and planting the seed once again of chaos in China, causing untold damage”.

Wang Ying, a businesswoman and government reform advocate, called the proposal “An outright betrayal, against the tide of history. I know that you (the government) will dare to do anything and one ordinary person’s voice is certainly useless, but I am a Chinese citizen and don’t plan to leave. This is my motherland too!”

Chinese are always reluctant to judge current leaders; it takes decades, they say, to discover if their policies were beneficial, but what can we make of Xi at this stage? Lee Kwan Yew, who knew him personally, said, “I would put him in Nelson Mandela’s class of persons. Someone with enormous emotional stability who does not allow his personal misfortunes or sufferings to affect his judgment. In a word, he is impressive”.

Neither his character nor his track record has spared him the burdens of everyday government: in 2018, Xi was still trying to merge China’s provincial retirement funds into an American-style Social Security system–which he pointed to as a model–and making slow progress towards a national land tax. Politics is universal.

Sources

1 In a 2000 interview with the journalist Chen Peng. Chinese Times

2 The Book of Filial Duty.

3 Born Red. New Yorker

4 How China’s Leaders Think: The Inside Story of China’s Past, Current and Future Leaders by Robert Lawrence Kuhn

5 Li Datong’s Open Letter

From: China 2020: Everything You Know is Wrong forthcoming 2018, read a sample here.

 
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  1. Da_Han says:

    Trump really is a child in comparison…

    How is anyone supposed to trust in their government’s ability to handle the Chinese after reading this?

  2. Dan Hayes says:

    Xi Jinping’s background is quite impressive even after discounting author Godfree Roberts’ slavish devotion to Chairman Mao and Chinese Communism.

    And the present-day Vatican under naif Bergoglio is currently negotiating with Jinping’s regime. What a farce and sure-to-be fiasco!

  3. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Look closely at the picture. This is supposedly a childhood photo of Xi Jinping, the de facto ruler of China.

    So this is the best Photoshopping that China’s top experts can do?

    Maybe we need to take another look at some other areas of supposed Chinese expertise.

    • Replies: @Joe Wong
  4. Tom Welsh says:

    Thanks for this excellent and highly informative piece! I already knew that Mr Xi was a remarkable man, somewhat in the Lincoln mould, but was astonished at the details of his life.

    How many Western politicians have repaired a village’s sewage system, walked up a mountain road carrying a 100 lb shoulder pole, or starved nearly to death every spring? Certainly not Mr Trump or Mr Obama.

    Most impressive, and very inspiring (which is also something that cannot be said about most Western leaders).

    • Replies: @Tom Welsh
  5. Tom Welsh says:
    @Da_Han

    Not to worry! You can trust the Chinese government’s ability to handle them.

  6. Tom Welsh says:
    @Tom Welsh

    One can see quite a lot of resemblances between Mr Xi’s life and that of Mr Putin. Their characters and leadership styles also have much in common.

    • Agree: FB
    • Replies: @Franklin Ryckaert
    , @TT
  7. jim jones says:

    How long until he turns into a Stalin?

    • Replies: @Joe Wong
  8. @Da_Han

    Trump really is a child in comparison…

    The level of infantility in Western “civilization” is beyond embarrassing; it’s dangerous. I’m pretty confident that any rational read of history would bear me out.

    Also, compared to Putin’s behavior, both Trump and Netanyahoo fall far short as well.

    • Replies: @freebird
  9. “Chinese President Xi Jinping: What Is His Background?”

    Somehow, I fail to give a shit.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    , @Joe Wong
  10. “The primary duty of a son is to live an upright life and to spread the doctrines of humanity in order to win good reputation after death and thus reflect great honor upon his parents”

    Who can imagine an American kid being raised with such ideals? It’s “glamor” over honor every time.

  11. TT says:

    Thank you, a very well compiled informative writing to give better understanding of the man that going to shape our world. This is unlike other nonsensical anti-China articles that add more rubbish to already distorted msm about China.

    I would add an interview that Xi’s elder sister(commit suicide is another?) gave:

    Xi was the most non ambitious & power clinging, very blend & quiet man among siblings. His father had chosen him to serve the country for his such character as it threaten no one, while urging all siblings to migrate out for safety, as politics is dangerous.

    Lee Kuang Yew tried to size Xi up in a luncheon meeting after predicting he will be next China pres, a man of few word, with will of steel.

  12. TT says:

    Lee Kuang Yew always reminded every US Potus & all its eminent politicians that eager to meet him for advice whenever he visited to work with China peaceful rising:

    “If you think Singapore had, will achieved much, we are mostly the descendants of the peasants class who escaped hardship in China to work as hard labourers. The elites are in China, some in Taiwan KMT. What we could achieve, they will, in many folds & better”. So are HK, Taiwan, Macau, together with Singapore, ranking Top10 in almost every Global rankings.

    Trumps & his team is only Potus & admin didn’t get a chance to hear that advice after LKY deceased. Kissinger had highest regards for LKY, and he rated Deng XP as one greatest leader in history.

    Deng XP once told LKY:“If i only have Shanghai alone, i can do much better than Spore, China is simply too huge with too many complicated problems.”

    In 1997, HK GDP was 1/5 of China, Taiwan GDP 1/3 of China. Shenzhen was a backward village then. I visited Shenzhen with Macau & HK in 1987 when it was juz opening up. HKer were publicly insulting any Chinese ethnic who can’t speak Cantonese as: “You come from Mainland?”. In 1997, I heard mainland Chinese business man was berating HKer hotel doorman:”don’t you feel ashamed as a Chinese can’t speak Mandarin?”

    In 2017, 20yrs later, Shenzhen GDP has surpassed HK! Soon will be Taiwan. A feat in short twenty years, completed with innovative & vigorous growing economy, without like HK inherited a prosperous economy from British, and relying mostly on sea ports & financial center heavenly gifted by mainland. This served as waking call to arrogant HKer who is still wallowing in their British colonial era hubris, looking down on China & stupidly striving for secession with color revolution instigated by West.

    In fact, as some Chinese reckoned, the whole HK main shopping streets are now empty of gold shops that lined entire street in past, after mainlander shunned it for anti-China stance.

    When China has decided unpatriotic HK no longer serve as a useful transitional international law-based hub for their economy development, they will simply have all imports/exports & financial activities done directly in mainland. Then HK will be 1997 Shenzhen village, with nothing but slums & poverty… independent is the last nightmare they wish.

    Taiwan is still playing with fire to collaborate with Trumps’ new legislation for mutual visits & closer military cooperation, that will automatically invoke China anti-secession law to take back Taiwan by force. US will not risk escalating to full scale war for Taiwan, but to blackmail as much from China.

    Taiwan has stupidly serve as a cannon fodder pawn for Uncle Scam. One Taiwan professor ridiculously insisted to me, all mighty military Japan will come to save Taiwan and defeated evil commie China, so independent they must fight for democracy. Their brains are toasted with Uncle Sam & Imperial Japan Formosa 50yrs of brainwashing.

    Today Taiwan has high unemployment, low salary, declining economy, that Spore actually recruited their young graduates for low pay security guards that its people shunned recently. But it has already lost all the bargain chips & technology edge, another 20yrs, Taiwan will become a poor unwelcome burden, like HK.

    Northern Tibet & Xinjiang are enjoying the minority bonus of China prosperity. Free Fast Speed Rail, new housing, prosperous economy. They are truly fortunate to drop into Chinese hand by historical reason, seeing their Southern Tibet kins still suffering relentless rape & massacre by invader India, where CIA groomed Tibetan separatist in India didn’t help but still dream of how to sabotage their better kins up north. So are Sikkim & Bhutan, with 7 sisters land falling miserably into India claws. Mongolia must be regretting for its independent.

    • Replies: @TT
    , @Godfree Roberts
    , @FB
  13. This essay had something of the puff-piece about it, but even taking that into account, it provides a remarkable portrait of a remarkable man and political leader.

    I live in South America and have long since abandoned earlier plans to encourage a US university education for my grandsons. Yes, they’ll learn English, but I plan to push hard for them to learn Mandarin Chinese as well. The 21st century will be the Chinese century and here in South America those who are prepared for that reality will likely prosper. I fear, however, that it’s already too late for the USA and Europe, given the increasingly childish and naive educational policies that have for all practical purposes destroyed their respective cultures and are well on the way to ushering in the twilight of Western civilization. Oswald Spengler may prove to have been prescient.

    • Replies: @TT
  14. @Tom Welsh

    Indeed, Xi and Putin are the great leaders of the moment. I had hoped that Trump would be an American equivalent, but he is sorely disappointing. What we need is peaceful cooperation, not irresponsible warmongering. I hope Xi and Putin can prevent Trump from making too many blunders.

    • Replies: @TT
  15. TT says:
    @Tom Welsh

    Pres Putin is similar in a lesser way, intending to serve the country after graduating from elite law, he opted to join the most powerful KGB, then helping his law professor teacher turn politician in governing, and eventually gaining Yeltsin’s trust when Putin shielded his teacher after he lost the election leading to political persecution.

    But inexperienced at young age, he had abruptly taken over a disintegrated Russia in abyss, plagued with economy crisis, West-Oligarchs domination, corruption, collapsing military, & low morale short lifespan people under a democratic system perverted by West control.

    Its miracle he could turn it around, probably with many of his ex-KGB comrades help, to make a strong Russia today, the only country that can stand against US Empire in Putin’s recent speech, to open counter threat with better nuclear weapons.

    Putin situation is worst than well seasoned Xi, who inherited a growing strong economy China with systematic handover, help with Hu JT, & his close connection with his father affiliated Military to consolidate power from adversary who planned to topple him with coup. Anti-corruption is a very dangerous life threatening acts, confronting with all powerful interest groups & military who controlled everything. The West leaders lacked such quality & patriotism to execute.

    Xi is a quiet stateman with low profile, like ancient dignified Emperor, resemble Deng XP style, Talk less, Work more, Show result. He is in last 2nd stage of his voyage, administrating China now. When that task completed, he will then start take care of world issues for peace. This is ancient Chinese wisdom for ruler.
    修身齐家治国平天下
    1st Cultivate one’s own morality, then Manage one’s household, follow by Administer one’s country well, finally Pacifying the world.

    Putin is more outspoken, a showing stateman so eloquent & sharp in addressing world audiences with great details without teleprompter. But that also bring him unwanted attention and wrath from the US empire that Deng XP managed to avoid.

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
    , @Joe Hide
  16. Lee Kwan Yew, Singapore’s Prime Minister for 30 years, said the primary responsibility of a government leader to “Paint his vision of the future to his people, translate that vision into policies which he must convince the people are worth supporting and, finally, galvanize them to help him implement them,”

    In many ways, Lee Kwan Yew has become the spiritual father of modern China. If I recall correctly, he also had kind things to say about President Xi and despite some original misgivings about him, it does seem that Xi both has a plan, and results to what he seeks to accomplish. I’m not as positive that you can defeat things like “poverty”; but I do think that the reduction in corruption has been impressive and if that’s his only legacy, it is more than enough.

    Today Taiwan has high unemployment, low salary, declining economy, that Spore actually recruited their young graduates for low pay security guards that its people shunned recently.

    Taiwan self-destructed. The Chinese have a saying about female leaders and their results, after all.

    • Replies: @for-the-record
  17. TT says:
    @Montefrío

    I fear, however, that it’s already too late for the USA and Europe, given the increasingly childish and naive educational policies that have for all practical purposes destroyed their respective cultures and are well on the way to ushering in the twilight of Western civilization. Oswald Spengler may prove to have been prescient.

    Today there are hundred of million Chinese in China, with tens of millions Chinese diaspora overseas who are well educated and know English well. They know several languages. What the West can do, they will able to match eventually and develop further on their own strength aspect & language.

    But how many Americans & Europeans who only know English can speak Mandarin, let alone read/write Chinese? They will be hard pressed when every business, every latest technology develop are conducted in Chinese language.

    Those still dwelling in past imperialism glory & hubris, will get to see this in 20yrs time, if a small village Shenzhen could turn better than HK within short 20yrs, what’s not possible? Many West & Asia leaders or rich are sending their offsprings to study Chinese, but still lack national level effort… or worst, anti-Chinese like Australia hysteria overdrive to crack their own rice bowl.

    Growth & development will be exponential, as China complete developing its full range of basic high tech supply chain that the West & Japan are currently blocking. Every new high tech indigenous production like microelectronics, China needs to develop thousand of new machines & instruments for complete supply chain. But Chinese has the will & resources to accomplish, achieved they will.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  18. @Twodees Partain

    Please show on this doll where Mr. Roberts touched you and forced you to read his article.

    • Replies: @FB
    , @Twodees Partain
  19. Joe Hide says:

    To Godfree Roberts,
    I usually rapidly speed read such long articles at best, given many readers like me routinely cover dozens of articles quickly each day before work. Yours was very interesting though, so I slowed down. Many of us, by our immersion in such topics presented by alternative writers, have been led to believe that leaders such as Xi, Putin, and Trump, are much more intelligent, ethical, and capable than the controlled media promotes. So yours is a good presentation on this Chinese leader. Just one thing, nobody is perfect. What are Xi’s main faults? List them and your article becomes more believable. Keep writing!

  20. I’m inclined to agree. As it happens, my university major (or concentration) was Chinese Studies at a time (mid-to-late 60s) when the Ivies (I’m a grad of one) had top-flight professors, although my use of the language, both oral and written, has atrophied. Still have my old texts, however, but they’re in the Wade-Giles transliteration, so I’ll need new ones to get my grandsons started. I’ll not likely be around (I’ll soon be 72) to see all that I expect to transpire take place, but while I last, I plan to prepare my family for changes that as a person of European origin somewhat sadden me, but…

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  21. freebird says:
    @jacques sheete

    Really – Trump did not create or help facilitate the current level of corruption, pay to play politics, and just outright dysfunction inside our national government. This took decades to metastasize to what it has become today a putrid globalist elite swamp run by people on the left and the right who oppose Trump as a candidate and now as president. If anything Trump is a lot like this Chinese guy. Trump is a hard-charger, he is trying to end corruption inside our government, and he is trying to level the playing field for American workers and modernize our infrastructure. People like Obama, the Bush’s, the Clinton’s, etc. are the real evil children they are just evil and corrupt all of them

  22. Is there anybody at Unz.com that doesn’t automatically feel affection for dictator-for-life types.

    Insecurity? Daddy issues?

  23. My impression of Xi is of serious, strong and capable leader. The way he behaved when the Donald surprised him during their mutual dinner with news of USA bombing Syria also showed he is cool and composed. His appearance projects authority and gravitas. Fitting leader for China.

  24. 22pp22 says:

    Godfree has seen him walk on water. He can turn water into wine as well.

    • LOL: Alden
  25. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Montefrío

    my old [Chinese] texts [are] in the Wade-Giles transliteration, so I’ll need new ones to get my grandsons started.

    What’s wrong with Wade-Giles?

    The most important thing for a student of Chinese is to learn that transliteration is an attempt to write CHINESE sounds, not an instruction to say English sounds. For example, it will help them to be reminded by an apostrophe that a consonant is ASPIRATED. Memorize some T’angshih.

    Similarly, Mandarin lacks voiced stops – many Western learners see transliterations like bao (“wrap,” “thin,” “ensure” or “newspaper” depending on tone) and instinctively voice the “b.” Pao is a much more instructive spelling for learners.

    Also, Westerners (and Southern Chinese) often fail to learn how to pronounce retroflex sounds, e.g. words such as 日 (sun/day) 施 (bestow) 至 (arrive) 吃 (eat). This should not be an obstacle in the age of the Internet and Youtube, but many learners seem unable to grasp that different languages have fundamentally different phonetic systems, and never make the effort to learn.

    • Replies: @Sergey Krieger
  26. TT says:
    @Franklin Ryckaert

    Indeed, Xi and Putin are the great leaders of the moment. I had hoped that Trump would be an American equivalent, but he is sorely disappointing.

    You aren’t joking to compare Trump with Putin & Xi?

    US system will not allow any good leader to rise up for election, not even a better sane old man like Sanders. Trump is a clown, albeit he know where is US problems but lack the courage or ability to do anything, he is simply controlled and besieged by deep states. He will be lucky to keep his life to serve out his term.

    Without starting a new war will automatically qualified him as the greatest Potus in history & a kind act to the world.

  27. @Anonymous

    I wonder is there difference between how how Chinese transcript is written in russia and in the West. Sun we would write as ri, arrive or till we would write as zhi and eat as chi. I noticed that in English speaking papers transcript is different from pin ying we learned.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  28. In 2008 Xi produced a flawless Beijing Olympic Games

    pretty sure that was hu.

    in geopolitical perspective, I completely understand why china wants an experienced leader at the helm to finish it’s economic and military transition. by 2025, china would be safer I guess.

  29. @Daniel Chieh

    The Chinese have a saying about female leaders and their results, after all.

    Enlightenment, pls.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  30. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Sergey Krieger

    I wonder is there difference between how how Chinese transcript is written in russia and in the West.

    Interesting point, and interesting answer from a Russian perspective.

    The examples you cite are all standard pinyin as now used in China and (mostly) in Taiwan to write Mandarin. There are other transliteration systems for “dialects” such as Cantonese, Taiwanese, etc. (These “dialects” are probably at least as distinct from Mandarin as Russian is from Polish.)

    Pinyin reflects the same sound distinctions and Wade-Giles, but (as noted above), uses slightly different spelling for the same sound, e.g. an unaspirated “p” is written “b,” while the aspirated form (with apostophe in WG) is simply written “p.” Omitting the apostrophes makes pinyin easier to type, but misleads foreigners as to the sound values.

    Pinyin is based on an earlier system developed by the USSR government for its ethnic Chinese minorities (Dungan) around the 1930s. (They did not want the Chinese to become too close to China.) It appears Alexander Dragunov played a role in this effort. The Russian/Soviet origin of pinyin explains some strange phonetic values that puzzle Westerners but make more sense to readers of the Cyrillic alphabet.

    Thus, the letter “q” in pinyin is pronounced not as a “k” but similar to an aspirated “tsh” similar to Russian Ч. Apparently, the letter “q” was left over after assigning sound values to other letters, and resembles the Ч in appearance. Similarly, x was originally used for a sound close to Russian Х (now written “h”), not the sound of Western “x” as in X-ray or xylophone.

    In current pinyin, the Cyrillic “x” still remains – puzzling Western readers – in front of the vowels i and ü. In those positions, the “x” represents a sound more like -ch- in Standard German “ich.” For example, the Chinese government news agency is known as Xinhua (“New China”).

    Of course, mentioning the Soviet origin of pinyin in China tends to cause outrage, precisely because educated Chinese suspect it may be true.

  31. Clyde says:

    Jinping Jehoshaphat! I never knew all this about Xi Jinping. Thanks!

  32. TT says:
    @TT

    Singapore offers clues to China’s
    political system
    By Ding Gang Source:Global Times

    http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/1091208.shtml

    The housing scheme and public security were among the first things that struck China’s former leader Deng Xiaoping when he visited the country 40 years ago, just before the Communist Party of China (CPC) decided to initiate the policy of reform and opening-up in late 1978. This visit steeled Deng’s determination for China’s development and raised his confidence in leading billions of Chinese to realize their dream in the generations to come.

    A detail of Deng’s conversation with Lee deserves more attention.

    “You’re able to catch up with us, even better than Singapore, and there’s no problem at all,” Lee said.
    “We are only the descendants of illiterate, landless farmers in Fujian, Guangdong and other places, but many of you are the descendants of officials and scholars,” Lee continued as Deng listened in silence.

    Today, these farmers descendants of Spore is World No.3 in GDP PPP, No.1 in IQ, PISA, Maths, Science, Reading, Top Asia University Ranking, Top50 World Uni, over 90% house ownership, lowest crime rate/ corruption/ unemployment,….

    • Replies: @Bliss
  33. Alden says:
    @Da_Han

    If, if it’s all true.

    • Replies: @Joe Wong
  34. @for-the-record

    “The scholar builds the cities, the woman knocks them down” is something I recall from my father, but there’s also “When a hen crows, the house falls apart.”

    • Replies: @rogue-one
  35. @Joe Hide

    Well, off the top of my head, not only does Xi lack the presence of LKY, but he hasn’t given us any chenyu or proverbs! Compared to Mao Zedong’s melodious(in Chinese) “Rebellion is justifiable!” or Deng’s clever “White cat, black cat, the cat that catches mice is the good cat,” we don’t have anything like that from Xi. “We will have a moderately prosperous society” and “it is not enough just to raise all boats, we need to help those left behind” are not stirring slogans, you know.

    Indeed, he’s terrible from a classical perspective in that sense. His calligraphy isn’t anything to write home about, he doesn’t write poetry, and he’s mostly just an efficient administrator with some strongly felt ideas. Does he even read that much classical literature? He seems more focused on the future, and that may be a good thing, but its a bit contradictory for someone who talks up about the importance of “Chinese culture” while being the ultimate technocrat.

  36. @TT

    Are Xu and Putin similar in being highly selective in choosing targets for, and exempying people from, anti corruption drives? Is it not notorious that Putin’s Russia remains profoundly corrupt with only political enemies targeted?

    • Replies: @TT
    , @Daniel Chieh
  37. Afar says:

    This propagandist drivel would have been better disguised as an honest piece without the blatant lie about the 08 olympics.

    • Replies: @TT
  38. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    “He is an efficient administrator.”

    If only we could be gifted this kind of President in America.

  39. Art says:

    There is no question, but that China is an aggressor – especially in economics.

    Trump is wise to go to tariffs – if he does not, we will note have the means to build anything. (He must go after chips and the like also.)

    If prices go up – so be it. The money will circulate internally. We must manufacture our own – PERIOD.

    Putin is a Western brother – Trump started to follow his instincts about Russia – but the Jews sidelined him (Javanka). We keep losing because of the Jews.

    Think Peace — Art

  40. According to American Nobelist Robert Fogel, China will certainly be prosperous: in 2049 its economy will be twice the size of Europe’s and America’s combined.

    link is broken, mr. roberts.

    I tend to agree with Martin Armstrong’s position that East Asia will be the economic center of the world by 2030. He’s not been wrong on much(or rather, his simulations have been usually correct), and close enough that we’ll be able to see if its true or not by then.

  41. denk says:

    True to form, the five eyes, led by the murkkans, the Brit Guardian and its Aussie brethens…. are frothing at the mouth over Xi the dictator,

    Here’s a sample.,

    https://theconversation.com/xi-jinpings-chilling-grab-for-absolute-power-in-china-92563

    [The four 'removed by moderators' posts were mine, ;-)]

    Basically I told the poor dears I dont give a fuck how many terms a Chinese , or Russian prez will serve their own countries, cuz thats exactly what they’r gonna do….serving their own countries.
    They wont bother me one bit, !

    OTOH,
    What I do know is, no matter which front manager is minding the store in that land of B.S.,
    nuthin will change,

    The fundamental law of Physics says…
    garbage in, garbage out !

    None of our businesss if they do it in their own house,
    Trouble is, they crap all over the planet !

    murkkan bombs would still be dropping somewhere in the world 24×7,

    murkkan drones would be murdering civiies in Afpak etc etc…

    murkkan Jets would be shrieking over the Okinawans head 24×7…

    That god damned p8 would still be rumbling over my head 24×7 ….

    Ergo,
    Nice try fellas, nobody outside the five eyes is losing sleep over ‘Xi the dictator’, its those ‘democratically elected’ leaders [1] in FUKUSI that make us sit up in the middle of night in cold sweat !

    [1]
    ‘democratically elected assholes’,
    jeeze, how do they manage to do that 45 times since 1785 ???

    hehehehehhe

  42. Bliss says:

    Lee Kwan Yew, who knew him personally, said, “I would put him in Nelson Mandela’s class of persons. Someone with enormous emotional stability who does not allow his personal misfortunes or sufferings to affect his judgment. In a word, he is impressive”.

    That is high praise indeed especially coming from Lee Kwan Yew who mentored every Chinese leader since Deng Xiaoping.

  43. @TT

    Yep. Lee Kwan Yew gave the same advice to Taiwan 20 years ago but, like old warlords, they didn’t listen.

    • Replies: @TT
    , @TT
  44. @Joe Hide

    The only two I’ve found are those I mentioned: he’s not as bright as his Beida classmates and he’s blunt to the point of rudeness. Otherwise, he’s a typical junzi, and not so exceptional in that regard. You don’t make it to the top in China if you’re an asshole in any dimension. Their filter system combined with a bench of 10 million candidates makes that impossible.

  45. @22pp22

    Is there anything untrue in what I’ve written?
    Is there anything misleading in what I’ve written?
    Have I ommitted anything that would give readers a more balanced picture of the man?

  46. @Daniel Chieh

    Sorry about the link. I had formatting/transmission problems. Here it is: foreignpolicy.com/2010/01/04/123000000000000/https://foreignpolicy.com/2010/01/04/123000000000000/

  47. @Daniel Chieh

    I re-checked the link and found that FP has suppressed the article. I wonder why?

    Here it is, from the archives: ROBERT FOGEL, nobel price winner of economics has estimated that
    China’s economy would reach $123 trillion by the year of 2040.
    Factors contributings to China’s growth:

    1. Massive investment in education.
    2. The hugh rural population contribute to growth in 2 ways:
    urbanization and local rural growth..
    3. Current statistics are under-reporting on the size of China’s
    economy
    4. Competence government.
    5. Rapidly expanding consumer spending.

    http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2010/01/04/123000000000000?page=0,0

    ————————
    $123,000,000,000,000*
    *China’s estimated economy by the year 2040. Be warned.
    BY ROBERT FOGEL | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2010

    [MORE]

    In 2040, the Chinese economy will reach $123 trillion, or nearly three times the economic output of the entire globe in 2000. China’s per capita income will hit $85,000, more than double the forecast for the European Union, and also much higher than that of India and Japan. In other words, the average Chinese megacity dweller will be living twice as well as the average Frenchman when China goes from a poor country in 2000 to a superrich country in 2040. Although it will not have overtaken the United States in per capita wealth, according to my forecasts, China’s share of global GDP — 40 percent — will dwarf that of the United States (14 percent) and the European Union (5 percent) 30 years from now. This is what economic hegemony will look like.

    Most accounts of China’s economic ascent offer little but vague or threatening generalities, and they usually grossly underestimate the extent of the rise — and how fast it’s coming. (For instance, a recent study by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace predicts that by 2050, China’s economy will be just 20 percent larger than that of the United States.) Such accounts fail to fully credit the forces at work behind China’s recent success or understand how those trends will shape the future. Even China’s own economic data in some ways actually underestimate economic outputs.

    It’s the same story with the relative decline of a Europe plagued by falling fertility as its era of global economic clout finally ends. Here, too, the trajectory will be more sudden and stark than most reporting suggests. Europe’s low birthrate and its muted consumerism mean its contribution to global GDP will tumble to a quarter of its current share within 30 years. At that point, the economy of the 15 earliest EU countries combined will be an eighth the size of China’s.

    This is what the future will look like in a generation. It’s coming sooner than we think.

    What, precisely, does China have going so right for it?

    The first essential factor that is often overlooked: the enormous investment China is making in education. More educated workers are much more productive workers. (As I have reported elsewhere, U.S. data indicate that college-educated workers are three times as productive, and a high school graduate is 1.8 times as productive, as a worker with less than a ninth-grade education.) In China, high school and college enrollments are rising steeply due to significant state investment. In 1998, then-President Jiang Zemin called for a massive increase in enrollment in higher education. At the time, just 3.4 million students were enrolled in China’s colleges and universities. The response was swift: Over the next four years, enrollment in higher education increased 165 percent, and the number of Chinese studying abroad rose 152 percent. Between 2000 and 2004, university enrollment continued to rise steeply, by about 50 percent. I forecast that China will be able to increase its high school enrollment rate to the neighborhood of 100 percent and the college rate to about 50 percent over the next generation, which would by itself add more than 6 percentage points to the country’s annual economic growth rate. These targets for higher education are not out of reach. It should be remembered that several Western European countries saw college enrollment rates climb from about 25 to 50 percent in just the last two decades of the 20th century.

    And it’s not just individual workers whose productivity jumps significantly as a result of more education; it’s true of firms as well, according to work by economist Edwin Mansfield. In a remarkable 1971 study, Mansfield found that the presidents of companies that have been early adopters of complex new technologies were on average younger and better educated than heads of firms that were slower to innovate.

    The second thing many underestimate when making projections for China’s economy is the continued role of the rural sector. When we imagine the future, we tend to picture Shanghai high-rises and Guangdong factories, but changes afoot in the Chinese countryside have made it an underappreciated economic engine. In analyzing economic growth, it is useful to divide an economy into three sectors: agriculture, services, and industry. Over the quarter-century between 1978 and 2003, the growth of labor productivity in China has been high in each of these sectors, averaging about 6 percent annually. The level of output per worker has been much higher in industry and services, and those sectors have received the most analysis and attention. (I estimate that China’s rapid urbanization, which shifts workers to industry and services, added 3 percentage points to the annual national growth rate.) However, productivity is increasing even for those who remain in rural areas. In 2009, about 55 percent of China’s population, or 700 million people, still lived in the countryside. That large rural sector is responsible for about a third of Chinese economic growth today, and it will not disappear in the next 30 years.

    Third, though it’s a common refrain that Chinese data are flawed or deliberately inflated in key ways, Chinese statisticians may well be underestimating economic progress. This is especially true in the service sector because small firms often don’t report their numbers to the government and officials often fail to adequately account for improvements in the quality of output. In the United States as well as China, official estimates of GDP badly underestimate national growth if they do not take into account improvements in services such as education and health care. (Most great advances in these areas aren’t fully counted in GDP because the values of these sectors are measured by inputs instead of by output. An hour of a doctor’s time is considered no more valuable today than an hour of a doctor’s time was before the age of antibiotics and modern surgery.) Other countries have a similar national accounting problem, but the rapid growth of China’s service sector makes the underestimation more pronounced.

    Fourth, and most surprising to some, the Chinese political system is likely not what you think. Although outside observers often assume that Beijing is always at the helm, most economic reforms, including the most successful ones, have been locally driven and overseen. And though China most certainly is not an open democracy, there’s more criticism and debate in upper echelons of policymaking than many realize. Unchecked mandates can of course lead to disaster, but there’s a reason Beijing has avoided any repeats of the Great Leap Forward in recent years.

    For instance, there is an annual meeting of Chinese economists called the Chinese Economists Society. I have participated in many of them. There are people in attendance who are very critical of the Chinese government — and very openly so. Of course, they are not going to say “down with Hu Jintao,” but they may point out that the latest decision by the finance ministry is flawed or raise concerns about a proposed adjustment to the prices of electricity and coal, or call attention to issues of equity. They might even publish a critical letter in a Beijing newspaper. Then the Chinese finance minister might actually call them up and say: “Will you get some of your people together? We would like to have some of our people meet with you and find out more about what you are thinking.” Many people don’t realize such back-and- forth occurs in Beijing. In this sense, Chinese economic planning has become much more responsive and open to new ideas than it was in the past.

    Finally, people don’t give enough credit to China’s long-repressed consumerist tendencies. In many ways, China is the most capitalist country in the world right now. In the big Chinese cities, living standards and per capita income are at the level of countries the World Bank would deem “high middle income,” already higher, for example, than that of the Czech Republic. In those cities there is already a high standard of living, and even alongside the vaunted Chinese propensity for saving, a clear and growing affinity for acquiring clothes, electronics, fast food, automobiles — all a glimpse into China’s future. Indeed, the government has made the judgment that increasing domestic consumption will be critical to China’s economy, and a host of domestic policies now aim to increase Chinese consumers’ appetite for acquisitions. …

    Of course, China faces its own demographic nightmares, and skeptics point to many obstacles that could derail the Chinese bullet train over the next 30 years: rising income inequality, potential social unrest, territorial disputes, fuel scarcity, water shortages, environmental pollution, and a still-rickety banking system. Although the critics have a point, these concerns are no secret to China’s leaders; in recent years, Beijing has proven quite adept in tackling problems it has set out to address. Moreover, history seems to be moving in the right direction for China. The most tumultuous local dispute, over Taiwan’s sovereignty, now appears to be headed toward a resolution. And at home, the government’s increasing sensitivity to public opinion, combined with improving living standards, has resulted in a level of popular confidence in the government that, in my opinion, makes major political instability unlikely.

    To the West, the notion of a world in which the center of global economic gravity lies in Asia may seem unimaginable. But it wouldn’t be the first time. As China scholars, who take a long view of history, often point out, China was the world’s largest economy for much of the last two millennia. (Chris Patten, the last British governor of Hong Kong, reckons China has been the globe’s top economy for 18 of the past 20 centuries.) While Europe was fumbling in the Dark Ages and fighting disastrous religious wars, China cultivated the highest standards of living in the world. Today, the notion of a rising China is, in Chinese eyes, merely a return to the status quo.

  48. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @TT

    Those still dwelling in past imperialism glory & hubris, will get to see this in 20yrs time, if a small village Shenzhen could turn better than HK within short 20yrs, what’s not possible? Many West & Asia leaders or rich are sending their offsprings to study Chinese, but still lack national level effort… or worst, anti-Chinese like Australia hysteria overdrive to crack their own rice bowl.

    There is no future in being a Tibetan in Tibet. White Australians would be wise to avoid their fate.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-03-04/beijing-official-urges-outreach-to-non-mainland-chinese/9506388?section=politics

    He said he was seeking to “mobilise all the sons and daughters of [ethnic Chinese] to work together for the greater national interests and the realisation of the Chinese Dream”, referring to Mr Xi’s nationalist vision of China as the pre-eminent global power.

    • Replies: @FB
    , @Alden
  49. FB says:

    Well this is a great article by Mr. Roberts…his series on Mao was tremendous…so much new to learn from this man…

    And of course we always have the indoctrinated ‘bots in the comment section…who naturally fail to appreciate actually learning something…the ‘casting pearls before swine’ scenario as they say in the ‘good book’…

    Mr. Xi’s life is remarkable…born into what could be called Communist Chinese aristocracy…he nonetheless had his rug pulled out from him as a young boy…when his legendary father fell out of court favor as they say…

    For me…his decision to double down in that village exile shows a life-changing test of character…how many of us here would have taken the villagers’ brutally honest assessment to heart like he did…

    He found what is the most important thing in life right there in that backbreaking life in that crummy village…the ability to look deep down and be your own worst judge…that’s what built this man…

    Xi is exactly what China needs…many have gone soft and taken to the life of leisure…especially the nouveau riche…

    Roberts mentions the ‘Eight Immortals’ and I found this…in the WaPo…

    We note here that most of the offspring of these historic Chicom leaders have gone into the money-making business…many now in the US etc…same as the Russian oligarchy and their penchant for the decadent life of the West…

    Xi might have ended up like this also…a footnote in a stupid WaPo article…taken the easy road and lived the life of Reilly…

    But he knuckled down on that shitty little farm…because to him…character means something…

    • Replies: @luba
  50. Bliss says:
    @TT

    Today, these farmers descendants of Spore is World No.3 in GDP PPP, No.1 in IQ, PISA, Maths, Science, Reading, Top Asia University Ranking, Top50 World Uni, over 90% house ownership, lowest crime rate/ corruption/ unemployment,….

    Singapore is proof that egalitarianism trumps hereditarianism. So is America.

    • Replies: @TT
  51. FB says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    Please…do not disturb our Mr. ‘Twopeas Fartain’…

    He provides valuable comic relief here…

  52. FB says:
    @TT

    Some good info there on Taiwan etc…

    During my college years I had a couple of Chinese friends…one was from Singapore and was the son of the Chinese ambassador there…the other fellow was from Taiwan…

    What do you think about Japan…?

    Looks to me like Abe is being willingly conscripted into the US latest desperate scheme…to remilitarize Japan…

    I agree with you about India making a wrong turn lately…they seem to have quickly forgotten who ruled them with a boot to their neck for two hundred years…

    Chinese seem to have a better memory…

    • Replies: @Astuteobservor II
    , @TT
  53. @Godfree Roberts

    In 1997, Xi was named an alternate member of the 15th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China. However, out of the 151 alternate members of the Central Committee elected at the 15th Party Congress, Xi received the lowest number of votes in favour, placing him in last place in the rankings of members.

    Source: wikipedia

    Doesn’t sound that Xi was that popular within the party elite before he was handpicked for leadership.

  54. FB says:
    @Anonymous

    Thanks for that link…

    Pretty comical…

    That story also links to another ‘alarming’ incident in January where some Chinese ‘publisher’ with Swedish citizenship was detained by Chinese police…

    Turns out his ‘publishing’ enterprise in Hong Kong is about Chinese political intrigue…

    He turned up in Chinese custody two years ago and confessed to a fatal hit and run accident 11 years prior…

    Just how he got Swedish citizenship is not clear…nor seemingly of any interest to the Australian media trying to blow this thing up into a big diplomatic incident…

    As are the Swedes of course…who have somehow morphed into a total US poodle…as seen in the bogus Assange ‘rape’ case…

    Funny that these little pissant countries still think they can poke the Dragon in the eye…like that Nobel literature prize to some obscure Chinese scribbler who just happened to be writing antigovernment agit-prop…

    The fun never ends…

    • Replies: @FB
  55. @Daniel Chieh

    why do you think his affinity for cultural importance interferes with him being a technocrat?

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  56. Ron Unz says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    I tend to agree with Martin Armstrong’s position that East Asia will be the economic center of the world by 2030.

    Actually, I pretty much made the same prediction in a letter to The Economist, published back in 1986:

    http://www.unz.com/runz/far-east-2/

    The letter was one of the longest they ever ran, and, perhaps coincidentally, the following year they followed my suggestion and added an Asia Section to their publication…

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  57. @FB

    india is scare china would become too big for them and gobble up all the influence in asia. it is why it is playing ball with usa on china.

    australia is just being a good poodle atm. gotta bark when the leash is yanked.

    the above is 100% base on the english news headlines coming out of the two countries. so take it with some salt.

  58. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    Debunking Myths About China’s Economy

    • Replies: @Joe Wong
  59. FB says:
    @FB

    Garbled that Nobel reference a bit…

    Was actually referring to Liu Xiaobo…who was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2010…while in jail in China…

    Clearly a political slap in the face…

  60. @Astuteobservor II

    I don’t think it interferes with him per se, but it does make any idea that he is a vanguard for Chinese culture, as understood traditionally, to be rather dubious.

  61. @Ron Unz

    Its nice to see that the Unz Effect has had results, perhaps even worldwide and the additional corroboration seems sensible.

    • Replies: @Clyde
  62. Alden says:
    @Anonymous

    American university research labs, tech companies and government agencies are full of diaspora Chinese sending every bit of information they have access to back to the fatherland.

    No problem getting their help.

  63. TT says:
    @Godfree Roberts

    Its pretty sad to see Taiwan going down, they are one of brightest business & technology people in my encounter, and have free access to technology & market blessed by US.

    When Honghai Precision appeared 20yrs ago to start taking over huge order from my Spore based subcontractors, all the world largest established SCI, Solectron, Natsteel,…i wonder who are they. Shortly, they change their name to Foxxcom, wipe out all competitors and remained most formidable No.1 leader. So are their computer industry Acer, MSI, semiconductor like TSMC, UMC, …the principal engineer designing Intel CPU chip is a Taiwanese guy.

    Singapore simply can’t compete with Taiwanese, Chartered Semicon still bleeding.

  64. TT says:
    @Godfree Roberts

    Taiwan have every talents & conditions to be the chief of 4 Asia small dragons, even be the dynamo to help China growth …unfortunately they fall for Uncle Scam fairy tale of Demoncrapcy… electing two secession Pres Chen Sui Bian & Chai Ying Wen have caused much damage.

  65. TT says:
    @Godfree Roberts

    Mr Roberts, 22pp22 is a Chinese hater troll whinner. Few of us had already given him a good beating in another article.

    Hope he had left NZ by now to where he belong, leaving the earlier arrived Chinese some peace without spreading his perverted Japanese version of Asian Studies anywhere.

    • Replies: @22pp22
    , @22pp22
  66. TT says:
    @Bliss

    Singapore is proof that egalitarianism trumps hereditarianism. So is America.

    US & EU have all the best education & egalitarianism to bring their people to max potential, but where is their rating & economy condition compare to less develop Asia now?

    Only Canada(many Asian migrants), Estonia(Slavic-East Asian) & Finland(Scandinavian) manage to get into top10 in PISA rating, the rest are Asian Singapore, HK, Macau, China, Jap, Korea, Taiwan, Vietnam,…

    US ave IQ98 is rated 21, lowest among OECD, again Top5 are Asians.

    Less developed Asians are consistently in Top10, with much room to further improve, deserve some attention.

    • Replies: @FB
    , @Bliss
  67. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    For six months every family lived only on bark and herbs. Women and children were sent out to beg so that the food could go to those who were doing the spring ploughing. You had to live in a village to understand it. When you think of the difference between what the central government in Beijing knew and what was actually happening in the countryside, you have to shake your head

    Well, well, so much for Roberts’ glowing reports of Mao’s tremendous achievements.

    In Mao’s new-and-improved China, people were subsisting on barks for 6 months of every year.

    • Replies: @Godfree Roberts
  68. TT says:
    @FB

    What do you think about Japan…?

    Looks to me like Abe is being willingly conscripted into the US latest desperate scheme…to remilitarize Japan…

    I agree with you about India making a wrong turn lately…they seem to have quickly forgotten who ruled them with a boot to their neck for two hundred years…

    Imho, Japan seems to have some very serious structural problem in their social-economy-industrial. Cracks are appearing in last 20yrs, im also curious but Che didn’t reply my questions in another comment. I work with Jp high tech decades ago, they already had many hidden problems but not as severe as recent.

    Abe is artificially propping up Jp declining economy with QE, negative interest Yen free printing with excess low exch rate(criticized by IMF chief), like US & EU(UK pound too). These 4 self appointed IMF foreign reserve currency countries are feasting on world & China large foreign reserve, taking world for free ride. So gold reserve is only way, (crytocurrency?). De-dollarization & petrol Yuan trading starting this mth will be big factor to watch.

    Militarization is deep in Jp DNA, Abe is grandson of war criminal Jp PM who started WW2. US probably wanted to use Jp to counter China, Russia to some extent, as both have territory disputes to spark war. Whereas Abe jumps at the opportunity to reestablish jp as normal country again. Anyhow, jp military is already Top4 under self defense force disguise. Samurai sword is not for sushi cutting.

    With severe aging, quick industrial declination, low morale nation, deflation, over 300% GDP heavy debts, Jp has no alternative but either spiral down or gamble with war for renewal. Many war started with country declination, Hitler? US could try pushing Jp & Korea into regional war to disrupt China rise.

    India going with US may be Modi Hindustan factor? Previous congress gov rejected US military wooing by publicly declared, US as the only country that will & can invade India. Modi is selling India for return of power & free FDI, tech transfer. There isn’t much real development in India, they will screw up whatever US gave to it like largest steel industry, car industry,…check its negligible export & large import deficit you know. And it risks losing long time Russia ally with USM tied up, even allowing USN to visit Russia nuclear sub on loan.

    China rising influence touching all India neighbors is certainly unnerving, that’s understandable. But China couldn’t wait for India to accept reality & join the Great Eastern prosperity, it muz push forward its 2nd phase of dev, BRI to sustain its growth by helping others to grow.

    Both ancient China & India were largest GDP. But one is striving for dream, another is like thug throwing tantrums dragging your legs. India is the real pain in ass for Chinese, but never a worthy competitor.

  69. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Great article, I had no idea Xi has such an interesting background.

    Curious what you think of China’s future though post Xi. Supposing Xi is president for another 10 to 20 years and oversees Chinas rise to prosperity, who’s to say that whoever succeeds him will be any good.

    To me China, much like Russia, has failed to make the needed institutional changes that ensure good rule over the long term. Chinas Communist/Capitalist model can work with honest leadership, but the moment Xi leaves office, who’s to say their form of government will persist?

  70. TT says:
    @22pp22

    22pp,

    Actually what make you so dislike of Chinese? With only 0.4% of UK population, do they really make your eyes so sore?

    Have Chinese ever send gunboats to your mother land to
    - invade your country
    - force you to trade
    - buy your goods with opium
    - force your kins to smoke opium
    - massacre your kins, rape your women
    - grab any of your islands
    - loot & burn down your Windsor or Buckingham palace
    - illegal enter
    - burden your social welfare as refugees
    - not contributing to economy
    - increase crime rates
    - monopolized any sector
    - terrorist acts
    - rowdy & noisy everywhere
    - instigating dissidents for subversion
    - actively converting you to communism or Chinese religion
    - broadcasting anti-UK propaganda everywhere like BBC, even right at your door steps
    - threaten to send its aircraft carrier to your straits for FON

    Talk about occupying SCS islands that China has historical proof (1800 Britiana Maps still showing its China territory), UK is still illegally occupying 1.7M sqKm of territories faraway from its country:

    The fourteen territories are Anguilla, Bermuda, the British Antarctic Territory, the British Indian Ocean Territory, the British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands, the Falkland Islands, Gibraltar, Montserrat, Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha, the Turks and Caicos Islands, the Pitcairn Islands, South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands, and the Sovereign Base Areas on Cyprus.[79]

    • Replies: @22pp22
    , @Anonymous
  71. Amasius says:

    I’m so jealous of people who get to live in real countries with real leaders. China, Russia, Hungary, Japan even though it’s faded– places where a person can have an identity, a past, present, and a future. Meanwhile I have to languish in dying (((Clownmerica))) where everything is insane lies and I can’t do anything to fight it, my only solace being books and little pockets of reason on the internet. *Sigh*

  72. @Anon

    Mao’s achievement was that they lived. It was the poorest village in China, remember, and death by famine was common until Mao brought an end to it, as both the CIA and private visitors attested:

    CIA, 4 April 1961: “The Chinese Communist regime is now facing the most serious economic difficulties it has confronted since it concentrated its power over mainland China. As a result of economic mismanagement, and, especially, of two years of unfavorable weather, food production in 1960 was little if any larger than in 1957 at which time there were about 50 million fewer Chinese to feed. Widespread famine does not appear to be at hand, but in some provinces many people are now on a bare subsistence diet and the bitterest suffering lies immediately ahead, in the period before the June harvests. The dislocations caused by the ‘Leap Forward’ and the removal of Soviet technicians have disrupted China’s industrialization program. These difficulties have sharply reduced the rate of economic growth during 1960 and have created a serious balance of payments problem. Public morale, especially in rural areas, is almost certainly at its lowest point since the Communists assumed power, and there have been some instances of open dissidence”.

    CIA, 2 May 1962: “The future course of events in Communist China will be shaped largely by three highly unpredictable variables: the wisdom and realism of the leadership, the level of agricultural output, and the nature and extent of foreign economic relations. During the past few years all three variables have worked against China. In 1958 the leadership adopted a series of ill-conceived and extremist economic and social programs; in 1959 there occurred the first of three years of bad crop weather; and in 1960 Soviet economic and technical cooperation was largely suspended. The combination of these three factors has brought economic chaos to the country. Malnutrition is widespread, foreign trade is down and industrial production and development have dropped sharply. No quick recovery from the regime’s economic troubles is in sight”.

    Calling it The Great Leap Backward,’ Edgar Snow[1], who had seen authentic death from hunger in pre-Mao China, saw no famine, “Were the 1960 calamities actually as severe as reported in Peking, ‘the worst series of disasters since the nineteenth century,’ as Chou En-lai told me? Weather was not the only cause of the disappointing harvest but it was undoubtedly a major cause. With good weather the crops would have been ample; without it, other adverse factors I have cited–some discontent in the communes, bureaucracy, transportation bottlenecks–weighed heavily. Merely from personal observations in 1960 I know that there was no rain in large areas of northern China for 200 to 300 days. I have mentioned unprecedented floods in central Manchuria where I was marooned in Shenyang for a week..while Northeast China was struck by eleven typhoons–the largest number in fifty years and I saw the Yellow River reduced to a small stream. Throughout 1959-62 many Western press editorials continued referring to ‘mass starvation’ in China and continued citing no supporting facts. As far as I know, no report by any non-Communist visitor to China provides an authentic instance of starvation during this period. Here I am not speaking of food shortages, or lack of surfeit, to which I have made frequent reference, but of people dying of hunger, which is what ‘famine’ connotes to most of us, and what I saw in the past”.


    [1] Snow, Edgar.  Red Star Over China, Victor Gollancz 1937. p.120

    • Replies: @Alden
  73. @Anonymous

    “China, much like Russia, has failed to make the needed institutional changes that ensure good rule over the long term.”??

    They’ve only been in business for 70 years and already they’re beating the pants off everyone else, despite 25 years of vicious embargo. And, unlike America’s government, they’ve never lost the trust of the people.

    When he steps down in 2027, every Chinese official will have been recruited by, and served entirely under, Xi. That’s a pretty good indicator of what we can expect.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  74. What I like most about Xi Jinping is apparent love of the people. Then again, it appears to be an East Asian trait in general to have leaders behave somewhat modestly. The Japanese are famous for this. China’s extreme inequality surely is grating at Xi’s conception of a harmonious society. I suppose that is one area, after corruption, where he will focus next, if he isn’t already.

    One criticism of Xi that hasn’t been articulated yet is his apparent re-nationalisation of the Chinese economy. Zhu Rongji, who I regard as the single most gifted Chinese reformer of the past few decades, did yeoman’s work in the late 1990s to clean up the bloated SOE sector which freed up tremendous resources. It also meant laying off tens of millions of people, in a very politically risky move. The result was that the Chinese economy could truly take advantage of its WTO entrance in 2001.

    Xi has changed tack. He has deepened SOE involvement. His “reforms” has mostly mean consolidation, some vague attempts at “efficiency” and infusion of equity into these SOEs without fixing their underlying inefficiency. This matters to him because he wants political control. It is not good for the economy, though, since these zombie firms clog up the credit stream which could otherwise go to healthy private sector companies.

    We’re not talking about small numbers here. China’s total non-financial debt is at 160% of GDP, higher than most advanced countries. Victor Shih estimates that China’s total debt to GDP(public+private) is well over 320%, again higher than most advanced countries for a country at 1/4th or 1/5th the per capita income level.

    China’s credit measure, called “Total Social Financing” has been growing faster than nominal GDP for a period of years now, resulting in rapid leveraging of the economy in further debt. 2017 was an outlier in that it seemed to stay still, but it did not decline and the IMF is forecasting this to continue.

    Xi’s response during the 2015 stockmarket meltdown was also bizarre. He essentially instructed the central bank to take several hundreds of billions of hard-won reserves and pump it into the casino called the Shanghai stock exchange. You’re supposed to save reserves for a rainy day for the economy, not the stock market, which is not the same as the economy. Yet it appeared that the “loss of face” prospect was too great for him to bear. Nobody naturally dared to stand up and point out the folly.

    I like Xi, I like his instincts, but he is not exactly an economic manager. His premier, Mr Li, is one but he is shunted aside, at least if we judge the Chinese government by what it does and not what it says. China’s immense size and population will guarantee it a place among the stars. In many ways, it is already there. But the massive leveraging of its economy, it’s inability to deal decisively with the zombie firms like Mr. Rongji had done, does raise worrying signs for the 2020s.

    I would be the first to celebrate if China became the undisputed world leader by the 2020s, but any realistic assessment of their economy must acknowledge the flashing warning signs that are slowing but surely building up. Once an economy becomes saturated with debt, it is very hard to get out of it. Just look at Japan. I’m less concerned of a big bang for China than a slow burn.

    • Replies: @PandaAtWar
    , @luba
  75. TT says:

    Donald Trump praises China’s decision to scrap limit on presidency term.

    “And look, he was able to do that. I think it’s great. Maybe we’ll have to give that a shot someday,” Mr Trump said to cheers and applause from supporters

    http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2018-03-04/donald-trump-praises-chinas-decision-to-scrap-presidency-limit/9507336

  76. Joe Wong says:
    @Alden

    The rampant fake news in the American led West is taking a toll on you guys isn’t it? Nothing is believable and nothing is true, all is lie isn’t it? You should know not everybody is cognitive liar like you guys who claims that bombing, killing and waterboarding on the fabricated phantom WMD allegation is humanitarian intervention as entitlement. The sad thing is the unscrupulous West even claims they are the final form of civilization, can you imagine how shameless they are? What humanity will become if they succeed?

    • Agree: FB
  77. @Daniel Chieh

    Please show on your own “doll” (whatever that means) where I admitted to reading the article. I only commented on the title, as you could see if you weren’t so blinded by your own Xi worship.

    I almost give a shit who is president of China. It’s none of my business, and it’s also none of yours unless you’re a citizen of Xi’s.

  78. @22pp22

    Good observation, even if it’s a joke. It’s amusing to see Americans become fans of foreign heads of state. It’s even more comical than seeing Americans become fans of their own heads of state.

  79. While the anti-globalists of the western world struggle to break down the false narrative concerning Russia, — truly admirable, Many of you seem to cover your eyes with a fantastically silly and naive rosy narrative about China. You are repeating exactly mistake of the peaceniks of 1970s, who protested the arms race and the hard line Republican Party, while blindly buying Henry Kissinger’s sinister adulation of Mao. Your benevolent and silly ignorance about China is so total I don’t even know where to start!! I wonder how Mr Putin will chuckle with incredulity if he sees the above article and commentaries. I, for one, had regarded the Economist as toilet paper for no less than three years, but this time May I earnestly council you to read the new cover article in Economist : How the West got China Wrong. While Russia will certainly not waiver from its currently sensible policy of good partnership with China, I have a strange feeling that Mr. Putin might also not disagree with that article in Economist, for the first time, in a long time. Bubbles, friend, bubbles! The western world has a real problem with its self-identity. Solve the problem. Do not project your own anxiety! Either as blind hatred against Russia, or as blind admiration of Xi. See? Xi is Laughing at all of you!

    • Replies: @pogohere
  80. TT says:
    @Afar

    What blatant lies?

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xi_Jinping

    Following his elevation, Xi has held a broad range of portfolios. He was put in charge of the comprehensive preparations for the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, as well as being the central government’s leading figure in Hong Kong and Macau affairs.

  81. Joe Hide says:
    @TT

    To Godfree Roberts,
    I usually rapidly speed read such long articles at best, given many readers like me routinely cover dozens of articles quickly each day before work. Yours was very interesting though, so I slowed down. Many of us, by our immersion in such topics presented by alternative writers, have been led to believe that leaders such as Xi, Putin, and Trump, are much more intelligent, ethical, and capable than the controlled media promotes. So yours is a good presentation on this Chinese leader. Just one thing, nobody is perfect. What are Xi’s main faults? List them and your article becomes more believable. Keep writing!

  82. Che Guava says:
    @Godfree Roberts

    God-free.

    You know that I am not unsympathetic (but never fully agreeing) with your China tales.

    Yes, without closely checking the whole thing, just from memory, you have two easy-to-spot sins, one of omission, one of commission.

    The first is that he graduated as an engineer. Your omission of this makes me strongly suspect that you are from the upper class and/or stupid-degree circles who despise engineers in some western countries.

    The second is your tale of his rural, reform through labour, time.

    The fact is, he ran away to a Pekin, stayed away for at least some weeks, then was found, arrested, and deported back.

    Your version of that is bizarre.

    • Replies: @FB
    , @Joe Wong
    , @Godfree Roberts
  83. FB says:
    @TT

    ‘…US ave IQ98 is rated 21, lowest among OECD, again Top5 are Asians…’

    IQ does not equal achievement…proof is that many Mensa members are low achievers…

    In fact the entire notion of an intelligence measure based on a sit-down test must be regarded with some caution…

    For instance…the test does not take into account personality or character…or even the ability to communicate effectively…very important factors in the real world…[ie much more complex than any test could ever simulate]

    Ie it is well known that those with leadership qualities rise to the top…how does IQ quantify this…?

    It doesn’t…supposedly there are ‘personality’ tests…also devised by ‘psychologists’ which purport do do so…

    But what about other factors such as the ability to perform under pressure…and even hand eye coordination…these are important abilities in many elite professions…ie aviation and astronautics…[not to mention athletics]

    A 15 year old Masai boy is expected to bring down a charging lion with a spear…

    How does one ‘quantify’ this kind of achievement…arguably an apex achievement in man’s primal struggle with unforgiving nature…but also seen in other ‘primitive’ cultures…ie the Inuit do the same thing with polar bears…one of the few species of animal that will hunt man…

    We must keep all this in perspective…our understanding of the human organism is the least developed of all the sciences…and understanding of the mind even less so…

    The entire field of psychology is considered a quite soft science…and rightfully so…to some it is outright quackery…

    Nothing in this discipline can be quantified…as in physics or mathematics…the entire notion of an intelligence ‘quotient’ is considered dubious by many…including those who are in fact very intelligent and great achievers and are able to score very high on these quizzes…

    Even within the psychology ‘profession’ itself…there are doubters…including a recent study that called the IQ test ‘meaningless’…

    • Replies: @FB
    , @TT
    , @TT
  84. TT says:
    @Joe Hide

    Just one thing, nobody is perfect. What are Xi’s main faults? List them and your article becomes more believable.

    Xi main faults are:
    So blend old uncle-next-door look, so bored. No Mao’s charismatic, Deng inspiring phrases, no great public speech or bared-chest macho adventures public stunts like Putin. Always typical side combed hair, boring dark suit with either red/blue ties.

    Even signature also not stylish.

    This is how a China Pres should look like:

    Uninspiring speech he gave before becom Pres:

    On 11 February, while visiting Mexico, Xi spoke in front of a group of overseas Chinese and explained China’s contributions to the financial crisis, saying that it was “the greatest contribution towards the whole of human race, made by China, to prevent its 1.3 billion people from hunger”.[61] Xi went on to remark: “There are some bored foreigners, with full stomachs, who have nothing better to do than point fingers at us. First, China doesn’t export revolution; second, China doesn’t export hunger and poverty; third, China doesn’t come and cause you headaches. What more is there to be said?”[62][63]

    Xi’s first speech as general secretary was plainly worded and did not include any political slogans or mention of his predecessors.[75]

    Xi mentioned the aspirations of the average person, remarking, “Our people … expect better education, more stable jobs, better income, more reliable social security, medical care of a higher standard, more comfortable living conditions, and a more beautiful environment.”

    That’s how he warned US, no new weapons or nuclear threat like Putin.

    On China-U.S. relations, Xi said, “If [China and the United States] are in confrontation, it would surely spell disaster for both countries”.[147]

    No shock & awe speech to destroy any country, yawn…

    13 May 2017 Xi said at the Belt and Road Forum in Beijing: “We should foster a new type of international relations featuring ‘win-win cooperation’, and we should forge a partnership of dialogue with no confrontation, and a partnership of friendship rather than alliance. All countries should respect each other’s sovereignty, dignity and territorial integrity; respect each other’s development path and its social systems, and respect each other’s core interests and major concerns… …What we hope to create is a big family of harmonious coexistence.”[159]

    That’s how he eat, so plain.

    In December 2013, Xi arrived unannounced at a small Beijing restaurant to have steam buns (包子, baozi) for lunch, with only one person accompanying him. He paid for the meal himself and dined with regular patrons.[88]

    Wapo comment on Xi:

    The Washington Post article by those who know him as “pragmatic, serious, cautious, hard-working, down to earth and low-key”. Xi was described as a good hand at problem solving and “seemingly uninterested in the trappings of high office.”[181]

    The worst criticism US can think of Xi

    Former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton tweeted, “Xi hosting a meeting on women’s rights at the UN while persecuting feminists? Shameless.”[49]

    And Xi biggest fault:

    In July 2017, the character Winnie-the-Pooh was blocked on Chinese social media sites because bloggers had been comparing the plump bear to China’s leader Xi Jinping.[172] This follows a previous incident where Chinese authorities censored a 9 year old child for comments about Xi’s weight.[173]

  85. FB says:
    @FB

    And just to add to that…

    The domestic dog’s intelligence is widely acknowledged to be considerably less than its wild cousins…like the African Wild Dog…or ‘painted dog’…one of the most successful predators in Africa…with the highest kill rate…60 percent…

    The domestic dog has been dumbed down by domestication…it is quite possible that the human species underwent the same kind of dumbing down with the change from hunter-gatherer to agrarian lifestyle…

    I remember reading a report in the NYT some years ago about the extirpation of the last member of a particular Amazon tribe…the last remaining members were an old man and his grandson…both living the traditional way in the jungle…

    The old man was desperately searching for a surviving female of the tribe for his grandson…when one night…a jaguar [they are considerably larger and more powerful than the leopard...with the strongest biting force of all big cats]…surprised them in their hammocks…

    The boy was shaken like a rag doll and perished…but the old man killed the jaguar with a well placed spear throw…in the pitch dark of the jungle…

    I remember years ago…a college friend who was an Afrikaner and had seen combat…as a member of the South African military… in Namibia fighting the Cuban-backed forces there…

    He told me the most impressive human he had ever encountered was one of their native trackers…whose sense of smell was so acute that he could sniff out the trail of the enemy from miles away…

    Many of our important senses have declined precipitously…how does IQ testing take this into account…?

    • Replies: @TT
  86. jpebbles says:
    @Da_Han

    xi is a right winger. his pops was a right winger. xi got sent to the country side for his right wing views

  87. TT says:
    @FB

    Of course i agree with your points, that’s my stand too. If Russians & US can send human into space 50yrs ago without a 286 computer, & China(only quite recent), but not others even after technology has advanced so much today, what it means by IQ rating?

    But as i said it deserved attention that why less developed East Asians particularly China, HK, Macau, Taiwan, Spore, Korea, Japan are able to consistently rank Top10 in almost all rankings, even IQ & PISA test are all skewed heavily towards English speaking Western education system.

    And PISA test determine who enter the top universities, that matter alot isn’t it. Also in Maths Olympiad, we are seeing Asians ranked Top10 too, with US & UK sending Asian team representative to compete.

    In US, Asians esp Chinese are also performing well above average whites in STEM too. Similarly in Asia, the Chinese ethnics excel in every fields, even more significantly, than all other ethnics under similar conditions.

    These are no coincident. Im not saying Chinese is most superior, consider many European, Russians, Germans, Jews, Iranians, Pakistan, Indians have long history of excellency in STEM fields & innovation.

  88. FB says:
    @Che Guava

    ‘…The second is your tale of his rural, reform through labour, time.

    The fact is, he ran away to a Pekin, stayed away for at least some weeks, then was found, arrested, and deported back.

    Your version of that is bizarre…’

    Well…if you are such an authority…why don’t you back up your truly bizarre narrative with some references…?

    In the meantime I will take the word of Mr. Roberts over some chat room clown…

    • Troll: Che Guava
    • Replies: @Che Guava
    , @TT
  89. TT says:
    @FB

    Many of our important senses have declined precipitously…how does IQ testing take this into account…?

    Then iq/ Pisa test should start include spear throwing and sniffing test. LoL.

    Different race is better in different skills. Blacks are juz so good in jazz & rap, basketball & marathon. Brazilian & Agentina in football, Russian in vodka & aerospace, …but here we want to focus on those tests that measure people general mind/analysis/study ability.

    Coincidentally, those top10 IQ countries are also enjoying significant higher GDP (ppp) & better life quality, except China is still on catching up. Germany certainly is one greatest power house in high tech, but their ratings are abysmal, never even in Top10 everywhere. So are these tech advanced France, UK, Russia, US, Sweden, Switzerland, .. even Jewish Israel.

    Put aside all those ancient Chinese great inventions & achievement until they missed the Industrial revolution, we shall see how advance is China be in 20yrs time to judge if these test result ranking do tell something.

  90. Che Guava says:
    @FB

    Since you always post the same photo of you in bad clown makeup, I request that the moderators block your posts unless it is absent.

    It is adding nothing of interest and is boring.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  91. TT says:
    @Wizard of Oz

    You got to ask them directly….

    Im not sure about Russia, but every Russians or those stay long time there that i know, same comment. Putin & Co. is Mega-corrupted. But how he could improve Russia so much if corruption is so bad?

    Whereas Chinese friends are all telling Xi crack down are making those officials used to live a emperor like life crying “Death is better than alive”…All official expenses are cut to bare, no alcohol, no dining, no gifts. Any abuse now is easily publicized by public using photo wechat, then their head roll.

    And friends used to bribe through are whining how difficult to do biz now, even a fire safety officer will not allow him to operate biz if not meet regulation.

    Pay is good now that they no longer bother for bribe. Those honest clean officials are getting promotion. Retirement pensions are very good too. So Xi is doing quite a good job.

    That’s probably reason that Chinese have high confident on their gov, no qualms for Xi unlimited term. It will be great uproar in Russia or US. Putin should try that.

    • Replies: @Astuteobservor II
  92. @Anonymous

    To me China, much like Russia, has failed to make the needed institutional changes that ensure good rule over the long term.

    Are you referring to things such as an independent judiciary?

    To some extent, I can sympathize with the notion that more efficient processes can be a positive development, but ultimately, you can’t avoid needing worthwhile people; you can’t assembly line a government even if you wish to. This is complicated by the fact that certain processes may be popular but have negative, even fatal consequences: for example, liberal democracy increases the sense(often an illusion) of citizen participation in the government, but in practice, it leads to an ever-increasing spiral of politicians using methods to increase their electorate through pensions, promises, immigration, etc, for a relatively short-term effort. This means that most effort, and the skills selected for, are for short-term marketing skills and decreases, or even discriminates against, individuals who seek long-term goals in governance.

  93. @TT

    corruption really doesn’t matter. only the super naive idealists think it matters. expecting elites not to line their pockets is just stupid. the realists would expect the elites to do their job while lining their pockets.

    when you read comments here and elsewhere, anytime anyone ever brings up corruption, human rights etc, you know they are brain washed idiots who are just regurgitating whatever spoon fed propaganda they happen to have read.

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
    , @TT
  94. @Che Guava

    Unz Review: A safe place for coulrophobia

    • Agree: Che Guava
  95. @Wizard of Oz

    Xi? No, not really. He is arguably a puritan, which has its own problems but it does mean that he’s pretty aggressive. Richard Mcgregor wrote that there’s basically a section of the Party which is made up of humorless, relatively poor inquisitorial types who get their only joy in life in hunting down their fellows who might be enjoying life too much. They’re very enthusiastic anti-corruption types: “I am not enjoying my life, and neither will you.

    • Replies: @Batambob
  96. robt says:
    @Joe Hide

    - Works too hard, not caring to enjoy personal recreation time.
    - Disappointed he is not quite perfect.
    - Too much of a perfectionist, which causes excessive demands on his subordinates.
    - Too devoted to the people rather than caring about his own situation.
    - Too busy to adequately pay attention to his own welfare.
    - And yes, sometimes too abrupt because he wants to squeeze so much accomplishment into so little time.

    - Oh, sorry, that might have been the job interview scene from ‘Trainspotting’.
    Seriously, though, some people are just born to be really serious and all business all the time. When you meet one, you know it; it’s overwhelming. The guy with all the instant answers all the time, never missing a beat. And it makes you feel really small and wish you could think big.
    I worked for a couple of people like that.

    • Replies: @Godfree Roberts
  97. FB says:

    ‘…Then iq/ Pisa test should start include spear throwing and sniffing test. LoL…’

    Maybe they should…

    The point is that visual acuity and hand-eye coordination are important not just in basketball but also to pilots and astronauts…[arguably more so...since their life is on the line and the pressure is much greater...]

    Also the IQ ‘tests’ are not just about inherent ability in logic and problem solving…they include specific topics that can be studied and prepared for…

    For instance that article I pointed to earlier…they give some sample questions from the Mensa ‘brain workout’ which is supposed to be a kind of prep for the test…

    One of the questions is…

    ‘…2 3 5 7 11 13 ?..’

    And the multiple choice answers…

    ‘…14,15, 16, 17, 18…’

    Where the idea is to choose the next number in that sequence…

    Well…if you know something about math…you would recognize that the question sequence consists of prime numbers…ie numbers that is not divisible by any whole number other than 1…

    And you would know instantly that the correct answer is 17…someone who has no math knowledge…or has not prepped…will not get this…

    This points up a fundamental flaw in this approach to ‘measuring’ intelligence…ie if you can study for the test then it’s a measure of your ability to study…not your ‘intelligence’…[whatever that really means...]

    Another question there is similar in terms of vocabulary skills…

    ‘…Which same three-letter word can be placed in front of the following words to make a new word?..’

    ‘…SIGN, DONE, DUCT, FOUND, FIRM, TRACT, DENSE…’

    Again…if you have a good vocabulary…you would know that the answer is ‘CON’…

    Again a matter of study…not innate ability…

    And how does this type of vocabulary question translate to other languages…?

    Which undercuts the whole idea of comparing IQ between different nations…

    These are valid questions…criticisms really…

    Anyway…my point is that we are assuming things about civilization itself…ie that our transition to agrarian and eventually higher forms of social organization have all been progress…

    But is this really so…?

    It is a valid question…for instance the ‘primitive’ societies such as Amerindians and others are known for having practiced wisdom in all areas of life…a quality that is conspicuous by its absence the more ‘civilized’ we get…

    They lived in great harmony with nature…while civilization has destroyed utterly large parts of our planet…

    Stephen Hawking has never taken an IQ test because he doesn’t see much value in it…I agree…

  98. gT says:
    @22pp22

    How a people who would happily sell their parents and their grand parents down the road to the nearest sausage making factory can produce a virtuous saint like Xi is just too unbelievable, so it must be BS.

    But “just like vampires have their familiars, and Jews have their Shabbos goys and various Christian sects, the Chinese also have their protectors / worshipers.” Its human nature I guess.

  99. 22pp22 says:
    @TT

    Gave me a beating?!?

    I don’t hate Chinese. I just find needling them on line is fun.

    • Replies: @denk
  100. I’m not so sure I agree with the picture being painted here of China’s future. I’m also not convinced Asians outperform Europeans and the Americans in STEM.

    China has major problems. Too many poor people, rampant corruption, unchecked pollution, significant elderly population, hyper urbanization without the required planning and safeguarding, low pay, deathly hours. China also excutes more people than anywhere else in the world.

    Quality is not a Chinese attribute. The Chinese have quantity.

    I think China is a stack of cards waiting to fall.

    On another note, I recently saw a video from China. These savages skinned a dog alive. I assume for food. Also, women are beyond second class citizens. After 30 if they are unmarried Chinese men consider them washed up and useless.

    American women are great contributors. And in my opinion are only getting started at 30.

    Chinese know how to do one thing. Take orders. They can’t think outside the box. Creativity is not at a premium.

    I would like to see China put in it’s rightful place. Blown up and brought back to the stone age.

  101. 22pp22 says:
    @TT

    One more thing. My desire to maintain my race and culture has nothing to do with the Chinese. This is about us, not you. China has very sensibly maintained its border controls and kicked out its African illegal immigrants. Israel has done the same. I think we should too.

    The people I hate are not Chinese, it is our own elites who have decided to parade their smug moral vanity by opening up our countries to aliens with whom I neither have nor wish to have anything in common. The White Australia Policy was a good one.

    These same super-moral elites then have no compunction about raining bombs on anyone they deem insufficiently democratic.

    The Chinese here usually behave well, but I don’t welcome their coming in large numbers. When I was at university, we had both Chinese students and Taiwanese students in our class. One Taiwanese said: “I am not Chinese: I am Taiwanese” and the Chinese girl burst into tears and ran out of the room. I saw similar incidents more than once.

    I do not care if the Taiwanese are considered Chinese or not. I just question the wisdom of allowing in large numbers of people whose loyalties will always be somewhere else.

    I feel ten times more strongly about Muslims than I do about Chinese.

    The Western World is under invasion, precisely because our countries are desirable to live in. The Irish turned Ireland into a rich country on their own. The Irish government now wants to grow the population by 20% through mass invasion. Why?

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
    , @TT
    , @TT
  102. @Astuteobservor II

    That’s a rather crude unnuanced, and I would suggest, unhistorical view. You serm to be suggesting that the people who collectively or individually hold the power steal in the sense that they use their power to acquire material wealth much greater than what they have earned in the sense og givennvalue for. Was that the case of the Mandariin class in China or powerful court eunuchs or the senior ranks of the British Civil Service after competitive entry by examination was introduced (remember how knighthoods and other, minor, honours were introduced and widely used as non monetary rewards). Of course the “Nabobs” of the East India Company – like the Indian rulers they sometimes worked with, sometimes plundered, filled their boots but that was not true of the Colonial and Imperial officers and civil servants in the settled colonies or India, Burma or Sudan.

    • Replies: @Astuteobservor II
  103. FB says:

    ‘…When I was at university…’

    I find this hard to believe…

  104. @22pp22

    I argue that the White Australia policy did wotk pretty well for Australia but ended at about the the right time because Australia had become rich enough to sustain a genuine liberal democracy which wouldn’t have complaining classes looking for scapegoats and could benefit from having the skills of eg. Colombo Plan students who already knew Australia and spoke fluent English.

    Now I see a traditional Australian immigration policy. i.e. no cheap labour (though I might benefit from it), as countering our own white Australians’ severely dysgenic breeding in terms of cognitive ability. I suppose we can do without bright people outside our exporting industries and the rest of the world will go on inventing and accelerating technical advances we could copy, buy or borrow without too much delay, but I don’t fancy lower and lower IQ voters and their elected representatives.

    Do you accept none of this as valid?

    • Replies: @22pp22
    , @22pp22
  105. @Just some guy

    That your knowledge of China and the Chinese is very limited and far from justifying your over confidently expressed views is suggested by your flimsy reliance onthat video to make generalisations. I am no expert on China but I know a lot of Han women and almost every one is very smart if not formidable.

  106. Bliss says:
    @TT

    America was largely populated by the dregs of Europe yet it became the richest, most powerful, most culturally influential nation on the planet. Singapore was largely populated by the dregs of southern China yet it beats every other Confucian country by the metrics you mentioned. Russia revolted against its monarchy and hereditary aristocracy and wiped them out, yet it became a global Superpower within a generation. Ashkenazi jews became such a big deal only after the Enlightenment gave them the opportunity. African-Americans attained the highest ranks in most every field of endeavor only after the success of the Civil Rights Movement gave them the opportunity etc etc

    These are all examples of egalitarianism and environmentalism trumping hereditarianism.

    By the way, Singapore is around 25% non-chinese (Malays and South Indians). How does that fit into your IQ narrative?

    • Replies: @Da_Han
    , @TT
    , @Daniel Chieh
  107. @Wizard of Oz

    I am not sure about the british, they hold no interest for me. but are you saying the colonial governors/officers in settled colonies were different? the non money grubbing kind? they governed with kindness? their aim weren’t wealth extraction? seriously? like, seriously?

    I do read alot about china. the mandarin class, eunuchs, the officials, the powerful houses in china of old all acts like that. I can say for certain this continued all the way up to 1949 in china. the dynastic cycle in china is because of this. for the last 40 years chinese elites got rich but also improved china as a whole. not sure about the future, but XJP has not given doubts so far. chinese elites could very well revert back to the old way in the future. who knows.

    and from what I know of american elites, I just know since the 70s, they have been trying with all their might in trying to get money from the middle class into their own pockets. and they have succeeded. I firmly believe in this. we went from a single earner per family, to two, now the kids can’t even move out of the house after getting a job.

    we have legal corruption/bribes in the usa, then we use that metric to pass judgment on the different type of bribes of other nations. looks to the sky, looks down the nose, looks down at their corruption!!! whenever people bring up corruption or human rights, I look at them like dumb asses. you can’t be destroying countries and using agent orange and tell me about human rights.

    they are all just ammunition in geopolitics, nothing more.

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
  108. 22pp22 says:
    @Wizard of Oz

    No I accept NONE of it as valid.

    Australia’s breeding is actually slightly less dysgenic than most countries. The worst is Brazil, the best is Finland. My last trip to Sydney indicated a highly dysgenic immigration policy.

    And if you are white, why on earth would you wish to become part of an underprivileged minority in you own country?

    To borrow Trump’s language, Canberra and Adelaide are OK, but Sydney is a sh1thole, just like everywhere else that has gone down this path. I will do virtually anything to avoid going through Sydney Airport. If that is the future, I would rather be dead.

    Australia is on its way to being a Chinese satrapy and has imported the Apex Gang.

    There is nothing more dysgenic than the Apex Gang.

  109. 22pp22 says:
    @Wizard of Oz

    And Canada’s immigration policy gave it Justin Trudeau!

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
  110. F. T. says:

    A regular at farmers’ markets, on fishing boats and down coal mines, he became a local celebrity for being the first local Party Secretary to visit all the villages in Zhengding County, a performance he repeated everywhere he governed and, after becoming President, visited all of China’s 33 provinces, regions and municipalities. His only recorded outbursts were over corruption. According to one Zhejiang official, Xi ‘kept his reputation wholesome and untainted by allegations of corruption’ and, under a pen name, contributed hundreds of earnest opinion pieces to local dailies: “If we remain aloof from ordinary people we will be like a tree cut off from its roots. Officials at all levels must change their style, get close to ordinary people, try their best to do good things for them, put aside the haughty manner of feudalism and set a good example”. In an essay on graft he said,

    “Transparency is the best anti-corrosive and as long as we embrace democracy, go through a proper procedures and avoid ‘black’ case work, fighting corruption won’t be just empty words”. “How important the people are in the minds of an official will determine how important officials are in the minds of the people. Officials should love the people in the way they love their parents, work for their benefit and lead them to prosperity”.

    These paragraphs are impressive. I have never heard of such behaviour, caring, and good will toward the people.

  111. @Astuteobservor II

    Well I’ll grant your superior knowledge of the US though I still think it might benefit from a bit of nuance based on Amrrican peculiarities like the work ethic conflated with godliness and evidence of god’s approval. Not much of that left where it started may be but I bet the Mormons and quite a few others would be like that.

    As for the Colonial governors etc in Australia I don’t remember reading of any of them becoming rich in the 1788 to 1850s period when they had real power. They were often professional soldiers who went on to govern other colonies elsewhere and quite often evangelicals in the English sense. The only notorious corrupt money makers in power in Australia (and I wouldn’t call them “elites”) have been in NSW and Queensland mostly under Labor though the rednecks if Queensland got contaminated too. These evils have largely been ended with a few gaolings and even Premiers who weren’t really dishonest having to resign.

  112. @22pp22

    Sorry, that went past me. Meaning? What facts do I obviously not know?

    • Replies: @22pp22
    , @22pp22
  113. TT says:
    @22pp22

    Ok. I agreed, its not you alone, many are disgusted by their gov using Weapon of Mass Migration WMM to artificially inflate their GDP. EU US, are facing that nightmare now, some coordinated effort is going on to move people around the world senselessly.

    I wrote several comments about this, esp for Singapore turning into Little Delhi, & UK into whatever nonsense, destroying itself & unfairly deprived the descendants of forefathers hardwork that build up everything.

    But you shouldn’t take out on Chinese, idiot. When im living in Oz, together with those whites (born & brought up in Oz), they are most friendly people to mix with & safe as neighbors. You will be fortunate if your gov chosen Chinese as main WMM that are wealthy, so much better than Muslim refugees(this is most difficult) & low level Indians that screw up everything.

    There should be some strict control, only the best & needed talents should allow in with resident visa only. Citizenship should be exceptional case imo. China is wise in this.

    Taiwanese is Chinese, they should not betrayed their forefathers goal. KMT never renounce mainland, their goal is always to retake communist China bcos of diff ideology. Now that China is very much a successful socialism that KMT can best dream of, reunion is natural best outcome.

    Whereas other diaspora around the world, their connection with China is lost after few generations, many couldn’t even speak or write Chinese, never visit China, but had assimilate into their unique culture, esp Asean & US Chinese ethnic. So they can’t identify themselves so much as Chinese that is deep in Chinese culture. Its identity stigma. But as China ascend, this will dissappear, as been Chinese no longer a inferrior status.

    Not all whites identified themselves as European AngloSaxon, British, Irish, Scottish, Welsh, Celtic, Slov, Scandinavian,…they identify themselves as Russian, American, Australian, kiwis, Italian, French, Canadians …wherever they grown up.

  114. Da_Han says:
    @Bliss

    environment yes, but not egalitarianism

    America imported the best minds after WWII, from Japan and from Europe, both of which were in shambles

    Singapore likes in one of the most strategic positions in the world

  115. De gustibus non est disputandum. And clearly our tastes differ. But I don’t think you have really done the numbers.

    The immigrant populations (including second generations) from the Sinosphere and from the Subcontinent are about equal in Austalia and it doesn’t even look like white Europeans and their pure white descendants being a minority in the next 100 years. Anyway a minority compared with who as a majority? No one anywhere near. If so many Hong Kong Chinese can still agitate energetically for more independence from China what reason is there to imagine Australians of Indian and Chinese descent getting together to reduce Australians’ freedoms?

    I have the best of a city repeatedly rated by The Economist as the world’s most liveable (which I take with a pinch of salt because our traffic is becoming appalling thanks to rapidly increasing population: still not too bad I suppose by Asian and London standards). Vancouver and Vienna are said to be its competitors. And it is full of Asian students. Its Central Business District municipal government body, within which I live in a house on a park elected and re-ected a Lord Mayor 25 years ago who was an immigrant from Hong Kong. I have a half East Asian nephew who is at a leading traditional WASP school and was immediately chosen to captain the surf club when they discovered quite a few boarders were keen surfers. I am sanguine about our having a population which can continue to run a liberal demicracywhich deserves the description.

    As to the Apex Gang…. Numbers dear boy! They are just right to make sure we never again make the idiotic mistakes that let in the South Sudanese, even as refugees, (or the late 1970s Lebanese: Christians who deal in drugs as well as Muslim gangrapers).

    Without going at length into the dysgenic breeding (in large part because smart women whose smart grandmothers had 12 children now only have one or two in their 30s) I draw your attention to what those incredibly low fertility rates of Germany, Spain and Italy must mean. And even China must have been losing IQ points as the smart and enterprising went yo the cities and had just one child. (Now its a habit).

  116. 22pp22 says:
    @Wizard of Oz

    Dysgenic breeding and its effects on IQ are easy to calculate and the data is easily available. Australia isn’t doing that badly. Singapore, which has a very high-quality population, isn’t doing much better in spite of the fact that its government recognizes the danger.

    And you say that we need to import foreigners as they vote more rationally than the dysgenic locals.

    In Canada, it was the immigrants who put Trudeau into office, and they vary nearly put Corbyn into office in the UK. He draws his economic inspiration from Venezuela. You say you worry about dysgenic whites and their voting habits. Immigrant voting habits worry me more.

    Canada: -0.4
    Indonesia: -0.6 (best scoring developing country)
    Japan: -0.8
    UK: -1.0
    Germany: -1.0
    Italy: -1.2
    China: -1.3
    France: -1.3 (France has a very fertile underclass compared to the UK or Germany)
    South Korea: -1.4
    Singapore: -1.4 (the only country openly following eugenic fertility policies, with dismal results it seems)
    Australia: -1.6
    USA: -1.7
    Russia: -1.8
    Poland: -2.2
    Romania: -2.9 (worst scoring European country, everyone knows why)
    India: -3.2
    Mexico: -3.3
    Nigeria: -3.4
    Iran: -3.6
    Turkey: -3.6
    Brazil: -3.9 (worst scoring major country, educated women in Brazil have extremely few children (1.2 on average))
    Afghanistan: -5.1 (worst scoring country on earth)

  117. kauchai says:
    @Anonymous

    “…who’s to say that whoever succeeds him will be any good.”

    Was Truman equal to or any better than FDR? Was Eisenhower? Was Kennedy, LBJ, Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush Sr., Clinton, Bush Jr., Obama and now Trump? If so, how were they equal or better?

    ” To me China, much like Russia, has failed to make the needed institutional changes that ensure good rule over the long term. ”

    What you meant was they didn’t follow the dictates of washington, london and brussels.

    China made a tsunami of institutional changes since 1978. They threw out orthodox communism and replaced it with “it doesn’t matter if the cat is black or white”, “crossing the river by feeling the stones”, “hide your capabilities and bide your chances”, etc, etc, etc. Today they have minted more new billionaires than the empire, less than 4% of the population live below the poverty line, put a lot of “tigers and flies” into jail for life and are still continuing to do so, grow the economy from practically zero to the world’s largest by PPP, the UN’s largest contributor to peace keeping, and last but not least are leading the world in science and tech such as super computing, quantum communications and computers, genetic engineering, new materials, fintech, 5G, etc, etc, etc.

    XJP is personally overseeing a very active, targeted and specialized anti-poverty campaign to root out the remaining 40-50 million hard core poor. These people will be provided with heavily subsidised housing (in some cases even free of charge), new land for cultivation of crops, new jobs, education, medical insurance and medical care and then some more. The target is to eliminate hardcore poor by 2020 so that he can declare china a “moderately prosperous society” by 2021. No other countries on this planet have something even remotely comparable.

    China is on target to invest trillions of dollars in the “Belt and Road” initiative all over asia, eurasia, the middle-east, africa, europe and latin america.

    From where i stand, china’s institutional changes are glowing and shining like a giant star and smell a million times more fragrant than roses. What’s more important for minions like me is that I am already basking in the light of that shining star and wallowing in its fragrance and i am not even a citizen of china. And please do not put any labels on these changes for i don’t wish the stench, blood and demons of broken, moldy and putrid ideologies to permeate all that is good and holy and full of hope for humanity into this fledgling new millennium.

  118. 22pp22 says:
    @Wizard of Oz

    World IQ drop due to immigration.

    http://www.unz.com/akarlin/not-sending-their-best/

    I lived in Cyprus for a number of years. I have also lived in Seoul, Tokyo, London, Christchurch (New Zealand), Auckland, Cologne and San Jose (Costa Rica)

    Quality of life in Sydney is not that high. The economist is subjective and highly PC. I would place Tokyo and Auckland way above Sydney. Seoul is OK, but if I never see another Ediya Coffee Shop ever again, it will be too soon.

    The last time I passed through Sydney it was on our way back from Cyprus. Nicosia was so nice. My wife and I found Sydney so grotty we went back to our hotel.

  119. TT says:
    @Bliss

    These are all examples of egalitarianism and environmentalism trumping hereditarianism.

    I don’t denied egalitarianism merits in bring every race to their maximum potential. In US, how does whites, Asians, Latino, ME, and Blacks fare under egalitarianism, equally well?

    Hereditarianism has its historical evidences. If majority white have potential to sprint 10sec/100m, with training most could. But that doesn’t mean with egalitarianism, all whites are as good as majority blacks who have potential to sprint 9sec. The blacks simply dominate tracks & NBA given equal conditions, whites are out.

    We are talking about majority performance of different ethnics under egalitarianism. How many scoundrel Obama in US? Few blacks in Harvard law. How many idiots Trumps/Bush? Plenty, in every ivy uni & whole US gov.

    By the way, Singapore is around 25% non-chinese (Malays and South Indians). How does that fit into your IQ narrative?

    They are social burden, esp Muslim Malays. Gov gave special privileges to help Malay improve with free education & gov jobs. They have improved substantially, well above Malaysia & Indonesia, India. But still ave IQ & PISA is brought down significantly by them. . Recent ave IQ has dropped if you see 10yrs result, South Indians migration increase Indian ratio from 2% to 9%. Whereas China migrants mostly are either obscene rich buying up $20M house with $5M investment to qualify immigration, or have some special skills, their children are doing exceptionally well in study.

    Majority (80%?) Malays & Indians are less educated, low paid workers, & highest crimes, like blacks in US. With Spore meritocracy system, they simply has no chance to ascend, very few enter University like 5Malays 10Indians out of 400 engineering group, only some Indians do well but mostly in law where they are great in word twisting (hereditarianism).

    • Replies: @Bliss
  120. TT says:
    @FB

    Che is quoting that from Wikipedia, which always has mixture of facts. CIA has probably a big army trolling wikipedia to forward their propaganda. Tibet, Xinjiang(CIA called East Turkstan), South China Seas dispute, …full of BS.

    • Agree: FB
  121. Alden says:
    @Godfree Roberts

    Who bothers with Edgar Snow any more?

  122. Only those who value eye-witness, first-hand reporting by professional journalists with stellar reputations for not lying to please their publishers.

    In other words, not too many.

  123. ve1 says:

    xi is far from an idealist, however, he did use coruption as an excuse to detroy his political enemy, just like deng accused his opponents of being counterevolutionary, even though it was deng himself who was the real counterevolutionary. theres no evidence that xi is any less corupt than jiang zemin

  124. TT says:
    @Astuteobservor II

    the realists would expect the elites to do their job while lining their pockets.

    You nail it. This is happened more obvious in better run countries, they legalized the corruption to regulate it so country get run by best caliber(or they will leave for private sectors), not those morons like the West now(still corrupted by many folds but screw up the country).

    In China, when they wanted to build something grand like airport in BaiYun Guangzhou, you will see a world class appear look exactly like Changi Airport, with dusbin & sign boards all imported from Spore, run seamlessly. Beijing airport will be a Grande. This is controlled corruption. But Xi get this controlled corruption tap turned off now. Juz take what you deserved, socialism.

    In Thailand, when they want to built Bangkok airport, budget dissappear, nothing built, until Thaksin appear to fulfil it, but you see a airport with torn seats within 6mths of operation.This is corruption, live goes on.

    In India, they want to build most expensive airport in Delhi, then you see people writing flight schedules with all system hang, counters not operating, all shit design you can imagine in it. Everywhere is corruption, country is stalled. This is utter corruption.

    In Africa, the money gone, they only said look at the horizon, there is a airport…. a mirage for your imagination. No words.

    You don’t pay peanuts for the best to run the biggest company(your country). But still get the corruption controlled so country get function efficiently.

    Human rights? Those Western assholes bombing & massacre innocents everywhere talk about human rights…so they put Saudi Arabia genociding Yemen as the chairman for HRW, the apex of UN sarcasm & hypocrisy.

  125. ve1 says:

    you want to know what kind of guy is? look at the western media. ive never seen the western media write anything really bad about him, like the way they write about mao. in fact, they even say good things about xi in the western media. so mao said, when the west praises you, you know youre doing something wrong. just look at the way the western media talks about mao. he was the only strong leader of the prc. none of the others even come close, and even the inperialists have said it themselves. each chinese leader is weaker than the last! just the fact that xi has distanced himself from the dprk tells you something is wrong with this guy. to make matters worse, the guy actually wants to get close to the rok, a pupet rejim of the west. he’s also relying on the kmt in tw to reunify china, again, the kmt have a long history of only being loyal pupets of the west. the fact that he aligns himself with all these us pupets tell you that he is not a reliable leader. what made mao legendary was his ability to unify the worlds proletariat. xi shows no signs of being able to unify the ordinary man. just like deng, jiang, and hu, he is just another guy who is on the side of the bourgeoisie. another thing that makes him look bad is his use of nationalism. when you use nationalism, you lose the support of the international comunity, and thats what hes done.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  126. Bliss says:
    @TT

    But still ave IQ & PISA is brought down significantly by them. . Recent ave IQ has dropped if you see 10yrs result, South Indians migration increase Indian ratio from 2% to 9%….Majority (80%?) Malays & Indians are less educated, low paid workers, & highest crimes, like blacks in US.

    Singapore has the highest IQ and the lowest crime rate with a 25% non-chinese population. Only a stupid and shameless liar would draw the conclusions that you have above.

    How do you explain the fact that with 25% non-chinese Singapore has a lower crime rate and higher IQ than East Asian nations with hardly any muslim malays and hindu indians?

    Show us where you learned that Singaporean IQ has dropped in the last 10 years. And show us where you learned that 10 years ago the population of indians was only 2%.

    • Replies: @PandaAtWar
    , @denk
    , @TT
    , @TT
    , @TT
  127. @Bliss

    How do you explain the fact that with 25% non-chinese Singapore has a lower crime rate and higher IQ than East Asian nations with hardly any muslim malays and hindu indians?

    “the fact”? Where said that? LOL

    You want to see the crime rate and sheer 3rd-world-alike filth in Singapore? pls visit the neighbourhood called “Little India” there..

    It’s average, mind you, averaged up by 75%-80% Han Chinese, who include some recent Han immigrants with very high IQ (>2sd above Han avg)from mainland China, along with some % of very high IQ elite European/American tax-evading expat immigrants.

  128. @Polish Perspective

    Without unleashing China’s ultra high IQ intellectual elites who can and will start a new wave of Chinese Renaissance like what European Renaissance did to Europe, China will not become the undisputed world leader by the 2020s or 2030s or 40s.

    To become the undisputed world leader, one needs, above all, to have a very uniquely attractive culture and value system for others to model. Without China’s intellectual elites in the driving seat to rejunvenate the real traditional Han culture and carry out deep reforms in national education and industrial revolutions, current China is in no position to be that. Japan is not comparison here, as Japan historically has always been an excellent imitator (copy Han China in pre-industrial revolution, copy Europe in Industrial Revolution), not innovator particularly on a civilisational level.

    Xi unfortunately, like his CCP predecessors, have held back the bulk of China’s intellectual elites through varies polices till this day… We’ll see.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    , @kauchai
  129. Joe Wong says:
    @jim jones

    If everyone has your kind of mindset and smear others with fake news like the video, what this world would be like? No wonder the West views selling Opium as free trade, stealing other people’s land as God’s gift, bombing, killing and waterboarding on the fabricated phantom WMD allegation as humanitarian intervention.

  130. Joe Wong says:
    @Anon

    You are right, only the West can invent and only the West can succeed. the old days of colonialsim, and White superiority will continue.

  131. rogue-one says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    In America (and generally throughout the west), the scholar is intent upon destroying cities and cultures. I think “social science”, “ethnic studies”, scholars have become far greater threat to civilization than women.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  132. rogue-one says:

    An important point ignored in the essay:

    Christianity is becoming more and more popular in China. Today there are more than 100 million christians in China, more than Communist Party members. Mr Xi does not know how to deal with rising faith. Christianity will be the agent of destruction of the communist party regime.

    (https://www.ft.com/content/a6d2a690-6545-11e4-91b1-00144feabdc0)

  133. @PandaAtWar

    China will not become the undisputed world leader by the 2020s or 2030s or 40s.

    Why is this necessary or even desirable?

    As the economic center, it just needs to offer an overall better life for its citizens versus much of the world and the positive externalities work out from there. The foundations and challenges are both there, but overall the weight of positives do indicate that this will be sustainable and accomplish a high living standard by 2030.

    Grandstanding the world seems rather pointless and may lead into the most unproductive use of capital of all: war.

  134. @rogue-one

    Heh, postmodernism should never have become so core to social science as it is now.

  135. @Bliss

    A meaningful definition of “egalitarianism” would be necessity reduce or remove affirmative action activity as being less than meritocratic. When political blocs exist primarily to benefit each other through a spoils system, any notion of meritocracy rapidly becomes laughable.

    But yes, I am generally in LKY’s position that what matters is the quality of immigration, as well as the control and flow of it. Like many things, what can be positive in controlled quantities can be negative, or even fatal, in uncontrolled quantities.

    That said, I obviously have very little patience for individuals still stuck here in a desire to maintain a certain static society, not only because it is silly but also because having studied history pretty extensively, it is almost entirely futile – I say almost, because sometimes they manage to prevent their dreaded outcome by about a generation. That said, its clear that riding hobby horses to tilt at windmills is psychologically very satisfying for some, so they can indulge in that passion as much as they wish.

  136. @ve1

    just the fact that xi has distanced himself from the dprk tells you something is wrong with this guy.

    yes, yes, juche is the way.

  137. denk says:
    @Just some guy

    In this world, it takes all kinds….

    Some of the Chinese, Vn, Koreans have dogs for food,

    Then there’r those who slaughter cats/dogs/goats/….en mass, for the fun of it……

    They gassed thousands of pet dogs belonging to Chagosians families and exiled the humans wholesale 30000 miles away,

    drove zoo animals insane in the 78 saturation bombings in Ex Yugo, [1]

    Vaporised 10000 live goats in Marshall island nuke test,

    Tip of an iceberg

    [1]

    The war is literally driving the residents of the Belgrade zoo mad, as a female tiger turns on her own cubs, killing all four, and a large snake aborts 40 fetuses. These augurs of an evil time prefigure the chaos and brutality we have unleashed in the Balkans: having opened the Pandora’s Box of Kosovar “self-determination,” we should not be at all surprised at what flies out.

    http://www.antiwar.com/justin/diaries/diary56.html

    P.S.
    woz makes a good point on your flimsy reliance on
    youtube vidoes, kid.

    Once again, you and your ilks are scrapping the barrel.

  138. denk says:
    @22pp22

    In a previous thread, You accuse the Chinese as ‘cry babies’ who are still harboring ‘historical’ grudges against Jp/fukus while the latter has moved on.

    Its rather cheeky of you to blame the Chinese for the current ‘crisis’ at their doorsteps, SCS/ECS/NK….

    In reality, the Chinese are the ones who’r more than willing to move on, its fukusIJ which, for reasons best known to themselves, are still picking fights at China’s doorsteps, not the other way round.

    There;s nuthin ‘historical’ about the pivot, the QUAD, Africom, TPP…Made in fukus, to screw China.

    Its here, its now, its in your face.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  139. denk says:
    @Bliss

    Barring any official statistics on the decline of IQ and deterioration of social order, one can nonetheless get a good idea just by reading the local media.

    Ever since the invasion of Indian WMM, Singapore’s first world subway system has plunged to third world standard, its now a laughing stock amongst the populace, if not the world.
    quality of housing construction also plummeted, with major defects popping up within months , even weeks of completion.

    The breaking down of social order is even more glaring.
    Indian imports who committed sexual/violent crimes are totally out of proportion to their ethnic ratio.

  140. TT says:
    @Bliss

    Bliss, has i offended you to be call stupid & shameless liar? If you don’t understand with your IQ90+, juz ask politely im happy to help.

    This is 1990-2010 Ave score, 105

    https://www.worlddata.info/iq-by-country.php

    2002-2006 ave, 108

    https://iq-research.info/en/page/average-iq-by-country/sg-singapore#

    2003, 2010 Test, 105/109

    https://www.iqtestforfree.net/average-IQ-by-country.html

    2016, 103

    https://list25.com/25-countries-with-the-highest-average-iq/5/

    2018 test, 103

    https://gazettereview.com/2016/06/top-10-most-intelligent-countries-in-the-world/

    There is 5pt declined from year 2010 peak IQ109 Rank1, down to 2018-IQ103 Rank5. I might speculate a large influx of low grade migration. Indians seem to occupy everywhere in Spore now, as Denk pointed out, its Little Delhi. Whereas HK, Taiwan, Japan, Korea kept relatively same ethnics, they remained in Top5 unchange.

    How do you explain the fact that with 25% non-chinese Singapore has a lower crime rate and higher IQ than East Asian nations with hardly any muslim malays and hindu indians?

    Although you lack basic manner, but i presume you got stir up by the absurdity of Spore gov immigration policy. So i will try explain in my capacity, if you don’t agree fine, but need not insult. If you has difficulty with algebra, then ask someone to help.

    For 2010 ave peak 109, 74%Chinese & 4%others need 112.1 to average out 22% of Malay&Indian 98 (assume they are subpar below 100 as US)

    For 2017, ave IQ103, in extreme case 78%(Chinese & others) no improvement 112.1 , 22%(Malay& Indian) will have to drop from 98 to 80(India ave). This will required a very huge influx of low IQ Indian migrants.

    So more realistic is in 2010 peak 109, Malay&Indian already IQ80-90(still better than India), Chinese & others was actually developed to 114~117 high. That explain how Spore remain highly rank despite of this 22% lower performing minority. What happen in 2017 to cause the 5pt drop, can be speculated as combination of low grade Indians migrants & some standard deviation. Don’t ask me why, im not statistician with access to full data.

    • Replies: @Bliss
  141. @denk

    My father always taught me that dogs bark at man, but it does not mean that man needs to bark at dogs.

    Ignore trolls.

    • Replies: @denk
  142. TT says:
    @Bliss

    How do you explain the fact that with 25% non-chinese Singapore has a lower crime rate and higher IQ than East Asian nations with hardly any muslim malays and hindu indians?

    Show us where you learned that Singaporean IQ has dropped in the last 10 years.

    Now if you agree that there are 5pt IQ drop over 10yrs, we can proceed to crime rates.

    As Spore improve quickly in overall crime rate, Malays & Indians are relatively still having highest crimes compare to Chinese ethnic. But their higher crimes doesn’t equate to US or your country whites criminals so violent. So ave its still rank Top1 or 2, but a drag down. Other Asian nations has their own crimes & problems, you can research yourself why, not my duty.

    Break down of crimes

    http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/Singapore/Crime

    Crime rate rise sharply after 2012.

    https://data.gov.sg/dataset/overall-crime-cases-crime-rate

    Malay race is lowest achievement, highest crimes. Indians fair better. This site provide much detail info.

    http://factsanddetails.com/southeast-asia/Singapore/sub5_7b/entry-3733.html

    With the lowest level of educational attainment of any ethnic group, the Malays were concentrated at the low end of the occupational hierarchy and had average earnings that were 70 percent of those of Chinese. Malays had a higher crime rate than other groups and in 1987 accounted for 47 percent of the heroin addicts arrested. The 1980 census showed that 86 percent of the
    Malay work force was in the clerical, service, and production sector; 45 percent of all employed Malays worked on assembly lines, largely in foreign-owned electronics factories. Only 8 percent of all professional and technical workers (including schoolteachers), and 2 percent of all administrative and managerial personnel were Malays. Malays dropped out of the competitive school system in large numbers, and those who continued past primary school were concentrated in vocational education programs. In 1980 they made up only 1.5 percent of all university graduates and 2.5 percent of students enrolled in higher education. *

    Here is the biggest most violent riot in Spore Little India by Indian Foreign Talents. None get arrested by police, PM LHL even gagged the newspaper from mentioning its Indian deed, only can said some South Asian rioted, however he will continue to welcome them heartedly to come in higher number.

  143. TT says:
    @Bliss

    And show us where you learned that 10 years ago the population of indians was only 2%.

    This i muz apologize for mistaken others 2% as Indian, it should be 6~7% 20+yrs ago, as i had another discussion with Denk over India WMM flooding Spore, i qn how it increase 2% to 9%, no one corrected me so i didn’t realized the mistake. Mistake & shameless lying is different, dear Bliss.

    Indian residents however rose to 9.2% in 2010 due to an increase in the number of Indians migrant workers (compared to 7.4% Indians in the figures for citizens).[44]

    Ethnic composition of resident population
    Ethnic group 1970 [45] 1980 [45] 1990 [11] 2000 [11] 2010 [11] 2011 [11] 2012 [11] 2013 [11] 2015 [46]
    Chinese 77.0% 78.3% 77.8% 76.8% 74.1% 74.1% 74.2% 74.2% 74.3%
    Malays 14.8% 14.4% 14.0% 13.9% 13.4% 13.4% 13.3% 13.3% 13.3%
    Indians 7.0% 6.3% 7.1% 7.9% 9.2% 9.2% 9.2% 9.1% 9.1%
    Others 1.2% 1.0% 1.1% 1.4% 3.3% 3.3% 3.3% 3.3% 3.2%

    On July 1989 Singapore’s 2,674,362 residents were divided into 2,043,213 Chinese (76.4 percent), 398,480 Malays (14.9 percent), 171,160 Indians (6.4 percent), and 61,511 others (2.3 percent).

    2000 census, ethnic Chinese make up 76.8 percent of the population. Malay (13.9 percent), Indian (mostly Tamil, 7.9 percent), or other (1.4 percent).

    There were 3.2 million citizens in 2009.[80] Various Chinese linguistic groups formed 74.2% of Singapore’s residents, Malays 13.4%, Indians 9.2%, while Eurasians, Arabs and other groups formed 3.2%.

    2015. The same census also reports that about 74.1% of residents were of Chinese descent, 13.4% of Malay descent, 9.2% of Indian descent, and 3.3% of other (including Eurasian) descent.[258]

    There is no data available for breakdown racial in non-residents.

    The government in recent years has faced a growing backlash against a surge of foreigners who now account for about a third of Singapore’s work force. Resentment toward the government’s loose immigration policies helped lower the vote won by the ruling People’s Action Party to its lowest level since independence in 1965 during parliamentary elections

    • Replies: @Bliss
  144. TT says:
    @22pp22

    By the way, our down under Kiwis native has asked me pass a message to you.

    One more thing. My desire to maintain my race and culture has nothing to do with the whites whatsoever that invade and colonized my ancester land violently. This is about us, not you. Your country has very absurd policy to let in everyone is your problem, have spine then go back revolt don’t whine here like spoilt brat throwing tantrums again.

    The whites here usually don’t behave well, and i don’t welcome them in any number. I do not care if the Anglos or Celtics or Scottish or Welsh or Irish whatever are considered European whites or not. I just question legality of these people occupying my ancestor land by gunboats.

    The World is under invasion, precisely because our countries are desirable to live in & you come univited with gunboats, unlike Chinese they arrived as legal migrants contributing to our welfare & economy under invitation.

    When Ming dynasty Zhenghe majestic navy fleet visited us, they left us in peace without molestation. After many hundreds years, your ancester come, killed our men, raped our women, slaved our children, stole our land. And make us perform war dance to help earn tourism $ for you. Feeding us with junk food to make us obese, then evil you claim there is no poverty & starvation.

    The Irish turned Ireland into a rich country on their own. The Irish government now wants to grow the population by 20% through mass invasion. Why? Ask your own greedy whites leaders, none of our business. Just leave our land in peace, go back to your own ancestor land to fight among yourself.

    • Replies: @22pp22
    , @22pp22
    , @Bliss
  145. 22pp22 says:
    @TT

    Nice to know what you really think. Diversity is not going to work.

    And Zheng He’s exploration of the entire planet is just silly. It didn’t happen. It’s China’s answer to Wakanda.

    And Tibetans and the native population of Taiwan know how wonderful it is to be colonised by Han Chinese.

    • Replies: @denk
  146. 22pp22 says:
    @TT

    Canada and Australia weren’t particularly appealing real estate before Whites arrived. Why are we legally inviting in Chinese? Good question.

    I put the welfare of me and mine first. Isn’t that normal? I have enjoyed posting here because it is so easy to cause Chinese to melt down. I find using the expression 天皇陛下萬歲 works really well.

    • Replies: @TT
    , @Joe Wong
  147. TT says:
    @FB

    Yan sen had written a interesting article on IQ.

    http://www.unz.com/article/iq-or-the-mathverbal-split/#comment-2230814

    Recent research on cognitive abilities is reinforcing what some psychologists suggested decades ago: spatial ability, also known as spatial visualization, plays a critical role in engineering and scientific disciplines. Yet more verbally-loaded IQ tests, as well as many popular standardized tests used today, do not adequately measure this trait, especially in those who are most gifted with it.” [13]

    • Replies: @pogohere
  148. pogohere says:
    @Китайский дурак

    The Economist

    3-1-18

    How the West got China wrong

    It bet that China would head towards democracy and the market economy. The gamble has failed

    ¨After the collapse of the Soviet Union, the West welcomed the next big communist country into the global economic order. Western leaders believed that giving China a stake in institutions such as the World Trade Organisation (WTO) would bind it into the rules-based system set up after the second world war (see Briefing). They hoped that economic integration would encourage China to evolve into a market economy and that, as they grew wealthier, its people would come to yearn for democratic freedoms, rights and the rule of law.

    . . .

    ¨The longer the West grudgingly accommodates China’s abuses, the more dangerous it will be to challenge them later. In every sphere, therefore, policy needs to be harder edged, even as the West cleaves to the values it claims are universal.¨

    What???????

    To counter China’s hard power, America needs to invest in new weapons systems and, most of all, ensure that it draws closer to its allies—who, witnessing China’s resolve, will naturally look to America.

    Ohhhhhhhhh, that again.

    https://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21737517-it-bet-china-would-head-towards-democracy-and-market-economy-gamble-has-failed-how

    Now there´s an expression of universal values. Do it our way or else. I hear the drums beating in the jungles of the MIC.

    • Replies: @Ron Unz
    , @Daniel Chieh
  149. Ron Unz says:
    @pogohere

    The Economist

    3-1-18

    How the West got China wrong

    It bet that China would head towards democracy and the market economy. The gamble has failed

    I think in many respects, the descent of The Economist into such establishmentarian nonsense is rather sad, probably even tragic.

    I’ve been a steady subscriber for nearly 40(!) years. I think their total circulation when I first began was something like 50,000, and given the likely age of those subscribers and the morality tables, I’d suspect that puts me in the 99.9+% of their current 1.5M figure. Almost certainly I go back further than virtually all of their current editorial staff, many of whom were probably not even born when I eagerly received my first issue.

    Back a few years ago, I wrote a column about the unfortunate situation, and here’s the link:

    http://www.unz.com/runz/the-long-decline-of-the-london-economist/

    • Replies: @Godfree Roberts
  150. Bliss says:
    @TT

    By the way, our down under Kiwis native has asked me pass a message to you…….When Ming dynasty Zhenghe majestic navy fleet visited us, they left us in peace without molestation. After many hundreds years, your ancester come, killed our men, raped our women, slaved our children, stole our land. And make us perform war dance to help earn tourism $ for you.

    1. Zheng He never went to what’s now New Zealand. Not even close.

    2. The Polynesian natives of New Zealand are known as Maoris. The term Kiwis applies to all New Zealanders, the majority of whom are not Maoris.

    It is pretty obvious that you just made up this BS. You seem to be a congenitally dishonest person.

    Btw, the Maoris and other Pacific Islanders are related to the Malays that you despise. Secondly, Zheng He was a muslim from the southwestern province of Yunnan and his 7 voyages led him to muslim ports in Malaya, Bangladesh, Maldives, Iran, Oman, Yemen, Saudi. Arabia, Somalia, Kenya etc (as well as buddhist Sri Lanka and Thailand, and hindu South India).

    • Replies: @TT
    , @TT
  151. @pogohere

    Now there´s an expression of universal values.

    It really is. After all, there’s only one set of rules for everyone. Why would anyone disagree or rebel against it? This is the End of History and this is Good.

    If you against it, this means that you are Evil. Its all pretty entertaining.

    Watch them scram and scream at the heavens.

    How swiftly does the moral facade fail, doesn’t it?

  152. TT says:
    @Bliss

    I hate to speak with fool who only know regurgitate what his gov msm sewage propaganda or only read wiki. Now get educate, idiot. This is last time i will educate you for you have very poor manner, its too tired to talk with a retard who will not check emself or humbly plead for answer.

    Sure European did not want to accept the facts that China actually visited the world before their Colombus.

    https://www.theage.com.au/articles/2002/11/24/1037697982893.html

    This will give you alot to read.

    http://www.gavinmenzies.net/Evidence/10-annex-10-evidence-of-chinese-fleets-visit-to-australia-%E2%80%93-west-coast/

    “Now we could confidently proclaim Zheng He’s Fleets had discovered Australia in the early 15th century.  Zheng He’s Fleets Nautical Chart is the evidence, irrefutable evidence beyond all doubt.”

    “We can also see from the chart [Wu Pei Chih] the two routes along which Zheng He’s Fleets returned to China, (1) via southwest Australia where they sailed northward (Hong Bao’s Fleet) (2) one from the east: west of the Tiger Tail reef” (Great Barrier Reef – Zhou Man’s route) – Professor Zhiqiang Zhang – Beijing, 28 August 2003.  From (1) we know Zheng He’s Fleets sailed northwards inside the Great Barrier Reef, from (2) they settled Australia – but where?  European and Jesuit Charts give the first clue:

    · Australia appears on European maps of the Dieppe school published centuries before Europeans reached Australia, viz. Desliens, Vallard (showing horses), Desceliers, Jean Rotz (1540s).   These show West, North, East and South Australia (to Warrnambool).  Someone charted Australia before Europeans did so.  Captain Cook may have had a Chinese map (William Li).
    · Albertin di Virga of 1410, where Australia is called ‘Java La Grande’ and placed in the correct position with the correct size and shape of the crest from Colliers Bay to the Gulf of CarpentariaAlbertin di Virga of 1410, where Australia is called ‘Java La Grande’ and placed in the correct position with the correct size and shape of the crest from Colliers Bay to the Gulf of Carpentaria
    · Australia appears on Jesuit maps drawn when in China and based on Chinese Maps, viz. Father Ricci 1589 (Now in the Royal Geographic Society, London)
    · Taiwan porcelain map (1447) showing East coast to Tasmania.
    · Zheng He’s passage chart shows Barrier Reef (Martin Tai)
    · Melchior Thevenot in Relations 1663 – Chinese aware of Australia – (M Righton).
    · Hessel Gerritsz chart (1618) shows Australia (purchased Seville) – (M Righton).
    · Australia shown on Wu Pei Chih (Sun Shuyun and Zhiqiang Zhang) (1422)
    · Ma Huan ( Rosace = Australia = Darwin = Marani) (Martin Tai evidence)
    · Old Chinese map of Australia disappeared from public viewing in National Palace Museum in Taiwan.  (Liuqioqing)

    • Replies: @Bliss
  153. pogohere says: • Website
    @TT

    Soft Power: Rising Chinese Dominance In The Sciences

    Analysis by: The Irish Crimean – Padraig Joseph McGrath

    [MORE]

    In 2016, for the first time, the People’s Republic of China surpassed the United States in published scientific output. A total of 429,000 scientific papers were published in China. In the United States, the total figure for 2016 was 406,000 published scientific papers.This is an important index of social and economic development, and an index of the shifting balance in geo-political strength. Knowledge-production is not only a key index of geo-political influence – it is also a key contributory factor to it.

    That is to say: knowledge-production is a key component of what is commonly referred to as “soft power.”

    The present debate on the role of language within ideology-transmission as an element of soft-power, is better informed with a view on this process in another civilizational sphere. In this case, we will topically examine that of the Chinese as it emerges onto terrain which until recently was hegemonically dominated by the Anglosphere.

    This essay will base itself in the understanding that language is in itself a vector for pre-discursive ideology-transmission.

    The Chinese very clearly had an understanding of soft power over 2,000 years before Joseph Nye coined that phrase, or before it was popularized by Fukuyama. You see this understanding of soft power implied throughout the Analects, which were compiled during the warring-states period (475 BC-221 BC). An example of such are sayings like: “You don’t need an ox-knife to kill a chicken,”

    One effect of the global spread of the English language as a lingua franca is that it created something approaching an Anglophone monopoly on knowledge-production, and therefore a disproportionate influence on ideology-production, and this in turn had a pernicious geo-political effect.

    At the same time, ideology-production can simply bypass knowledge-production on certain levels. Outside of the Anglophone world, the most irreprarably indoctrinated students are usually those who went to secondary schools which specialized in languages. Thus the students coming out of these schools do not know much on the subjects of physics or chemistry, and they know very little history or geography. Their core-skills are languages – they just subliminally and pre-discursively internalized Atlanticist liberal ideology by learning the English language. This leads us to our central thesis:

    Language in itself is a vector for pre-discursive ideology-transmission. In the English language, this happens on at least three distinct levels.

    Firstly, the grammar of the English language sets reality up as a list of standalone objects.
    Compare the English sentence “There is a desk in the office.” with the German equivalent “Es gibt einen Schreibtisch im Büro,” which literally translates “It gives a desk in the office.”

    So in the German sentence, the desk’s existence is postulated in the following way – the desk is thought to “exist” insofar as it is conferred into existence through its participation in some larger context – something which overarches the desk’s existence “gives it” – that is to say, confers it into existence. Furthermore, there is a loose implication that the desk is a manifestation of this “Es” which “gives” it or confers it into existence…. This way of thinking is inescapable if one happens to think in the German language – nothing simply exists in isolation – everything is part of a larger context. The grammar of the German language is pantheistic.

    On the other hand, in English, the desk is postulated simply as a standalone object – it exists quite independently of any surrounding objects, independently of any social or historical context, independently of any surrounding physical reality – it’s just “there.” English grammar sets up quite a different ontology to German grammar.

    With this in mind, it’s hardly surprising that many of Germany’s most historically noteworthy philosophers and theologians have offered pantheistic interpretations of Christianiaty, and that the empiricist tradition of philosophy and scientific realism have always been more influential in the English-speaking world. Native English-speakers just naturally think that way because that’s just how the grammar of their language cognitively sets reality up for them – objects in the world are just “out there.”

    And, indirectly, this has ideological implications – it impacts on how we discuss history, politics, science, social morality, public policy issues, questions of technocratic or decision-making competence, ways of verifying knowledge, models of social organization, and so forth.

    Secondly, the technical lexicon of the English language, being largely comprised of transliterations from Greek and Latin, is already dehistoricized. That is to say, native English-speakers have great difficulty getting an intimate grasp on the histories of many words which they use, insofar as the Greek and Latin etymological roots of many English words are obscured. For example, most native English-speakers are oblivious to the point that the English word “object” is conventionally taken to mean almost the opposite of what was meant by the Latin “objectus.” This helps to explain why most native English-speakers have such an epistemologically naïve idea of “objectivity,” which also has pernicious ideological implications.

    In most technical disciplines, the German lexicon is mostly morphologically pure German. Many Slavonic languages employ binomial systems of terminology in chemistry, physics, engineering, medicine, etc. In English, however, all we have to work with are words which have been dehistoricized by virtue of having been transliterated from Greek and Latin rather than having been actually translated, morpheme by morpheme, from Greek and Latin. On this basis, it is also arguable that dehistoricization as an ideology in itself, and in particular the dehistoricization of knowledge, are pre-discursively inscribed into the word-stock of the English language. Is it any wonder, then, that so many Anglophone thinkers have interpreted the history of science as a historically linear progression, as “an ever-increasing approximation of the truth?” Furthermore, is it any wonder that so many native English speakers fall into the trap of scientism? Unfortunately, most of scientism’s core articles of faith are pre-discursively inscribed into the English language itself.

    We might go even further.

    Take, for example, the belief which is very widely held by people in the Occident, that all or almost all of history’s enduring scientific and technological ideas are of western origin. In historical terms, this belief is demonstrably nonsense. It is impossible to overstate the impact of what China bequeathed to the world in the fields of metallurgy, agriculture, medicine and astronomy. The first known microbiological theory of disease was first written down in 11th century Uzbekistan. Geology, plate-tectonics, clinical pharmacology and optics, to name but a few disciplines, all developed during the golden age of Islam.

    The mathematization of physics can be traced back to Ibn Al Haytham (11th century). Lomonosov probably discovered oxygen before Lavoisier did, but never published his findings – many of his discoveries were published posthumously. The horse’s bit was probably invented in central Asia. The Romans knew about it, but this simple technological innovation was lost to early medieval Europe – the development of cavalry in early medieval Europe would not have been possible had it not been for its re-discovery through subsequent European contact with Asiatic peoples during the Carolingian period.

    And yet, despite all of the historical evidence to the contrary, most Occidentals believe that all or almost all of history’s enduring scientific and technological ideas are of western origin.

    Who taught them to hold this belief? In most cases, nobody actually taught them.

    Most Occidentals who hold this belief (that all or most of our currently accepted received scientific wisdom is of western origin) were not explicitly told this by any science-teacher, nor did they ever read any article by any historian of science in which any such claim was ever explicitly made. No science-teacher or historian of science ever would tell them that they should believe such a claim, for the simple reason that it would be demonstrably nonsense. Most westerners who believe this simply believe it intuitively. This commonly held belief is partially an intuitive bi-product of the manner in which the English language, the dominant language for scientific publishing, dehistoricizes knowledge.

    This serves as a particularly good example of what I mean by “pre-discursive ideology-transmission.”
    In a nutshell, this concept means that it is not actually necessary to teach people any “doctrine” in order to “indoctrinate” them.

    Actually, we might even say that the most effective way to indoctrinate somebody is by not teaching them any explicit doctrine. Doctrines can be falsified, argued against. If we indoctrinate people by teaching them explicit doctrines, explicit truth-claims about the world, then these doctrines can be itemized and intellectually attacked later. This explicitly doctrinal level of indoctrination is therefore reversible.

    The most effective way to indoctrinate a person, the most irreversible modus of indoctrination, is to carefully avoid teaching them any “doctrine” or “dogma” whatsoever. The most irreversible level of indoctrination is to insidiously inculcate beliefs and other attitudes in people by gaming their processes of intuition – in this case, the indoctrinated person may not even be aware that they hold the belief or attitude in question; they may be unable to articulate it, a point which renders the belief impervious to intellectual attack.

    https://www.fort-russ.com/2018/03/soft-power-rising-chinese-dominance-sciences/

    • Replies: @TT
  154. TT says:
    @Bliss

    The Polynesian natives of New Zealand are known as Maoris. The term Kiwis applies to all New Zealanders, the majority of whom are not Maoris.

    Im not addressing to a moron. 22pp tho a foolish troll, but he is smart enough to understand what is Kiwis native- indigenous people, aka maoris, that you clever ass had to search & pointed out. You don’t need to remove your pants to fart.

    See, if you hurled shits on others against the truth wind, your hand get dirty first. Now its blow back on your face.

  155. Joe Wong says:
    @Anonymous

    That photo was taken in 1958, Apple II made its first appearance in 1977 while Photoshop made its first appearance in 1987. Your lack of basic common sense in time and logic is glaring, did you actually finish primary school? With its citizen like you USA’s decline surprise no one.

    Beside that photo is way better than Vango’s paintings in presentation and clearity.

  156. Joe Wong says:
    @Twodees Partain

    The USA is a shithole state, nobody give a shit to anyone, thus they are using assault rifles mass killing people on the street, concert hall, school kids, family members, … on rampage, as they don’t give a shit.

  157. TT says:
    @22pp22

    Simple, they are wealthy, you are poor. They are well educated, well behaved, no crimes, contribute to society. You are not. So your gov choose them over you.

    This is 6millions qn. Every developed countries are getting screw by this WMM now, mine too so i understand your painful ass. Some stupid scholars come out such theory of importing mass migrants will solve aging population & give economic population bonus. Its akin to invite 10 strangers to live & share ownership of your family house that your forefathers work hard to built. Then hope they can contribute some bill payment to make the household income higher.

    But don’t needle the Chinese, its your capitalism whites leaders fault. Chinese are better than Indian, that my country is now been taken over.

    • Replies: @22pp22
    , @22pp22
  158. Joe Wong says:
    @Che Guava

    Funny you did not troll other fake news about Xi and his family and relatives fabricated by the CIA, NED and their cronies, what happens? CIA, NED and MI6 won’t pay if you copy trolls?

    • Replies: @TT
  159. Joe Wong says:
    @22pp22

    But it was the Japanese who chopped the Canuck and Aussie heads off, abused the Canuck and Aussie along your blood kin the Britons and Yankees in prison camps, used them as specimen and dissect them alive in the bio-chem war experiments, and bombed Australia. Don’t you have any empathy for your own kind and hate and feel vindictive toward those perpetrator beastly Japanese at all? You have such fond love with the Japanese is not normal, it appears you have Stockholm syndrome.

    Besides it was the Japanese destroyed the auto industry in Australia, treated Australia like economic colony after WWII, why are you (Canuck or Aussie) accepting Japanese abuse so contentedly? Would you happen to be a Jap or a Jap wannabe DPP member?

  160. 22pp22 says:
    @TT

    I’m not poor and nor is the region I live in. Gavin Menzies is mildly insane and most Chinese scholars do not accept his theories.

    That, aside, though it pains me to say it, I actually agree with you 1000%.

  161. denk says:
    @22pp22

    Nice to know what you really think. Diversity is not going to work

    Its easy to understand people’s angst against a tsunami of foreigners ,
    I know it first hand,
    Its only human .

    I can even understand , tho not empathise, with Malaysia’s preferential policies favoring the Malays, afterall, self preservation is a human instinct.

    But,
    I have a hard time empathising with so-called white genocide ….

    Firstly,
    Whiteys like to pick on the Chinese , dont take my words for it, RU is crawling with such Chinese hating white supremacists.

    Secondly, they scream at legit Chinese immigrants,
    even tho they themselves were illegit invaders who ursurped the indigenuous lands in North America/Oz.,/NZ/Hawaii/GUam/Puerto Rico,.

    And the land grabbing continues unabated right into the 21C,
    Diego Garcia,
    Okinawa,
    Jeju island., Iraq, Kosovo, Syria…..
    ‘Hey Saddat, We’r here to help you fight the ISIS, whether you like it or not’ !
    Such hubris !

    The next time whiteys whine about alien invasion,
    remember this….

    Its your ‘deep state’ , the globalists, which engineered the white genocide in EU and Indian WMM in Sikkim/Nepal/Myanmar/Singapore etc/
    ethnic cleansing in Diego Garcia/Okinawa./Jeju and………..
    purported ‘white genocide’ at home !

    Confucius sez
    Don’t do unto others what you don’t want others to do unto you.

    Karma is a bitch,,,…

    • Replies: @22pp22
    , @TT
  162. @Che Guava

    “The first is that he graduated as an engineer. Your omission of this makes me strongly suspect that you are from the upper class and/or stupid-degree circles who despise engineers in some western countries”.

    The university refused to graduate him or give him a diploma because he was poorly prepared, and gave him a certificate of completion instead and he never attempted to practice as an engineer. I suspect they’ve since revised their original decision.

    “The second is your tale of his rural, reform through labour, time. The fact is, he ran away to a Pekin, stayed away for at least some weeks, then was found, arrested, and deported back.” Nonsense. All the sent-down kids came and went. How could anyone stop them? He came home feeling sorry for himself but his aunt and uncle talked him out of it.

  163. @Just some guy

    Erm, not only does China have the most trusted government on earth, it also has an economy 50% bigger than America’s and it leads in most fields of endeavor.

    According to the Japan Science and Technology Agency, China now ranks as the most influential country in four of eight core scientific fields, tying with the U.S. The agency took the top 10% of the most referenced studies in each field, and determined the number of authors who were affiliated with the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, China or Japan. China ranked first in computer science, mathematics, materials science and engineering. The U.S., on the other hand, led the way in physics, environmental and earth sciences, basic life science and clinical medicine. China is also rapidly catching up in physics, where the U.S. has long dominated. It is spending more than $6 billion to build the world’s largest particle accelerator, which could put it at the forefront of particle physics. https://tinyurl.com/ydeqeqnb.

    In January, the United States National Science Foundation reported that the number of scientific publications from China in 2016 outnumbered those from the US for the first time: 426,000 versus 409,000.

    45% of technical papers published in the USA have a Chinese co-author.

    Chinese scientist Bai Chunli has been re-elected as the president of the World Academy of Sciences for another two years. http://www.china.org.cn/china/2015-11/21/content_37123628.htm

    China leads the world in all fields of civil engineering, Manufacturing, Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-orbit Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Sustainable Energy, Radiotelescopy, All fields of Sustainable Energy Research and Manufacturing, Hypersonic Space Weapons, Satellite Quantum Communications and quantum secure direct communications.

    It’s going to be hard to bomb them back to the Stone Age.

  164. @Ron Unz

    As a longtime Economist subscriber I, too, claim to have influenced their editorial policy, though modestly.

    After I repeatedly pointed out that they had predicted, 57 times in 36 years, that China’s economy would ‘crash and burn’ (their phrase) they stopped using it.

    But their coverage remained otherwise unaffected, alas.

  165. kauchai says:
    @PandaAtWar

    The Chinese Renaissance has already started 40 years ago.

    Chinese science is blazing the trail in quantum communications and computing, semi-conductor based super-computing, new materials, gene therapy, fintech with crack proof facial recognition (unlike the iPhone garden variety), internet commerce, new energy vehicles, etc. Chinese manufacturing prowess already dominates solar power, wind power, thermal power, hydro power and soon to come, methane ice or natural gas hydrate will be mined commercially. Chinese nuclear power generation technology (Hualong I) is being implemented in Pakistan and China as we speak and soon in England and Argentina.

    Where is the empire when china (a third world country with NO DEMOCRACY and NO HUMAN RIGHTS) is leading humanity towards a cleaner and brighter future? (Oh, sorry, its AMERICA FIRST, LOL!)

    Chinese methods of teaching math is being replicated all over the world, even in one of the most revered cauldrons of education, the UK.

    Chinese UCAVs are being used in Iraq, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Syria to fight ISIS, Al-qaeda, DAESH and whatever names they happened to morph themselves into at the moment with deadly accuracy. Chinese submarines are in or will be in service with the navies of Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Thailand, and more countries are coming on-board. Just ask the israelis how many of their gunboats were sunk by the hezbollahs using chinese anti-ship missiles that were one or two generations older.

    China has already unleashed its “ultra high intellectual elites” and the world can expect more goodies from china in the future. Whether or not china can become the “undisputed world leader” in 20 or 30 years times is not an aspiration of the chinese people nor its leadership. They only aspire to be a “moderately prosperous society by 2020″ and ” a strong and prosperous country” by 2049. Nowhere in this have they mentioned “undisputed world leader” by “regime change”,” color revolutions”, “economic sanctions”, “if you are not with us, you are against us”, “pre-emptive strikes”, etc, etc.

    Why? Because china does not have DEMOCRACY, HUMAN RIGHTS and UNIVERSAL SUFFRAGE bullshit to deliver.

    • Replies: @TT
  166. 22pp22 says:
    @TT

    When I was a child, I used to enjoy tormenting my elder brother. Eventually, he wised up and stopped taking the bait.

    When I lived in Costa Rica, out neighbours had a dog and a troop a carablanca monkeys would enjoy climbing through the trees over its kennel and shitting on its head. It would go berserk and never wised up.

    I know it’s childish, but now when I need someone to torment, I go on line and sing the praises of the Japanese to Chinese and Koreans.

    • Replies: @TT
    , @denk
  167. 22pp22 says:
    @denk

    Okinawa?

    I know Okinawa well. There are a couple of US bases on the island, but apart from that just about everyone is Okinawan.

    They have lost a good deal of their culture and the Uchinaa language has been completely replaced by Japanese, but the population has changed very little.

    Jeju is Korean now and always have been. They’re also incomprehensible. I am not sure even other Koreans understand them.

    Is there any ethnic group in the whole history of the world that has never conquered another? Mongols burned and slaughtered their way through Eastern Europe and Muslims conquered Spain and the Balkans. What I resent is that we are being conquered by weaklings (ie Muslims) and you are right, that is not the fault of the weaklings, it is the fault of out own scumbag politicians.

    I have long since forgiven the Japanese and the Germans for WWII. My grandmother hated Japanese till the day she died, but I think the time has long since passed for that.

    • Replies: @Joe Wong
  168. 22pp22 says:
    @TT

    Cyprus is one of the several countries I have lived in. I love Cyprus and its people. I have done my level best to learn Greek, but I never succeeded. I nailed Japanese, but I never nailed Greek! Fortunately, everyone speaks English. I have never met a Cypriot who cares that much about the bases. The big issue is the 1974 Turkish invasion and the forced ethnic cleansing of Greeks form the North and Turks from the South.

    The British Antarctic territory. All those penguins screaming for self determination!

    The overwhelming majority of the Gibraltarians voted to stay with Britain. Don’t their voices count for anything? I’ve also been there. They are hugely much more patriotically British that Brits in Britain.

    I have not been any other other places on your list.

  169. Bliss says:
    @TT

    You got to be a fool to take a teller of tall tales like Menzies as an authority on anything. He also wrote a book claiming that Zheng He discovered America in 1421. Most laughably, in another book, he claims that in 1434 Zheng He landed with his humongous ships in Italy and jump started the Renaissance. Never mind that Italians have no record of this wondrous event. Lol.

    https://www.theage.com.au/articles/2002/11/24/1037697982893.html

    Central to Menzies’ theories about Australia is a master world map produced in 1542 by Jean Rotz…….But Barber describes the Rotz map as “generally discredited or, at the very least, hotly contested”.

    Another map used by Menzies, drawn by Venetian Fra Mauro in 1459, even fails to accurately depict China, a strange occurrence if the Chinese were the source, Barber says.

    More extensive debunking here:

    http://www.1421exposed.com/html/wade_challenge.html

    By the way, there was no mention of New Zealand anywhere. Didn’t you write that a Maori asked you you to pass on this message to the readers of Unz.com: “When Ming dynasty Zhenghe majestic navy fleet visited us, they left us in peace without molestation.”? Lol.

    You really should get your hero Menzies in touch with your Maori friend.

  170. Bliss says:
    @TT

    This i muz apologize for mistaken others 2% as Indian, it should be 6~7% 20+yrs ago

    Mistaken? How could anyone from Singapore possibly be ignorant of the fact that Singapore’s Indian population has never been anywhere as low as 2%?

    https://www.murdoch.edu.au/Research-capabilities/Asia-Research-Centre/_document/working-papers/wp124.pdf

    On political independence, the racial composition of the population was approximately 78% Chinese, 15% Malays and 7% South Asians.

  171. TT says:
    @Joe Wong

    Joe, Che is quoting from Wiki, not his fake troll. Me too read that, Pres Xi was a chemical engr grad from Qinghua. The runaway story, Mr Roberts is more reliable than CIA.

    China is passive in counter propaganda war, everywhere Fukus is smearing China. SCS China bully BS is etched into whole world mind, ..

    But i suspect its china wisdom, juz strive ahead, truth shall prevail. China don’t need to fight with every barking dog slowing down journey. Russia is been cornered bcos too successful in counter propaganda war.

  172. Bliss says:
    @TT

    So more realistic is in 2010 peak 109, Malay&Indian already IQ80-90(still better than India), Chinese & others was actually developed to 114~117 high.

    Too stupid and too dishonest.

    Firstly, no chinese nation has been measured at an IQ of 114-117. You are just pulling numbers out of your ass to avoid facing reality.

    Secondly, according to your own link Singapore IQ increased from 105 in 2003 to 109 in 2010. And according to the data you posted (I reprint it below) the Chinese population in Singapore decreased from 76.8% in 2000 to 74.1% in 2010 while the Indian population increased from 7.9% to 9.2% in the same time span. That does not support your claim that Indians and Malays are lowering Singapore’s IQ does it?

    Ethnic group 1970 [45] 1980 [45] 1990 [11] 2000 [11] 2010 [11] 2011 [11] 2012 [11] 2013 [11] 2015 [46]

    Chinese 77.0% 78.3% 77.8% 76.8% 74.1% 74.1% 74.2% 74.2% 74.3%
    Malays 14.8% 14.4% 14.0% 13.9% 13.4% 13.4% 13.3% 13.3% 13.3%
    Indians 7.0% 6.3% 7.1% 7.9% 9.2% 9.2% 9.2% 9.1% 9.1%
    Others 1.2% 1.0% 1.1% 1.4% 3.3% 3.3% 3.3% 3.3% 3.2%

    • Replies: @Che Guava
  173. TT says:
    @22pp22

    Its sadist, not childish. Jap war crimes are very cruel to Asians, China & Korean got the blunt. Many of my country folks are massacre too, Chinese ethnic was main resisting force in SEAsia.

    Contribute your last part of life wisely for truth & peace, not waste it like a fool shitting BS on innocents head. Its your lunatic gov deserve your attention. Turnbull has gone berserk harming its own nation. Nz will be nxt coerced by Fukus.

    • Replies: @22pp22
  174. TT says:
    @kauchai

    Why? Because china does not have DEMOCRACY, HUMAN RIGHTS and UNIVERSAL SUFFRAGE bullshit to deliver.

    That’s China essence. No need distract or play by enemy’s rule. Pres Xi team performance is impressive.

    Below will be the greatest contribution to humanity ever if its extended to the world & enshrine into Constitution.

    http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/1091609.shtml

    As President Xi Jinping’s concept of “building a community(world) with a shared future for humanity” gains ground internationally, China will attach more importance to the five-year-old notion, with a view to finding an ultimate way to world peace.

    At the beginning of March, China is entering its annual political high season. As the country’s top legislature and advisory body gear up for their annual sessions to set the national agenda for the year and beyond, analysts expect the “shared future” concept to be a major theme during this year’s meetings.

    Analysts have suggested that building a community(my word:world) with a shared future for humanity could potentially be proposed to be added to the Constitution, at the two sessions.

  175. TT says:

    That’s a model for every world leaders.

    Country & people true welfare come first, not corrupted West capitalist.

    http://www.china.org.cn/china/NPC_CPPCC_2018/2018-03/06/content_50664173.htm

    [MORE]

    Chinese economy has transitioned from a phase of rapid growth to a stage of high-quality development, said Xi, also general secretary of the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee and chairman of the Central Military Commission, warning that old ways of thinking might lead China almost nowhere and miss precious opportunities.

    Local governments should build on their strengths and tap their potential to develop more emerging, high-end, high-value-added and capital-and-technology-intensive industries, putting in place a multi-dimension and multi-pillar modern industrial mix, Xi pointed out.

    He also called on the region to develop modern equipment manufacturing, modern services and other emerging sectors like new material, biomedicine, electronics and information, energy conservation, and environmental protection to lend fresh growth momentum.

    The region should enhance infrastructure development and make full use of its geographical position for better resource allocation and production layout, Xi said.

    Debt risks should be closely watched and effectively prevented, Xi added.

    Xi called for more efforts on environmental protection. The management of mountain, water, forest, land, and lake should be planned as a whole. Important projects should be pushed forward elaborately, including the northwest-north-northeast China networks of shelterbelts.

    The region should try its best to strike a balance between grass and livestock, strengthen desertification prevention and wetland conservation as well as controlling water, air, and soil pollution.

    Xi called for more intensive and precise efforts to help villages with a large number of impoverished residents shake off poverty.

    Efforts should focus on issues like industrial development, employment, infrastructure, public services, and healthcare. The medical security system should be improved to address poverty caused by illness, he said.

    The president said the poverty alleviation fight should be complemented with China’s rural vitalization strategy to improve living conditions of farmers and herdsmen.

    Xi said actions should be taken against corruption and undesirable practices in poverty relief work, while demanding strict punishment for embezzlement of poverty relief funds, and elimination of practices like formalities for formalities’ sake, bureaucratism, and falsification.

    Xi also called for fostering a strong sense of community for the Chinese nation and promoting ethnic solidarity.

    Efforts should be made to encourage all ethnic groups to watch out for and help each other and raise awareness of ethnic unity, so that all ethnic groups could be together “like seeds of a pomegranate,” he said.

  176. TT says:
    @pogohere

    One effect of the global spread of the English language as a lingua franca is that it created something approaching an Anglophone monopoly on knowledge-production, and therefore a disproportionate influence on ideology-production, and this in turn had a pernicious geo-political effect.

    For a language to becom dominating, it required dominating influence in geopolitical & economy, cultural & may be spiritual too.

    Anglo was successful bcos of British empire, follow by US. When i was young, Japanese, French & German were also actively promoting their language, but English is simply too dominating. Japan got some success with its cultural influence & industrial might, but all didn’t success in carving out their sphere eventually bcos of US overwhelming influence.

    When China reach the level that consummate its great civilization status, everything will fall naturally into order. Chinese will again become language of elites, as in ancient Jp & Korea pre war time. And Chinese wisdom believe in: knowing ownself & others well, one win every battles. This is better than the Anglos way of indoctrinate ownself, dwelling in hubris that lead to their declination.

    US empire certainly can last long if its continue to built strength instead of squandering away its great wealth in numourous wars for hedgmon. China understand this very well.

    大國崛起 The Rise of the Great Nations. This documentary has reveal China wisdom in its peaceful rising vision.

  177. Che Guava says:

    Thank you, God-free.

    Polite and informative reply, you likely are correct about his failure at engineering. Just a certificate of completion, not a degree. Not worth checking, in any case.

    Wanted to check your other point, so asking my good friend and neighbour from PRC which version of the other part he is believing, was Xi arrested and sent back, or kindly uncle and aunt to advising the young Xi to go back?

    My friend had no hesitation to say that the former is generally believed, and the latter most unlikely.

    God-free, I am agreeing about much you say about The Great Helmsman, but you go too far to excuse things.

    Personally, I think it is a shame that Deng ever assumed the ‘Proletarian Mandate of Heaven’, I like parts of his style, love of cigarettes, but his programme was revenge for his exile.

    So, as you would know, rural school and health systems destroyed, in a very narrow frame of time. The Party princelings, like earlier versions of Xi, established in power.

    You can not having it both ways, but you are trying to propagandise both. Anybody with reason can see.

  178. Che Guava says:
    @Bliss

    TT, I am not to quoting from Wiki, and, as I was saying in my reply to God-free, it is a question

  179. TT says:
    @denk

    Denk, where is your soulmate Malla & your present in another interesting post?

    AaronB:
    I’m just waiting for malla and denk to show up so the real entertainment can begin.

    http://www.unz.com/article/iq-or-the-mathverbal-split/#comment-2231736

    • Replies: @denk
  180. denk says:
    @TT

    I hope he wasnt dragged away by men in uniform in the middle of the night, this kind of stuff is very common in India, you know.. that ‘world’s largest democracy’
    heheheh

    Anyway if you’r interested I’ve a story to tell,….

    Over the years ,I came across and got aquainted with quite a numbers of whitey tourists , they initially claimed to come from Canada, Oz,….etc , whatever.
    but after a few drinks , they got loosened out and confided that they’r actually murkkans.

    I say ‘what the hell would you wanna do that for, are you ashamed of your own country ?

    They’d nod sheepishly,
    ‘Our country has gotten into such a bad name these days, bombing countries, extra judicial killings,the lot,…you know,
    we’ve learned to cover our ass when abroad , to save ourselves some embarrassment’

    I chuckled and told them I could understand that, we then got on to rounds of murkka bashing over drinks and generally had a good time.

    I’d say these guys had the right kind of attitude !

    And yet…….

    There’r those who figure its China that needs to be reigned in…

    From reddit,
    ‘Why aint the Chinese rising up against Xi the tyrant ‘ ?

    Hey honey,
    ‘Could it be that the Chinese like what Xi is doing , perchance ‘ ? [1]

    Which begs the question,

    Why aint there no more anti wars protests in the five eyes , do the anglos all support fukus perpetual wars for profit ?

    Jim Jones, gt, care to tell us when was the last time you protest on fukus killing spree ???

    In this world, it really takes all kinds…

    hehehe

    • Replies: @TT
  181. 22pp22 says:
    @TT

    The Japanese killed my grandmother’s brother. We nuked Hiroshima. We sold opium to the Chinese in 1840. Mao starved millions of his own people to death in 1960.

    There has to be a statute of limitations on hatred.

    I have never met a Japanese who wanted to kill me. I get the impression that one or two of the Chinese commenters here would still a knife into me and look into my eyes as my life ebbed away screaming: “Karma’s a bitch!”

    • Replies: @denk
    , @Joe Wong
    , @TT
  182. denk says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    Over the years I’ve reformed and salvaged quite a number of
    brainwashed whiteys in various forums, all very grateful for
    the deliverance.

    Im still working on 22p.

    P.s.

    Woz is improving, quite impressive/

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  183. Joe Wong says:
    @22pp22

    I have lived in Japan for a while, after a few bottle of Sake, the Japanese started to brag, they had not forgotten Australia as their Tennō (天皇)’s gift, they said the land is polluted and it’s contamination by the barbarian ex-convicts needs to be purified and returned Australia to whom it belonged, the Asian. Those Japanese complained that Chinese should work with them then, without the Chinese pinning down their Kwantung Army 關東軍, they would have landed in Australia and purified Australia already. Surprising the Japanese still have not forgotte that dream about Australia after 75 years of the war.

  184. denk says:
    @22pp22

    I know it’s childish, but now when I need someone to torment, I go on line and sing the praises of the Japanese to Chinese and Koreans.

    The joke is on you…they’ve been feeding you B.S. all these years,’
    ehhhhehhe

    http://original.antiwar.com/john-v-walsh/2013/02/03/us-goading-japan-into-confrontation-with-china/

  185. denk says:
    @22pp22

    I thought you understand,

    That karma is the white genocide administered by TPTB, your ‘deep state’ globalists.

    • Replies: @22pp22
  186. Joe Wong says:
    @22pp22

    Don’t take us wrong, Chinese bloggers have no intention to upset anybody here, Chinese bloggers are here to expose the lies told about China, clear the smear painted on China and correct the distorted facts with truth about China.

    The Westerners have been misguided by their evil imperialist forebear far too long and the majority of them are totally living in a world with a mindset belonging to the past, stalled in the old days of colonialism, constrained by the zero-sum cold war mentality and detached from reality.

    Indeed it is harmful to believe one’s own reality based on the past, out of date and obsolete records, such nostalgia outlook is a sign of falling behind and feeling helplessness. So please do not take Chinese bloggers’ frankness as insult, rebuttal or lecturing.

  187. Joe Wong says:
    @Che Guava

    If one does not want to stay, you cannot make him stay for more than ten years, and participated hard labour work wholeheartedly to improve the locals living conditions and became the chief of the village. You should know there were no walls and shackles to tie him down, if he was forced back against his will, he would run again like all normal kids would do, during that chaotic time there were plenty of places he could go. It seems you are so deep in the ideology that you even don’t know you have one, and you are so eagerly to fill your old days of colonialism and zero-sum cold war mindset you just take any hearsay as the last straw. You should know not everybody like the Westerners who only believes zero-sum, beggar-thy-neighbour, materialistic and morally defunct; serving-the-people is out of their mind frame and not in their dictionary.

    What do you mean that rural school and health system were destroyed? It was a culture revolution, the old establishment was corrupted like the ones before liberation, and it needed to be overhauled to save the new China which was established on very high cost. Even the victims like Deng agreed the idea was correct but the mean was a bit radical. It was Chinese internal affairs it is not up to you the Gweilo to verdict, just like the French Revolution, American Civil War and English Civil War, it is not up to Chinese to denounce them as barbaric and evil.

    You should know the whole world’s ills is created by the ‘god-fearing’ morally defunct evil ‘puritans’ who have been meddling other people’s business with treachery and organized violence, and rewriting other people’s history based on their own evil imagination and construct, it is the Gweilo who cannot see the log in their eyes.

  188. 22pp22 says:
    @denk

    I do understand. My loathing for our deep state is beyond words. More than anything, I feel they have made me complicit in their crimes in the Middle East, especially the second Invasion of Iraq and the destruction of Yemen.

    I do not feel guilty about colonialism. In 1860, Qing China was stuck at medieval levels off economic development and the West was so far ahead it could simply dictate terms.

    I do not want to see roles reversed.

    China’s economic development is easy to explain. Deng Xiaoping took the shackles off the Chinese economy gave the country a modern infrastructure and Chinese IQ did the rest.

    Western economic success is actually harder to explain. There are fewer than us than there are of you and yet we still produce a lot of top-quality scientific innovation despite our slightly lower IQs.

    Many Western Europeans mock the Russians, yet they are smart enough to put rockets into space and built top-quality military hardware. Some of it is down to their Jewish minority, but the contribution of Slavs is also huge.

    I look at white rural New Zealand, small-town Bavaria, even Thessaloniki in Greece and I do not see failed, crime-ridden hell-holes. Crime is so rare in Cyprus it makes Japan feel like Chicago in the 1920′s.

    What is wrong with our society can be summed up as 1) a bad relationship with alcohol and 2) obesity.

    I want our universities to train our doctors and engineers,not other people’s.

    TT is a proud Singaporean and that is a good thing, but Singapore is a city state and so I think it should be left out of international comparisons the same way that Luxembourg and Monaco should be.

    You might find the following data instructive.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/256642/the-20-countries-with-the-highest-trade-surplus/

    Italy, the Netherlands and Ireland are no more blessed with natural resources than South Korea.

    Also, I am aware that Chinese people are not perfect. They have flaws. That’s not racist, it’s simply a function of the fact that they are human. The idea that we will not be trodden on if we lie face down in the first is simply silly.

    Godfree Robert is a self-loathing Westerner. They get on my nerves – as does this puff-piece on Xi Jinping. No human is perfect, not even a man with the smarts to rise to the leadership of the world’s biggest county.

    Vladimir Putin’s achievements rival Xi Jinping’s in that he turned around a country that was on the verge of imploding, but I’ve never seen a pro-Putin puff-piece to rival this.

    • Replies: @kauchai
    , @TT
    , @Joe Wong
    , @denk
  189. Batambob says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    Aggrieved complaints about those who are not conforming to narrowly defined rules is common in Singapore. It is also a common aspect of traditional village life.

  190. kauchai says:
    @22pp22

    ” I do not feel guilty about colonialism. In 1860, Qing China was stuck at medieval levels off economic development and the West was so far ahead it could simply dictate terms.”

    “I do not want to see roles reversed. ”

    “The idea that we will not be trodden on if we lie face down in the first is simply silly.”

    Spoken like a true psychopathic hypocrite. You are tasting some of this roles reversal in the south china sea right now. Best thing of all, china didn’t even have to fire a single bullet and the empire’s mighty navy can only play chicken.

    If you stick around a little longer, there is just a slim chance you may see your passion about colonialism come true when the PLA or the russian army march into 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue and 10 Downing Street.

    And I am sure you’d love it just as much when the PLA trooper grinds his heel into you face and shove the other one into your ass.

    I bet you’d enjoy it just as much when your limbs are sawn-off and reattached with somebody else’s without anesthesia.

    How about being injected with typhoid, malaria, dengue, syphillis, gonorrhea, ebola, SARS, H5N1 just to see how you hold up to these wonderful germs, heh?

    Not enough? Get a dose of VX, anthrax, Sarin, maybe even polonium or depleted uranium?

    Maybe you would laugh and encourage your colonial masters when your daughters, wife and other female friends were raped and sodomized and then have iron rods and branches stuffed into their vaginas and rectums. I bet you will be the first in line to patronize them when they are turned into comfort women. You would cheer to the high heavens when pregnant women’s bellies are slit open and their fetuses thrown into the air for bayonet practice, won’t you?

    You would even volunteer for a campaign to spray the countryside with agent orange so that you will have a chance to eat the GMO grown wheat, soybeans, barley, rice, fruits because they are soooo nutritious won’t you?

    See, colonialism is so much fun…when you wouldn’t feel guilty about it.

    But then again, chinese have a silly thing about not doing to others what you don’t want others to do unto you. Sorry, to raise your hope so high…

    But if you continue to poke china in the eye whenever the itch strikes, you may just be the first to get a taste of their brand new hypersonic ICBM (DF17) delivered to your doorstep with guidance from the BEIDOU satellite navigation system in less than 14 minutes. If this is not enough for your colonial fetishes, the PLAN can send a few dozens 094 nuclear ballistic missile subs off the artic, atlantic and pacific coasts to keep you warm in the cold winter.

    ” Western economic success is actually harder to explain. There are fewer than us than there are of you and yet we still produce a lot of top-quality scientific innovation despite our slightly lower IQs. ”
    Its really not that hard to explain. But I supposed by now I may not be able to prevail on you to check out the twenty something volumes of Joseph Needham’s “SCIENCE AND CIVILIZATION IN CHINA” which (as a prequel for you) was the basis for a large part of the industrial revolutions in europe that brought the west out of the dark ages. But if you are interested, they can be found in the university of cambridge in good old mother england.

    When he was asked what he taught of the french revolution, former premier zhou enlai said it was too early to tell. All of europe, ex-roman empire have only less than 2000 years. The empire of chaos has less than 300. The chinese civilization has not only survived the last 5,000 years of bloody and inhuman invasions by the west and the japs, internal revolutions, natural calamities and the progress of time, it has expanded and thrive with its unique culture and its own system of governance. As for the empire of chaos, I am sorry to say that looking at the way it is being run today, I highly doubt it will make it to the next 300 in one piece.

    • Replies: @22pp22
    , @22pp22
    , @Daniel Chieh
  191. TT says:
    @denk

    Malla is in UK, is Indian RAW hands that long? May be, Assange is still illegally lock up in Estonia Embassy.

    We had an encounter with Indian RAW. They qn about our present in their remote area. The American took a photo of their supervisor & said, i’m Murkans your soulmate. Loo… magic word, they dissappear.

    I haven’t met any Chinese that is disapproval of Xi performance yet. Only some websites by murkans stooge paid Chinese dissidents, crowing everything Chinese has achieved is propaganda. When a nation has 80% approval rate like China & Russia, its formidable, West can only wet dream about it.

    50% murkans don’t vote, 50% divide betw 2 moronic puppet parties & powerless tea party. Less than 25% votes winning is what they called demoncrapcy. At least EU still can have some opposition to fight back deep states destructive immigration policy.

    • Replies: @Che Guava
  192. TT says:
    @22pp22

    Denk is a Crusader of FukusIndia lies, nothing more. One day he might get a honary citizenship awarded by Xi for his tiresome work since 1998(wow, i actually read his comment in 1999 for Tiananmen).

    When one day your jp neighbors without provocation, sneak up into your house, slaughter all your sons, rape all your daughters & wife, and crow about it, you might find hard to forgive huh? But you nuke jp, more ruthless, so ok.

    Im quite sure Chinese has no hesitation to see Jp dissappear if they could, consider jp still trying to honor war crimes, denied atrocity, gang up with US & Indians to sabotage it. It require a sane jp PM to apologize sincerely, atone, and patch up in goodwill with Chinese & Koreans.

    People are forgiving to sincere repentance. German did that, but jp try to chge history by rewriting school textbook. The murkans said we nuke their military(brigade of women & children) to save more innocent soldiers life, let’s move on. War criminals forgive lesser war criminals.

    • Replies: @denk
  193. TT says:
    @22pp22

    I do not feel guilty about colonialism. In 1860, Qing China was stuck at medieval levels off economic development and the West was so far ahead it could simply dictate terms. I do not want to see roles reversed.

    In 2040, the West was stuck at medieval levels off economic development and the East was so far ahead it could simply dictate terms. But don’t you colonize me & have no modest sense of guilt. Its ok if i f**k your wife & daughter, but don’t you touch mine….that’s white mentality.

    Godfree Robert is a self-loathing Westerner. They get on my nerves – as does this puff-piece on Xi Jinping. No human is perfect, not even a man with the smarts to rise to the leadership of the world’s biggest county.

    I would said Godfrey is rare realistic westerner, telling his foolish kins to look straight at Truth. You can’t cover your own eyes to make others can’t see you. The West is naked emperor now, Godfrey called it out.

    Vladimir Putin’s achievements rival Xi Jinping’s in that he turned around a country that was on the verge of imploding, but I’ve never seen a pro-Putin puff-piece to rival this.

    You ought to be kidding, Putin has much colourful profile story that make Xi look like a boring old dish washer in Chinatown.

    But Putin has no vision for the world like Xi, he is very much on Russian rise to super power & won’t hesitate to throw his allies under bus if West agreed to give him an equal seat in the eminent vultures club, G8 less China.

    Now read these.

    http://eng.putin.kremlin.ru/bio

    https://www.biography.com/.amp/people/vladimir-putin-9448807

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_Putin

    Putin paternal grandfather, Spiridon Ivanovich Putin, a skilled cook who worked for Lenin, then Stalin. Father was a ww2 soldier.

    He was high flyer in study, enrol in law, St Petersburg Uni. A Judo black belts. Joint most elite KGB1 as foreign intelligence officer for 16 years, rising to Lieutenant Colonel,.. joint politics, become assistant to rector of uni, do Phd …joined President Boris Yeltsin’s administration, rising quickly in 8yrs to become Pres of Russia.

    He was Director of the Federal Security Service (FSB), successor to the KGB.[62]

    Putin cultivates an outdoor, sporty, tough guy public image, demonstrating his physical prowess and taking part in unusual or dangerous acts, such as extreme sports and interaction with wild animals,[368] part of a public relations approach that, according to Wired, “deliberately cultivates the macho, take-charge superhero image” Notable examples of Putin’s adventures include:[376] flying military jets, demonstrating martial arts, riding horses, rafting, and fishing and swimming in a cold Siberian river, many of which he did bare chested.[370] Other examples are descending in a deepwater submersible, tranquilizing tigers and polar bears,[370][377][378] riding a motorbike,[379] co-piloting a firefighting plane to dump water on a raging fire,[369] shooting darts at whales from a crossbow for eco-tracking,[380] driving a race car,[376][381] scuba diving at an archaeological site,[371][382] attempting to lead endangered cranes in a motorized hang glider,[383] and catching large fish.[384][385]

    “He was expert at reading and manipulating people and was unfazed by violence,” writes Katusa. “These were indispensable qualities for anyone out to make his way to the top of the Russian political pile.”

    He flown a fighter plane. He threaten to flush terrorists down the toilet. He won Chechnya war, Georgia war, took back Crimean under murkans eyes, screwed West & Israel terrorists in Syria war…

    In March 2018, during his annual address to Parliament, Putin boasted of new weaponry that would render NATO defenses “completely worthless,” including a low-flying nuclear-capable cruise missile with “unlimited” range and another one capable of traveling at hypersonic speed. His demonstration included video animation of attacks on the U.S., ratcheting up tensions with Washington

    The only man in earth can threaten to annihilate murkans if their rott heads decide to risk attack Russia.

    • Replies: @FB
  194. Che Guava says:
    @TT

    Wow, from your language, you are clearly a crazy person who is pretty stupid. Sure, good at whining.

    So, keep whining.

    • Replies: @TT
  195. TT says:
    @Che Guava

    Thank you for your contribution to Unz humor.

    • Agree: Che Guava
  196. luba says:
    @FB

    Deng’s grandson, Deng Zuo Di, mentioned in the WaPo article you mentioned, was sent to work at one of the local county governments in Guang Xi between 2013-2016 in the same fashion as Xi had done with his “aprenticeship” in the destitute village and county adminstration. Obviously it is a bit too hard for the US-born & US-educated younger Deng, he quitted it and is now playing bridge in Beijing.

    Even if you are born into the “red aristocratic family”, there is no gurantee that you can become the head of the country if you can’t take the bitter and bite the dirt.

    • Agree: FB
  197. Joe Wong says:
    @22pp22

    We are now living in a rapidly changing world…Peace, development, cooperation and mutual benefit have become the trend of our times. To keep up with the times, we cannot have ourselves physically living in the 21st century, but with a mindset belonging to the past, stalled in the old days of colonialism, and constrained by zero-sum Cold War mentality.

    The West (Europeans and their offshoots like the American, Aussie, etc.) is where is now, because of those hundreds of millions of people all over the world who were robbed and murdered, those who become victims of their very madness of colonialism and orientalism, of the crusades and the slave and Opium trades. Cathedrals and palaces, museums and theatres, train stations – all had been constructed on horrid foundations of bones and blood, and amalgamated by tears.

    The West squandered all the wealth they obtained thru stealing, looting and murdering hundreds of millions of people all over the world in the scrabbling of a dog-eat-dog play rough over the monopoly to plunder the rest of the world through two World Wars, one on the edge of Armageddon, and on the verge of another Armageddon. It proves the West is incapable of bringing peace and prosperity to the mankind because of their flawed culture, civilization and religion. The chaos and suffering of the world in the last few hundreds of years under the dominance the West proves they are a failure.

    Human beings deserve better, we need to depart from the chaotic and harmful world order and path established by the moronic West. China proposed a new way of life, a win-win approach for the wellbeing of mankind like Belt-Road-Initiative to build and trade the world into peace, harmony and prosperity. The West should not be the obstacle for achieving such refreshing winner for all initiative. The West should embrace the new approach proposed by China because the West will benefit from it. 22pp22, let go the old, obsolete, failed and detrimental believe passed onto you by your colonialist forebears please, welcome the new era.

    • Replies: @22pp22
  198. FB says:
    @TT

    Well said TT…always enjoy your Confucian take on geopolitics…

    Also appreciate the pictures…you may have missed this one of Macron…

    They say he is trying to be like Putin…but the leash gets in the way…

  199. luba says:
    @Polish Perspective

    Premier Li Keqiang is a graduate of Economics from Beida (Beijing University aka China’s Harvard) , center of neoliberal. He’s a follower of American neoliberal IMHO. The neoliberal economic policy proves to be disatrous for ordinary people while beneficial to the rich-and-richer few.

    His attempt to reform of finance brings quite some fluctuation into the stock resulting some huge financial scandals. I agree with you that the reation of China’s government about 2015 stockmarket meltdown was stupid/suspicious. Now CEOs and managers of some Chinese financial groups and funds are now under investigations and some top officials of the supervision board of China’s stock markets are also arrested for corruption. (One of those under investigation is the husband of Deng’s granddaughter.)

    His proposal for “financial innovation” ends up with tons of online usury loans to the young people, esp students at universities. Some of the scams have real interest rates as high as 50%. There are some young students who can’t pay back the loans and can’t bear the high pressure from the loan sharks committed suicide. Big problem for social stability.

    His push of PPP, euphemism for privatisation, of public services and asset-rich SOEs are not popular with average Chinese who have seen what happened in USSR and/or experienced in China under Zhu Rongji.

    Zhu Rongji is a darling in Western and among China’s nouveau riche because he offered them the super chances to make huge amount of money in China and to steal the public assets to become millionaire overnight.

    He sold the state-owned enterprises (SOE) at fire-fight price, which enriched the well-connected ones and opened the gate to the rampage of corruptions that spread to all levels of governments, even to the army, and still saddles the society. He ruthlessly closed hundres of thousands of SOEs no matter wheather they were in healthy economic status or not and forced tens of millions of workers out of job without social net in place. Womens out of job from the Northeast China went to become prostitutes to support their families. Some out-of-job workers’ could not afford to have meat once in a month. In some extrem cases the whole family committed suicide by jumping off the top of the building.

    His policy totally destructed the industry of Northeast of China, where used to be the industry base for China, and it yet recovers. The traumatic psychological shock is still haunting the ordinary workers, their families as well the local society.

    Zhu is obviously very competent but equally ruthless. Millions of workers whose lives and famlies were ruined by him will never forget nor forgive him.

    • Replies: @TT
  200. 22pp22 says:
    @kauchai

    I have forgiven the Mongols. Now I forgive you for you highly intemperate outburst. You say:

    Maybe you would laugh and encourage your colonial masters when your daughters, wife and other female friends were raped and sodomized and then have iron rods and branches stuffed into their vaginas and rectums. I bet you will be the first in line to patronize them when they are turned into comfort women. You would cheer to the high heavens when pregnant women’s bellies are slit open and their fetuses thrown into the air for bayonet practice, won’t you?

    You certainly have a vivid imagination. I really wouldn’t laugh if I saw any of those things. I am not like you.

    • Replies: @kauchai
  201. 22pp22 says:
    @Joe Wong

    Actually, there is a great deal less suffering today than there has been in the past.

    Thirteenth century. Mongols slaughter 1/6 of the planet.

    Seventeenth century – Fall of the Ming, Thirty Years War, Time of Troubles – in terms of the numbers killed relative to population far worse than anything in the past century. Nothing to do with colonialism.

    Nineteenth Century. The great bloodbath of the nineteenth century was the Taiping Rebellion. That was Chinese on Chinese. The worst thing that happened on European soil was the French occupation of Spain and the Irish Famine.

    Hundreds of millions of murders? There weren’t hundreds of millions of Maori or Aborigines. Wandering through Rotorua or Cairns, there still seem to be quite a few of them around. If you are referring to the New World, then you do have a point. The exploitation of the silver mines or Potosi was brutal and the Trail of Tears is a stain on our history. However, it was primarily smallpox and other Old World diseases that wiped out the locals. If Chinese had reached the New World First (as Gavin Menzies claims), the Chinese would have infected the Red Indians with influenza and measles in the same way that we did.

    In 1900, Germany did more trade with Luxembourg than it did with its entire colonial empire. Switzerland and Sweden were never colonial powers and yet they are stinking rich. Many European countries still run massive trade surpluses, per capita far more so than China.

    The Cathedrals of the West were built when we were under assault from Islam and were not in a position to colonise anyone.

    This idea that the Western World success was built on colonialism is silly. The West was able to subjugate other people because it had first become wealthy, not the other way round. The Japanese realised this and copied the West in the Meiji Era. They then joined in the subjugation of other people with gusto.

    I hope I won’t have to kowtow in this new Utopia.

    • Replies: @Joe Wong
  202. 22pp22 says:
    @kauchai

    Ancient China is a fascinating civilization.

    But Joseph Needham? Come on! The man was caught in one lie after another. He was delusional. He said that Aztec culture was clearly inspired by China.

    An no Chinese people did not split the atom or invent the aeroplane. Westerners did.

  203. @kauchai

    He will experience the future, one way or another. Slamming words on the keyboard won’t change anything. In a way, its perhaps particularly just given his basically evil attitude that he gets to suffer it far more than someone who is more enlightened. He chose suffering, and in that, there is much karma.

    In the end, selfishness and evil becomes its own punishment.

    • Replies: @22pp22
  204. denk says:
    @22pp22

    I see that TT and Kauchai have beaten me to it,
    but your proclaimation does begs more questions,

    I do not feel guilty about colonialism. In 1860, Qing China was stuck at medieval levels off economic development and the West was so far ahead it could simply dictate terms.

    Migt make right is ok for us !

    I do not want to see roles reversed.

    but not for the Chinese etc…..

    To hell with the multi-polar world,
    Long live to Pax murkka !

    I guess you support the asia pivot, the quad machination,
    to nip the yellow peril in its bud eh ?

  205. denk says:
    @TT

    Was that in the Guardian ?

    • Replies: @TT
  206. kauchai says:
    @22pp22

    I forgive you for your inconsiderate and ill-mannered take about colonialism that brought so much misery, pain, loss, dislocation, etc. It has been a 500-year old enterprise that are still being felt and practiced all over the world today. This is especially so in the middle-east, africa and latin america.

    My vivid imagination comes from Daniel Barenblatt’s A PLAGUE UPON HUMANITY – The Secret Genocide of Axis Japan’s Germ Warfare Operation (Harper-Collins). If reading is hard on you, please go visit the UNIT 731 museum in Harbin China and do not forget to drop by the Nanjing Massacre Memorial.

    By the way, the mongols are not chinese.

  207. kauchai says:
    @22pp22

    ” An no Chinese people did not split the atom or invent the aeroplane.”

    I doubt the chinese will bring themselves to develop a weapon of mass destruction when they stopped at just using gunpowder to make fireworks. Do chinese have to invent everything for the human race?

    And unlike you, Needham backed up his assertions about chinese inventions with cold hard facts.

    • Replies: @22pp22
  208. TT says:
    @luba

    Mr Zhu Rongji certainly had a more impressive biography than Pres Xi JP. Is he really so bad, or its an unjust comment on such remarkable visionary China leader?

    Consider his so many accolades & achievements, single handledly kill off 1997 Asian Crisis raiders against West vultures pressure to devalue Yuan, restructured debts burden states banks & SoE, cutoff colossal PLA involvement in business, Justice Bao of anti-corruption…the most impressive Premier since Zhou Enlai.

    Deng praised Zhu RJ highly, “If China were to discover Zhu 10yrs earlier, China progress could have been much far ahead….”. …Deng, who noted that Zhu “has his own views, dares to make decisions, and knows economics.”[1] In comparing Zhu to his peers when considering his appointment, Deng said, “The current leadership do not know economics… Zhu Rongji is the only one who understands economics.”[11]

    The only China leader could charmed the West, giving unscripted English speech & playing erhu in US congress to standing ovation, and was praised by American journalists, politicians, and business leaders for his frankness, openness, energy, and technical background.

    During the Cultural Revolution Zhu was purged again. From 1970-1975 during his exile in the countryside Zhu worked as a manual laborer, raising pigs and cattle, carrying human waste, and planting rice.[3]

    [MORE]

    Zhu was chosen to become China’s fifth premier in 1998, largely due to his success in managing large macroeconomic projects.[5] During his term Zhu continued to focus on issues related to economic development. He generally favoured stable, sustainable development supported by robust macroeconomic control measures and a tight monetary policy. He continued to promote investment in China’s industrial and agricultural sectors.[24]

    His reform of state-owned enterprises led to approximately 35% of their workforce, forty million workers, being laid off over five years.[14][27] Some of Zhu’s reforms were reversed under the leadership of Hu Jintao, and other reforms he hoped would be addressed by the incoming administration were not implemented. Notably, state-owned enterprises were allowed to regrow and re-establish a dominant place in the Chinese economy, and large areas of the banking sector remained unregulated. Hu may have reversed the Chinese government’s previous position and promoted state-owned enterprises in an effort to promote social stability.[27]

    Shortly after coming to office, in 1998, he required the People’s Liberation Army to relinquish its involvement in business interests. Referring to his efforts to fight corruption, he once said, “I will prepare 100 coffins for the corrupt, and one for me, for I will die of fatigue”.

    Zhu assisted Deng in regaining his prestige and authority by assisting Deng in organizing his 1992 Southern Inspection Tour.[8]

    Throughout Zhu’s term as both vice-premier and premier, Li Peng was successful in blocking Zhu from introducing regulation or government oversight over China’s power companies,[17] and they remained private monopolies essentially run by Li’s family throughout Zhu’s term of office.[18]

    Although he demonstrated a desire and ability to enact large, thorough legal and economic reforms, and political reforms aimed at making the Chinese government more efficient and transparent, Zhu made it clear that he did not support dramatic political change. When asked by Western journalists in 1990 whether he was China’s Gorbachev, he responded “No, I am China’s Zhu Rongji”.[10]

    In 1951 he became the chairman of the Tsinghua Student Union.

    From 1952-1958 he worked in the State Planning Commission, where he worked as group head, deputy director, and deputy section chief.[4] In 1957, during the Hundred Flowers Campaign,[2] he criticized Mao Zedong’s economic policies, saying that they promoted “irrational high growth”. His comments led to him being subsequently identified as a “rightist” in 1958, for which he was persecuted, demoted,[1] disgraced, and thrown out of the Communist Party.[5] In the late 1950s his family was also persecuted for their pre-revolutionary status as wealthy landowners, and their family mansion was destroyed.[2]

    After his persecution as a rightist, Zhu was sent to work at a remote cadre school. In 1962, following the famine and industrial collapse caused by the Great Leap Forward,[6] Zhu was pardoned (but not politically rehabilitated), and was assigned to work as an engineer at the National Economic Bureau of the State Planning Commission. During the Cultural Revolution Zhu was purged again. From 1970-1975 he was sent for “re-education” to the “May Seventh Cadre School”, a special farm for disgraced government workers and former Party members.[4] During his exile in the countryside Zhu worked as a manual laborer, raising pigs and cattle, carrying human waste, and planting rice.[3]

    Shortly after the death of Mao Zedong in 1976 Deng Xiaoping initiated economic and political reforms which led to Zhu’s rehabilitation, and he returned to work in the government.[6] From 1976 to 1979 he worked as an engineer in the Ministry of Petroleum Industry, and served as the director of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences’ Industrial Economic Bureau.[5] In 1978 he was formally rehabilitated and allowed to rejoin the Communist Party.[6] During the late 1970s Zhu’s positions were relatively low-profile, but after Deng consolidated his power in the 1980s and the government became more meritocratic, Zhu was promoted to work in increasingly demanding positions. He had few connections in the army, the Party, or the bureaucracy, and was able to rise through the ranks of the government mostly through his own skills.[6] In 1979 he was reassigned to the State Economic Commission, in which he served as vice-minister from 1983-1987.[1]

    • Replies: @luba
  209. 22pp22 says:
    @kauchai

    I have had enough fun now.

    I think you need to take some blood pressure medication.

    Beta blockers are out of the question as they were developed entirely by Westerners. A Chinese chemist called Kevin Ng played a major role in the development of ACE inhibitors, but most of the other key figures were White. Are you allowed to take those?

    • Replies: @Joe Wong
  210. 22pp22 says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    Isn’t slamming words into a keyboard what we are all doing on this forum?

    None of us knows what the future will bring.

  211. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @TT

    Falkland Islands are illegally occupied? >99% voted to stay with Britain in a recent free and fair referendum.

    Perhaps the rest of your post is nonsense too?

    • Replies: @TT
    , @denk
  212. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Godfree Roberts

    Why even entertain the comparison? Chinese exhibit qualitatively different behavior to other races, which means it’s futile to try and judge the Chinese government since there are no comparable reference points. They really are very very different to Russians.

    Good article though. I enjoyed it immensely.

    • Replies: @Joe Wong
  213. Quite agree. It’s pretty futile to compare governments abstracted from the societies from which they arose.

  214. @robt

    I’ve met a few, too. They really stick in your memory. You wish you could be more like them but then, as you walk away…naaaah, next lifetime.

    An anecdote you might enjoy: Dambisa Moyo, the Oxford foreign aid expert, was in Beijing last year giving a paper at an aid conference when she got a call from someone offering to pick her up and take her to meet an official who had read her book, Dead Aid. She was whisked off to Zhongnanhai and straight into Xi’s office.

    They spent half an hour together swapping stories. “He just wanted to know what works,” she said. “It could be anything. He didn’t care at all about ideology. He was totally focused on pragmatic solutions to Africa’s problems”.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  215. @Che Guava

    I should have been more explicit: the university refused to graduate any of that year’s intake of sent down youths because they were not prepared. They all got certificates of completion. I suspect there was a revenge motive, after the Cultural Revolution scared the faculty shitless.

    No doubt Xi’s certificate has been upgraded since then.

    • Replies: @Che Guava
  216. @22pp22

    Where did you get your information about Professor Needham?

    I’m pretty familiar with his bio, his scientific work and his Sinological output and have never heard anything like that about him.

    I will be spending time next month with someone who knew him personally and will be happy to factcheck anything of substance.

  217. TT says:
    @Anonymous

    Juz a way to needle back our dear friend 22p. He could understand, but some smart alec couldn’t & get so nosy, like “Bliss” & you.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  218. TT says:
    @denk

    Forgotten. But your name denk was there,…a long time Crusader for truth.

  219. Che Guava says:
    @Godfree Roberts

    That is intereresting.

    Tonight I was randomly meeting a 20 y.o. tourist from PRC, he wanted a light for his cigarette. For some reasons (one apparently that he failed the state university exam. in China, which he says is one chance only), he wants to go to university in England, to study economics. I do not know why, but not discouraging him from it .

    Very smart for his age re. history and politics, although as he was saying, not much good at maths and programming, so forget the cliches.

    I want to be hospitable to travellers, so talk was touching on Mao. Deng (there, mainly on his chain-smoking), and Xi.

    I was raising the point that Deng seemed to have acted out of rage against his time in exile, or ‘reform through labour’, my acquaintance agreed.

    Neither chain smokers, we were agreeing Deng for that only.

  220. denk says:
    @Anonymous

    How many Chagosians voted for themselves to be exiled to some slums 3000 miles away ?

  221. Joe Wong says:
    @Anonymous

    Why even entertain the comparison?

    Then how can the West is so hostile to China despite China supports the posh living standard of the West like in the old days colonialism? Are you saying the Western civilization is flawed; its foundation is zero-sum, greed and brutality? And it sees nothing wrong the wrongs it has done to the world?

    You should know the whole world’s ills are created by the Eurocentrism which is a comparison between a fabricated sane West to an imaginary and evil inquisition mind constructed Orientals, then the unscrupulous Westerners use it as moral authority to commit their war crimes, crimes against humanity and peace with impunity on the moral high ground in the last few hundreds of years and counting.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  222. Joe Wong says:
    @22pp22

    Funny, your denials and revisionist narrative remind me the Japs. Your remorselessness about crimes against humanity, crimes against peace, and war crimes is unique to the unrepentant war criminal Japanese; no one is comparable to the morally defunct war criminal Japs, not even the gut eating ISIS. It seems you have proven me wrong, the West and Muslim have mingled together since the inception of their religions, they bound to have learnt from each other.

    Europe was dirt poor for more than a thousand years, it was a superstitious and cult serfdom that 99.99% of the people was illiterate and they used wood to farm; small population of the White is the result of that long period of backwardness; but not until Columbus led banditry plundering and carrying out genocide in Americas, and followed by barbaric colonialism thru barbaric wars, illicit drugs like Opium, slavery, stealing, robbing, looting, plundering, murdering, torturing, exploiting, polluting, culture genocide, ‘pious’ fanaticism, unmatchable greed and extreme brutality around the world. The sudden rich of the West in the 18th century cannot be logically explained even by Darwin’s Evolution theory other than thru the unscrupulous means of the evil Western colonialism.

    Chinese has medical means to counter smallpox and other diseases before 18th century; unlike the West, bloodletting and praying to the God were the only means to fight illness. Black Death wiped out half of the White was due to their backwardness in medicine before 19th century. Besides Zheng He visited seven seas with hundreds of 3000 tons ships (Santa Maria was 108 tons, Mayflower was 180 tons) for culture exchanges. Chinese did not colonize the places they visited with organized violence and atrocities like the West, or brought any diseases to wipe out the local population like the West. The West could follow Zheng He’s footstep to carry out a peaceful mutual benefit interaction mission, then you do not have to white wash and gloss over the crimes committed by the West so stressfully with ridiculous obfuscation that makes people think you are psychopathic.

    Anyhow what you proud of is a deep nostalgia of the British Empire of the past, the West’s trade volume of the past compares in pale with the current situation where China is the largest trading nation in the world and China is the largest trading partner of nearly all nations in the world. China returns to its historical position in the world like its economy is the combination EU and USA, or 50 times of Japan is only a natural course because of its size, established civilization and innovative heritage, not thru harmful and unscrupulous means adopted by the West.

    I feel for the anxiety of the White Aussie in the remote corner in a sea of Asians, particular their harmful behaviour against others during their brutal imperialistic colonial era and a long history of violence between themselves and with the Muslim, the past does not sit well with them. The Aussie worries chickens coming home to roost due to their ugly past is only natural.

    But Chinese is not the West; Chinese believes five principles of peaceful coexistence, they treat every nation large and small as equal with respect; making peace, development, cooperation and mutual benefit the trend of our times is the Chinese goal. Letting go the nostalgia of the West imperial colonial past is the first step to join the new Utopia.

  223. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Godfree Roberts

    He was totally focused on pragmatic solutions to Africa’s problems”.

    That’s incredible. It’s almost as if Chinese officials have seen Steve Sailer’s graph of African population explosion and thought, “Hey, maybe we outta do something about this?”, and then decided to take on projects that could help lead to better infrastructure and quality of life for Africans.

    OTOH, America continues to bomb third world countries and send wave after wave of African and ME migrants packing to Europe. The invade the world, invite the world strategy.. A few months ago, several US troops were killed in an ambush in Niger while on some secret mission or something.. But why in the hell are we at war in Niger? Why can’t the US divert their time, resources, and insane military budget towards something more constructive?

  224. Joe Wong says:
    @22pp22

    White washing and glossing over war crimes, crimes against humanity and crimes against peace is fun? English said they only exiled unrepentant psychopathic convicts, it seems they told the truth.

  225. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @TT

    You’re complaining that we’re calling you out for posting rubbish disguised as facts? I think this might be the wrong site for you.

    • Replies: @TT
  226. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Joe Wong

    I never said any of that. Like Godfree Roberts understood, I was merely saying that comparing government models is of very limited utility since what needs to be evaluated is the inseparable whole of the populace:government relationship, which is almost always unique and incomparable (Korea being a rare exception).

    • Replies: @Joe Wong
  227. Joe Wong says:
    @Anonymous

    Thanks for the clarification, perhaps we could defeat those who have a mindset belonging to the past, stalled in the old days of colonialsim, and constrained by the Zero-sum Cold War mentality one day.

  228. TT says:
    @Anonymous

    Who are these shameless hypocrite liar “we” that you represent? Don’t snipe from darkness like coward. Everyone is entitled to their opnion, this is different from shameless lies that you & your gangs are doing while trying to smear others.

    I didn’t want to debate on this, but if you must, Falklands is so closed to Agentina and thousands of miles away from UK, how could it belong to UK historically other than by Anglo historical viking behavior, every land it touched, blood flow, fire burned, men they killed, women they raped, children they slaved, land they stole & colonized. These same DNA traits are still blatant manifested in ME & Africa till this moment while i typed. Name one country Anglosaxon didn’t commit atrocity when they touch, America, Africa, India, Asia, Oz, Nz,….

    Agentina if it could, would certainly took back their stolen land, like China did for HK, with Diaoyu Island awaiting. They lost the war bcos of UK got US to pressure France to render their anti-ship missiles useless. Im not advocating for wars, but UK should accept its useless to continue clinging to their dying empire that harm them more.

    And stop your hypocrisy talking about Falkland vote, you are no different from Bush-Blair’s Iraq war lying, stirring Balkans atrocity, still pressurizing Serbs to recognize Albanians secession while condemning Crimea overwhelming wish to rejoin their motherland, Russia.

    There are tons of blatant B. S. from your kins, yet you happily gobbled. Once it touches your ancestors atrocities shameless acts, you scream “shameless liar”. You sound like Nikki.

    Deng did a great job by showing Margaret Thatcher his middle finger for her wet dream of perpetual governing of HK. And Mao is damn correct, power emerged from gun barrels. The jackals only understand one thing, brute force. Putin juz told Yankees, F.O. my button is even bigger.

  229. luba says:
    @TT

    TT,

    Please allow me to take the liberty to give you some tips on how to decipher Western MSM news/reports:

    - If most of the Western MSM heaps all sorts of praises on a leader of a US-unfriendly (perceived or real) foreign country, you can be sure that this leader fits the US ideology and strategic agenda, i.e. his/her policy will be very benenfitial to US establishment.

    Example: Mikhail Gorbachev, Boris Yeltsin (US’ useful fool)

    - If most of the Western MSM comes out with a sh!t-storm and smearing campaign against a leader of a US-unfriendly (perceived or real) foreign country, you can be sure that this leader probably puts his/her country’s interest more in the heart of his/her policy ahead of the interests of US establishment.

    Example: Putin, Xi

    So we’d see MSM & US government were all supporting Saddam when he went to war against Iran, the most hated enemy of US establishment; then CNN & Co turned 180 degree to condemn him as the butcher of Baghdad when Bush family started to invad Iraq.

    Both Xi and Bascher Assad at the begining of their term were regarded as “reformer” who’d bring hope and changes to their respective country by US State Department & MSM, and now they both are dictator/authoritarian in the eyes of MSM & USG.

    So all the praise you quoted from Western MSM about Zhu should be analysed and understood in this manner, if you ever want to get some true information from MSM. This is my personal reading experience of Westen media.

    Now back to Zhu Rongji. No doubt he very compete and one of the few top world leaders who really has a grasp of Western economic theoreishe. He is also extreme smart and knows when and how to put on some public stunt to polish his image. Still remeber his famous saying “prepare me 100 coffins.”

    Yet both his left and right men Zhu Xiaohua, Vice Governor of People’s Bank of China (China’s Central Bank) and Chairman of Board Directors of China Everbright Group (one of the biggest financial groups in China), and Wang Xuebing, CEO of Bank of China, were sent to jail for corruption and neglecting of duty, which had caused billions of loss to the state-owned banks.

    His son, Zhu Yunlai who used to work at Credit Swiss First Boston as analyst went to work and became CEO of China International Capital Corporation Limited (CICC), the first joint venture investment bank in China. CICC monoplised basically all big SOE companies’ IPO in US and HK stock markets in cooperate with JP Morgan, Goldman Sachs & Co. It is rumoured that his salary was as high as one billion RMB.

    His sister is now Vice President of Bank of China Holding HK.

    Zhu was typical mandarin/bureaucrat: competent, impatient and lack of empathy. That’s why he had no qualm to force tens of millions of workers out of job overnight without any social net in place, selling their factories dirty cheap and destroying their lives. You have to know for those workers that the factories were not merely their working place but also their whole world: kindgarden service, schools, health service, etc.

    What I wrote in my previous post @201 is not some “unjust comment” but FACTS basing on the personal experience from friends and relatives who have been through the ordeal, about which no MSM (Western and Chinese alike) would want to do deep reports because that would taint the bright image of Deng’s reform and scratch the shining image of capitalism.

    Btw, do you know why Zhu had to fight the most infamous corruption Yuan Hua Case? Thanks to Deng’s white-cat-black-cat ideaology, people with connections, high ranking officials, heads of custom and police as well as army all went to make money , they effectively formed a smuggling ring in 2 to 3 year’s time with a turnover of 50 billion RMB, tax aversion of 30 billion RMB.

    The rampage of corruption and hiking prices are the main reasons for students and ordinary citizens to street to protest in 1989. Deng is pragmatic but did not know how to run an economy.

    Chaiman Mao once said “Satellite goes up to the sky, red flag goes down to the dirt.” That’s what I would call a man with vision and strategic thinking.

    • Replies: @TT
  230. TT says:
    @luba

    My view is always when west msm praise their enemies, it must be damn correct. When they smear them, its muz be damn suspicious. But you have better wisdom which i shall learn.

    Zhu Rongji was actually one of my idol…we are all fed with msm sewage, so in unz we can hear from horse mouth. Thks for sharing.

  231. It’s actually kind of sad seeing how badly outmaneuvered the West is compared to China and Russia. Hard times are coming to America and the harvest of schaudenfreude is going to be pretty sweet.

    • Replies: @TT
  232. TT says:
    @George Orwell

    Indeed its sad to see how a highly prosperous West has plundered its own good fortune built by its forefathers, in waging endless atrocities war everywhere and hollow out themselves with greedy capitalism they cherished. Even Germany could not resist the obvious orchestrated destructive mass migration invasion.

    With so much wealth concentrating in 1% and having all their puppet governments controlled by capitalist, there isn’t any future for the majority of hardworking people but to slip further down the gutter.

    Since these zombies are entirely helpless to drain the swarm by themselves, it might be actually good that China & Russia help to collapse their evil empire fast. Like many had reckoned, perhaps an economic catastrophe is best outcome for US empire & West to rid their parasitic deep states for a fresh start without a devastating nuke war US empire is gloating the world into.

    Certainly the hardworking Europeans are capable to rebuild a prosperous Europe again in peaceful world after ill-conceived EU has disintegrated with US yoke removed.

  233. Jaylon says:

    It is a good read until the last paragragh – what? Trying to have a pension plan model after US social security? Does he not know that system will soon be bankrupt? If he does that, that will be the end of Xi’s printine reputation!

    • Replies: @TT
    , @Godfree Roberts
  234. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    Canada’s Envy: Russia and China

    http://thesaker.is/canadas-envy-russia-and-china/

    Canada sinophobia generated from envy & fear.

    Repost from someone comment.

    Antonio on March 09, 2018  ·  at 7:34 pm UTC
    Top 10 reasons West has no chance against China!

    The crime record of the West against the rest of humanity is unseen in the known history of mankind. The estimate number of deaths ( 500 years) of non-white people is about ONE BILLION according some researchers. China is one of those countries suffered terribly. They called it 100 years of humiliation, 100 millions opium addicts, theft, invasion and genocide.
    Now to the topic. I am not Chinese and not any supporter of China either, only observer. There are my reasons, why West will never be able to defeat China.

    1. China as a culture and civilization is much older and mature then West.
    2. China is superior as far as concern wisdom and spirituality.
    3. The motto of China was/is”conquest by service”, while western motto was and is: conquest by force and plunder.
    4.The average Chinese is much polite, modest and humble then a average western, who is often arrogant, self glorifying and hedonist.
    5.China is a united nation and it was very difficult for Western spies and deceivers to create conflict and disorder or regime changes. A Gigantic United Country.
    6. Chinese are very hard working people with a strong family and social structure. Western people can not survive without alcohol and TVs.
    7.Chinese schools have a rigid discipline, respect to teacher, to old people and parents. Western Kinder gardens teaching children about gays, trans, and sex. In the entire 10-12 years of school you never hear any word about modesty, respect of parents, senior people, dignity, wisdom, faithfulness etc.
    8.China does not interfere in the affairs of other countries, they respect other cultures. Western world thing they own the planet and other nations should be thankful that they can live in this planet, which they consider a private property.
    9.Leaders of China does not consider themselves “Gods” , elites, or superior men. They consider themselves as fathers of nation, mothers of nation, they are part of nation, not “Gods” of nation.
    10. Now the most important one. An average Chinese (here includes Japan, Korea, Singapore, Malaysia etc) have an IQ of 105-110, it is much more then an average Western “superior proud white”. In any IQ test or math competition no “Superior western white”can be a match for “lower races” of far east. I think this is a punishment from God almighty. History will decide who are the real “superior ones”.

    Based on these 10 reason, West have no chance to stand, compete or win against China. West may defeat or control any nation in the planet, including Russia, but not China.

  235. TT says:
    @Jaylon

    China version, like its market economy that work like charm but not in West. A huge fund that can be invested in AIIB, BRI, etc., that will overshadow US funds currently heaping havock to the world financial market by speculation. Not all west policies are bad, its their greedy corrupted politicians that sell out their own people.

  236. jtl170 says:

    Some pro-China commenters have suggested that Western whites have produced no good, and all evil. Is that really true? Western imperialism introduced modern education, technology and political organization into regions that had been stagnant for centuries. Modern railroads, ports and automotive transport simply did not exist until Westerners came.

    Even today, the manufacturing industries of the East are products of the scientific discoveries of the West. I just don’t buy the idea that the white West has been the genesis of all evil, and nothing good. I think the non-West has benefited extravagantly from our accomplishments.

    Furthermore, wasn’t it Eastern brutality that created the horrors of the Japanese Empire? Wasn’t it Eastern brutality under Mao, Pol Pot and Kim Il Sung/Jong Il/Jong Un that have slaughtered tens of millions of Asians?

    • Replies: @TT
  237. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @denk

    Who is woz?

  238. TT says:
    @jtl170

    Some pro-China commenters have suggested that Western whites have produced no good, and all evil. Is that really true?

    Sure its not true. Examples of such comments?

    I just don’t buy the idea that the white West has been the genesis of all evil, and nothing good.

    Sure, the hardworking West people were real good in old time. Now what good do they give other than below extravagant benefits they bestowed kindly, even start cannibalizing among themselves now?

    I think the non-West has benefited extravagantly from our accomplishments.

    Eg? Slavery of blacks, Opium wars to China, Colonizing the world by violent, rampage of wars after wars, regimes change, color revolution, coup, installation of pro-west dictators, spreading of weapons, instigated financial crisis raid, ISIS, Al Queda…long list huh, so much extravagant kindness.

    Eastern brutality that created the horrors of the Japanese Empire? Wasn’t it Eastern brutality under Mao, Pol Pot and Kim Il Sung/Jong Il/Jong Un that have slaughtered tens of millions of Asians?

    So Jp was to be punished. Will the white west accept a few nuke too for their many folds brutality?

    Mao is still getting tens if not hundreds of millions admirers. His portraits still proudly displayed everywhere. Why these “victims” mentioned by the West msm behaving that, worth some ponder. Is West msm really honest all these while? Im not from China, but i could smell rats here.

    Pol Pot
    Blamed Vietnam & Soviet expansionary. Did they invade other people?

    Kim Il Sung/Jong Il/Jong Un
    Who slaughter tens of millions Koreans? They were forced into ideology civil war instigated by US&UK, defending against the merciless US Allied ruthless onslaught, with bombs more than whole WW2 add together dropped in their small homeland. Everything move was bombed, every buildings flattened. How benevolent?

    Been denied a peace treaty by US with continuous existential threat for last 50yrs with strangling sanction, NK rebuild a country with a free health care that visiting WHO Secretary said, an envy to the US! Go search its cities pic & data, globalresearch. ca have many articles. Today their IQ ranked higher than most OECD. Their country is functioning well, very well.

    Who is the real evil? NK /US?

    https://www.globalresearch.ca/north-korea-versus-the-united-states-who-are-the-demons/28342

    Achievement of NK

    https://www.globalresearch.ca/north-korea-their-health-system-sucks-do-they-have-schools-and-hospitals-in-america-weve-got-medicare/5604293

    https://www.globalresearch.ca/the-social-and-economic-achievements-of-north-korea/5594234

    Is West whites producing any good to the world now? When whole world incl all whites ranked US as No.1 threat, that’s funny huh? The non-white has stopped war long ago, West whites still heaping havocs & wars when we typed.

  239. @Che Guava

    Che,

    If you ask a broader question I believe that most answers will support Xi’s own account: Did the sent-down kids shuttle back and forth between the countryside and mama’s welcoming arms and were they looked down on by the peasantry for that reason? A lot of peasants came to see the sent-down thing as just another Beijing boondoggle, something to occupy the wannabe Red Guards. Also, we have Xi’s own testimony and he’s never been known to tell a lie.

    Why do you say, “you go too far to excuse things” when (a) I don’t excuse anything (though my explanations may be new to you) and (b) you offer no evidence that I ‘go too far’?

    And why do you not use my name when addressing me? It looks like a dumb form of ad hominem.

  240. @22pp22

    One lie after another? I’m very familiar with Needham’s non-scientific work (for which he was knighted and which was never found lacking) and with critiques of it.

    Can you provide us with two or three direct quotes to support your allegation?

  241. @Jaylon

    They want American-style SS portability and Chinese-style solvency. It’s the portability that rich provinces are resisting: they want to hang onto the surpluses that the poor migrant workers are forced to leave in their care. Plus ca change

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