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As technologies and systems evolve, once important distinctions often become insignificant or entirely disappear.

When I first launched The Review in late 2013, I made a sharp distinction between “bloggers” and “columnists,” the former usually publishing one or more short “posts” per day, while the latter produced much lengthier and more substantial columns or articles, typically on a weekly basis. A similar sort of distinction is found on most other webzines or personal websites, with the latter often displaying the content material in “blog mode,” namely via a single long scrolling page of pieces, ordered sequentially by date.

However, as time has gone by, these differences have considerably eroded. Several of the newer columnists that we have taken on board, such as Peter Lee, Linh Dinh, and JayMan, had previously published their material on personal blogsites, and the latter format provided some display advantages, allowing a large quantity of recent material to be easily examined on a single screen. These advantages even apply to the work of the most traditional of regular columnists, such as Pat Buchanan, Ron Paul, or Andrew Napolitano.

Therefore, just as the published works of our resident bloggers such as Steve Sailer, Razib Khan, and Andrew Karlin may be displayed in archive/teaser mode instead of on a traditional scrolling blog page, I have now similarly extended the same “Blog View” option to all of our columnists. For example, if you click on the Peter Frost’s columns, you’ll normally see his archive page, containing short teasers of all his pieces. But on the right side of the top bar is “Blog View” link, that provides the same material in that other display format:

http://www.unz.com/author/peter-frost/

http://www.unz.com/pfrost/

Since many columns or articles are overly long for a blog display, “Read More” links are automatically inserted after roughly 1200-1500 words, allowing the entire piece to be read.

Similarly, all the columnist bars contain “B” (for Blog View) link on the right side, providing easy access to the “Blog View” of each columnist’s work.

 
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  1. Nice, smart. Tangentially on the point of bloggers and columnists, I have a lofty but firm opinion of what writers owe to those they teach at a distance, and those they will teach when they’re gone. One authentic man of letters said the health of a civilization could be perfectly determined by a writing sample from its bureaucrats–no need to rate their pros, writing is that fundamental. For a long time I thought blogging was an abomination to that responsibility, perfectly summed up by that heinous neologism, blogging. I remember early on when some people noticed that the writing was just really bad, and the technology to self-publish will do that to anybody I suppose, but some of it was and still is just embarrassing. One time a while back I remember a debate that did indeed make the rounds for some reason, about the “epistemic closure” of the conservative movement, and the guy who wrote the instigating post didn’t even know what epistemic closure meant. That’s when I pretty much stopped reading every blog that Steve Sailer doesn’t link to. And just lately, I was leafing through some of the crap that Regnery puts out, apparently for a market of morons who read a lot, and then I picked up an older anthology of George Will columns, and the thought struck me: Steve would need to do very little to simply cut and paste his blog posts over the course of a year to make a book that was more useful, valuable, to future generations, the historical record really, than inane unlearned reduncies from idiots or the unforgivably pointy-headed style that George Will never stops but seldom actually instructs under. The fact that Steve tends to pull long excerpts of the luminous details from the stupid media, and then sunders them concisely with shaming sarcasm, well, would We Who Know That Wit Deserves To Win be worse off if we had anthologies of Mencken slaying the media examples he found most illustrative of the disrespect the yahoos deserved, plus his columns? I mean, I guess its good to remember that one day people won’t remember when their weren’t bloggers, and hopefully books will still exist.

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  2. I find the mobile drag and drop prevents me from clicking articles. And I can’t disable it. It’s already unchecked in user settings.

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