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I’m very pleased to report that our small webzine once again broke records last month, both in total readership and in comments. Steve Sailer’s results were particularly impressive, with his April comment total coming in nearly 2,000 above his previous March record, a truly remarkable result given that the time period was one day shorter. Taken together, our commentariat—often very well informed and almost always contentious—are now providing us with 50,000 words of opinionage every day, a figure which has almost tripled during during the last year. All these website metrics are now considerably higher—sometimes vastly higher—than were those at The American Conservative at the time of my departure nearly two years ago.

These general trends of growing readership and visibility were spearheaded by the publication of a particularly noteworthy item, a 6,000 word personal profile of prominent evolutionary biologists written by Prof. Robert Trivers, whose own seminal work in that field stretches back decades. That article landed at the very top of the prestigious Arts & Letters Daily website, a singular achievement given all the competing longform pieces from The Atlantic, The New York Times Magazine, and every other mainstream publication in the country, while also being tweeted out many hundreds of times, including by such leading luminaries as Steve Pinker, Richard Dawkins, and Charles Murray.

We have certainly come a long way in a short time, all thanks to our contributors, whose scintillating and controversial perspectives have demonstrated that neither ideological monochromaticity nor blandness is required for the success of a webzine.

Given these successes, I am planning to expand the coverage of The Review in coming weeks, while also hoping to finally begin spending more time on my own research and writing.

I will also be making a few enhancements and modifications to the software design of the website, especially the Mobile version, and would welcome any suggestions or other input.

 
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  1. Muse says:

    I don’t read the UNZ review for news, but I do read it to help me decide what to think about it.

    If you could get John Mearsheimer from U of C as a regular contributor, that would be great.

    • Replies: @International Jew
  2. You would certainly generate a spate of comments if you ran frequent pieces by Daniel Pipes. Some of your crankier commenters might make him wonder why it was worth his while and you would probably disagree (at least tentatively recognising that he has learned a lot about the Arab and Muslim world) with his hardcore views on the necessity of defeating utopians like much of the Muslim world of people and polities. His arguments would be careful and clear. I commend an approach, even if it only resulted in reprints with only occasional responses by him to blog comments.

    • Replies: @LA Dude
    , @solontoCroesus
  3. You really need to get rid of the Ask a Mexican feature.

    • Replies: @iffen
  4. @Muse

    If you could get John Mearsheimer

    Great idea! That would smoke out whether Mearsheimer is content to stick with the genteel antisemites, or if he’s ready to be associated with the real hard core.

    My guess is, he wouldn’t touch this site with a ten-foot pole.

    • Replies: @MUSE
    , @iffen
    , @silviosilver
  5. iffen says:
    @FirkinRidiculous

    No he does not.

    If someone needs to go it should be some of the chroniclers of the decline and fall. Exactly how many are needed? Politician’s speech writers should get a review as well. Hey, two birds with one stone.

    • Replies: @John Jeremiah Smith
  6. anon • Disclaimer says:

    “Likes” of comments and showing replies below a comment would be improvements.

    And Mearshimer is an unapologetic antisemite. Find a pro Israel Jewish writer.

    Sailed is great.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  7. BDoyle says:

    I cam over when you brought Razib Khan on, That’s usually worthwhile reading. Sometimes I will sample the delusional paranoid rants for entertainment, but I agree with Firkin about “Ask a Mexican.” That is just so awful that it is not even entertaining as a parody.

  8. AKAHorace says:

    I like reading Steve Sailer, but I also enjoy reading intelligent opinions of people who I disagree with on many points (so keep ask a Mexican). I don’t know of any other site that has as much intellectual diversity.

    A small point, you also posted a link to an online library of thousands of old newspapers and magazines. Where did it go, I can’t find it.

    all the best,

    AKAHorace

    • Replies: @Kyle a
  9. MUSE says:
    @International Jew

    Same old schmear, different day. Pathetic.

  10. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    Find a pro Israel Jewish writer.

    There are pro-Israel Jewish writers EVERYWHERE. It would serve no purpose for Unz to have another writer who would just repeat the same old stories that can easily be found in every corner of internet.

    The trick is to find a writer who can write about Isreel without parroting the same old narrative without resorting to traditional anti-semitic storyline.

    Perhaps, Unz could get Jim Lobe.

  11. Congrats on the well-deserved success. Sailer is the main reason I visit, but I also appreciate Derbyshire, Pat Buchanan, and others.

    Agree with one comment above: I do wish there were a way of ‘surfacing’ more significant/popular comments because it’s impossible (for those of us who work for a living) to sift through 200 or so per article when ‘sifting’ means reading each one.

  12. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    I would like to see an expanded front page that featured a rotation of the top 6 or so articles here.

    Maybe a banner that takes up most of the space above the fold and automatically scrolls every 3 seconds or so.

    • Replies: @Power Child
  13. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    John Mearsheimer would be a great addition here.

    My 2c.

  14. Kyle a says:
    @AKAHorace

    “I enjoy reading intelligent opinions of people who I disagree with” so keep the ask a mexican. I have yet to witness anything intelligent regarding that particular article offered by the Unz. Didn’t you really mean to type ” I love the ask the mexican posts as it offers me all the reasons I need for building a wall”.

  15. Immigrant from former USSR [AKA "Florida Resident"] says:

    Dear Mr. Unz:
    1. Deep gratitude for your great work.
    2. It wold be nice if any essays longer than 500 words
    are provided with 5% to 10% long annotations.
    Respectfully yours, F.r.

  16. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Two guys I would like to see on this site are Col. W. Patrick Lang (http://www.turcopolier.typepad.com) and Larry Johnson (http://www.noquarterusa.net/blog/). Both are highly regarded in the military and intelligence communities and have a following that includes generals and spooks. They write short, no-BS Sailer-esque pieces that eviscerate neo-con (and liberal) politics like no one else. Given their backgrounds (CIA, Special Forces, DIA, State Dept. Counterterrorism) they always have informed and interesting takes on world events.

    • Replies: @RW
  17. iffen says:
    @International Jew

    Apparently I cannot recognize anti-Semitism. As a favor to me, can you give specific examples of how this site is such?

  18. @iffen

    If someone needs to go it should be some of the chroniclers of the decline and fall. Exactly how many are needed?

    But … but … but … what is “Ask a Meskin” other than a chronicle of decline and fall?

    • Replies: @iffen
  19. Pat Casey says:

    Cheers! I recall Johnson’s essay The Multiplication of Books, and would say in this age of the multiplication of websites, Mr. Unz has done right by Johnson.

  20. Pat Casey says:

    The ICONOCLAST proves enough when he proves by his blasphemy that this or that idol is defectively convincing—that at least one visitor to the shrine is left full of doubts. The liberation of the human mind has been best furthered by gay fellows who heaved dead cats into sanctuaries and then went roistering down the highways of the world, proving to all men that doubt, after all, was safe—that the god in the sanctuary was a fraud. One horse-laugh is worth ten thousand syllogisms. –H.L. Mencken

  21. Sean says:

    Mearsheimer is not “Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media” .

    Ilana Mercer would be a good addition here,

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
  22. Are there any leftist/liberal writers that accept – or, at least, consider – HBD?

    Discovering Sailer and HBD in general not only destroyed my libertarian philosophy but made me – to my surprise – more liberal. It also has made me more conservative in other ways. I developed a much better understanding that much of what we are is luck of the draw, which made me more liberal. I also developed a much better understanding that societies can deeply change those odds for future generations, which made me more conservative.

    Anyway, I don’t see why HBD and a liberal philosophy should be mutually exclusive; indeed, they go hand-in-hand. (However, I don’t see how a liberal philosophy and large-scale immigration work together.) So, are there any liberal writers that embrace HBD?

  23. Contrarian that I am, I seldom read Sailer. I find him too predictable for iconoclasty, though versatile in offering up permutations of the same schtick. I also prefer to be challenged by new ideas, simply for the salutary effect on potentially inelastic thinking that is too often coincident with the hardening of arteries.

    • Replies: @Pat Casey
  24. EriK says:

    Mr. Unz doesn’t get enough credit for the important information he makes available. Kudos Ron.

  25. @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Are there any leftist/liberal writers that accept – or, at least, consider – HBD?

    JayMan, of course.

    Robert Lindsay. He’s even a Marxist.

    I developed a much better understanding that much of what we are is luck of the draw, which made me more liberal.

    That’s an argument Lindsay explicitly makes arguing for socialism in diverse societies.

    • Replies: @AshTon
  26. Contrarian that I am, I seldom read Sailer. For some reason, he is too predictable for iconoclasty, though versatile in offering up permutations of the same schtick. I also prefer to be challenged by new ideas, simply for the salutary effect on potentially inelastic thinking that is too often coincident with the hardening of arteries!

    • Replies: @D. K.
    , @Wally
  27. iffen says:
    @John Jeremiah Smith

    Different perspective; he doesn’t see it as decline and fall.

  28. D. K. says:
    @Fran Macadam

    Have you programmed a macro to insert that boilerplate, Fran? You are such a deep thinker; we all are in awe of your otherworldly intellect.

  29. @Anonymous

    What you’re describing is a “carousel”. Most websites that have them test very low for reader retention and comprehension. They’re also very unfriendly to people with shaky connections (i.e. mobile users) and people who use accessibility technology. As a software and web usability professional, I’d recommend against it. But hey, that’s just me.

    What Unz should do is find out how people access the site. Do they type in “unz.com” and land on the home page, or do they tend to navigate directly to the page of some writer (e.g. type in “unz.com/isteve”) and hunt around from there? That should determine how the site is laid out.

    My big suggestion right now would be to have a bit more churn in the links over on the right. How long does that “Bush Inaugural Embraces Liberalism” article by Sam Francis have to stay up? It was written in 05 and has 3 comments.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  30. Please for the love of all that is good:

    Make the list of other articles smaller! I want to read what I’m reading, not what I’m not reading (e.g., ask a Mexican)! Make it 70/30, not 50/50.

  31. @D. K.

    :) That’s what I was thinking too. I skip the remainder of any post which starts with self-congratulation.

  32. Pat Casey says:
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    I had the exact same experience. If you read Steve Sailer closely as long as I have, you will see that in terms of economic opinions he shares, say, John Kenneth Galbraith’s vision of more structured equality. He’s nostalgic for the days of powerful unions, and maybe especially nostalgic for the personalities they produce. Simply put he is the best advocate in the nation for the middle class, both in terms of the force of his arguments and the values of his ideology. He has often reminded readers that The Bell Curve is finally about how to help the low-iq class because they can’t much help themselves. My favorite point he brings home on occasion is how the in-the-know class invent complicating processes to exclude those too dumb to navigate them.

    But where Sailer is most admirably a man apart is how can keep his balance on the ground without pulling any punches or devolving his arguments into rants. No one else writing, certainly no one else blogging can do that as well as he does.

  33. AKAHorace says:

    I consider myself a social democrat. But the old lines between the left and right are breaking down. We are at a point in history where the old ideological labels are no longer useful and new alliances can form. The Unz review and Steve Sailer in particular can help this process forward in a useful way.

  34. Maj. Kong says:
    @Sean

    Is WND, “mainstream” ? It’s typical Conservatism inc.

    https://twitter.com/IlanaMercer

    I’d like to see James Kalb

    • Replies: @Sean
  35. Double your pleasure, gentlemen, courtesy the vagaries of the editing delay posting twice instead of revising.

    But Unz.com would be worth less than half were there not the diversity of opinion, which Ron says is quite the point, in case you missed it.

  36. Please consider adding online Daily Mail columnist Peter Hitchens.

    Besides writing provocative columns with original ideas, Hitchens actively engages with Daily Mail and Twitter commentators.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  37. Pat Casey says:
    @Fran Macadam

    Well, you can’t step in the same river twice, and there’s nothing new under the sun. Maybe permutations of inconoclasty are potentially inelastic schticks? I also prefer to be coincident with predictable contrarians more versatile than my arteries.

    • Replies: @Fran Macadam
  38. Anonym says:

    Well done Ron. This site is kicking ass and taking names.

    My guess is that few people have time to read everything on here, unless you skip the comments (and what is the fun in that?). So, best to keep the standards as high as possible, like a great album with no filler songs. Maybe auditions, or a “best of” selection, or a rotating guest spot. Maybe you could get luminaries such as Charles Murray to contribute something, or maybe political or mainstream pundits such as Ann Coulter or Nigel Farage. That would both draw from their readership/followers and increase the interest in the blog.

    Maybe include some other figures who have drawn the eye of Soros in the past, Jason Richwine and Larry Summers come to mind.

    As for bloggers, Jewamongyou I have found very thought provoking in the past, and his translation of “The Ashkenazi Revolution” very interesting. Perhaps some other bloggers that don’t get the recognition of Sailer. Steve was just as good as he is now, back in 2004, maybe even better in that he was still building his framework of HBD and associated articles. It is possible there is someone of his caliber yet to be discovered.

    Other than that, it’s working really well and the comments section implementation is excellent.

  39. iffen says:
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    to my surprise – more liberal

    I am just as far to the left as I have ever been (not a writer). What HBD has done for me is show me where certain policies or programs are doomed to failure and should be jettisoned. It in no way solves any of the social and political problems that we have; it just puts one on a more realistic foundation for studying those problems and evaluating proposed solutions.

    One aspect of HBD fits nicely into some ethnocentric and racialists ideas and a lot of those people are prolific commenters and to the extent that their comments scare off some readers it could be detrimental to more people reading HBD blogs and e-zines. This is the reason that I liked Peter Frost’s attempts to keep the people with jews on the brain from clogging up his comment section.

  40. Pat Casey says:
    @Fran Macadam

    entertesting. met him pike hoses. i’m emerald.

  41. Sean says:
    @Maj. Kong

    Mercer invented the original version of ‘invade the world invite the world’ and is not ideologically monochromatic, even on a particular issue.

  42. Get a couple of cartoonists. One on the left and one on the right, putting the center squarely in the crossfire of no man’s land…

    Here’s one on the left should put all the angry White_on_the_right folk into spontaneous popping hemorrhoids:

    https://ragheadthefiendlyterrorist.wordpress.com/2015/03/02/raghead-the-nobel-prizident/

    (not that the mainstream liberals would love his work)

  43. @Pat Casey

    Don’t forget Sailer’s reminder of regression to the mean, i.e. just because your IQ is 125 doesn’t mean your grandkids will have an above average IQ, so you might want to think about helping the middle of the bell curve not just for some strangers but for members of your own family.

    Of course, assortative mating may be slowly reducing that threat, making TPTB even less inclined to help the middle. My friends can’t conceive of their children not going to college, and, you know what, so far they’ve been right. Their kids typically are or will be third generation – or more – college graduates. At some point, having no grandparent or even great grandparent with an IQ of less than 110 and probably averaging in the low 120s is going to change the mean for those kids.

    • Replies: @Anonym
  44. Wally [AKA "BobbyBeGood"] says: • Website
    @Fran Macadam

    “Contrarian that I am ..”

    Contrary to what?

    You are dreaming.

    • Replies: @Fran Macadam
  45. Anonym says:
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Even if your children are uniformly IQ 125, with the immigration the way it is they will be competing with a lot of elite and networked non-whites for money and power. And that game is definitely zero sum. The larger percentage they have, the less our children and grandchildren will have.

  46. @D. K.

    I think his post was in fun.

    • Replies: @D. K.
  47. LA Dude says:
    @Wizard of Oz

    You would certainly generate a spate of comments if you ran frequent pieces by Daniel Pipes.

    Great suggestion, though Philip Giraldi is evidently the national security editor of The Unz Review, and it seems unlikely that he would welcome a columnist here with views on Israel, the Middle East, and US foreign policy that are diametrically opposed to his own. However, I hope my assumption is proven wrong!

    • Replies: @Sean
  48. Why is that Alexander Cockburn piece on Elie Wiesel still up after seven months? Considering it’s a reprint of an article from 2006, does that mean Unz thinks it’s one of the most important essays of the last nine years?

  49. D. K. says:
    @pork pie hat

    I think that you need to read more of his comments….

  50. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Astonishingly, many requests for new authors inclusion seem to come from the idea that more diversity of opinions is desirable. This is dead wrong. It would lead to a dilution of the “webzine” image. Good publications are like people – with instantly recognizable faces and styles. A magazine should not voice all kinds of opinions, just like an intelligent person cannot hold every possible opinion on any subject.

    And yes, “¡Ask a Mexican!” is just awful. Even as a parody.

  51. @International Jew

    Great idea! That would smoke out whether Mearsheimer is content to stick with the genteel antisemites, or if he’s ready to be associated with the real hard core.

    Sure, if you define antisemitism as: anything besides complete obsequiousness to the Jewish power structure.

    I don’t think the so-called ‘antisemitism’ on this site gets any worse than my comments. It may send shivers down your spine, but if you think it can be compared to the actual hardcore hatred you find on sites whose names I don’t wish to sully this place by mentioning then you’re off your rocker.

    I think you may to regret pissing off good people, who demand substantial reform but are not out to cause harm, with your tiresome smears.

    • Replies: @International Jew
  52. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Baldrin

    he blocked me on twitter in less than 5 minutes. I don’t think he’d be a good fit here at all.

  53. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Hey Ron, I found a guy who supposedly has an IQ as high as yours (210). Kim Ung-yong, who started college at 4 and graduated at 8. There is a clickbait list of other highest IQ people (Sunnunu, Kasparov, Netanyahu, et al.) here.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    , @International Jew
  54. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    I don’t like the idea of adding likes. This isn’t reddit or facebook and the idea is not necessarily to have the most popular opinion.

    Only lesser intellects rely on internet likes to gauge merits of opinion.

    • Replies: @Ronald Thomas West
  55. D. K. says:
    @Anonymous

    I do not care to click on clickbait; but, how many of their verified IQ scores are from deviation-IQ tests taken as adults? How precocious someone might have been as a child is often fascinating, but comparing adults is a lot more salient. I do seem to recall reading that the former governor, listed by you, had scored the highest among all takers of the famous Mega Test, several years ago, though.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  56. To a degree, that’s true. However, in a complex economy, even tribal groups will need to go outside the group for smart workers. Of course, that doesn’t mean that they’ll let those smart white guys into top management.

    Whites will need to relearn tribalism to get by in the future. Frost and HBD chick talk about our altruism and I’d suspect that they’re in general correct. However, I also believe that some of lack of tribalism simply comes from having been on top for nearly 500 years. We started to think that our shit don’t stink, so to speak. We’re like a trust-fund kid who doesn’t want to know how they get such nice stuff and good service. But we’re running out of money and the help no longer wants to clean up after us.

    A little competition will do us good. That or we’ll go the way of the Romans.

    • Replies: @palladino
  57. Sean says:
    @LA Dude

    Pipes is largely excluded?; he was on Republican presidential candidate Giuliani’s team (along with Podhoretz). Mercer was asked by the Ron Paul campaign for a written endorsement. And it would not hurt to have a woman with a family added.

    • Replies: @LA Dude
  58. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @D. K.

    I thought IQ scores past 18 years of age were less accurate?

    Time magazine had an article on Sunnunu while he was chief of staff for Bush 41. He went through MIT with a 4.0 (bachelor’s through doctorate in Mech. Eng.) and, according fellow students, never studied. On an Air Force One coast-to-coast plane flight he would read three books, including a book on complex math. His I.Q. was listed as 180. Kasparov was 190. Netanyahu was 180. On the list of 21 people were two black guys, one had a 190 I.Q. and was a scientist/engineer. Some others listed were Judith Polgar (female chess phenom) and actor James Woods (MIT grad).

    • Replies: @D. K.
  59. @Anonymous

    I don’t like the idea of adding likes

    Ditto .. although there are a few things at reddit can be informative

    http://www.reddit.com/r/TheoryOfReddit/comments/tdf3l/are_downvote_bots_becoming_an_issue_for_anyone/

    With our military (and too many other organizations to detail here) managing armies of ‘virtual people’ …

    http://www.rawstory.com/2011/02/revealed-air-force-ordered-software-to-manage-army-of-fake-virtual-people/

    Our tax dollars can post a comment and then ‘like’ it (as much as your $ like.) Just inviting trouble (where the trolls already roam)

  60. D. K. says:
    @Anonymous

    Like ‘Rick Blaine’ in “Casablanca” (1943), you were “misinformed!” Childhood IQs, of necessity, conflate native intelligence with maturation rate. The resulting distribution of scores is spread more widely, with many more scores in the left- and right-hand tails than in the case of the Normal Distribution.

    By age 18, when almost all brains have fully matured, the conflation becomes minimal, and an adult-level deviation-IQ distribution closely follows the Normal Distribution, save for a small bump of extra high-scorers, in the right-hand tail, and a larger bump of extra low-scorers, in the left-hand tail, with the former’s cause still being a matter of debate, while the latter is the result of diseases, and other forms of traumatic brain injury.

    People’s adult IQ scores, after age 18, tend to be very consistent, over their lifespans– at least, until old age takes its toll on their brains. People, of course, get slower mentally, after about age 30; but, they are still able to solve problems of similar difficulty, in middle-age, that they could in their twenties– just a bit more slowly. People who scored at extremes, as children, on the other hand, regress markedly toward the mean, as adults.

  61. @Anonymous

    Whuh? Is Unz’s 210 IQ in an FAQ I’ve missed? Is there documentation? Was it one of those on-line deals, self-administered?

    His “emotional IQ”, judging by what I’ve seen here, is none too impressive.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    , @Pat Casey
  62. D. K. says:
    @International Jew

    An interesting article on our virtual host, from exactly twenty-one years ago, as of today:

    http://articles.latimes.com/1994-05-08/news/mn-55185_1_ron-unz

    The woman billed as the smartest person in the world– Marilyn vos Savant– once pulled a childhood IQ score of 228; however, as explained in her Wikipedia entry:

    ***

    Alan S. Kaufman, a psychology professor and author of IQ tests, writes in IQ Testing 101 that “Miss Savant was given an old version of the Stanford-Binet (Terman & Merrill 1937), which did, indeed, use the antiquated formula of MA/CA × 100. But in the test manual’s norms, the Binet does not permit IQs to rise above 170 at any age, child or adult. And the authors of the old Binet stated: ‘Beyond fifteen the mental ages are entirely artificial and are to be thought of as simply numerical scores.’ (Terman & Merrill 1937). …the psychologist who came up with an IQ of 228 committed an extrapolation of a misconception, thereby violating almost every rule imaginable concerning the meaning of IQs.” . . .

    ***

    She pulled a 186, as an adult, on the Mega Test– the IQ test for people with above-average intelligence– on which John Sununu, if I recall correctly, has been the highest scorer, to date.

  63. LA Dude says:
    @Sean

    Pipes is largely excluded?; he was on Republican presidential candidate Giuliani’s team

    And The Unz Review’s Philip Giraldi was on Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul’s team. What’s your point?

    along with Podhoretz

    Pipes has dissociated himself from the neo-conservative camp. Here are just two of several relevant quotes from his website:

    “if the [neo-conservative] term currently requires having supported George W. Bush’s Middle East-related policies, then I am not a neoconservative.” (2007 Source)

    “my differences with neo-conservative positions on the promotion of democracy and on Iraq have become too great for me to consider myself part of this movement.
    I now see myself as a plain “conservative,” not more or less.” (2009 Source)

    Pipes can be politically incorrect and is not a member of the Hivemind. In addition, he supports his arguments with an understanding of the Arabic language and a deep knowledge of Middle Eastern religions and history (Harvard PhD).

    it would not hurt to have a woman with a family added

    The Unz Review purportedly strives for intellectual diversity, which is not necessarily correlated with demographic diversity (this can be easily seen from a quick perusal of The Huffington Post).

    • Replies: @Sean
  64. Immigrant from former USSR [AKA "Florida Resident"] says:
    @D. K.

    Central limit theorem says that you will get Gaussian distribution of continuous random variable X under the following conditions:

    1. X is a sum of individual contributions x_i;
    2. These contributions x_i are themselves random variables;
    3. Random variables x_i are statistically independent from each other;
    4. Total number N of summed contributions in the limit goes to infinity;
    5. Contribution of individual x_i to X must have finite dispersion, D_i= {[x-x_av]^2};
    6. Total D_X , being the sum of D_i, does not have predominant part from any particular D_i;
    7. Total D_x behaves as (N * D_i) and thus D_X has finite limit at N going to infinity;
    it means that D_i behaves proportionally to 1/N.

    Then mathematical theorem predicts Gaussian distribution of X, i.e. standard Bell Curve.

    Think about x_i as contributions of individual genes to X
    (probably contributions to IQ, which interests here everybody in this discussion).

    In any real physical or biological situation
    a) total number N of contributions x_i is not infinite;
    b) contributions usually are not quite independent;
    c) X is not simple linear sum, but somewhat nonlinear function of all those x_i.
    Even if X has Gaussian distribution, then for any nonlinear function Y = F(X) random variable Y generally will not be Gaussian-distributed.

    For all those reasons the distribution of X in many cases may be well approximated by Gaussian function in the central part, i.e for moderate deviations from the average, but not in the wings.

    Conclusions:
    C1) Do not discuss distant wings in terms of Gaussian function.
    C2) Do not discuss those deviations quantitatively
    without clear definition of IQ for large deviations

    • Replies: @D. K.
  65. Chang says:

    Congratulations! Good news to see Unz.com succeeding.
    Congratulations especially to Sailer. Impressive to build such a large and loyal audience despite the enmity of mainstream media both Left and Right.

  66. D. K. says:
    @Immigrant from former USSR

    IQ tests are not developed to measure the relative frequencies of various gene alleles, individually or collectively; they are developed to measure “g”– the general factor of intelligence. There is no reason for psychometricians to assume that IQ scores, aside from the effects of diseases and other forms of brain trauma, do not closely approximate the normal curve, as natural phenomena tend to do.

    It should be obvious, even to the casual observer, that childhood IQ scores are, of necessity, conflating a child’s native intelligence– “g”– with his or her current level of maturation. Children with the same amount of “g” who were born on the same date will have their own scores distributed around an average according to their degree of maturation, as of the date of the test. At age 25, after each is fully mature, and before their brains begin their slow declines (again, likely at different rates), their adult IQ scores should be identical– all other things having been equal!

  67. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Power Child

    NO carousel please, this is so 1990 design from Geo-cities and the likes.

    We so hated banner advertising in those days. I am allergic to that stuff.

    Keep the ‘zine clean and uncluttered.

    For your info I used to follow Razib , Fred and Steve long before they assembled with Ron.

    This site is almost heaven!

    I would like some one like Escobar , some military strategy=policy blogger.

    ann þ Þ

  68. @Wizard of Oz

    The American people and your audience should also be made aware of the activities of the most moral army, and of Breaking the Silence.

    Show them these videos

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kiAy0HPxNE

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_z7bJSB8rg

    http://mondoweiss.net/2015/05/testimonies-palestinian-cellphones

    think of them as a muffler for corroded daniel pipes.

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
  69. Gotta laugh at all the IQ jockeys discussion. High IQ doesn’t mean squat in any meaningful way if you don’t have common sense.

    “We can not solve our problems with the same level of thinking that created them” -Albert Einstein

    Uh, let me rephrase that. High IQ only means if you don’t have common sense, you’re gifted at lousing things up. That’s what Desmond Morris’ Tarzan accomplished:

    http://ronaldthomaswest.com/2015/04/01/merge/

    ^ Chomsky got his turn now maybe I can come up with a lampoon of the intelligence driving our ‘big brained White people’ on the right. Oh, actually I DID do that:

    http://ronaldthomaswest.com/2014/10/09/liberals/

    ^ ‘Liberals’ (it’s a stealth title)

  70. Truth says:

    An interesting article on our virtual host, from exactly twenty-one years ago, as of today:

    It’s good you found that article.

    Mr. Unz wanted me to send this to you, he’s too polite and cultured a Caucasoid gentleman to send it himself.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fP_hKDpXTug

  71. Gregory Cochran would be great, if you could get him. I always enjoy his writing style.

  72. Pat Casey says:
    @International Jew

    Hey International Jew! I can’t tell how many masks of irony you’re wearing. But by all means, stick around!

  73. Sean says:
    @LA Dude

    Giuliani’s team is mainstream.

    The Unz Review purportedly strives for intellectual diversity

    I doubt much intellectual diversity is to be found in a son of the éminence grise behind the neocon movement.

    .

    OVER THE PAST TWO YEARS, the Bush administration has inspired one of the more stimulating scavenger hunts in recent memory — the search for the Ur-theorist of its bold foreign policy initiatives. With each new turn another name has emerged. “Regime change” gave us the political philosopher Leo Strauss. The “shock and awe” campaign brought forth the Cold War calculations of military strategist Albert Wohlstetter. Hints of follow-up aggression against Syria and North Korea had some consulting Trotsky’s writings on “permanent revolution.” A likelier candidate might be Richard Pipes, the eminent historian of Russia who two decades ago interrupted a thriving career as a Harvard professor to help the Reagan administration articulate an assertive foreign policy that strikingly prefigured the “Bush doctrine” of today

    • Replies: @LA Dude
  74. @Wally

    Contrary to the consistency of the closed mind… and your arguments as you must realize, are with Ron Unz and his eclecticism, which the character of the site that bears his name reflects.

  75. @solontoCroesus

    My puzzle over the two You Tube links is not totally dissimilar to my wondering why Sean would say, and thnk it relevant, that Australa is a Third World country. Except you are presumably aiming at what you to take to be my favourable view of Israeli actions and my problem is just that, having watched the You Tube records, I can’t see your problem. The titles, “Israeli troops attacking a Palestinian woman and her child” and “Israeli terrorism on Palestinian woman and her children”, are totally misleading – they could almost be training films for an American police force and one of them looks as though large elements of it might have been stage. Clearly police are trying to brush off s womam imterfering in an arrest of a young man in one case.

    • Replies: @International Jew
  76. @Wizard of Oz

    Yeah, those videos are pretty silly. The soldiers arrived to do something unrelated and they’re obviously untrained in crowd control (eg it takes three of them to handcuff one woman).

    I’m not sure if any of the civilians we see are even Arabs, and half of them are holding movie cameras. It’s a familiar thing by now: European anarchist types going to Israel to provoke soldiers and, with some luck, getting footage like this for a souvenir.

  77. @silviosilver

    Antisemitism here comes in layers, true. At the top, already somewhat malodorous, we have Sailer who reads the Times and blames the other 5,999,950 of us for their nutty ideas.

    One layer below that is Unz and his Jewish-Ivy-League-admissions conspiracy (which, having been shredded by more careful researchers has reduced him to ad hominem tactics).

    One layer down, the putrefaction already pronounced, we have Giraldi painting Israel as America’s implacable enemy. Mearsheimer would slide into about that layer of the muck.

    The most rancid material comes in comments that bubble with crazy Holocaust stuff and long-view theories about the Jews’ historical perfidy.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Sean
    , @iffen
  78. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @International Jew

    Ahh. So anyone who criticizes Isreal is an antisemite and you have your own counter arguments for anyone criticizing Jews or Isreal.

    Good for you.

    That is precisely why we need more people who don’t care about being labeled an antisemite and are willing to put forth their opinions.

    Sailer, btw, is afraid of directly criticizing Jews. While he may talk about Jews indirectly he is always careful to pull his punches and not say anything too inflammatory.

    He does make his living off of donations after all, and in doubt he sees any reason to piss off the richest subgroup.

  79. Sean says:
    @International Jew

    Sailer mentions Jews as public policy intellectuals in much the same way as he mentions blacks in sports: winners get talked about. Israel is Mearsheimer’s best case in point for his offensive realism theory of international relations, although he tries to gloss over this by saying Israel’s crushing hegemony (everyone’s goal according to his theory) is not in its interests. Again, if the Israel Lobby had not been so successful over the last few generations, no one would be mentioning it. There is a problem with commenters, but they would be disabused if Ilana Mercer was here.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  80. RW says:
    @Anonymous

    Good idea. Or someone similar.

  81. iffen says:
    @International Jew

    Antisemitism here comes in layers, true. At the top, already somewhat malodorous, we have Sailer who reads the Times and blames the other 5,999,950 of us for their nutty ideas.

    Taking note of the disproportionate numbers of people of Jewish origin who are in the media business is not anti-Semitism.

    One layer below that is Unz and his Jewish-Ivy-League-admissions conspiracy (which, having been shredded by more careful researchers has reduced him to ad hominem tactics).

    He could be wrong or he could be correct. How is that anti-Semitism?

    One layer down, the putrefaction already pronounced, we have Giraldi painting Israel as America’s implacable enemy. Mearsheimer would slide into about that layer of the muck.

    I haven’t read this Giraldi. It is hard to see how Israel could be classified as an enemy. Along those lines there are no good global political reasons for the U.S. to consider Israel as an ally. It really is an un-equal and unique relationship. It must be because of the domestic political power of American Jews and evangelical Christians.

    The most rancid material comes in comments that bubble with crazy Holocaust stuff and long-view theories about the Jews’ historical perfidy.

    True, but they have a sort of open comment policy and don’t seem to sensor the crazy things that people want to say. Now if they blocked you while letting the Nazi wannabes have free reign that would be different.

    You have not persuaded me that this site is anti-Semitic.

    • Replies: @Ronald Thomas West
  82. LA Dude says:
    @Sean

    Giuliani’s team is mainstream.

    Do you think Giuliani transformed Manhattan from a crime ridden borough to a playground for the rich by relying on MSM-approved policy prescriptions?

    Giuliani is only culturally mainstream due to his outstanding leadership during and after the 9/11 attacks. He never has been politically mainstream.

    I doubt much intellectual diversity is to be found in a son of the éminence grise behind the neocon movement.

    Why don’t you reread Daniel Pipes’ statements rejecting the neocon label. He was never in favor of nation building in the Middle East, and he is not a neocon. Ascribing guilt by association with a parent, for whatever reason, does not really merit a response.

    • Replies: @Sean
  83. “Netanyahu was 180.”

    That explains the ticking time bomb cartoon he offered as “proof” at the UN. He thinks everyone else must be really, really stupid.

  84. AshTon says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    Lindsay is a bigfoot-obsessed simpleton, and has been taken in by every bigfoot-promoting conman on the web. It’s hard to take his politics seriously with that in mind.

  85. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Sean

    The real problem is Sailer and many of his readers are nationalists…

    While you are decidedly ‘international’

    This is a fundamental conflict that isn’t going to be resolved any time soon.

  86. @iffen

    About ‘International Jew’ stating:

    One layer down, the putrefaction already pronounced, we have Giraldi painting Israel as America’s implacable enemy

    Without analyzing Giraldi (a former USA intelligence officer) per motive, IJ’s observation could be backed up by former Israeli intelligence officer Ari Ben Menache’s work at (read free online)

    http://www.american-buddha.com/lit.profitswar.toc.htm

    Where he profiles Yitzak Shamir’s vehement hatred for, and undermining of, the USA while Israel is up to its armpits in joint MOSSAD/CIA criminal activities. It were never a simple world, eh? When the reasons for Shamir’s hatred are given (the USA’s refusal to do business with the Reich including no negotiation to open any avenue for the Askenazi to escape Europe pre-final solution), right or wrong, it’s pretty clear this seeing the USA as an enemy with a payback due would not be an isolated view in Israel.

    Would noting that fact make Ben Menache anti-Semitic? No, that’d be a ridiculous proposition. If Giraldi were to note similar things insofar as intelligence related perception regarding actual policy, it could only make him anti-Semitic in some people’s view because Giraldi is Catholic, would be my guess. Are there anti-Semitic Catholics? Sure, lots of them, Mel Gibson being right up there. Would that determine Giraldi is an anti-Semite? No.

    I would agree with your assessment about this site. Insofar as IJ’s accusations, in fact there are numerous documented Israeli endeavors where the internet is a battlefield for ‘hearts & minds’ and those who are in empathy with that endeavor are never going to be prone to reason but will lay out cases for anti-Semitic motivation to a point of nearly jingoism and undermine facts to a degree that cheapens the very term anti-Semitic. The Unz comment policy clearly points to a philosophy of ‘water off a duck’s back’ in this regard, and so the better cause for people to read and interact in this forum.

  87. Sean says:
    @LA Dude

    Do you think Giuliani transformed Manhattan from a crime ridden borough to a playground for the rich by relying on MSM-approved policy prescriptions

    Basically no, he came up with the right solution at that time. But if they had been dealing with a rising crime rate Bratton’s methods would not have worked very well, and might well have started civil unrest. I would give him credit for taking moderately tough decisions, but to attribute a change like that to one’s own policies was like taking credit for an ellipse, crime rates are related to youth bulges. there are tipping points where a certain concentration of young men leads to a phase shift. NYC violent crime actually peaked 12 % higher and four years before Giuliani brought in Bratton and the new methods began to be used. I wouldn’t say Bratton-style policing had no effects though, but although you can achieve results by concentrating on trouble spots, but only if there are a limited number of trouble spots. Giuliani’s policies would not have worked all that well a decade beforehand, because the police would not have been able to achieve those concentrations and they might have started riots.

    “He was never in favor of nation building in the Middle East” That depends which nation we are talking about. I dare say he is in favour of more building in the west bank territory of a nation demographically secured by a wave of immigrants from the former Soviet Union, who arrived after the US used its powerful economy for a military build up that may well have been a crucial factor in causing the collapse of the Soviet power, and subsequent allowing of migration. And his dad, Richard Pipes, was maybe the most important figure who advocated that cold confrontation with the USSR. Now his son advocates an attack on Iran, to which Israel could be seen as the main beneficiary (because it would remove the main ME force actively supporting the Palestinians).

  88. Gotta laugh at the ‘good guy Guiliani’ comments, that is one nasty s.o.b. behind the geopolitical curtain:

    http://ronaldthomaswest.com/2013/08/28/the-mojahedin-e-khalq/

    Not to mention his role in 9/11 (his ‘emergency’ center was in the imploded WTC Building 7)

    http://ronaldthomaswest.com/2013/05/12/1617/

    ^

  89. palladino says:
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    I like the sentiment of competition here and hope I have not misconstrued your comment, but I don’t think that is what we are facing. The deliberate forcing open of borders with the 1965 Act to import cheap labor and add “diversity” is not competition, it is change by design. On the scale it has been occurring it has benefited elites and the immigrants themselves at the expense of the majority.

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