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As some of you have probably noticed, our small webzine has recently expanded a bit, bringing on board additional voices of the Left and the Right regularly excluded from the mainstream media. This frequently includes their extensive archives, which in these troubled times might otherwise someday vanish without a trace.

For over a dozen years, Kevin Barrett’s Truth Jihad program has been broadcasting to the world via radio and podcast, providing in depth interviews and discussions with prominent figures in the “Alternative Left” community, with a special focus on the 9/11 attacks and other so-called “conspiracy theories.” His recent article on that subject—“Why the War on Conspiracy Theories Is Bad Public Policy”—was well-received and provoked a considerable number of comments, some of them quite thoughtful.

I’m very pleased to say that Kevin has now joined our website as a regular Columnist, and we have also augmented our growing podcast offerings by incorporating his entire existing archive of nearly 1,400 two hour shows, with the overwhelming majority of the ones from recent years including the audio files. Given the enormous size of these archives, the contents may be conveniently explored by time period, by Topic, or by particular Guests. Examples include the 16 featuring Gilad Atzmon, the 20 with James Petras, or the 28 focusing on the JFK Assassination.

Kevin joins Bonnie Faulkner, whose popular and long-running weekly show Guns & Butter was purged by Pacifica’s KPFA last summer, and whose archives we subsequently added. Given this expansion, we’ve also added a general audio archive page, allowing those interested to browse our audio contents in combined fashion, so that those shows featuring particular guests can be displayed across all different podcast channels.

http://www.unz.com/audio/

For example, here are the 47 shows featuring Webster Tarpley:

http://www.unz.com/audio/guest/webster_griffin_tarpley/

or the 263(!) podcasts discussing the 9/11 attacks:

http://www.unz.com/audio/topic/9-11/

This global archive will become especially useful as we gradually begin to add additional podcast channels in the future.

 

These new “Alt-Left” offerings are balanced on the ideological spectrum by the addition of Paul Kersey’s SBPDL (“Stuff Black People Don’t Like”) blog, which has been transferred from Google’s increasingly obsolescent Blogger platform.

The archives of SBPDL stretch back nearly a full decade, totaling well over 3 million words of posts and nearly 25 million words of comments, representing the equivalent of nearly 300 hardcover books and possibly constituting the world’s largest compendium documenting recent black crime and serious misbehavior in America, a grim reality so totally excluded from the pages of the New York Times and our other mainstream media sources.

ORDER IT NOW

During the Internet crackdown of late Summer 2017, SBPDL temporarily disappeared and some people wondered whether its vast accumulation of content material had permanently vanished. Although it eventually returned, our growing climate of censorship suggested that its eventual demise was merely a matter of time, so we are very glad that to have anticipated that likelihood by now providing it a more reliable permanent home. This step followed the previous addition of the Audacious Epigone HBD blog, whose contents stretch back to the mid-2000s.

 

By now offering the Truth Jihad and Guns & Butter podcasts and the SBPDL and Audacious Epigone blogs, we are continuing to fulfill our mission statement of providing convenient access to “Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media.”

The bulk of our regular media seems moving in exactly the opposite direction of increasing censorship, with the mainstream topics of even just ten or fifteen years ago now sometimes constituting career-ending ideological heresy. Given this climate, it is hardly surprising that our readership seems to have been growing quite nicely. According to Alexa.com, our relative traffic rank is now moving towards 75% of that obtained by the venerable New Republic and tops 60% of that in Foreign Policy.

Meanwhile, various “clickbait” Internet webzines and more established news organizations have recently announced a couple of thousand layoffs despite our current cyclical economic peak. So we seem to be headed in the right direction.

 
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  1. Mr. Unz, I applaud your expansive digital generosity in providing an Island for our culture’s Misfit Toys. Great move, and kudos on your expanding landscape.

    In a larger sense, your outreach is forcing me to rethink my conclusion that Free Speech is Jewish Kryptonite.

  2. Renoman says:

    I like the brevity of the Unz articles Pat Buchanan’s being about perfect. A lot of writers don’t get that I would encourage you to keep the thumb on the long boring story tellers and every little detail people weeding out the former and italicizing the details of the latter so people who aren’t interested in the big back story can get straight to the meat of the news.
    Brevity is what the modern World wants, we have no patience hence the phrase yada yada yada.
    Thanks for your great work.

    Regards,

    William

    • LOL: atlantis_dweller
  3. ” provoked a considerable number of comments, some of them quite thoughtful.”

    A beautifully barbed comment.

  4. republic says:

    Mr Unz

    This is a great site, both in terms of content and comments.

    However, there is one regular contributor who refuses to accept comments.

    Many readers here refuse to read articles which do not have a comment section.

    This well know contributor allows comments on other internet sites but not here.

    This particular contributor on very rare occasions does allow comments, but such occurrences are extremely rare.

    At any rate it is your site and you are in charge of it.

    regards

  5. Sowhat says:

    I enjoy expanding my vocabulary; however, no one needs to be impressed by $50 words except the writer.

  6. @republic

    It’s not just me then who doesn’t read Craig Roberts due to that?

    Truth be told… Unz’s policy on comments — whose liberality I agree on — gives space to plenty of rather inconvenient salliess of incivility.
    C. R. happened to be on the receiving end of a few in a row and he thought he had had it with the comments.

    This is the beauty, and the bane, of uncensored Internet: it allows a lot that wouldn’t be allowed in filtered, socially-controlled contexts: along with the abovecited incivility, it allows truth. Any system winnowing the comments flow would introduce bias. I like it as it is here, despite how disappointing it can be not-so-rare occasions.

  7. Yngvar says:

    How about adding Alex Jones’ InfoWars to the video-section? They’ve been banned by YouTube.

    • Agree: atlantis_dweller
    • Replies: @Hrw-500
  8. AKAHorace says:

    I read some of the columns on Unz review often. Others, I think are rubbish. But I enjoy being able to read such a broad range of views on a single website. Thank you for supporting so many writers who would not be heard with out this site.

    • Agree: Patricus
  9. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:

    As long as this has become an omnibus forum about how various columnists are presented on this great website, can something be done to at least merge Mr. Engelhardt’s blog-quality teasers into the articles of the “TomDispatch regulars” whose work he links to?

    My many comments about this explain that the separate publication disrupts commenting, and that Mr. Engelhardt’s prominent presentation as Columnist likely distracts readers from the substantial article. In at least one case, the intro did not present fairly what the article actually said. (I acknowledge also being motivated by disappointment in Mr. Engelhardt’s subjection of his dissidence to partisan political loyalties.) Other commenters have agreed, but in the thread under Mr. Engelhardt’s intro to Mr. Carroll’s column this week you’ll see that I have now gotten a couple angry at me for going on about this.

    If the format can’t or won’t be changed, OK. But I would like to know.

    Thank you.

  10. Tom Verso says:

    To my mind:

    “The Unz Review”, a breathtaking social scientific publication, is the manifestation of a profoundly unique combination of a brilliant and truly social scientific mind, genius computer programing and very significant wealth all warped into one person … Ron Unz. Thank You!

    • Agree: Audacious Epigone
  11. Hrw-500 says:
    @Yngvar

    I agree.

    Btw, I wonder if we could menage to contact blogger Mike Smith who had once the blog “Mike Smith Political Commentary” and gived some news from South Africa. Archive.today and the Wayback Machine had kept some partial archives of his blog?
    http://archive.is/FkLCx
    https://web.archive.org/web/20150430021112/http://mikesmithspoliticalcommentary.blogspot.com/

    I also thought of suggesting then Saboteur365 could be at Unz.com but I don’t know if it might be worth for it.

    • Replies: @atlantis_dweller
  12. Is there anything on the left that’s being suppressed or does leftness automatically buy admission to the established media?

    • Replies: @atlantis_dweller
  13. You can expect the Dark Forces to do everything possible to “disappear” this site that continually penetrates journalistic no-go zones. I hope you have technological defenses in depth prepared or already activated.

  14. Truth says:

    Hey, 4 or 500 hundred of Kersey’s 300 million words might actually be worth something.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Revusky
  15. @Truth

    Hey, 4 or 500 hundred of Kersey’s 300 million words might actually be worth something

    Ron Unz seems to think that something being excluded from the mainstream automatically means it has value.

    Sometimes, yes. Sometimes not so much. Kevin Barrett is excluded from the mainstream for telling the truth about things they want covered up. Kersey is excluded basically on account of being a race-baiting dirtbag.

    There is a difference.

  16. @Bill Jones

    What left are you turning your thought to?
    Truly leftist stances are, naturally, suppressed.
    Equally likely, some care is put to ensure their suppression be less loud and harder to notice than that of rightist stances.

    Rather than suppressed, true leftist claims and protestations are… neutered, with some cleverness.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
  17. @Jonathan Revusky

    A difference can also be there between being race-baiting dirtbags, and looking like that to you, I trust.

  18. @Hrw-500

    A real lodestone would be the retired blogger of Unqualified Reservations, Curtis Yarvin.

    • Replies: @Hrw-500
  19. Hrw-500 says:
    @atlantis_dweller

    Good idea and we could also add to the list, the late blogger Ex-Army who sadly, passed away in 2017. :_(
    https://vultureofcritique.wordpress.com/2017/08/23/i-think-either-ex-army-or-baloo-died-recently/
    https://aquilonseyrie.wordpress.com/remembering-ex-army-libertarian-nationalist/

    Unfortunately, I don’t think then the Wayback Machine and Archive.is saved all his blog posts, so we could had uploaded them all on Unz.com to archive his old posts.

  20. @republic

    For most of the writers, I enjoy the comments as much as the articles/posts. Paul Craig Roberts is a good Constitutional Libertarian. The only thing I HAVE disagreed with him on has been his couple of Global Climate Disruption/Sky-is-falling BS posts, and I let him know why, fairly civilly as I recall. Well, I NEED to recall, myself, as the comments are gone.

    Mr. Roberts seemed pretty hurt that lots of us commenters didn’t agree with this stupidity on just that one topic. That, Mr. Roberts’ bad-mounting of the commenters, along with a vague threat of a violence by a spoofed Paul Roberts, as I recall, were what got him to request the commenting be turned off. I haven’t read his writing since.

    • Agree: Svigor
    • Replies: @Yevardian
  21. @Jonathan Revusky

    You never stated whether you think Mr. Kersey tells the truth or not. That’s what I go by and why I won’t read the crap from the Commies on unz. To each his own – not everyone seeks the truth.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Revusky
  22. @Achmed E. Newman

    You never stated whether you think Mr. Kersey tells the truth or not.

    Well… Kersey does talk some stuff that is self-evident nonsense. Like his idea that we never “went back” to the moon because we were spending so much money on welfare for the n-words, or something like that… that’s obviously nonsense.

    But, okay, when he devotes some post to recounting the details of the latest gruesome crime story that took place somewhere or other, that’s probably all true for the most part.

    Okay, but… so what? I mean, on a national scale, there are about a hundreds traffic fatalities on a typical day, so you could create a ghastly collage from even a single day’s worth. And that would be truthful, as far as that goes.

    But what does one learn from that?

    That’s the problem. Yeah, we know that there is a certain amount of crime out there. On a national level, in a country with over 300 million people, there is quite a bit on any given day. And yes, we also know that disproportionate amount of the violent crime is being done by black underclass thugs. (Not ALL of it either, but okay…)

    But if I already know all that, what is Paul Kersey telling me that I don’t know?

    On the other hand, if you (or just about anybody) listens to Kevin Barrett’s radio show regularly, you will learn quite a few interesting things that you didn’t know before. I don’t think that applies to the Paul Kersey material. That was my point.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    , @Svigor
  23. @Jonathan Revusky

    Like his idea that we never “went back” to the moon because we were spending so much money on welfare for the n-words, or something like that… that’s obviously nonsense.

    It’s not obviously nonsense. If you take the entire “Great Society” huge Socialist system as a whole, that could easily be the case, numbers-wise, and politically. It’s not something one could prove, but neither is it nonsense.

    I will agree that Mr. Kersey’s posts can get very repetitive, especially the ones in which some violence, often including shooting deaths of black people, happens during a) a funeral for a slain black person and/or b) during another in a long series of “stop the violence” marches and rallies. It’s funny once, but …

    Yes, the violence by black thugs in particular happens everyday, as ~100 traffic deaths also do. The difference is that work on preventing traffic deaths has made headway (I swear I remember the number 50,000 yearly a few decades back, as I attended traffic school, one of the times). There can be no solution to the black violence until people first start being truthful about it, as ugly as that may seem to you.

    Some of the crimes, such as the Knoxville Horror, with raping, burning, torturing, etc. of the young white couple are crimes that are so horrible, and being racially motivated, would have been in the national news for 2 years running were the race reversed. You’ve gotta know that already, if you pay any attention.

    By publishing stories on the everyday violent acts, in addition to everyday destruction of our once-great cities, I think Mr. Kersey gives the big picture by all the repetition of the small pictures (it’s big to the family of the man/lady/child who’s dead, of course.)

    If it’s not your thing, I completely understand. I may listen to one Barrett show, and see what I think, time permitting (commenting is like a part time job!)

    • Replies: @Jonathan Revusky
  24. @atlantis_dweller

    I was thinking of the late Robert Parry who still seems to get some press

    But other than WSWS I don’t see much independent left (Ignoring Greenwald’s bought and paid for effort)

  25. @Achmed E. Newman

    Like his idea that we never “went back” to the moon because we were spending so much money on welfare for the n-words, or something like that… that’s obviously nonsense.

    It’s not obviously nonsense.

    Well, it’s obviously nonsense if you are numerate, i.e. numerically literate.

    If you take the entire “Great Society” huge Socialist system as a whole, that could easily be the case, numbers-wise, and politically. It’s not something one could prove, but neither is it nonsense.

    Uhh, no, it can’t easily be the case. The numbers aren’t there. You only have to look at the ball park figures. The last time I looked, the biggest single “welfare” program in the U.S.A. was food stamps and when I looked, that was about 60 billion a year. I think TANF, as it was called then, “Temporary Assistance to Needy Families” was something like 20-odd billion.

    All the welfare programs put together were maybe 100 billion and military spending was approaching ten times that or something.

    So, the whole idea that we never went back to the moon because some single mother in the ghetto is getting, oh, I dunno, a few hundreds bucks a month — that’s just numerically illiterate.

    Or here’s another way of looking at it. Maybe the various welfare programs did prevent us from going back to the moon and that is also why we couldn’t invade Afghanistan or Iraq or have 800 military bases around the world.

    But hold on…

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  26. @Jonathan Revusky

    Along with some numeracy there must be a DIMS (Does It Make Sense) in your calculations, meaning seeing the big picture. You’re way the hell off, Revusky. Did you count Section 8 housing? Did you count medicare and medicaid? Did you count the use of emergency rooms by people that get the rest of us billed for it, due to laws requiring their being treated there as if emergency rooms were clinics?* Did you include huge expansions of police forces to keep violence in the ghetto down to Iraq levels. Welfare programs are often at the state and local levels, not just Federal (it used to be only the former).

    Bringing up the US military warmongering around the world is the usual trick by you Socialists to change the subject. Any Libertarian/Constitutionalist like myself would agree that there’s tons of money blown and wasted in “Defense” of the world (a measly 1/2 day’s of annual spending of the Feral Gov’t could pay for that border wall/barrier in one shot, even counting the usual government waste). The spending on social programs is about equal to on-the-books defense spending – look at the back of an income tax booklet.

    .

    * A doctor friend of mine harshly chewed out an indigent black patient who came to the hospital for the 3rd time complaining of chest pains – all 3 times he refused treatment (as in an expensive catheter procedure). The reason my friend was so pissed was that in the 3rd case, instead of by $500 ambulance ride, the patient was transported by helicopter. Do you have any idea how much that costs, Mr. Revusky? I don’t think you do.

  27. @Achmed E. Newman

    You’re way the hell off, Revusky.

    Well, okay. Then put up some real numbers and demonstrate it.

    Did you count Section 8 housing? Did you count medicare and medicaid? Did you count the use of emergency rooms by people that get the rest of us billed for it, due to laws requiring their being treated there as if emergency rooms were clinics?*

    Well, fine, if you want to demonstrate to me that you are not some random crank (which I have catalogued you as) then add it all up and give me the ball park numbers.

    Nearly a decade ago, I was in some argument with some right-winger telling me that the U.S.A. is going bankrupt because of all the give-aways to the poor people (and surely he meant the nXXXXXs.)

    I was actually curious at the time and took a look at the numbers and saw that it’s just not tenable. All that stuff added up is like a tenth of the military spending.

    The reason my friend was so pissed was that in the 3rd case, instead of by $500 ambulance ride, the patient was transported by helicopter. Do you have any idea how much that costs, Mr. Revusky? I don’t think you do.

    First of all, you’re conflating two questions. Like the $500 ambulance ride. The ambulance ride was billed at $500 but that is not its true cost. And the same would apply to the helicopter ride. That one entity within the overall system probably billed another entity in the system thousands of dollars for the helicopter ride does not mean that this is its true cost to society.

    You see, you’re such a dumbshit that you don’t even have an analytical framework for attacking the question.

    In any case, an “indigent black man” getting a ride in a helicopter is obviously not the reason that the country is bankrupt or the reason that we did not “go back” to the moon.

    One has to be a major league idiot to take such notions seriously.

  28. @Jonathan Revusky

    Revulsky, I’ve got plenty of numbers, so let me just paste the picture directly off of the back of the 2015 US income tax booklet. It’s from a Peak Stupidity post called Quick glance at the budget from US-Gov crack Green-eyeshade boys. Can you read a pie chart, first of all?

  29. @Jonathan Revusky

    I meant to add: I’m just referring to the right-hand pie chart, of the Outlays.

    Now, you’d probably reply that the “Defense” budget is more than that $700 billion shown, with “off-budget” black ops stuff, etc. I would agree with you on that. Look at both the SS/Medicare/retirement 42% – I consider that mostly welfare. Then, there is the Physical/Human/community development 7%, and then the Social Programs 23%. Holy Moley, that’s most of the budget, ain’t it, Revuskly? Most of these programs redistribute money to the poor, and guess who makes up a large share of the poor?

    The portions of state and local government budgets that are doled out disproportionately to blacks due to their social ills are something I can see all around me, but I don’t have numbers on that.

    The Space Program is something that, as a Libertarian, I think was never the US Government’s job to begin with. However, it was still just a small, though non-negligible, portion of the budget – from 1960 through 1972, from before the Mercury program through Apollo, $56 Billion total was spent by NASA. During that time the Federal outlay ramped up from $150 billion or so up through the mid-$300 billions, so call it ~ $3,000 billion (3 Trillion bucks) over those 13 years – a +/- 10 % quick estimate. That’s on the order of 2%. If we took only 50% of the budget being welfare-type spending, with blacks using only their proportional amount (not the case, of course), we’d still get black welfare > space program spending (5% of budget vs. 2%). That’s welfare on the Federal level – of course, the space program was ONLY on the Federal level.

    Here’s a good site for Feral Gov’t budget info, BTW.

  30. @Jonathan Revusky

    What the hell, man, have you never heard of opportunity cost? The $500 ambulance ride and the $15,000 helicopter ride are billed to the taxpayers or payed via healthcare costs. The money could have been spent productively by these people had it not been redistributed to some idiot dead-beat who refused treatment.

    That one entity within the overall system probably billed another entity in the system thousands of dollars for the helicopter ride does not mean that this is its true cost to society.

    None of these entities were doing anything PRODUCTIVE with the money, as could be the case were the taxpayer or paying patient not bilked out of it.

    Do you think I believe there was only this one guy last year? I know plenty of people in health care, not just doctors. There are emergency rooms being shut down due to inability to make ends meet by charging the 25% paying customers enough to pay for the 75% dead-beats.

    See the difference in China, where healthcare is very much closer to a free market – Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Postscript

    If the momentum of that amazing engineering and technical work during the space program had been kept up, there is no telling how far we’d have gone. Just imagine if these guys had 10% of the digital electronics we have today.

    • Replies: @Svigor
    , @Jonathan Revusky
  31. @Achmed E. Newman

    As I recall the first swine flu patient in the US was a baby whose family had entered illegally. The baby was flown by helicopter 500 miles from Brownsville to Houston where R.N.s and Drs took care of it full time for 2 weeks. Then it died. I wonder how many similar cases have been charged to the US taxpayer since?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  32. Svigor says:

    INB4 Kersey makes his comments policy super-restrictive, so all my questions only make him privately uncomfortable.

  33. Svigor says:
    @republic

    Ditto. The only PCR I read is the headlines. He can go **** himself.

  34. Svigor says:
    @Jonathan Revusky

    Well… Kersey does talk some stuff that is self-evident nonsense. Like his idea that we never “went back” to the moon because we were spending so much money on welfare for the n-words, or something like that… that’s obviously nonsense.

    This is high levels of autism.

    It’s meant to be provocative. A talking point. (Actually, his intent is irrelevant, because it works that way, regardless)

    The rest of your comment is autistic, too. Some people find emotional stories persuasive; not everyone is so autistically oriented toward statistics.

    Sorry to keep throwing that word around, but seriously – high levels of autism in that post.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Revusky
  35. Svigor says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Along with some numeracy there must be a DIMS (Does It Make Sense) in your calculations, meaning seeing the big picture. You’re way the hell off, Revusky. Did you count Section 8 housing? Did you count medicare and medicaid? Did you count the use of emergency rooms by people that get the rest of us billed for it, due to laws requiring their being treated there as if emergency rooms were clinics?* Did you include huge expansions of police forces to keep violence in the ghetto down to Iraq levels. Welfare programs are often at the state and local levels, not just Federal (it used to be only the former).

    And has anyone ever counted how much extra NAMs have cost us over the years in terms of higher insurance rates? This has got to be in the trillions.

    P.S., Revusky, I actually respect you more than I do Kersey, who, last I heard, was an inveterate JQ-dodger. I respect the idea that people like Jared Taylor and Kersey have a role, but in Kersey’s case, I have trouble respecting the man. Maybe because Kersey is a blogger, and bloggers are more like journalists, whereas I don’t have such problems with Taylor, perhaps because Taylor is more like a politician.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Revusky
  36. Svigor says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Just a quibble, as I have been reading about space flight for the last year+, and my autism is tingling; it’s worth pointing out that the narrative from some quarters is that after the Moon landings, further spending would have suffered from diminishing returns. With the rise of SpaceX and reusability, the narrative is that we’re picking up where we left off, this time via the private sector, with the help of Musk’s vision, and forty years of improvement in IT and other technology. Interestingly, after the Moon Landings, the public space sector itself pivoted toward reusability with the Space Shuttle program, which unfortunately largely failed at the crucial goal of reusability. That last bit, at least, agrees with the previously-mentioned narratives.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  37. @Sin City Milla

    That had to be in the 1/4 million dollar range, all told. I wonder if the parents came knowing the child was very sick. Fred Reed, quick question if you are lurking: Aren’t the hospitals top-notch down there in Ole Mexico? (It’s great we have so many experts we can turn to here on unz.)

  38. @Svigor

    Svigor, the Space Shuttle, besides proving a lot of concepts and doing work that unmanned boosters couldn’t do (repair of the Hubble telescope is a good example), kept lots of engineers in the aerospace business that held lots of human capital. That is, from working in the industry continuously lots of very important technology/know-how that just cannot be all documented is kept on hand. All that gets lost when there is a big long lapse like there has been in this industry.

    It’s as if Boeing had quit building airliners completely for 15 years or so. There would be so much engineering knowledge and culture lost. It takes lots of time to build it back up, and I don’t think our modern engineers even have the capability on some of the real honest-to-god mechanical stuff.

    That’s not to put down SpaceX though. I haven’t been following much of it.

    • Replies: @Svigor
  39. Svigor says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Pretty sure they put dudes in space before the Shuttle.

    There’s usually some benefit to big gov’t programs. The SS program wasn’t worth the money, and obviously failed in its primary task of dropping the cost of space launch via reusability, but it had its successes. If you’re saying it was better than the alternative of atrophy via cancellation of any kind of space program, I guess I have to admit that’s a strong possibility. But then, that ain’t sayin’ much. But in their defense, I suppose it’s entirely possible that what SpaceX is doing now simply wasn’t doable in the sixties, when NASA needed a pivot. Further, it’s entirely possible that NASA would never prove equal to the task, owing to its nature as a gov’t jobs program.

    You should read up on SpaceX. Basically picking up where the sixties left off in pursuit of 2001.

    As for NASA, I hope they wise up and pivot out of the launch business, and into the special projects (space colonization tech) biz.

  40. @Achmed E. Newman

    What the hell, man, have you never heard of opportunity cost?

    Well, actually, I have heard of “opportunity cost” and, unlike you, I also understand the concept.

    The resources used to transport the person by helicopter, by and large, have minimal opportunity cost because if they didn’t do that, the helicopter would just be sitting on the ground, the personnel involved would just be on the ground drinking coffee and eating donuts. And all of those people are drawing the same salary regardless.

    The only real cost of the helicopter ride the I can readily see is the fuel that was burned up, but that is really not all that much money. In any case, if the personnel were sitting around too much, they might organize some training drills to give these people something to do. So, you could say that giving some person a helicopter ride to the hospital could serve as a training drill to maintain readiness. But, regardless, the real “opportunity cost” to society as a whole from the helicopter ride is probably quite trivial.

    Meanwhile, all of the expenditures on foreign wars really are resources sucked out of the domestic economy and really do have a massive opportunity cost for society as a whole.

    The money could have been spent productively by these people had it not been redistributed to some idiot dead-beat who refused treatment.

    You’re engaging in a very basic fallacy. You’re conflating the budget of a country as a whole with that of, say, and individual or a household.

    You actually are a perfect example of the adage that “a little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing”, this way you are bandying about terms like “opportunity cost” when you don’t really even understand the concept.

  41. @Svigor

    It’s meant to be provocative. A talking point. (Actually, his intent is irrelevant, because it works that way, regardless)

    So, the bottom line is that you are tacitly that Kersey is little more than a two-bit troll, right?

  42. @Svigor

    Revusky, I actually respect you more than I do Kersey,

    Well, that’s good to hear. I’m not sure exactly how to parse that. I suspect that you’re more expressing how little you respect Kersey than how much you respect me! LOL!

    • Replies: @Svigor
  43. Svigor says:
    @Jonathan Revusky

    No, going after Jews two-fisted really does earn a lot more respect from me than going after Blacks does. Blacks are small-fry, and lots of people criticize them. Jews, not so much. That takes balls.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Revusky
  44. @Svigor

    So, out of curiosity, Svigor, do you still buy the official story on 9/11? (And the rest of the false flags attributed to the Arabs.)

    Or have you been wising up….

    • Replies: @Svigor
  45. Yevardian says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I have to admit, I got a good chuckle out of that ‘Paul Craig Roberts’ commenter.

  46. Svigor says:
    @Jonathan Revusky

    That’s a fair question. My quick answer is that I’m not big on “conspiracy theories.” Reason being, they all seem to divert from the rock-solid, obvious “conspiracy theories” that everyone ignores. The JQ is right there in the open and all of these caved-in-head fucks want to divert to all of this politically-correct horseshit.

    A more honest answer is that I really don’t GAF. The idea that citizens of Saudi Arabia, our (apparently) second-greatest ally, and ally of our first-greatest ally (Israel) pulled it off because of, inter alia, the Jewish occupation of Palestine works okay for me.

    Seriously though, I devote very little energy to this stuff. There’s far too much EXTREMELY OBVIOUS Jewish domination and subversion afoot for me to care about 9/11.

    Want to know the funniest part? This’ll kill you: 9/11 is exactly, 100%, PRECISELY the event that set me on the path to ethnopatriotism. In the wake of 9/11, I said to myself, “okay, you may not be interested in politics, but politics are interested in you.” I set about figuring out WTF was going on. My father raised me with a rather solid grounding in critical thinking, so I knew not to rule anyone’s arguments out based on what someone else said about them. Meaning, I didn’t rule anyone’s arguments out. Meaning, I entertained everyone’s arguments. Meaning, I entertained white nationalists’ arguments. And guess what? Theirs were the most persuasive. Frankly, they blew everyone else out of the water. A couple years later, and I was a White Nationalist.

    Funny, no?

    P.S., I admit, I was relatively well-primed for WNism. I was born and raised in the South, by a race-realist father. He was not a WN (barely a proto-WN, even), but he was a supremely honest, courageous man, and FFS, you can’t be both of those things and white man in the South, and not be race-realist.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Revusky
  47. Svigor says:

    (And the rest of the false flags attributed to the Arabs.)

    Maybe you could unpack that? Frankly, I don’t have a clue which events you’d put in that list.

    The Syria gas attack springs to mind. As far as that goes, I’m agnostic. I know a lot of WNs say it was a false-flag attack. I’m willing to stipulate that it was. Frankly, I don’t really care. I would prefer that we stop the foreign adventurism on behalf of Zionists. That very much includes overthrowing Assad. But I really don’t get as invested as most WNs seem to. To be frank, I’d make a deal with the Devil and overthrow every regime in the ME, if the zhids would reciprocate by stopping their genocide of my people. That said, I know the zhids would never honor the deal…

  48. @Svigor

    I’m not big on “conspiracy theories.

    Svigor, judging by some of your tone here, I’m getting the sense that you have matured significantly since my previous run-ins with you. I have a distinct recollection of some previous conversations I had with you and they were not really very enriching. I don’t think that was primarily my fault.

    First of all, to be clear about one thing, I do not particularly object to your or anybody else being a “white nationalist” per se. It is a viewpoint and I don’t believe you’ve ever seen me trying to demonize that viewpoint.

    But the problem is this: WN or any other ethno-nationalism is still primarily an ideological position.

    9/11 Truth and other so-called ” conspiracy theories” revolve around purely factual questions. Whatever the truth ultimately is about 9/11 is, in principle, the same for everybody — black, white, male, female, gay, straight…

    Right?

    9/11 Truth, as a purely factual question, has absolutely nothing to do with where you are on some left-right or ethnocentric vs. multiculturalist spectrum.

    Do you grasp the above point?

    To say that you’re NOT interested in 9/11 and other purely factual questions because your big thing is that you are WN, that simply makes no sense, Svigor. At least, properly understood, it doesn’t really make sense.

    As for the so-called JQ, i.e. the political power of organized world Jewry, a.k.a. the Zionists and all that, well, that is one of the most central issues of our time. I recognize that as somebody of Jewish descent myself.

    It’s one thing to say that they exercise power, but then the next question is: HOW do they do it?

    Well, to a very large extent, they control the narrative, right? They control the MSM, they control Hollywood and just about everything all the normies watch on the TeeVee. But how do they construct narratives? Synthetic events…

    To say that you are obsessed with the JQ but so-called “conspiracies” don’t interest you… it’s almost like saying you’re interest in cars but motors and transmissions don’t interest you at all.

    Okay, you can reject my point, or even refuse to understand it, but my guess is that eventually, you’ll come to see that I’m right.

  49. Hello,

    it happens to all of us, I guess, to remove browser cookies.
    Couldn’t you make your site store information on what commenters a user wishes to ignore?
    So that when I use the site again, once I identify myself, previously ignored commenters are back on the ignore list.

  50. There’s an erstwhile-looking Scotland-based blogger, Craig Murray, which I thought I’d invite you to consider adding to the columnist roster here (if he would give is consent).

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