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In early Spring of this year, Pew Research released the results of an 11-question quiz gauging rudimentary science knowledge. On all eleven questions men fared better than women, Hispanics fared better than blacks, and whites fared better than Hispanics and blacks. Results for Asians and other racial groups were not separately reported.

This reveals Pew to be both racist and sexist. It’s too bad because while the organization does lean gently to the left, it does a lot of great, meticulous, and interesting work.

Anyway, the following graph shows the average score each group received on the quiz (which may be taken here–most who do so will find it easy to ace):

 
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  1. That there’s a hate-graph, buddy. The only reason I’m not gonna report you to the $PLC is that you have the dependent variable axis starting at 0. Oh, and your colors are quickly interpretable.

    Maybe next post you can present some similar data from this polling organization in a different format, say a Pew-de-Pie chart.

  2. Alter course?

    Nonsense! Full speed ahead!

  3. One thing is missing from the results of this poll:  the odds of getting a correct answer by random chance.  The difference between that and the actual score, not the raw score, is the true measure of knowledge of the subject.

    It would not surprise me in the least if there were only 3 choices per question, and the results for blacks prove absolutely zero knowledge at all.

  4. @Mr. Rational

    The twelfth question: Can you follow the provided link to the quiz and see how many choices are offered per question?

    Four choices. There were three questions Blacks got wrong about equal to or more than would be expected by random chance

    • Replies: @Anonymousse
  5. @Cloudbuster

    I also found that amazing, not only do they not have any idea about the most basic stuff, they seem to have somehow actively acquired actual anti-knowledge along the way.

    • Replies: @DRA
  6. lhtness says:

    I got an 11/11 on the quiz. I’m half inclined to send it to relatives, but I’m afraid to find out if some of them actually get a score of less than 10.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  7. Anon[280] • Disclaimer says:

    It seems clear that mostly white men took the test. The women’s lower score did not lower the white score by much, and I don’t see radically more black or Hispanic women taking it over white women.

    The odds of getting a correct answer by guessing would be 25 percent, since it was a four-question multiple choice test.

    I don’t think the questions were generated dynamically based on prior answers, but that would be a good way to get a more granular ranking.

  8. Triumphs of Black Science: Fake Snow

    In all fairness, this particular gentleman seems rather fair-minded (if a bit dim), but there were dozens of similar videos after the Atlanta snowstorm of 2014, of blacks performing similar “experiments” and accusing the government of dumping “fake snow” on them.

    When you have this degree of ignorance in a population, you do not have a functioning society. All we have is a thin veneer of functionality masking a bevy of barely interacting cargo cults. It’s pretty terrifying when you think about it, so we all just put our heads down and try to carry on, but it’s going to blow up someday.

    • LOL: Twodees Partain
  9. 216 says: • Website

    o/t

    Do we know the race of the shooting victim? BezosBlog didn’t point out if he was black or WokeWhite/Asian

    A photographer told a group of teens to stop using the n-word. Then shots rang out.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/a-photographer-told-a-group-of-teens-to-stop-using-the-n-word-then-shots-rang-out/ar-AAIu6rj?ocid=spartanntp

    Black ethnopress infers that this guy was black

    https://atlantablackstar.com/2019/09/30/hispanic-men-charged-with-aggravated-assault-despite-shooting-phoenix-man-9-times-over-the-n-word-you-cant-say-the-word/

    https://www.facebook.com/chea.tardey.3 (unclear if same guy)

    • Replies: @Jim Christian
  10. Which of the following is an example of genetic engineering?

    A: Khaaaaan

    • LOL: Talha, Ash Williams
    • Replies: @A123
  11. Pew more like
    Please
    Excuse our
    Whiteness

    Statistics are racist!

    Now the question i have is what questions did black people get right?

  12. After you complete the quiz you can break the results down by race!

  13. In stead of just average results, I should really have liked to have seen the distributions for the groups broken out above.

  14. Lot says:

    “ This reveals Pew to be both racist and sexist. It’s too bad because while the organization does lean gently to the left, it does a lot of great, meticulous, and interesting work.”

    My emphatic agreement. Nobody else does as much polling and related research by race.

  15. @lhtness

    I got a 10/11, but the question it says I got wrong (on genetics – don’t want to spoil it) is one I swear I clicked correctly. It got recorded wrong. That site is racisss, man, against white people!

    • Replies: @Duke84
  16. Multiple choice is said to somewhat favor the male brain …
    but only 16% of the populace should have been allowed to finish high skoo?

    Gross.

  17. Duke84 says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I got 10/11 too.It was the ear infection question I got wrong.

    • Replies: @Boston Sid
  18. 11/11.

    Idiots made the results page more than 1 screen wide and disabled the horizontal scroll bar.  I saved it and hope to have energy to go over it later.  Right now I am still fuming over Windoze 10 rebooting while I was AFK and destroying several hours worth of research, plus somehow making all my open tabs unrecoverable in the browser.  For the millionth time, god damn Microsoft.

    • Replies: @Ash Williams
  19. Perhaps blacks are less educated in terms of science but they are not less intelligent. The black people invented so much in the field of art in the last 100 years it’s impossible to underestimate them. The Jazz, Blues, Gospel, Rap, and they are good in poetry too. There are talented black artists and actors, and directors, and dancers. All this requires high intelligence. Music is intelligent.

    • Troll: MBlanc46
  20. On all eleven questions men fared better than women, Hispanics fared better than blacks, and whites fared better than Hispanics and blacks. Results for Asians and other racial groups were not separately reported.

    The screen after the web test shows the distribution of correct answers for every single question relative to age, race and level of education of the respondents in the survey proper. Unfortunately, it breaks down the categories separately rather than combining them.

    What depresses me most is that according to those figures, only 80 percent of the respondents with graduate degrees could correctly answer Question 5 (the one about ranges of temperature). Which requires absolutely no prior knowledge of facts, with everything supplied by the graph itself. In other words, assuming that Pew’s selection for the survey was statistically valid, in this day 20 percent of Americans who have written master’s and doctoral theses that passed can’t read a simple diagram. How’s that for dumbing down higher education?

    Even worse are the results on the final question, which was a literal elementary school math problem of the “Car A travels at X miles per hour. How far does it get in Y minutes?” variety. Again, 19 percent of post-graduates failed at this. We should hope and pray that at least some of that was at least due to laziness rather than honest imbecility.

    As a scientific curiosity, the percentage of blacks who got the answer to that question right was 23 percent… on a four-choice multiple answers quiz.

  21. I took the quiz. It was very basic and I scored 100%. It said I was in the top 16% that answered correctly. I suspect that AA’s chart needs updating. I tick all the boxes you would expect.

    It was interesting to see the breakdown in individual answers, evidently the public is dramatically ignorant in chemistry, then less so genetic engineering, what a “hypothesis” is, math, and statistics. They were most accurate on identifying antibiotic overuse as creating resistant bacteria.

    The ear infection question was poorly worded and indicated a lack of knowledge on the quiz maker’s part. They should have added “use two additional groups, one that does nothing, and one that uses saline” to control for untreated infections, and the placebo effect.

    The quiz results are very likely skewed to the upside, as the people interested in taking such a quiz are probably better at science & math than those that aren’t. If_you_only_knew_how_bad_it_really_was.jpg

    • Replies: @Jim Christian
  22. @Mr. Rational

    Windoze 10 rebooting while I was AFK and destroying several hours worth of research, plus somehow making all my open tabs unrecoverable in the browser. For the millionth time, god damn Microsoft.

    Linux works very well these days. I’ve never had a spontaneous reboot in 3 years.

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
  23. @Ash Williams

    I’ve heard that Linux works poorly on my particular computer.  I don’t have time to mess around with OSs any more, more’s the pity.

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
  24. Anonymous[217] • Disclaimer says:

    This study doesn’t even matter to me because they only included the minorities that I almost never run into. Why don’t they separate scores for the Ashkenazim vs non-Hispanic, non-Jewish Whites? Why don’t they list separate scores for East Asians and Subcons?

    They really should make UMC versions of all of these race studies. Instead of White vs Black vs Hispanic they should only include Whites vs Ashkenazim vs East Asians vs Subcons. List the people that we actually interact with in real life.

  25. songbird says:

    I wonder if this would replicate across Congressional racial caucuses.

    Some of the members of the Black Caucus have said some pretty alarming things over the years. Hank Johnson worried Guam would tip over. But, maybe, he was just misusing language?

    Sheila Jackson Lee, who was a member of the House Science Committee, is rumored to have thought Armstrong had planted the US flag on Mars in 1969. But, then again, maybe that is a false rumor because is it likely she would get the year right, but would think it was Mars?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    , @Bill
  26. I’ve used Linux exclusively since 1999. I’m a retired professional software developer and white hat hacker.

    I had a consulting company in Texas and our record up time was on a Linux box we installed that hadn’t been rebooted in over 6 years. We took it down because that server was running out of disk space. We had other boxes we installed that also had years between reboots and didn’t consider that too out of the ordinary.

    The Internet runs on Linux boxes because they’re reliable and efficient.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @The Alarmist
  27. Rosie says:

    11/11, but the quiz really wasn’t that easy. I’m sure my parents, perfectly responsible and informed citizens, would have missed several.

  28. A123 says:

    10/11 — One realizes the questions have to be short to avoid ‘abandoning’ by survey takers, but a couple of the questions have more than one right answer. Over prescribing antibiotics creates multiple problems.

  29. Bill says:

    I found the average scores by question interesting. After taking the test but before looking at the score breakdown, I guessed that the axial tilt question would be the most missed. Not even close. Evidently, that was an easy one.

    A super easy chemistry question was the most missed. I was worried as I read that question at first because I thought maybe I would have to choose between base and ph buffer. But ph buffer was not a choice.

    The fact that blacks do slightly worse than random chance on the arithmetic question is, uh, eerie.

  30. @songbird

    Nope, Songbird, Hank Johnson really is that stupid. It’s all on video now, so stupidity is much more difficult to hide now:

  31. Bill says:
    @songbird

    The flag on Mars thing is not a rumor either. It was reported in the news and can easily be found using google—she also thinks the US Constitution is 400 years old, evidently. The Congresswoman immediately screeched racisss, so one might think that there are lots of other gaffes that reporters are afraid to report.

    • Replies: @songbird
  32. Svevlad says:

    So 2/3 and 1/2 must be unpersoned…

    Doable.

  33. A123 says:
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    A: Khaaaaan

    Do you remember the TV series Andromeda…

    A genetically engineered heavy worlder, a genetically engineered pilot, and a massively genetically engineered Nietzschean. There’s a show that never would be made today.

    PEACE 😇

  34. A couple of the questions on the quiz were constructed poorly. I got 11/11 but could have made a case at least twice that an alternative to the “right” answer was plausible. There were a couple questions that continued what I believe are idiotic theories, not the least of which is that hydrocarbons are “fossil fuels.” Hydrocarbons exist throughout the solar system and sure as hell aren’t from plants, dinosaurs or dinosaur poop. And a proper control for the ear infection treatment trial would have whatever is the carrier (mineral oil?) in the treatment group also used in the control group. I understand why they dumb this stuff down, but their answers are actually a form of misinformation as well.

    FWIW, I have two science degrees and worked in science-related occupations.

    That said, do we forget Jay Leno’s “Jaywalking?” Black, white, green or chartreuse, people of all ages are largely so ignorant that listening to them reduces one’s intelligence.

    That’s bad, but what’s worse? That essentially everyone grossly overestimates their level of knowledge, and they act on (and cling to opinions based on) their folly. There are myriad ways to separate people into two groups, and here’s one: Some people are smart enough to know that they live in a sea of ignorance, and others are too stupid to realize that they’re too stupid to realize this truth.

    In the land of the blind, the sighted wouldn’t be king; he’d be hanged or stoned as a heretic.

  35. @Achmed E. Newman

    We are ruled by literal morons.

    There are two theories for this:
    (1) The American electorate is so saturated with idiots and/or so slothfully complacent that they don’t give a rat’s ass who is on the ballot, they just want their “I voted” sticker.

    (2) The people who REALLY rule us have insured that only sock-puppets, egregiously corrupt and/or idiotic people are allowed into the figurehead positions of power. This way, when CONgress et.al. produces offal and toxic waste on a daily basis, no one is surprised and no one tries to change it.

    I figure both could be true. And most likely the combination is the best explanation.

    For over 100 years, people who are too stupid to close their mouths while counting a huge flock of birds overhead have been enabled by widespread innovations to survive childhood and reach reproductive maturity (and produce massive numbers of clones of themselves.) It is beyond doubt that the intelligence of people is in steep decline. We are simply not culling the morons, instead we support them as they multiply. I’m not a fan of Nature’s blunt scythe, but eventually there’s going to be an inflection point. Idiocracy isn’t a comedy; and a world full of people too stupid to maintain the basic infrastructure they inherited from their betters will become a charnel house sooner or later.

  36. @216

    Chris Rock always said the N word is “our word”. If you’re any but Black, you can only use Chris Rock’s word if you’re held up and shot by a Black.

    That was in one of his acts/HBO specials a decade ago or more. He knew more than he knew. A lot of the stuff Rock thought was ridiculous ten and twenty years back actually came true.

  37. @John Regan

    In other words, assuming that Pew’s selection for the survey was statistically valid, in this day 20 percent of Americans who have written master’s and doctoral theses that passed can’t read a simple diagram. How’s that for dumbing down higher education?

    Ok, so where’s my one missed question about antacids being bases stand in the Pantheon of American Scientific Stupidity (PASS)? I may have skipped out on the day of that lesson in Chemistry, or maybe Biology, Earth Science. If only they had included the base of alks.

    10 out of 11. Not bad for a numb-skull.

    • Replies: @John Regan
  38. @Ash Williams

    The base-level issue of the question is, you either understand or not what a control group is and why it’s necessary to the point of being double-blind in any medical research/environmental research (pharma comes to mind, also). It doesn’t take an education to understand that, just the curiosity to look into it for three seconds. I think people are addled by their devices and non-existent attention spans.

  39. Talha says:
    @dc.sunsets

    Some people are smart enough to know that they live in a sea of ignorance, and others are too stupid to realize that they’re too stupid to realize this truth.

    That’s basically the spectrum – I’ll definitely agree there.

    (2) The people who REALLY rule us have insured that only sock-puppets, egregiously corrupt and/or idiotic people are allowed into the figurehead positions of power.

    I’ll go with this one. The sock-puppets are good with distracting the masses with irrelevant and stupid antics (now made even easier with TWIT-ter. Every week to the next stupidity is served up in a new and unique package while the underlying mess doesn’t change.

    Peace.

    • Replies: @dc.sunsets
  40. @Talha

    The con artists who sit on Mount Olympus (or their massive yachts) have, I think, pushed things too far for the conditions of the thefts on which they thrive to continue, so I think we’re in the middle of a massive setup of “Lets you and him fight.”

    Everywhere I look we’re being set up to go at each other’s jugular, a multi-faceted donnybrook whose purpose, I think, is to thin our herd of its most aggressive members. A vs B vs C vs D, and so on…surrounds us. It is a Narrative, perfectly scripted.

    Animal husbandry 101 as practiced by those who see themselves as our owners, to whom we are equal parts milch cow, monkey island and ant farm. They live off of us and parasitize us even as they use us for their entertainment.

    But it’s the only game in town.

    • Agree: Denis
  41. anon[339] • Disclaimer says:
    @dc.sunsets

    That essentially everyone grossly overestimates their level of knowledge

    Not just knowledge, but intelligence as well. There’s a term for that.

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Dunning%E2%80%93Kruger_effect

  42. @Jim Christian

    You may have misunderstood my complaint. My dismay was explicitly not targeted at respondents not being aware of various specific pieces of scientific knowledge (some of which are more basic than others, no pun originally intended). Rather, I despair at seeing a substantial portion of Americans with post-graduate degrees unable to read clearly labeled graphs or solve literal elementary school arithmetic problems (Questions 5 and 11).

    Having gaps in one’s knowledge is one thing, and one we might all be guilty of at one point or another, if not all in equal measure. Being literally functionally illiterate as far as numbers are concerned is on a whole other level. So to speak, it is not what I expect of our supposed highly educated class of professionals.

    • Agree: Twodees Partain
  43. laughing because my score dropped from the last time I took this quiz. I was recently accused of becoming senile . . . maybe that the evidence that supports the accusation.

    There are some problems with the questions, because on several there are important details missing. But my ego is sufficiently assuaged.

  44. songbird says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I had entertained the idea that he was speaking figuratively, in a very inarticulate way, about the ecosystem of Guam, but I didn’t realize that he prefaced it by talking about the dimensions of the island, and only mentioned the environment, after asking if it would tip over.

    It does sound like he actually believed that it would actually slide into the sea.

    • Replies: @Duke84
    , @anon
  45. songbird says:
    @Bill

    There’s no audio, as far as I know. That’s why I call it a rumor.

    I do believe Sheila Jackson Lee is dumb – perhaps, that dumb, but I consider the Mars quote unverifiable.

    • Replies: @Bill
  46. @Mr. Rational

    Pew breaks down the responses by question on the website. In some cases, the black respondents did worse than they would’ve if they’d choosen their answers at random.

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
  47. DRA says:
    @Anonymousse

    A little help from their ‘friends’ perhaps?

  48. @The Dark Night

    You keep working on that excuse list.

  49. Michael S says:

    It’s acceptable to show disparities, as long as it is clearly explained that the disparity itself is because of racism.

    So Pew can point out the racial gap here, but it must clearly be attributed to racist teachers, racist textbooks, racist schools, racist education systems, and racist attitudes in general.

    For example, the science gap may (nay, must!) be caused by black absenteeism, which is itself caused by teachers and principals suspending black students, which is caused by absolutely nothing but pure meanness and white fragility and hatred of beautiful black bodies.

  50. @The Dark Night

    ” and they are good in poetry too.”

    Of course you’re right. Here’s an example:

    I set my cup o’ gin down,
    Don’tchaknow Tanqueray and kronic, I’m fucked up now.

    Even white musicians have covered “Gin ‘n Juice”:

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @The Dark Night
  51. @Mr. Rational

    D/L and install the latest Puppy Slacko. It’s a set it and forget it it Linux o/s.

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
  52. I belong to the technocratic elite. I got a perfect score. H.G. Wells told me I would be wearing a white jumpsuit and bossing people around on Mars.

  53. I scored 10/11. Just, I don’t think the quiz was too good. For instance, I knew, of course, about the seasons of the earth, but- it’s something I’ve learned in school & remembered, without further thinking about it (I just don’t care about solar system astronomy or earth). For me, it is an empty information (if something like this exists).

    Personally, I’d construct a quiz with questions like, say, following ones (you decide whether it is dumber than some of the questions posed):

    1. the periodic table has approximately:

    a) 50
    b) 100
    c) 150
    elements

    2. earth is old

    a) less than 500 million years
    b) less than 5 billion years
    c) less than 50 million years

    3. dinosaurs’ “descendants” are

    a) birds
    b) lizards
    c) snakes

    4. DNA has a structure of

    a) double penetration
    b) double decker
    c) double helix

    5. atom is made of electron(s) and

    a) nucleus
    b) nucleotides
    c) positrons

    6. 3/2 + 1/3 is

    a) 4/5
    b) 11/6
    c) 3/6

    7. we count among modern humans

    a) Neanderthals
    b) Cro-Magnons
    c) Denisovians

    8.
    …..

  54. anon[237] • Disclaimer says:
    @RoatanBill

    The Internet runs on Linux boxes because they’re reliable and efficient.

    For now.

  55. Anon[426] • Disclaimer says:
    @Twodees Partain

    The claim that blacks are particularly good at poetry compared to whites is a strange one– perhaps it’s an unconscious projection of feelings about the Irish?

    But there are certainly decent black poets– Dunbar obviously, and some other okay ones, Countee Cullen for instance, and, even if you don’t like Langston Hughes, which is perfectly possible, he was still a capable writer.

    If rap is the kind of poetry you meant, though, I have to concede to your authority on the subject.

    Even white musicians have covered “Gin ‘n Juice”:

    Demonstrating that white taste is not much better than black, I guess.

    • Replies: @The Dark Night
  56. @dc.sunsets

    There were a couple questions that continued what I believe are idiotic theories, not the least of which is that hydrocarbons are “fossil fuels.” Hydrocarbons exist throughout the solar system and sure as hell aren’t from plants, dinosaurs or dinosaur poop.

    You can tell the difference between biotic and abiotic carbon by the C-12/C-13 ratio as well as the presence of plant-derived molecules in less-heated deposits (by the time you cook to methane the chemical evidence of origin is destroyed, of course).  Coal seams often have preserved plant/tree parts in them.  The hydrocarbons on earth come from fossil plant matter, no doubt about it.

    • Replies: @dc.sunsets
  57. Corvinus says:
    @dc.sunsets

    It absolutely frightens you that normies have control over their own decisions regarding race and culture, right, “Astonished”, your sock puppet on this fine blog?

    “Everywhere I look we’re being set up to go at each other’s jugular, a multi-faceted donnybrook whose purpose, I think, is to thin our herd of its most aggressive members. A vs B vs C vs D, and so on…surrounds us. It is a Narrative, perfectly scripted.”

    Your comments are Jokeresque, a homage to the scene where this character (played hauntingly by Heath Ledger) is convinced that the normies on one boat are at the end of their rope and will collectively nuke the convicts on the other boat, which will trigger an all out battle royale. Except the Joker’s nightmare is never materializes, because the normies, who have weathered storm after storm, remain steadfast in their quest for decency. In a similar vein, you are absolutely desperate that the inner Anglo-Saxon anger will be brought to life, supercharged by elitist contempt, that will result in Pinchot inspired levels of helicopter violence. “All it takes is a little push” is your broken record. Be my guest to keep singing that out of pitch tune.

    “That essentially everyone grossly overestimates their level of knowledge, and they act on (and cling to opinions based on) their folly.”

    Including yourself?

    “There are myriad ways to separate people into two groups, and here’s one: Some people are smart enough to know that they live in a sea of ignorance, and others are too stupid to realize that they’re too stupid to realize this truth.”

    So what group do you fall into?

    “I figure both could be true. And most likely the combination is the best explanation.”

    False premises aided by confirmation bias. Even alleged high IQ’s fall into this trap.

    “We are simply not culling the morons, instead we support them as they multiply. I’m not a fan of Nature’s blunt scythe, but eventually there’s going to be an inflection point. Idiocracy isn’t a comedy; and a world full of people too stupid to maintain the basic infrastructure they inherited from their betters will become a charnel house sooner or later.”

    Elitist claptrap. You are no different than the globalists.

    • Replies: @dc.sunsets
    , @dc.sunsets
  58. @Daniel Williams

    You would expect that by random chance given a small sample size.

    If I could download this data as a spreadsheet, I’d re-norm it by subtracting 0.25 and dividing by 0.75 to get a knowledge figure.  A 25% hit rate is chance, zero knowledge.  A less-than-25% hit rate is evidence of antiknowledge.  But to be really sure, you’d have to know the specific wrong answers chosen to see if there is a pattern of mental error.

  59. @Twodees Partain

    I’ll take a look at it, thanks.

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
  60. Interesting: Men did better on all the questions, but the difference between men and women was closest on the health care questions.

    So, girls are interested in science when it involves health care.

    Who knew?

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
  61. Duke84 says:
    @songbird

    The admiral had pretend like he was taking the question seriously.Too bad he couldn’t say what he realy thought.

  62. Aced it. The hardest question for me was the one about the temperature ranges, probably because of my old, tired eyes.
    I have an MBA, and I’m a Hispanic white guy (gasp!). I’m a tail end baby boomer.
    Like others have mentioned, it’s distressing how some of the groups scored.
    Sad!

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
    , @SFG
  63. anon[335] • Disclaimer says:
    @songbird

    It does sound like he actually believed that it would actually slide into the sea.

    He’s not just worried that Guam will slide into the sea. He said he is worried that it will tip over. He thinks an island can tip over if you put too many people on it.
    He appears to be stoned in this video. If you smoke enough marijuana or down enough pills you start to speculate that islands will tip over.
    In bygone days Congressman might show up drunk at the proceedings. Now they show up stoned.

  64. @Duke84

    You guys missed one?? You’d better get that checked out. Order a 23andMe test to find out if your 9% non-white.

  65. @Corvinus

    Hurt your feelings again, didn’t I, Corrie.

    I repeat: I pity you, given that it must really hurt to have someone bicep-deep up your rear end, in order to work you like a sock-puppet.

    (FTR, my bicep is 15.5″ in circumference, so…OUCH! if your puppeteer is muscular.)

  66. @Corvinus

    It absolutely frightens you that normies have control over their own decisions regarding race and culture, right, “Astonished”, your sock puppet on this fine blog?

    Keep your hands to yourself, bitch, and we’ll be just fine.

    Unlike the envious (you, for example) I don’t begrudge those smarter, faster, stronger or simply wealthier than me doing well for themselves. People like you, however, see someone else’s superiority (in any way) as a crushing insult to who you are.

    I can’t imagine how bad it must feel to be fat, ugly, weak, and just articulate enough to rage at your lack of life’s success. I suggest you find a drug trial for an investigational anti-depressant or anti-psychotic, because the one(s) you’re taking aren’t working.

    For people like you, if you can’t achieve, then your best bet is better chemistry. Now, please excuse me because I’m going back to continued teaching myself to play the piano. Ease in self-education is one of the little benefits of my specific genetic makeup.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  67. @Mr. Rational

    The hydrocarbons on earth come from fossil plant matter, no doubt about it.

    Insofar as we’re always working from what we’re told (not even a petroleum engineer working for Exxon knows more than a small patch of what’s reported) and I don’t trust what we’re told very much, I’ll choose to not join you on this one.

    The stuff I’m told (and choose to embrace) suggests that abiotic oil theories hold more water. The people at the very top of the world’s wealth hierarchy are all massive owners of the system that brings us petroleum fuels. We’re talking about money with 10, 11, perhaps even 12 zeroes after the first figure. This informs me that most of what we “know” about this subject is almost certainly “controlled information,” aka propaganda.

    We don’t live in the Information Age, we live in the Mis-Information Age. We have no means of knowing just how much we think we know just ain’t so.

    • Replies: @A123
    , @Mr. Rational
  68. Corvinus says:
    @dc.sunsets

    “Hurt your feelings again, didn’t I, Corrie.”

    Not in the least. I understand why you are lashing out–you got caught engaging in SJW behavior, “Astonished”.

    “(FTR, my bicep is 15.5″ in circumference…”

    Anyone can say anything on the Internet.

    “see someone else’s superiority (in any way)…Keep your hands to yourself, bitch, and we’ll be just fine.”

    Trigger much? The observable fact is you are no different than the elitists and globalists you claim to abhor and are butt hurt that an alleged midwit bested you at your own game. Your sophomoric insults and over the top gasconade only demonstrates your shame of being exposed. It is not a great look. Recalibrate and get back to us when you are done with your temper tantrum.

    • Replies: @dc.sunsets
  69. @Twodees Partain

    There’s plenty of good rap. Black rappers are as good as a rapper can be. MF Doom, for example. And then there are black poets, such as Everton Sylvester. You have no clue, and are talking nonsense.

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
  70. @Anon

    Everton Sylvester is the only black poet of high class I know of, but I think that’s enough to say that blacks make good poets. Plus there is a lot of good songwriting kind of poetry. Wasn’t Bob Marley a great poet?

  71. A123 says:
    @dc.sunsets

    The stuff I’m told (and choose to embrace) suggests that abiotic oil theories hold more water.

    My question is, “Where is the Carbon coming from?”

    There is plenty of subsurface heat and pressure to drive a reaction. Hydrogen and Oxygen are also easily explained. Geothermal vents in the ocean flow show water circulation is occuring.

    If the process is driven by carbon that was trapped at planetary crust formation, why have core samples not pulled up chunks of pre-biologic carbon? Admittedly, this could be simply bad luck. It also implies a time limit when that buried carbon will run out.

    For the full “abiotic” oil cycle theory to hold up there needs to be a way that replacement, non-organic carbon is currently being driven underground. The math I have seen doesn’t support dissolved CO2 in sea water injecting enough carbon.

    PEACE 😇

  72. @dc.sunsets

    The stuff I’m told (and choose to embrace) suggests that abiotic oil theories hold more water.

    That’s because you are failing (refusing?) to follow the logic where it goes.

    If oil was abiotic and arose from e.g. processes in the mantle, we would see oil seeps and tar sands literally everywhere but especially around volcanic islands like Iceland and Japan.  Hawaii would be driller mecca.

    What do we actually see?  Oil comes from deep sedimentary rock layers originating in shallow seas full of plant matter that got buried in silt.  The convenient stuff lies in the pores of sandstones above the shales which gave rise to it, but now we’re learning (forced to learn) to get it out of the shales themselves because we’ve drained the sandstones.  Volcanic Hawaii and Iceland import all their petroleum.

    Petroleum comes from plants.  Abiotic oil “theory” isn’t even a theory, it’s a wish-fulfillment fantasy.

    • Replies: @A123
  73. Bill says:
    @songbird

    Really? So, as far as you are concerned, no quote from before sound recording existed is real?

  74. @RoatanBill

    The Internet runs on Linux boxes because they’re reliable and efficient.

    Yep, avoiding payment of licencing fees has nothing to do with it.

  75. A123 says:
    @Mr. Rational

    If oil was abiotic and arose from e.g. processes in the mantle, we would see oil seeps and tar sands literally everywhere but especially around volcanic islands like Iceland and Japan. Hawaii would be driller mecca.

    Abiotic oil creation implies chain building. Not strictly polymerization, but something similar.

    Industrial oil extraction has been centered on dome like sedimentary some formations, because they can trap commercially viable quantities of oil. Volcanic areas are likely to have broken geology.

    If abiotic hydrocarbon creation is occurring in broken rock and is not being trapped, the newly formed light hydrocarbons could be water soluble and/or easily degraded. Short chain abiotic hydrocarbons could only become long chain abiotic oil when trapped in a sedimentary dome so that the entire chain of reactions could take place.

    _____

    Realistically, the world is large and complex. Both biologic and abiotic oil creation could be happening simultaneously. And, given the need for dome geology to capture the oil, current oil fields could easily be a mix from both sources.

    Again the question for the advocates of abiotic oil is, “Where is the Carbon coming from?” This would seem to be the limiting resource for ongoing abiotic hydrocarbon formation.

    PEACE

  76. @The Dark Night

    Oh, of course there is “plenty of good rap”, just like there are plenty of sweet smelling turds. Rap has rotted your mind.

  77. @Xcommenter

    Like others have mentioned, it’s distressing how some of the groups scored.

    If people with PhD’s are getting any of those wrong, it strongly suggests that our universities are awarding degrees to barely-competents and should lose their accreditation.

  78. @Mr. Rational

    “Not sure” was also an option for the survey quiz-takers, and 17% of responses were answered in that way. See here. I should’ve noted that in this post.

  79. @Christopher Chantrill

    It’s almost as though men tend to like interacting with and understanding systems while women tend to like interacting with and understanding people.

    • Replies: @Rosie
  80. SFG says:
    @Xcommenter

    So you’re white. The whole ‘Hispanic’ thing is a little silly, but nobody knows what to call the non-white, non-black ancestry in Latin America over here. Indio? Indigenous? Nah, you’re just ‘Hispanic’, which is everyone from Cameron Diaz to Rigoberta Menchu to Sammy Sosa.

    More and more I’m starting to think if we can’t have the wall we should just ‘turn’ as many Hispanics as possible. Most of them are Christian anyway. Good way to goose the LGBTQWERTYs and feminists.

  81. @A123

    I’m going to dig into this because it is (a) a really interesting technical topic that is (b) of huge social significance.

    Abiotic oil creation implies chain building. Not strictly polymerization, but something similar.

    Very true.  The problem is that high temperatures favor small, stable molecules and break down larger ones to get there.  Hotter reservoirs yield lighter and lighter hydrocarbons until you are left with methane.  Methane happens to be an extraordinarily stable molecule; look at its heat of formation.  Lots of anaerobic bacteria turn their food into methane because the reaction yields more energy than anything else they could use.  Basically, once you get methane in a reducing environment, you’re not getting any more energy out of it.

    Industrial oil extraction has been centered on dome like sedimentary some formations, because they can trap commercially viable quantities of oil. Volcanic areas are likely to have broken geology.

    If oil was being produced by volcanic processes, we’d detect it in the gases always coming off them.  If anyone had detected hydrocarbons in significant quantity, it would be in the geology books.  Your typical lava is energized by steam with a bit of CO2.  This is neutral, not reducing.

    If abiotic hydrocarbon creation is occurring in broken rock and is not being trapped, the newly formed light hydrocarbons could be water soluble and/or easily degraded. Short chain abiotic hydrocarbons could only become long chain abiotic oil when trapped in a sedimentary dome so that the entire chain of reactions could take place.

    Short chains don’t become long chains when heated.  Large organic molecules like triglycerides and porphyrins break down into simpler ones.  Porphyrins in particular are present in petroleum and, if abiotic, would indicate that abiogenesis of life would be a slam-dunk.

    Realistically, the world is large and complex. Both biologic and abiotic oil creation could be happening simultaneously. And, given the need for dome geology to capture the oil, current oil fields could easily be a mix from both sources.

    Except that if petroleum was a mix we would see a gradient of C-12/C-13 ratios depending on the source, and my understanding is that we don’t.  We don’t see oil around volcanic areas like Yellowstone, either.  We do get hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide from serpentinization reactions of certain minerals with water, but that doesn’t turn into hydrocarbon chains.

    Again the question for the advocates of abiotic oil is, “Where is the Carbon coming from?” This would seem to be the limiting resource for ongoing abiotic hydrocarbon formation.

    It would have to come from things like subducted limestone, and somehow wind up in a reduced state.  It would also have the C-12/C-13 ratio typical of limestone or whatever the source.  Again, we don’t see it.

    All of this is promoted to make people believe that petroleum is an unlimited resource and we can rely on it forever (obviously a good thing for the wealthy and politically powerful oilcos).  That runs up against another logical conundrum.  The world consumes roughly a cubic mile of petroleum per year.  If any process was producing anything remotely close to a cubic mile of it every year, and this process had been going for geologic time rather than magically going into high gear just when we decided to start pumping oil, there should be vast amounts of oil, tar sands and everything else all over the earth.  A process running for as little as 1 million years and producing 1 million cubic miles of oil would cover the earth 26 feet thick in oil.  If it ran for 50 million years we’d have either some 1300 feet of it or its breakdown products.

    If oil is an abiotic product, where did all the ancient oil go?  No answer.  And that’s one of the many reasons I find that the notion is all but certainly just one more bit of propaganda to keep us in the power of the world’s financial interests.  Follow the money, and that’s where it goes.

    • Replies: @A123
  82. Rosie says:
    @Audacious Epigone

    It’s almost as though men tend to like interacting with and understanding systems while women tend to like interacting with and understanding people.

    It’s not so much that we just like interacting with people. We like doing all sorts of things that don’t involve interacting with people, but we don’t much like inanimate systems. That much is certainly true. I am a generally a curious person, but there is something about cars, hvac systems, and various other sorts of contraptions that just bores me to tears. I think it’s actually gotten worse over the years as well-meaning men have attempted to explain various things to me. I have become particularly adept at tuning it out. I don’t want to know anything more about my vacuum cleaner than I absolutely have to operate it.

    • Replies: @iffen
  83. iffen says:
    @Rosie

    I don’t want to know anything more about my vacuum cleaner than I absolutely have to operate it.

    Rosie knows how to operate a vacuum cleaner.

    Take that, all you mean-spirited Rosie detractors.

    • LOL: Rosie
    • Replies: @Rosie
  84. @Corvinus

    I guess I’ve taken up residence in your head, else you’d find better things to do.

    Everything in this last reply of yours is projection. Self-awareness isn’t a strong suit, huh? In case you missed it, my point is, you go your way, I’ll go mine, and I have no idea why you think me going my way undermines “normies” like you exercising “control over their own decisions regarding race and culture.” You control yours. Leave your Dunning-Kruger hands off mine, okay? (Yes, everyone is 6′ tall and strong on-line; the hilarious part is that I’m probably the exception that proves the rule…I have no need to represent myself as more than what I am.)

    Back to the comment that initiated your diatribes:

    That said, do we forget Jay Leno’s “Jaywalking?” Black, white, green or chartreuse, people of all ages are largely so ignorant that listening to them reduces one’s intelligence.

    That’s bad, but what’s worse? That essentially everyone grossly overestimates their level of knowledge, and they act on (and cling to opinions based on) their folly. There are myriad ways to separate people into two groups, and here’s one: Some people are smart enough to know that they live in a sea of ignorance, and others are too stupid to realize that they’re too stupid to realize this truth.

    In the land of the blind, the sighted wouldn’t be king; he’d be hanged or stoned as a heretic.

    I still really don’t get what the *%$& is your problem with that statement. It’s all self-evident for me from life experience, and few people I’ve ever met would find falsehood in it.

    Which makes you special, doesn’t it? I guess you object to being classified as too stupid to realize you exist in a sea of ignorance. Makes this entire exchange hilarious, actually.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  85. A123 says:
    @Mr. Rational

    I do not want to go too far making this a chemistry thread. A couple points to consider as you dig deeper.

    Short chains don’t become long chains when heated. Large organic molecules like triglycerides and porphyrins break down into simpler ones.

    If the reaction area traps gases and water is the source of the hydrogen, what happens to the oxygen?
    — Are the early short chain hydrocarbons likely to contain oxygen (e.g. Methanol)?
    — Even if not, free O2 could strip hydrogen allowing chain formation.

    At room temperature and pressure such chemistry would be highly unfavorable. Given the free heat energy & pressure deep underground, energy consuming reactions can be ‘pumped’.

    If any process was producing anything remotely close to a cubic mile of it every year,

    There are two different scientific questions:
    -1- Is abiotic oil production occurring?
    -2- If so, how much abiotic oil production is occuring?

    Even if #1 is true, both abiotic and biologic oil formation are likely to be limited by carbon availability. Thus, abiotic oil chemistry may only produce at a rate similar to biologic oil chemistry.

    PEACE 😇

  86. Rosie says:
    @iffen

    Rosie knows how to operate a vacuum cleaner.

    I also know how to capitalize on little boys’ natural curiosity about these things. I don’t bother making them help with the vacuuming. I’m happy to do that myself, but I do make them read the manual, do any routine maintenance, and troubleshoot.

    It kind of reminds me of that episode with the white-washing from Tom Sawyer. They actually think you’re letting them do something grand and fascinating.

    • Replies: @iffen
  87. iffen says:
    @Rosie

    I don’t bother making them help with the vacuuming.

    Come the revolution the SJWs will have a very special camp for people who re-enforce gender roles. My preference is for everyone to learn to vacuum and everyone try their hand at routine maintenance.

  88. Corvinus says:
    @dc.sunsets

    “I guess I’ve taken up residence in your head, else you’d find better things to do.”

    LOL, if you truly had something more pressing to take care of, or felt that you were wasting your time in the end, then you wouldn’t have responded. The irony escapes you.

    “In case you missed it, my point is, you go your way, I’ll go mine, and I have no idea why you think me going my way undermines “normies” like you exercising “control over their own decisions regarding race and culture.”

    Except you, “Astonished”, believe that are significant barriers–chiefly, the apparent stupidity of normies–which impede that ability to “go your own way”. In which case you seek to remove, preferably, from the gene pool.

    “(Yes, everyone is 6′ tall and strong on-line; the hilarious part is that I’m probably the exception that proves the rule…I have no need to represent myself as more than what I am.)”

    Clamoring to the Internet world about your physique when no one asked you to share your body type demonstrates your vanity and insecurity. I thought only women were that hung up with their image. As Vox Day opines, it’s not about you.

  89. @A123

    Just what is your source of information for the idea that “Abiotic oil creation implies chain building. Not strictly polymerization, but something similar.”

    My assumption is that oil generated from the decay of plants involves the breakdown of complex sugars to simpler ketones and ethers and similar compounds. The ethers and ketones then breakdown further into simpler straight chain hydrocarbons, with carbon backbones from 1 to 10 carbon atoms. If my assumption is correct, then your speculation about some type of hydrocarbon compound linkages to longer chain hydrocarbons (methane to octane???) is scientific illiteracy, OR you have discovered something that no other organic chemist in the past 120 years had discovered and you should immediately be awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for 2019!!

    Another point: most oil formations do not have large amounts of ethers, ketones, etc. and certainly not polymers associated with them. Your comment implies that those would though!!

    What low molecular weight straight chain hydrocarbons, such as methane or butane, are soluble in water? Again, you seemed to have discovered a new “chemistry” that no other organic chemist has ever discovered. Or, perhaps you are completely ignorant about the question of the solubility of low molecular weight straight chain hydrocarbons being soluble in water. Moreover, the thermodynamics of such solubility would be in favor of a conclusion opposite to what you wrote.
    But perhaps you have discovered, again, new phenomena in molecular bonding that physical chemists have been unable to determine over the past 120 years!!!!!

    At what university or government laboratory do you produce this phenomenal research that no other chemist anywhere on this planet has been able to produce?

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