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What the partial shutdown is making clear is just how superfluous so much of the federal government is. Most people have no idea what exactly is shut down or how it affects them–because it doesn’t affect them. The impending government shutdown is the new Y2K bug.

President Trump isn’t going to get the wall. As his candidacy was a referendum on a wall so will the status of the wall in 2020 be a referendum on his presidency. The biggest impact of his four years in office will instead be the total makeover he’s performed on the Overton Window. He has said so many putatively verboten things and despite the hysteria about their presaging the coming of Orange Hitler, everything is basically the same as it was before. Now he’s revealing that a shuttering of the federal government doesn’t change anything, either.

If we don’t need the federal government, maybe we don’t need a federal anything. Our walk down the path of political dissolution continues. Happy New Year!

 
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  1. And yet, weirdly, violence against women is still illegal!

    • LOL: Rosie
    • Replies: @Stan d Mute

    And yet, weirdly, violence against women is still illegal!
     
    Are we sure about that? We should test it by calling the fatass mulatto mean names on the internet.
    , @Audacious Epigone
    We're always one law away from peace and harmony!
  2. Thanks, and glad you’re here at Unz. The purported crisis of a federal government shutdown becomes a pfft for more Americans each time it’s trotted out.

    P. S. Your “effect” should be “affect.”

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    Thanks, glad to be here, and thanks, fixed it.
  3. Bear in mind that only 25% of the federal government is shutdown now.

    It’s true that most federal employees are superfluous, and we wouldn’t miss them if they never came back to work. But it’s not true that we wouldn’t miss the federal government if it were completely shutdown. What would happen if Social Security and Medicare payments stopped?

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    What would happen if Social Security and Medicare payments stopped?

    In the long run? A new era of American prosperity (assuming the S.S. and Medicare taxes also stopped). Nothing has been more corrosive to American government and society than those two entitlement programs that sit astride the federal budget like giant, noxious leeches.
    , @Stan d Mute

    What would happen if Social Security and Medicare payments stopped?
     
    Probably the same thing that happened before communist FDR created them.

    The real fun begins when Section 8 voucher payments stop and EBT cards fail to reload. That will be known as the first day American freedom began its comeback. A day that will be celebrated for generations to come!
    , @Corvinus
    "It’s true that most federal employees are superfluous, and we wouldn’t miss them if they never came back to work."

    A barbell clearly hit your noggin'. Federal workers ensure food safety, investigate criminal activity, provide emergency care, develop science and technology, and serve in national parks and museums. Try to be careful next time.

  4. @Dave Pinsen
    Bear in mind that only 25% of the federal government is shutdown now.

    It's true that most federal employees are superfluous, and we wouldn't miss them if they never came back to work. But it's not true that we wouldn't miss the federal government if it were completely shutdown. What would happen if Social Security and Medicare payments stopped?

    What would happen if Social Security and Medicare payments stopped?

    In the long run? A new era of American prosperity (assuming the S.S. and Medicare taxes also stopped). Nothing has been more corrosive to American government and society than those two entitlement programs that sit astride the federal budget like giant, noxious leeches.

    • Agree: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    Ending in orderly fashion would make more sense. In truth, Medicare is pretty efficiently run compared to health insurers like Aetna. It's unsustainable because 2.9% of payroll in the USA won't cover the heroic end-of-life interventions we make.

    Now, it's a different question as to whether the USA should pour so many medical resources into people from whom it will derive no further revenue, instead of assuring healthy young tax slaves coming up. My guess: when the majority of young people paying in are non-white, and the super majority of people taking out at white, the system ends. 10-15 years?
    , @TomSchmidt
    Question: how much SS, Medicare, and Federal Income tax does a married man pay on (approximately) 80,000 dollars in qualified dividends? Run that one through Turbo Tax; create a fake taxpayer, give him 0 in salary and 78K in dividends.

    https://www.fool.com/investing/2018/06/18/your-2018-guide-to-dividend-taxes.aspx

    You'll find that the total is 0. So you can stop SS and Medicare taxes now if you can be paid only in dividends, up to 78k, which, in after-tax money, might even be enough to live in San Francisco as a middle class person.

    The ability to do this exists NOW. Go do it. Your one hint: subchapter T.
  5. @Cloudbuster
    What would happen if Social Security and Medicare payments stopped?

    In the long run? A new era of American prosperity (assuming the S.S. and Medicare taxes also stopped). Nothing has been more corrosive to American government and society than those two entitlement programs that sit astride the federal budget like giant, noxious leeches.

    Ending in orderly fashion would make more sense. In truth, Medicare is pretty efficiently run compared to health insurers like Aetna. It’s unsustainable because 2.9% of payroll in the USA won’t cover the heroic end-of-life interventions we make.

    Now, it’s a different question as to whether the USA should pour so many medical resources into people from whom it will derive no further revenue, instead of assuring healthy young tax slaves coming up. My guess: when the majority of young people paying in are non-white, and the super majority of people taking out at white, the system ends. 10-15 years?

    • Agree: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @densa
    Good comments about Medicare. End of life costs are a factor, but so is the raging inflation in the healthcare racket, which balloons costs well beyond the wages used to pay in.

    You might be right about when it will become fashionable to end it, but I think the end game is to continue to bankrupt the aged as a transition to everyone being on Medicaid. Money will be electronic,infinite and not a store value, private property (for the masses) will be a thing of the past.

    Cheers, no really, Happy New Year!
    , @Audacious Epigone
    Great point. Xers, many of whom are childless, are a couple of decades away from hell. Not only will there be resentment over resources going to them instead of the young POC ascendancy, that resentment will manifest in the behaviors and actions of the POC nurse/care staffs that will attend to these childless people as they near the end. There are already horror stories of these things happening, but most of the oldsters now have children. The ones who have no one looking out for them are lambs for slaughter.
    , @Cloudbuster
    I believe Medicare's vaunted administrative efficiency is largely a myth, completely overwhelmed by a) the vast amount of Medicare fraud that goes on -- in part due to the lack of administrative resources to fight it, and b) the harm it does to the healthcare market overall due to its distorting effects on prices and availability of care.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    We could certainly save a lot of money on healthcare by not treating sick people.
    , @SafeNow
    Besides demographic pressure: A 2016 Johns Hopkins study found that 250,000 people die each year from medical negligence. This is the #3 cause of death. This will get much worse. It will put impossible pressure on the system. I would double the number of doctors and nurses, starting now, and in 7 years (the training period) the frustrating, degrading, harmful battle to get a delayed brief appointment would be over. The Easter Bunny could campaign on this platform and be elected President.
  6. I like how Dems are suddenly concerned about garbage and feces piling up in our national parks. Where were they when Mexican cartels set up illegal pot grow operations in our parks, spread poison around to kill wild animals and booby-trapped the sites to injure first responders? It’s pretty clear that some dirty money is going to Democrats — and probably some Republicans.

    • Agree: Audacious Epigone
  7. The impending government shutdown is the new Y2K bug.

    Not nice. Problems due to two-digit-year fields didn’t happen BECAUSE a lot of effort was spent in fixing potential problems before time was up. Further down the road, this effort helped in reviving/replacing undocumented and unmaintainable code, an investment for the 10 years post-1999.99. Money well spent.

    Let’s take a look at…

    https://thenextweb.com/dd/2017/10/26/developers-wish-people-remember-big-deal-y2k-bug/

    The reason why it wasn’t as bad as some forecasted (some predictions were positively apocalyptic) was largely due to the vast amounts of money thrown at the problem (between $200 billion and $600 billion), and most importantly, the hard work of engineers, developers, and sysadmins. Those folks don’t particularly enjoy having their contributions minimized, as the following caustically-sweary tweets show.

    I was a software engineer in late 90s. I spent 2 or 3 years fixing dangerous millennium bugs. Rees-Mogg is an uninformed, gobby arsehole. https://t.co/cSYY0hpbwP

    — Russ

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    Duly noted. At the level of the end-user's experience the comparison still makes sense though, I think.
    , @MarkinLA
    That money was largely wasted. The real problems that could occur were due to real time programming which used clocks that repeatedly rolled over. The representation most used in computers is called twos complement. That representation has the property of giving the correct value when the clock rolls over and you subtract the current time from the previous time to get the elapsed time.

    The problems that could occur in the financial field were already discovered in the 1970's when mortgage amortization tables blew up when the mortgage was to be paid off in the year 2000.

    Managers panicked and hired a bunch of old COBOL programmers to go through the old code and make fixes if they were needed. I doubt much was done. At the company I worked at we allocated 300K and after asking the programmers if there were problems they didn't spend any money. Just date stamping an event won't cause problems. That was as much as we did with the calendar clock. Everything else was real time clocks which rolled over about every 65 seconds.
  8. Our walk down the path of political dissolution

    Haven’t heard much from #CalExit lately. Where are they?

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    Languishing at around 20% support. It'll spike when the impending economic crisis becomes a currency crisis. You read it here!
  9. I’m curious about the Trump shutdown in DC. During Obola’s shutdown the Jefferson Memorial was barricaded and had armed guards inside it to prevent the people from visiting. They also shut the Lincoln Memorial, but there was a veterans march on the mall that weekend and the vets took the barricades from the Lincoln and deposited them at the White House. That was a proud moment in American history. But my question is whether the FedGov has done any spiteful shit like closing normally unguarded monuments during Trump’s shutdown. I’ve read somewhere that all the parks and monuments are open but the restrooms are closed this time around.

    Also, comically, I watched Obola fly over the barricaded and guarded Jefferson in his trio of Marine One & clones on his way to play golf at Andrews (obviously not closed).

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    The Census pages I use have a disclaimer! The banner runs across the very top.
  10. @Cloudbuster
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DvxHzsdUcAAFjgx.jpg:large

    And yet, weirdly, violence against women is still illegal!

    And yet, weirdly, violence against women is still illegal!

    Are we sure about that? We should test it by calling the fatass mulatto mean names on the internet.

  11. @Dave Pinsen
    Bear in mind that only 25% of the federal government is shutdown now.

    It's true that most federal employees are superfluous, and we wouldn't miss them if they never came back to work. But it's not true that we wouldn't miss the federal government if it were completely shutdown. What would happen if Social Security and Medicare payments stopped?

    What would happen if Social Security and Medicare payments stopped?

    Probably the same thing that happened before communist FDR created them.

    The real fun begins when Section 8 voucher payments stop and EBT cards fail to reload. That will be known as the first day American freedom began its comeback. A day that will be celebrated for generations to come!

    • Replies: @216
    In no uncertain terms, a shutdown of both programs would risk insurrection. There's no better accelerationism than this. And no other First World country is paying such sums to a hostile Third World (growing) minority in its midst.

    A small risk to be said however, in that cutting off SNAP will reduce obesity rates, turning the urban underclass back into the physical state their parents and grandparents were in during the much more violent 1960s riots. Slashing Section 8 would see buildings physically expropriated.


    http://www.trivisonno.com/wp-content/uploads/Food-Stamps-Percent.jpg
    , @MikeatMikedotMike
    This is my prediction as well.
  12. @TomSchmidt
    Ending in orderly fashion would make more sense. In truth, Medicare is pretty efficiently run compared to health insurers like Aetna. It's unsustainable because 2.9% of payroll in the USA won't cover the heroic end-of-life interventions we make.

    Now, it's a different question as to whether the USA should pour so many medical resources into people from whom it will derive no further revenue, instead of assuring healthy young tax slaves coming up. My guess: when the majority of young people paying in are non-white, and the super majority of people taking out at white, the system ends. 10-15 years?

    Good comments about Medicare. End of life costs are a factor, but so is the raging inflation in the healthcare racket, which balloons costs well beyond the wages used to pay in.

    You might be right about when it will become fashionable to end it, but I think the end game is to continue to bankrupt the aged as a transition to everyone being on Medicaid. Money will be electronic,infinite and not a store value, private property (for the masses) will be a thing of the past.

    Cheers, no really, Happy New Year!

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    Well, the costs of Medicare are lower than non-Medicare. One reason health "insurance" costs so much is that hospitals bill retail for non-Medicare customers instead of wholesale for Medicare (and sub-wholesale for Medicaid.) even so, plenty of hospitals are built to cater to Medicare patients, so the "low" reimbursements leave enough incentive to open them.

    The emergency room scam is ending for people without insurance now. Around NYC, CityMD provides emergency room services for non-emergencies (fevers, minor stitches) at a cost below 1k per visit, as opposed to the egregious (and highly profitable) charges at emergency rooms. As more and more of these places skim off the profitable emergency room patients, expect hospitals to go further in the red as only Medicaid and Medicare patients roll in.

    Happy New Year, if my imposing a Gregorian Catholic calendar on you doesn't offend too much.
  13. President Trump isn’t going to get the wall.

    As Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces, Trump should task the US Army Corps of Engineers with building the wall. The cost would be small change from the defense budget.

  14. @Cloudbuster
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DvxHzsdUcAAFjgx.jpg:large

    And yet, weirdly, violence against women is still illegal!

    We’re always one law away from peace and harmony!

  15. @anonymous
    Thanks, and glad you're here at Unz. The purported crisis of a federal government shutdown becomes a pfft for more Americans each time it's trotted out.

    P. S. Your "effect" should be "affect."

    Thanks, glad to be here, and thanks, fixed it.

  16. @TomSchmidt
    Ending in orderly fashion would make more sense. In truth, Medicare is pretty efficiently run compared to health insurers like Aetna. It's unsustainable because 2.9% of payroll in the USA won't cover the heroic end-of-life interventions we make.

    Now, it's a different question as to whether the USA should pour so many medical resources into people from whom it will derive no further revenue, instead of assuring healthy young tax slaves coming up. My guess: when the majority of young people paying in are non-white, and the super majority of people taking out at white, the system ends. 10-15 years?

    Great point. Xers, many of whom are childless, are a couple of decades away from hell. Not only will there be resentment over resources going to them instead of the young POC ascendancy, that resentment will manifest in the behaviors and actions of the POC nurse/care staffs that will attend to these childless people as they near the end. There are already horror stories of these things happening, but most of the oldsters now have children. The ones who have no one looking out for them are lambs for slaughter.

    • Agree: Trevor H., Stan d Mute
    • Replies: @UrbaneFrancoOntarian
    Yup, things are going to get very ugly for them (and possibly me).

    Right now, the POC hospital staff (and staff everywhere) act with a certain level of manners and competence. Why? Because there is still some accountability and structure in place, largely because executives and upper staff are still white Baby Boomers.

    What happens when they retire? The structure is gone, and the same 3rd world corruption continues, in the formerly first world. Is a Muslim hospital executive really going to fire another Muslim for mistreating a white devil? The answer is no. 3rd worlders are tribalistic savages.

    Ignorance is bliss. This is why boomers and especially gen x are blind to the future. It feels bad to think that all non whites hate you. It doesn't feel nice to ask the hard questions, and receive the honest answers. So, they just ignore it, and kick the can a little bit further down the road.

    God knows what it'll look like by the time I'm in my sixties in 40 years. I suspect that once the legacy boomers are dying off it will become open season.

    , @TomSchmidt
    Having never known a society as children or adults that wasn't suicidal, we Xers will need to invent our own support in old age. It won't, as you point out, come from outside.
  17. @El Dato

    The impending government shutdown is the new Y2K bug.
     
    Not nice. Problems due to two-digit-year fields didn't happen BECAUSE a lot of effort was spent in fixing potential problems before time was up. Further down the road, this effort helped in reviving/replacing undocumented and unmaintainable code, an investment for the 10 years post-1999.99. Money well spent.

    Let's take a look at...

    https://thenextweb.com/dd/2017/10/26/developers-wish-people-remember-big-deal-y2k-bug/

    The reason why it wasn’t as bad as some forecasted (some predictions were positively apocalyptic) was largely due to the vast amounts of money thrown at the problem (between $200 billion and $600 billion), and most importantly, the hard work of engineers, developers, and sysadmins. Those folks don’t particularly enjoy having their contributions minimized, as the following caustically-sweary tweets show.


    I was a software engineer in late 90s. I spent 2 or 3 years fixing dangerous millennium bugs. Rees-Mogg is an uninformed, gobby arsehole. https://t.co/cSYY0hpbwP

    — Russ
     

     

    Duly noted. At the level of the end-user’s experience the comparison still makes sense though, I think.

  18. @Hail

    Our walk down the path of political dissolution
     
    Haven't heard much from #CalExit lately. Where are they?

    Languishing at around 20% support. It’ll spike when the impending economic crisis becomes a currency crisis. You read it here!

    • Replies: @216
    Redstan for Redstanis!
    , @Svigor
    From your lips to God's Ears.
    , @JimS
    I am very curious how you specifically think the economic crisis becomes a currency crisis, and leads to dissolution. In accordance with Nobel Laureate Krugman's theory for economic crises, "for whatever reason, a large part of the private sector tries to increase its cash reserves at the same time." (cf. https://isteve.blogspot.com/2008/10/i-had-not-realized-nobel-laureate-paul.html).

    I've tried to simulate this a little in my head, how it will go. The way I see it, something will cause a severe shortfall in cash buying U.S. debt, which must be taken up by printing money. This could be Chinese refusing to finance as much due to a trade war, or the required bailout of a state (e.g. http://usdebtclock.org/state-debt-clocks/state-of-california-debt-clock.html), or the overdue economic crisis, some other factor I can't think of, or a combination of all. When that happens, there will be nothing holding back a massive inflation.

    But will it be massive enough to take out the USD as the world reserve currency? What replaces it? EUR, I presume, or RMB (if anyone would trust it)? What level of inflation or other change would it really take for the USD to fall? A factor of 2 reduction in value in a year? More? (By the way, a quick reference for inflation rates is 7% will halve your currency's value in 10 years, 10% in 7 years).

    If the currency crisis does happen, what then of the states? Their individual state debts are then meaningless because the currency they are owed in is devalued, but so is every fixed income provided by the state. This, I think, is the only way out for CA in a post-Gray Davis world. What then would be the mechanism for dissolution? Everyone is then in the same currency boat, as it were. Is there a pensioner revolt?

    I agree all things are possible when this happens, but it does help to think through how it would go down. I certainly think that is the time when things will necessarily change, but I do not know if dissolution is the most straightforward prediction. Maybe it is. What do you think?
  19. @Stan d Mute
    I’m curious about the Trump shutdown in DC. During Obola’s shutdown the Jefferson Memorial was barricaded and had armed guards inside it to prevent the people from visiting. They also shut the Lincoln Memorial, but there was a veterans march on the mall that weekend and the vets took the barricades from the Lincoln and deposited them at the White House. That was a proud moment in American history. But my question is whether the FedGov has done any spiteful shit like closing normally unguarded monuments during Trump’s shutdown. I’ve read somewhere that all the parks and monuments are open but the restrooms are closed this time around.

    Also, comically, I watched Obola fly over the barricaded and guarded Jefferson in his trio of Marine One & clones on his way to play golf at Andrews (obviously not closed).

    The Census pages I use have a disclaimer! The banner runs across the very top.

  20. Trump has really not done much to shrink the size of the federal government. I still don’t understand why he won’t. Between that, and the failure to repair common core, a disappointing path has been taken.

    In Canada, the Federal Conservatives shrunk the size of the government and laid of thousands of workers. The amount of bitching and moaning was insane. However, word on the street was that nobody’s workload actually increased. Federal government is probably 40% dead weight.

    The shutdown really doesn’t matter. When the federal employees start to starve because they haven’t been getting paid, then maybe the Dems will start to make a deal.

    • Replies: @216
    Most federal government is outsourced to contractors, the civil service is capped because of the superior retirement benefits and inability to be fired.

    Further, not all fedgov workers are Dems, as working in fedgov is incentivized by something called "veterans preference". Veterans tend to be a bit more conservative than the average American, even black vets are about (20% GOP) compared to 10% at-large.

    Shutting down wholesale departments (Education being the easiest) is difficult because it requires cooperation with Congress. (HUD, Energy, Labor would be the next plausible). These agencies also mostly just dispense out "grants" to contractors and lower levels of government. Most of the Agriculture budget is food stamps.

    As the President is commander-in-chief, he can order a unilateral withdrawal from certain overseas engagements. Said money is already budgeted and could be re-allocated to building a wall.

    Some have discussed an EO to mandate E-Verify, that's a good idea, but I wonder how this squares with the written intent of the law that it is not mandatory. Of course, it would be bad optics for the California Attorney General to be arguing in the Supreme Court that they "need" illegal workers.
  21. social security was one of the worst things to ever happen to the united states in it’s over 200 year history. social security is WORSE than any war the US participated in. you can recover from a war, even a major war. you can’t recover from forever growing socialism. social security never goes away, and just continues to make things worse, decade after decade. it robs you of your income, and gives you a horrendous ROI too. plus, you have to pay taxes on it again, even if you live long enough to collect. it’s total nonsense. there’s a reason the US did not have it for over 150 years. it was not a mistake, it was not an oversight, it was not the case that they didn’t realize they could have something like that. it deliberately did not exist.

    medicare is equally bad, but in a different way. so we are correct to fight with everything we have, to keep them from creating a forced, legally required, national healthcare system with mandated pay in under the thread of the government’s guns. and again, there’s a reason the US does not have it. no, it’s not an oversight. no, it’s not because they didn’t realize they could have it. it deliberately does not exist. it’s very on purpose that america does not have a single payer national healthcare system. it’s a terrible idea that smarter, better men realized was shit, hundreds of years ago, and deep sixed any movement towards such a thing.

    democrats are trying to force on the US, every bad idea that’s been repeated a hundred times in the old world. there’s a reason 2 million third worlders are trying to come to the US every year, and are willing to risk their life to get there.

    it’s because the US DOESN’T have stuff like a national healthcare system, VAT, total civilian disarmament, and so forth. those are the things that create that 3% GDP growth or higher, and enable people to own a half acre lot with a 2000 square foot house with air conditioning and a big SUV with 2 dollar gasoline. we used to be able to say, it’s also because it doesn’t have a national income tax, or a central bank that meddles in everything and causes inflation, or something stupid like social security, but we can’t say those things anymore. democrats relentlessly want to steer the US into being just like any other garbage socialist country with crushing taxes, complete regulation, 1% GDP growth, and a disarmed population. previous americans rejected all that. contrary to modern doctrine, social security, medicare, and single payer healthcare are all actually HUGE steps backwards. they’re not ‘progress’ at all. in many ways, the US in 1800 was the most advanced nation in the history of the world, in terms of political thinking and opportunity maximization. it didn’t even have property tax.

    • Replies: @GU
    The states most definitely levied property taxes (real and personal) in the 1800s. The federal government did not, true, but it does not today either.
    , @MarkinLA
    Well if the financial sector hadn't destroyed people's private savings and pension plans in the 1930s we wouldn't have Social Security. If the medical system wasn't bankrupting seniors we wouldn't have Medicare. The government operates in response to the failures of the free market system.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    With the exception of GU's duly noted correction, great comment, Mr. Noticer!

    I didn't start reading Mr. A.E.'s stuff until his latest post on the change in IQ scores vs. paper degrees over time. I'd have had lots to say on this one, but I'll just say that I'm very glad to read posts (by our writer here) and comments by some good people with Libertarian views who understand freedom. That's getting rarer and rarer these days.

    Nice job, all of you, but I reckon it's too late to start replying to a number of comments here.
    , @TomSchmidt
    The healthcare system of Germany seems to work pretty well. But then, it cares for EVERYBODY, not just serving as a suction device to transfer wealth to older people. They pay less, and are healthier (granted, we would need to compare Germans in Germany to German Americans; I wonder if those data exist?)

    Medicare is a MUCH bigger scam than Social Security. According to Kotlikoff, the unfunded liability of the Feds is about 200 trillion. social security is less than 20% of that,with a much bigger slice being Medicare:
    https://www.financialsense.com/contributors/laurence-kotlikoff/social-security-massive-looming-problem

    Oh, and we most certainly DO have a national healthcare system. Any hospital that takes even ONE dollar of Medicare or Medicaid money is forbidden to Bar ANYONE from receiving emergency room services, legal or no. Does the use of modern emergency rooms in a relatively non-third-world country like the USA encourage people to move here? I'd have to think it does.

    Do you know how to avoid paying SS and Medicare tax on up to 78K in income? It's possible, and legal, so long as that income is in the form of qualified dividends. Start with Subchapter T, and stop worrying about big SUVs with 2 dollar gasoline; your life, and your children's, and your generation's, will be much better.
  22. @Audacious Epigone
    Great point. Xers, many of whom are childless, are a couple of decades away from hell. Not only will there be resentment over resources going to them instead of the young POC ascendancy, that resentment will manifest in the behaviors and actions of the POC nurse/care staffs that will attend to these childless people as they near the end. There are already horror stories of these things happening, but most of the oldsters now have children. The ones who have no one looking out for them are lambs for slaughter.

    Yup, things are going to get very ugly for them (and possibly me).

    Right now, the POC hospital staff (and staff everywhere) act with a certain level of manners and competence. Why? Because there is still some accountability and structure in place, largely because executives and upper staff are still white Baby Boomers.

    What happens when they retire? The structure is gone, and the same 3rd world corruption continues, in the formerly first world. Is a Muslim hospital executive really going to fire another Muslim for mistreating a white devil? The answer is no. 3rd worlders are tribalistic savages.

    Ignorance is bliss. This is why boomers and especially gen x are blind to the future. It feels bad to think that all non whites hate you. It doesn’t feel nice to ask the hard questions, and receive the honest answers. So, they just ignore it, and kick the can a little bit further down the road.

    God knows what it’ll look like by the time I’m in my sixties in 40 years. I suspect that once the legacy boomers are dying off it will become open season.

    • Replies: @Rosie

    What happens when they retire? The structure is gone, and the same 3rd world corruption continues, in the formerly first world. Is a Muslim hospital executive really going to fire another Muslim for mistreating a white devil? The answer is no. 3rd worlders are tribalistic savages.
     
    Elder suicide will be rampant.
    , @GU
    Lionel Shriver’s book “The Mandibles” touches on the elder care of whites during the POC ascendancy. The story and writing is decent, and the predictions about the coming crisis in America strike me as very realistic.
    , @Trevor H.
    YouTube is already replete with examples of abuse of elderly white people in hospitals and nursing homes at the hands of woke POCs in Current Year America. Some have even made it into the 'respectable' media though the stories are quickly squelched.

    Food for thought: these are examples which are actually recorded, and which actually made it into the hands of people who judged them worthy of publication. And even more ominously, this is still an era where it's not universally accepted to simply abuse and kill any defenseless white people you may encounter. Won't be long though.

    , @Stan d Mute

    God knows what it’ll look like by the time I’m in my sixties in 40 years. I suspect that once the legacy boomers are dying off it will become open season.
     
    I've had deep exposure to the healthcare system for my entire life and the degradation since the 1970’s has been stunning. If you are poor and/or don’t have loved ones looking after you daily today it is incredibly bad. You are nothing but a cash machine for some anonymous corporation’s use in extracting money from the taxpayers. Your “care” designed only to prolong your service as a cash cow with zero regard for your dignity or quality of life.

    If you’re in your twenties, I can only advise you to stock up on Nembutal so you can take the easy way out when your time comes.
    , @TomSchmidt
    Uh, every GenX male I know knows that the society they've lived in all their lives is against them, and that oblivious navel-gazing boomers CANNOT see the problem (and it's probably past fixing.)

    Greenspan's commission raising the SS contribution to 12.4% of payroll went into effect in 1983 or 1984, meaning that Xers essentially paid maximum SS their whole working lives, to pay off the Boomers and Silents. There won't be a dime left when Xers turn 67 (another change that screwed Xers) since the "trust fund" evaporates in 2033 or so. Adding racial change to things only makes it worse, since there's no way black and Hispanic youth are going to become tax slaves to transfer wealth to white late Boomers and Xers.

    Btw, this is exactly what the book The Fourth Turning mentions: Gen X is the generation that gets the short end of the stick from society throughout its life, and will be cut off in old age. The book theorizes that, because we don't feel any love towards the existing social order, we are more likely to support changes to it that benefit future generations, even at cost to ourselves.
    , @Audacious Epigone
    Have kids who love you and allow them to take care of you in your dotage. My parents sure as hell aren't ending up in nursing homes. We'll always have room in the Epigone household.
  23. @UrbaneFrancoOntarian
    Yup, things are going to get very ugly for them (and possibly me).

    Right now, the POC hospital staff (and staff everywhere) act with a certain level of manners and competence. Why? Because there is still some accountability and structure in place, largely because executives and upper staff are still white Baby Boomers.

    What happens when they retire? The structure is gone, and the same 3rd world corruption continues, in the formerly first world. Is a Muslim hospital executive really going to fire another Muslim for mistreating a white devil? The answer is no. 3rd worlders are tribalistic savages.

    Ignorance is bliss. This is why boomers and especially gen x are blind to the future. It feels bad to think that all non whites hate you. It doesn't feel nice to ask the hard questions, and receive the honest answers. So, they just ignore it, and kick the can a little bit further down the road.

    God knows what it'll look like by the time I'm in my sixties in 40 years. I suspect that once the legacy boomers are dying off it will become open season.

    What happens when they retire? The structure is gone, and the same 3rd world corruption continues, in the formerly first world. Is a Muslim hospital executive really going to fire another Muslim for mistreating a white devil? The answer is no. 3rd worlders are tribalistic savages.

    Elder suicide will be rampant.

    • Replies: @Anonnu
    Yes women should be chained to the bed until it's time to fuck.
  24. @Audacious Epigone
    Languishing at around 20% support. It'll spike when the impending economic crisis becomes a currency crisis. You read it here!

    Redstan for Redstanis!

    • Replies: @Hail
    There should be a ready-to-go plan to divide CA into several entities in the event of a CalExit crisis, one or more of which would be released as independent and one or more reincorporated into the USA. Like Virginia was split in two during the Civil War combined with some India-Pakistan-1947-like population exchanges.

    There is still a lot of salvageable territory in California, and millions of people who would not be a demographic burden (as the majority of CA now is). (Perhaps there should be a mechanism whereby White readmitees have to pass a political loyalty test to be readmitted to a California successor state.)

    Not to get too carried away, but it would be good to have such a "shovel ready" proposal on hand. We need institutions to argue our case, think tanks. It's a shame the relatively well funded National Policy Institute got bogged down and never became one.

  25. @UrbaneFrancoOntarian
    Trump has really not done much to shrink the size of the federal government. I still don't understand why he won't. Between that, and the failure to repair common core, a disappointing path has been taken.

    In Canada, the Federal Conservatives shrunk the size of the government and laid of thousands of workers. The amount of bitching and moaning was insane. However, word on the street was that nobody's workload actually increased. Federal government is probably 40% dead weight.

    The shutdown really doesn't matter. When the federal employees start to starve because they haven't been getting paid, then maybe the Dems will start to make a deal.

    Most federal government is outsourced to contractors, the civil service is capped because of the superior retirement benefits and inability to be fired.

    Further, not all fedgov workers are Dems, as working in fedgov is incentivized by something called “veterans preference”. Veterans tend to be a bit more conservative than the average American, even black vets are about (20% GOP) compared to 10% at-large.

    Shutting down wholesale departments (Education being the easiest) is difficult because it requires cooperation with Congress. (HUD, Energy, Labor would be the next plausible). These agencies also mostly just dispense out “grants” to contractors and lower levels of government. Most of the Agriculture budget is food stamps.

    As the President is commander-in-chief, he can order a unilateral withdrawal from certain overseas engagements. Said money is already budgeted and could be re-allocated to building a wall.

    Some have discussed an EO to mandate E-Verify, that’s a good idea, but I wonder how this squares with the written intent of the law that it is not mandatory. Of course, it would be bad optics for the California Attorney General to be arguing in the Supreme Court that they “need” illegal workers.

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    I wonder how this squares with

    The side that is arguing procedure is the side that is losing. Trump should be issuing several executive orders from now until the end of his presidency. Make the courts thwart the will of Heritage America on behalf of the invaders again and again and again and again. When informed people like us are hearing about something for the hundredth time, a normie is hearing about it for the first time.
  26. @Stan d Mute

    What would happen if Social Security and Medicare payments stopped?
     
    Probably the same thing that happened before communist FDR created them.

    The real fun begins when Section 8 voucher payments stop and EBT cards fail to reload. That will be known as the first day American freedom began its comeback. A day that will be celebrated for generations to come!

    In no uncertain terms, a shutdown of both programs would risk insurrection. There’s no better accelerationism than this. And no other First World country is paying such sums to a hostile Third World (growing) minority in its midst.

    A small risk to be said however, in that cutting off SNAP will reduce obesity rates, turning the urban underclass back into the physical state their parents and grandparents were in during the much more violent 1960s riots. Slashing Section 8 would see buildings physically expropriated.

    • Agree: Audacious Epigone
  27. I’d say 30-40% of government employees are dead weight and are in only in place because it is the modern form of the patronage spoils system of the late 19th century. The left has essentially paid off a few million people to be reliable Democrat voters by pushing paper around in government agencies. People who can’t hack the private sector now have $50,000 jobs and a generous pension. At least with the old spoils system, people would be moved in and out of positions depending on who won. Imagine white working class males who have no job opportunities working at the DMV or Medicaid offices instead of sassy black women.

    • Agree: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @Trevor H.
    Your points are all painfully valid; I'd only add that in my experience the proportion of incompetent government "workers" is roughly twice your estimate and their typical pay scales are definitely twice what you said. But then I live in a very expensive area so it's possible that government pay is adjusted accordingly. Many of these people making 100K on "workfare" are Latinas with marginal command of English.
    , @Mr. Rational

    Imagine white working class males who have no job opportunities working at the DMV or Medicaid offices instead of sassy black women.
     
    Imagine White working-class males at Medicaid and the DMV each turning illegal aliens over to ICE agents several times a day.  This would fix SO many things very quickly, including our crisis in understaffing in the care system.  With hundreds of thousands removed and millions no longer daring to try to leech off the system, the problems with wait lists and such would be fixed pronto.
  28. @Stan d Mute

    What would happen if Social Security and Medicare payments stopped?
     
    Probably the same thing that happened before communist FDR created them.

    The real fun begins when Section 8 voucher payments stop and EBT cards fail to reload. That will be known as the first day American freedom began its comeback. A day that will be celebrated for generations to come!

    This is my prediction as well.

  29. @TomSchmidt
    Ending in orderly fashion would make more sense. In truth, Medicare is pretty efficiently run compared to health insurers like Aetna. It's unsustainable because 2.9% of payroll in the USA won't cover the heroic end-of-life interventions we make.

    Now, it's a different question as to whether the USA should pour so many medical resources into people from whom it will derive no further revenue, instead of assuring healthy young tax slaves coming up. My guess: when the majority of young people paying in are non-white, and the super majority of people taking out at white, the system ends. 10-15 years?

    I believe Medicare’s vaunted administrative efficiency is largely a myth, completely overwhelmed by a) the vast amount of Medicare fraud that goes on — in part due to the lack of administrative resources to fight it, and b) the harm it does to the healthcare market overall due to its distorting effects on prices and availability of care.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @A Random Dude
    or c) the private health care industry is such a cluster, that its inefficiencies and fraud so numerous, that a government program is better by comparison.
    , @Stan d Mute

    the vast amount of Medicare fraud
     
    Just the fraud on Medicare would pay for a couple walls - each year.
    , @TomSchmidt
    I'd refer you to this article:
    http://content.time.com/time/subscriber/article/0,33009,2136864,00.html

    Warning: it's long. It addresses the efficiency of Medicare. I used to think about fraud the way you do. I no longer do.

    As to fraud and inefficiency,
    https://www.courant.com/business/hc-biz-bertolini-2017-compensation-20180406-story.html
    "Mark Bertolini, chief executive officer of Aetna Inc., received compensation in 2017 of nearly $59 million..."

    Kindly tell me how the "market" figured out that 59million was the right amount to pay this health insurance CEO. Hint: it's a rigged insider's game.
  30. @prime noticer
    social security was one of the worst things to ever happen to the united states in it's over 200 year history. social security is WORSE than any war the US participated in. you can recover from a war, even a major war. you can't recover from forever growing socialism. social security never goes away, and just continues to make things worse, decade after decade. it robs you of your income, and gives you a horrendous ROI too. plus, you have to pay taxes on it again, even if you live long enough to collect. it's total nonsense. there's a reason the US did not have it for over 150 years. it was not a mistake, it was not an oversight, it was not the case that they didn't realize they could have something like that. it deliberately did not exist.

    medicare is equally bad, but in a different way. so we are correct to fight with everything we have, to keep them from creating a forced, legally required, national healthcare system with mandated pay in under the thread of the government's guns. and again, there's a reason the US does not have it. no, it's not an oversight. no, it's not because they didn't realize they could have it. it deliberately does not exist. it's very on purpose that america does not have a single payer national healthcare system. it's a terrible idea that smarter, better men realized was shit, hundreds of years ago, and deep sixed any movement towards such a thing.

    democrats are trying to force on the US, every bad idea that's been repeated a hundred times in the old world. there's a reason 2 million third worlders are trying to come to the US every year, and are willing to risk their life to get there.

    it's because the US DOESN'T have stuff like a national healthcare system, VAT, total civilian disarmament, and so forth. those are the things that create that 3% GDP growth or higher, and enable people to own a half acre lot with a 2000 square foot house with air conditioning and a big SUV with 2 dollar gasoline. we used to be able to say, it's also because it doesn't have a national income tax, or a central bank that meddles in everything and causes inflation, or something stupid like social security, but we can't say those things anymore. democrats relentlessly want to steer the US into being just like any other garbage socialist country with crushing taxes, complete regulation, 1% GDP growth, and a disarmed population. previous americans rejected all that. contrary to modern doctrine, social security, medicare, and single payer healthcare are all actually HUGE steps backwards. they're not 'progress' at all. in many ways, the US in 1800 was the most advanced nation in the history of the world, in terms of political thinking and opportunity maximization. it didn't even have property tax.

    The states most definitely levied property taxes (real and personal) in the 1800s. The federal government did not, true, but it does not today either.

  31. @Cloudbuster
    I believe Medicare's vaunted administrative efficiency is largely a myth, completely overwhelmed by a) the vast amount of Medicare fraud that goes on -- in part due to the lack of administrative resources to fight it, and b) the harm it does to the healthcare market overall due to its distorting effects on prices and availability of care.

    or c) the private health care industry is such a cluster, that its inefficiencies and fraud so numerous, that a government program is better by comparison.

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    Nope.
  32. @UrbaneFrancoOntarian
    Yup, things are going to get very ugly for them (and possibly me).

    Right now, the POC hospital staff (and staff everywhere) act with a certain level of manners and competence. Why? Because there is still some accountability and structure in place, largely because executives and upper staff are still white Baby Boomers.

    What happens when they retire? The structure is gone, and the same 3rd world corruption continues, in the formerly first world. Is a Muslim hospital executive really going to fire another Muslim for mistreating a white devil? The answer is no. 3rd worlders are tribalistic savages.

    Ignorance is bliss. This is why boomers and especially gen x are blind to the future. It feels bad to think that all non whites hate you. It doesn't feel nice to ask the hard questions, and receive the honest answers. So, they just ignore it, and kick the can a little bit further down the road.

    God knows what it'll look like by the time I'm in my sixties in 40 years. I suspect that once the legacy boomers are dying off it will become open season.

    Lionel Shriver’s book “The Mandibles” touches on the elder care of whites during the POC ascendancy. The story and writing is decent, and the predictions about the coming crisis in America strike me as very realistic.

  33. @UrbaneFrancoOntarian
    Yup, things are going to get very ugly for them (and possibly me).

    Right now, the POC hospital staff (and staff everywhere) act with a certain level of manners and competence. Why? Because there is still some accountability and structure in place, largely because executives and upper staff are still white Baby Boomers.

    What happens when they retire? The structure is gone, and the same 3rd world corruption continues, in the formerly first world. Is a Muslim hospital executive really going to fire another Muslim for mistreating a white devil? The answer is no. 3rd worlders are tribalistic savages.

    Ignorance is bliss. This is why boomers and especially gen x are blind to the future. It feels bad to think that all non whites hate you. It doesn't feel nice to ask the hard questions, and receive the honest answers. So, they just ignore it, and kick the can a little bit further down the road.

    God knows what it'll look like by the time I'm in my sixties in 40 years. I suspect that once the legacy boomers are dying off it will become open season.

    YouTube is already replete with examples of abuse of elderly white people in hospitals and nursing homes at the hands of woke POCs in Current Year America. Some have even made it into the ‘respectable’ media though the stories are quickly squelched.

    Food for thought: these are examples which are actually recorded, and which actually made it into the hands of people who judged them worthy of publication. And even more ominously, this is still an era where it’s not universally accepted to simply abuse and kill any defenseless white people you may encounter. Won’t be long though.

  34. @A Random Dude
    I'd say 30-40% of government employees are dead weight and are in only in place because it is the modern form of the patronage spoils system of the late 19th century. The left has essentially paid off a few million people to be reliable Democrat voters by pushing paper around in government agencies. People who can't hack the private sector now have $50,000 jobs and a generous pension. At least with the old spoils system, people would be moved in and out of positions depending on who won. Imagine white working class males who have no job opportunities working at the DMV or Medicaid offices instead of sassy black women.

    Your points are all painfully valid; I’d only add that in my experience the proportion of incompetent government “workers” is roughly twice your estimate and their typical pay scales are definitely twice what you said. But then I live in a very expensive area so it’s possible that government pay is adjusted accordingly. Many of these people making 100K on “workfare” are Latinas with marginal command of English.

  35. @216
    Redstan for Redstanis!

    There should be a ready-to-go plan to divide CA into several entities in the event of a CalExit crisis, one or more of which would be released as independent and one or more reincorporated into the USA. Like Virginia was split in two during the Civil War combined with some India-Pakistan-1947-like population exchanges.

    There is still a lot of salvageable territory in California, and millions of people who would not be a demographic burden (as the majority of CA now is). (Perhaps there should be a mechanism whereby White readmitees have to pass a political loyalty test to be readmitted to a California successor state.)

    Not to get too carried away, but it would be good to have such a “shovel ready” proposal on hand. We need institutions to argue our case, think tanks. It’s a shame the relatively well funded National Policy Institute got bogged down and never became one.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    All the water resources are in the part of CA that would not be cut loose. They'll never agree to that. Lose access to the Colorado and the Sierra Snowpack and the regions along the coast return to Indian population densities.
  36. I read that terminating niggers was being taken off of the list of federal hate crimes. Whatever a ‘hate crime’ is.

  37. @TomSchmidt
    Ending in orderly fashion would make more sense. In truth, Medicare is pretty efficiently run compared to health insurers like Aetna. It's unsustainable because 2.9% of payroll in the USA won't cover the heroic end-of-life interventions we make.

    Now, it's a different question as to whether the USA should pour so many medical resources into people from whom it will derive no further revenue, instead of assuring healthy young tax slaves coming up. My guess: when the majority of young people paying in are non-white, and the super majority of people taking out at white, the system ends. 10-15 years?

    We could certainly save a lot of money on healthcare by not treating sick people.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    Years ago, Philip Morris got in trouble for a report to the Czech government on the benefit of cigarettes. The government would collect more in taxes, and because smokers die younger, pay out less in old age benefits. (Even better if they get cancer, which kills quickly and cheaply compared to emphysema, I guess.)

    I'm sure a profit-maximizing government can and will perform the same calculation. From birth to, say, 22, no taxes are collectible, just as from 65 on, in most cases. Both age groups are a drain on the fiscal resources, but the 0-22 crowd at least has upside in the future while the 65+ crowd has mostly cost.

    So not saving people from 0-50 will incur a cost, most likely. That will likely continue to be funded.

    It's coming.

  38. @TomSchmidt
    Ending in orderly fashion would make more sense. In truth, Medicare is pretty efficiently run compared to health insurers like Aetna. It's unsustainable because 2.9% of payroll in the USA won't cover the heroic end-of-life interventions we make.

    Now, it's a different question as to whether the USA should pour so many medical resources into people from whom it will derive no further revenue, instead of assuring healthy young tax slaves coming up. My guess: when the majority of young people paying in are non-white, and the super majority of people taking out at white, the system ends. 10-15 years?

    Besides demographic pressure: A 2016 Johns Hopkins study found that 250,000 people die each year from medical negligence. This is the #3 cause of death. This will get much worse. It will put impossible pressure on the system. I would double the number of doctors and nurses, starting now, and in 7 years (the training period) the frustrating, degrading, harmful battle to get a delayed brief appointment would be over. The Easter Bunny could campaign on this platform and be elected President.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    This results from the open conspiracy to limit the number of spots in American med schools in order to inflate the income of doctors. It has the bug/feature of necessitating third world educated witch doctors that are now found in every hospital system in America. I live near a major medical school and even it is increasingly populated with witch doctors from hinpooh land and the cannibal continent. Add the affirmative action doctors educated here and by the end of this century you can expect to see albino parts dispensed at Walgreens or CVS.

    Meanwhile, the Medicare ATM will continue to saddle future generations with the bills for million dollar interventions to “save the life” of octogenarian narcissists. Just think of the profits to be made on albino parts! Of course what with the “OMG! opioid epidemic” palliative care will continue to wither away and die a silent death.

    Progress!
  39. @UrbaneFrancoOntarian
    Yup, things are going to get very ugly for them (and possibly me).

    Right now, the POC hospital staff (and staff everywhere) act with a certain level of manners and competence. Why? Because there is still some accountability and structure in place, largely because executives and upper staff are still white Baby Boomers.

    What happens when they retire? The structure is gone, and the same 3rd world corruption continues, in the formerly first world. Is a Muslim hospital executive really going to fire another Muslim for mistreating a white devil? The answer is no. 3rd worlders are tribalistic savages.

    Ignorance is bliss. This is why boomers and especially gen x are blind to the future. It feels bad to think that all non whites hate you. It doesn't feel nice to ask the hard questions, and receive the honest answers. So, they just ignore it, and kick the can a little bit further down the road.

    God knows what it'll look like by the time I'm in my sixties in 40 years. I suspect that once the legacy boomers are dying off it will become open season.

    God knows what it’ll look like by the time I’m in my sixties in 40 years. I suspect that once the legacy boomers are dying off it will become open season.

    I’ve had deep exposure to the healthcare system for my entire life and the degradation since the 1970’s has been stunning. If you are poor and/or don’t have loved ones looking after you daily today it is incredibly bad. You are nothing but a cash machine for some anonymous corporation’s use in extracting money from the taxpayers. Your “care” designed only to prolong your service as a cash cow with zero regard for your dignity or quality of life.

    If you’re in your twenties, I can only advise you to stock up on Nembutal so you can take the easy way out when your time comes.

  40. @Cloudbuster
    I believe Medicare's vaunted administrative efficiency is largely a myth, completely overwhelmed by a) the vast amount of Medicare fraud that goes on -- in part due to the lack of administrative resources to fight it, and b) the harm it does to the healthcare market overall due to its distorting effects on prices and availability of care.

    the vast amount of Medicare fraud

    Just the fraud on Medicare would pay for a couple walls – each year.

    • Agree: Audacious Epigone
  41. @SafeNow
    Besides demographic pressure: A 2016 Johns Hopkins study found that 250,000 people die each year from medical negligence. This is the #3 cause of death. This will get much worse. It will put impossible pressure on the system. I would double the number of doctors and nurses, starting now, and in 7 years (the training period) the frustrating, degrading, harmful battle to get a delayed brief appointment would be over. The Easter Bunny could campaign on this platform and be elected President.

    This results from the open conspiracy to limit the number of spots in American med schools in order to inflate the income of doctors. It has the bug/feature of necessitating third world educated witch doctors that are now found in every hospital system in America. I live near a major medical school and even it is increasingly populated with witch doctors from hinpooh land and the cannibal continent. Add the affirmative action doctors educated here and by the end of this century you can expect to see albino parts dispensed at Walgreens or CVS.

    Meanwhile, the Medicare ATM will continue to saddle future generations with the bills for million dollar interventions to “save the life” of octogenarian narcissists. Just think of the profits to be made on albino parts! Of course what with the “OMG! opioid epidemic” palliative care will continue to wither away and die a silent death.

    Progress!

    • Agree: Trevor H.
    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    This results from the open conspiracy to limit the number of spots in American med schools in order to inflate the income of doctors.

    Some evidence for your conspiracy, please? That doesn't sound plausible.

    You know, the top people typically get the spots. It's not clear to me that there a lot of highly-qualified people who want to get into medical school but are unable. And if there are a lot of highly-qualified candidates who can be educated at a profit, then a) Why aren't medical schools doing it already -- they have competing interests with the doctors, and b) Why would I trust top-down bureaucrats to achieve a better result than the market?

    Why would doctors be able to maintain such a conspiracy when at various times we've seen gluts in other highly-trained professions (currently law)?

    Doubling the number of doctors, as SafeNow suggests, would probably increase the rate of incompetent doctors. Does it matter much if the incompetent doctor is foreign or native?

    Cargo cult thinking: "People with college educations earn more, so lets get everyone a college education!" or "Doctors who graduate from rigorous programs are superior, so lets get more graduates from those rigorous programs." Inevitably, they get the causality backwards and end up devaluing the credentials.

    Being a doctor is already not the picnic it once was:

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/1-million-mistake-becoming-a-doctor/

    , @Trevor H.
    Very good writing, brother.

    You see far and well, and the view isn't pretty.

    , @Audacious Epigone
    Yes, from the outside looking in there is a real zero sum aspect to this that must be compounding problems in all kinds of different ways (reduced time per patient, increased labor cots, more Dr. Nicks, etc).
  42. @A Random Dude
    or c) the private health care industry is such a cluster, that its inefficiencies and fraud so numerous, that a government program is better by comparison.

    Nope.

  43. @Stan d Mute
    This results from the open conspiracy to limit the number of spots in American med schools in order to inflate the income of doctors. It has the bug/feature of necessitating third world educated witch doctors that are now found in every hospital system in America. I live near a major medical school and even it is increasingly populated with witch doctors from hinpooh land and the cannibal continent. Add the affirmative action doctors educated here and by the end of this century you can expect to see albino parts dispensed at Walgreens or CVS.

    Meanwhile, the Medicare ATM will continue to saddle future generations with the bills for million dollar interventions to “save the life” of octogenarian narcissists. Just think of the profits to be made on albino parts! Of course what with the “OMG! opioid epidemic” palliative care will continue to wither away and die a silent death.

    Progress!

    This results from the open conspiracy to limit the number of spots in American med schools in order to inflate the income of doctors.

    Some evidence for your conspiracy, please? That doesn’t sound plausible.

    You know, the top people typically get the spots. It’s not clear to me that there a lot of highly-qualified people who want to get into medical school but are unable. And if there are a lot of highly-qualified candidates who can be educated at a profit, then a) Why aren’t medical schools doing it already — they have competing interests with the doctors, and b) Why would I trust top-down bureaucrats to achieve a better result than the market?

    Why would doctors be able to maintain such a conspiracy when at various times we’ve seen gluts in other highly-trained professions (currently law)?

    Doubling the number of doctors, as SafeNow suggests, would probably increase the rate of incompetent doctors. Does it matter much if the incompetent doctor is foreign or native?

    Cargo cult thinking: “People with college educations earn more, so lets get everyone a college education!” or “Doctors who graduate from rigorous programs are superior, so lets get more graduates from those rigorous programs.” Inevitably, they get the causality backwards and end up devaluing the credentials.

    Being a doctor is already not the picnic it once was:

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/1-million-mistake-becoming-a-doctor/

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    As I wrote, it’s an open conspiracy, a duck-duck-go search on “medical school class size” just yielded this among countless other results:

    https://www.acponline.org/acp_policy/policies/future_supply_of_physicians_reassessing_medical_school_class_size_1987.pdf

    As for accepting only the best, remember affirmative action and look up the seats reserved for non-Asian minorities and women. Basically today, to find a good doctor, one must perform an image search for white (or oriental) men and cross search that with the most selective schools.
    , @Mr. Rational

    You know, the top people typically get the spots.
     
    No they don't.  Quite a few years ago I knew a young lady who was aiming for med school.  There was ONE slot open (for her school? not clear on this) at the local university for a combined undergrad-med program.  It went to a minority.

    Doubling the number of doctors, as SafeNow suggests, would probably increase the rate of incompetent doctors.
     
    Kermit Gosnell got the M.D. after his name anyway.  If you want competent doctors, eliminate affirmative action and immigration.  If you want to compensate doctors decently without causing rampant medical inflation, stop piling on reporting and other mandates which add expenses without a single second of actual patient care.
    , @Stan d Mute

    if there are a lot of highly-qualified candidates who can be educated at a profit, then a) Why aren’t medical schools doing it already — they have competing interests with the doctors
     
    Look at the org chart and faculty for a med school. They’ve all got credentials that begin with an “M.” but it ain’t an MBA (hint - it starts with an “M” and ends with a “D”). It’s a cartel. Why do you think state medical boards only yank licenses in the most outrageously flagrant and egregious cases of violations? Same thing, cartel. Dr Mom was euthanized in the state that sent Jack Kevorkian to prison and not an eye was batted. Why? Professional courtesy they call it - they have the decency to end suffering in one of their own but you are a cash cow they’ll keep alive as long as someone can be fleeced (yeah, I mix my metaphors, so what).

    and b) Why would I trust top-down bureaucrats to achieve a better result than the market?
     
    You tell me. Why do you? There is no market, it’s all either cartel or government (but I repeat myself).

    Oh, and since you earned your spot on my ignore list this reply isn’t for you, but the editorial “you” (ie those who are capable and worthy of guidance).
  44. The government shut down? I’m afraid I didn’t notice (and the dangerous part for our bureaucracy – neither did most people).

    • Agree: Audacious Epigone
  45. You know these mopes are completely bereft of argument when they’re leading with “[it] would be an absolute waste of taxpayer money.”

    L…M…F…A…O. Why not just say, “we surrender”? The democrats give literally zero shits about wasting taxpayer money. Ever. In fact, wasting taxpayer money is why they live and breathe.

    Everyone…knows…this. Literally everyone knows this. Buy even the most duplicitous die-hard two-faced lying partisan hack donkey-waving blue-state leftist 3 shots and he will freely admit this.

    • Agree: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    AGREED!

    My apologies if you have seen these links before, but anyone with any degree of numeracy, along with a knowledge of the scale of the US Feral budget, will understand that even with the usual cost overruns and corruption, this wall will be nothing but 1/2 day or less of US government annual spending. For maintenance, it'd be the same order of magnitude - see Border control vs. the interstate highway system and Border control maintenance vs. defending some Koreans against other Koreans.

    Maybe "bereft of arguments" is not the right way to put it, Svigor. How about "they know better, but this lie works better than the truth for them"? The truth is that they are in favor of open borders, not for economic reasons, not even for emotional reasons, but to destroy the American nation.

  46. @Audacious Epigone
    Languishing at around 20% support. It'll spike when the impending economic crisis becomes a currency crisis. You read it here!

    From your lips to God’s Ears.

  47. @Audacious Epigone
    Languishing at around 20% support. It'll spike when the impending economic crisis becomes a currency crisis. You read it here!

    I am very curious how you specifically think the economic crisis becomes a currency crisis, and leads to dissolution. In accordance with Nobel Laureate Krugman’s theory for economic crises, “for whatever reason, a large part of the private sector tries to increase its cash reserves at the same time.” (cf. https://isteve.blogspot.com/2008/10/i-had-not-realized-nobel-laureate-paul.html).

    I’ve tried to simulate this a little in my head, how it will go. The way I see it, something will cause a severe shortfall in cash buying U.S. debt, which must be taken up by printing money. This could be Chinese refusing to finance as much due to a trade war, or the required bailout of a state (e.g. http://usdebtclock.org/state-debt-clocks/state-of-california-debt-clock.html), or the overdue economic crisis, some other factor I can’t think of, or a combination of all. When that happens, there will be nothing holding back a massive inflation.

    But will it be massive enough to take out the USD as the world reserve currency? What replaces it? EUR, I presume, or RMB (if anyone would trust it)? What level of inflation or other change would it really take for the USD to fall? A factor of 2 reduction in value in a year? More? (By the way, a quick reference for inflation rates is 7% will halve your currency’s value in 10 years, 10% in 7 years).

    If the currency crisis does happen, what then of the states? Their individual state debts are then meaningless because the currency they are owed in is devalued, but so is every fixed income provided by the state. This, I think, is the only way out for CA in a post-Gray Davis world. What then would be the mechanism for dissolution? Everyone is then in the same currency boat, as it were. Is there a pensioner revolt?

    I agree all things are possible when this happens, but it does help to think through how it would go down. I certainly think that is the time when things will necessarily change, but I do not know if dissolution is the most straightforward prediction. Maybe it is. What do you think?

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    Whew, those are all $64k questions.

    The most obvious answer for the what places the US dollar as the world's reserve currency is simply another currency. The yen, maybe--it tends to track hard stores of value like gold unlike the dollar which does the opposite. While I'd love to say crypto will fill the void, I don't believe it will.

    Re: the states, by bailing on the union and effectively--if not explicitly--abandoning their debts, fights will break out between the POC ascendancy wanting its welfare and senescent boomers wanting their pensions and social security. Both are going to get less than before.
  48. What the partial shutdown is making clear is just how superfluous so much of the federal government is.

    yes and no – yes, the expenditure is almost entirely worthless as a thing in itself but ever increasing debt-fueled government spending has to a large extent been the only thing keeping the western economies afloat as their manufacturing base was looted.

    western governments are disguising the economic decay created by the banking mafia off-shoring the real economy by borrowing and paying interest on money from the same banking mafia – money the banking mafia create out of thin air.

    deficit spending is yet another banking mafia scam.

  49. @Cloudbuster
    This results from the open conspiracy to limit the number of spots in American med schools in order to inflate the income of doctors.

    Some evidence for your conspiracy, please? That doesn't sound plausible.

    You know, the top people typically get the spots. It's not clear to me that there a lot of highly-qualified people who want to get into medical school but are unable. And if there are a lot of highly-qualified candidates who can be educated at a profit, then a) Why aren't medical schools doing it already -- they have competing interests with the doctors, and b) Why would I trust top-down bureaucrats to achieve a better result than the market?

    Why would doctors be able to maintain such a conspiracy when at various times we've seen gluts in other highly-trained professions (currently law)?

    Doubling the number of doctors, as SafeNow suggests, would probably increase the rate of incompetent doctors. Does it matter much if the incompetent doctor is foreign or native?

    Cargo cult thinking: "People with college educations earn more, so lets get everyone a college education!" or "Doctors who graduate from rigorous programs are superior, so lets get more graduates from those rigorous programs." Inevitably, they get the causality backwards and end up devaluing the credentials.

    Being a doctor is already not the picnic it once was:

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/1-million-mistake-becoming-a-doctor/

    As I wrote, it’s an open conspiracy, a duck-duck-go search on “medical school class size” just yielded this among countless other results:

    https://www.acponline.org/acp_policy/policies/future_supply_of_physicians_reassessing_medical_school_class_size_1987.pdf

    As for accepting only the best, remember affirmative action and look up the seats reserved for non-Asian minorities and women. Basically today, to find a good doctor, one must perform an image search for white (or oriental) men and cross search that with the most selective schools.

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    I did the same search, and I'm not seeing it. That's a 32-year-old position paper. The conditions on the ground are far different now. In contrast:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3383155/

    "Introduction: In 2006, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) issued a recommendation that medical schools increase the supply of physicians by 30% to meet the patient needs of the new millennium."

    That recommendation looks to be reflected in graduation rates (interestingly, it looks like this happened by reversing a decades-long decline of male participation):

    https://www.aamc.org/download/493700/data/factsdatachart4.pdf

    Opening a new medical school, or making additional seats available, is probably a more difficult process than for almost any other career, due to the facilities and hands-on requirements.
  50. @Stan d Mute
    As I wrote, it’s an open conspiracy, a duck-duck-go search on “medical school class size” just yielded this among countless other results:

    https://www.acponline.org/acp_policy/policies/future_supply_of_physicians_reassessing_medical_school_class_size_1987.pdf

    As for accepting only the best, remember affirmative action and look up the seats reserved for non-Asian minorities and women. Basically today, to find a good doctor, one must perform an image search for white (or oriental) men and cross search that with the most selective schools.

    I did the same search, and I’m not seeing it. That’s a 32-year-old position paper. The conditions on the ground are far different now. In contrast:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3383155/

    “Introduction: In 2006, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) issued a recommendation that medical schools increase the supply of physicians by 30% to meet the patient needs of the new millennium.”

    That recommendation looks to be reflected in graduation rates (interestingly, it looks like this happened by reversing a decades-long decline of male participation):

    https://www.aamc.org/download/493700/data/factsdatachart4.pdf

    Opening a new medical school, or making additional seats available, is probably a more difficult process than for almost any other career, due to the facilities and hands-on requirements.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute

    Medicare, the federal government health care program that largely influences the number of residency positions, has kept the number of slots about the same since 1997
     
    https://www.usnews.com/education/best-graduate-schools/top-medical-schools/articles/2013/06/27/how-increasing-medical-school-enrollment-affects-md-hopefuls

    I’ve been immersed in the shenanigans of the field since I was adopted as an infant by a physician. But I’m not going to do your research on the subject for you. Believe me or don’t, check the facts for yourself or don’t. You’re the one who will be alive to deal with the consequences, not me.
  51. @Rosie

    What happens when they retire? The structure is gone, and the same 3rd world corruption continues, in the formerly first world. Is a Muslim hospital executive really going to fire another Muslim for mistreating a white devil? The answer is no. 3rd worlders are tribalistic savages.
     
    Elder suicide will be rampant.

    Yes women should be chained to the bed until it’s time to fuck.

  52. @Stan d Mute
    This results from the open conspiracy to limit the number of spots in American med schools in order to inflate the income of doctors. It has the bug/feature of necessitating third world educated witch doctors that are now found in every hospital system in America. I live near a major medical school and even it is increasingly populated with witch doctors from hinpooh land and the cannibal continent. Add the affirmative action doctors educated here and by the end of this century you can expect to see albino parts dispensed at Walgreens or CVS.

    Meanwhile, the Medicare ATM will continue to saddle future generations with the bills for million dollar interventions to “save the life” of octogenarian narcissists. Just think of the profits to be made on albino parts! Of course what with the “OMG! opioid epidemic” palliative care will continue to wither away and die a silent death.

    Progress!

    Very good writing, brother.

    You see far and well, and the view isn’t pretty.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    Thank you. Sincerely. There are a lot of commenters here with a wealth of wisdom far beyond anything else published anywhere (not to mention the outstanding service Ron Unz is performing or his growing stable of vigilant writers/bloggers). It’s nice to get some recognition for my minuscule additions.
  53. O/T

    lol

    Think about it this way. Landscaping is one of the sectors in which employers are constantly clamoring for more guest workers and hiring large number of illegal aliens. Owners of landscaping companies say there is a shortage of available workers. Yet, who in America is unable, if they chose, to hire a crew to mow their lawn?

    Some people choose to mow their own lawns, but the fact that one can contract with a landscaping company to have one’s lawn mowed relatively cheaply has made that a common practice today, certainly compared to thirty years ago. It used to be that if homeowners hired someone to cut their lawn, it was usually an enterprising teenager who was paid a lower rate than that commanded by a professional landscaping crew. Immigration has lowered the price of landscaping and put enterprising teenagers out of business (who can now while away their time playing Fortnite).

    https://www.numbersusa.com/blog/constant-reports-worker-shortage-isnt

  54. The Wall Street Journal is pushing a Trump Voter Base Destruction plot cooked up by the likes of Newt Gingrich and Lindsey Graham to give AMNESTY to Obama’s illegal alien invaders in exchange for a few dollars to build more rickety fences on the border.

    The New York Times has an opinion article today about Afghanistan that suggests the American Empire is spending at least 45 billion dollars a year in Afghanistan.

    Newt Gingrich and Lindsey Graham are treasonous rat globalizers who push nation-wrecking mass legal immigration and amnesty for illegal alien invaders. President Trump should cut all contact with Gingrich and Graham to send a message to his voter base that he won’t stab his voter base in the back.

    President Trump has discontinued following the great patriot Ann Coulter on Twitter, but he has time to waste screwing around with treasonous globalizer rats such as Newt Gingrich and Lindsey Graham. It is an outrage, DAMMIT!

    I hereby challenge Trump, Gingrich and Graham to a debate on immigration and national sovereignty and multicultural mayhem.

    I would rhetorically wipe the floor with filthy globalizer politician whores Graham and Gingrich, and I would politely list, in great detail, all the ways that Trumpy has abandoned and backstabbed his voter base!

  55. If we don’t need the federal government, maybe we don’t need a federal anything. Our walk down the path of political dissolution continues. Happy New Year!

    Audacious Epigone says maybe the federal government should go out of business completely. Maybe the states or other political units should go their own way?

    The American Empire is using the United States as a cover to rob and cheat and steal the future of White Core Americans.

    The American Empire must have massive amounts of dollars flowing overseas to keep all the imperial scams going. The American Empire must keep the dollar-wasting endless wars going and the American Empire must allow foreigners to send hundreds of billions of dollars out of the United States each year.

    The American Empire has to make sure the United States has the global reserve currency to keep the imperial gravy train rolling for the Deep State and its minions.

    Trump should propose a massive tax on remittances to pay for his wall, but he has stayed mum on that. Why?

    Some guy named Kevin MacDonald wants a 5 percent remittance tax to pay for the wall. I say make the tax 99 percent and remove the foreigners sending out the dollars. Remove the foreigners, keep the dollars — sounds good to me!

    • Agree: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    "Some guy named Kevin MacDonald."

    Surely you know his status on the dissident right?
  56. @A Random Dude
    I'd say 30-40% of government employees are dead weight and are in only in place because it is the modern form of the patronage spoils system of the late 19th century. The left has essentially paid off a few million people to be reliable Democrat voters by pushing paper around in government agencies. People who can't hack the private sector now have $50,000 jobs and a generous pension. At least with the old spoils system, people would be moved in and out of positions depending on who won. Imagine white working class males who have no job opportunities working at the DMV or Medicaid offices instead of sassy black women.

    Imagine white working class males who have no job opportunities working at the DMV or Medicaid offices instead of sassy black women.

    Imagine White working-class males at Medicaid and the DMV each turning illegal aliens over to ICE agents several times a day.  This would fix SO many things very quickly, including our crisis in understaffing in the care system.  With hundreds of thousands removed and millions no longer daring to try to leech off the system, the problems with wait lists and such would be fixed pronto.

    • Agree: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    This is good as it wouldn’t require new legislation. Legislation is always a net negative for us legacy Americans who have ancestral skin in the game.

    Another would be to force illegals to build the wall for us. The prohibition on slavery explicitly allows for slavery as punishment for crime (hence the existence of chain gangs and prison factories). So instead of paying $50K/yr for Pedro to sit on his burrito stained skivvies all day, force him to do wall construction for a few years before we dump his ass on the opposite side of it. As a keen student of mestizo/Indio construction crews, I know how quickly they could get the job done. And isn’t that why they’re here anyway - to do the jobs Americans won’t do?
  57. @Cloudbuster
    This results from the open conspiracy to limit the number of spots in American med schools in order to inflate the income of doctors.

    Some evidence for your conspiracy, please? That doesn't sound plausible.

    You know, the top people typically get the spots. It's not clear to me that there a lot of highly-qualified people who want to get into medical school but are unable. And if there are a lot of highly-qualified candidates who can be educated at a profit, then a) Why aren't medical schools doing it already -- they have competing interests with the doctors, and b) Why would I trust top-down bureaucrats to achieve a better result than the market?

    Why would doctors be able to maintain such a conspiracy when at various times we've seen gluts in other highly-trained professions (currently law)?

    Doubling the number of doctors, as SafeNow suggests, would probably increase the rate of incompetent doctors. Does it matter much if the incompetent doctor is foreign or native?

    Cargo cult thinking: "People with college educations earn more, so lets get everyone a college education!" or "Doctors who graduate from rigorous programs are superior, so lets get more graduates from those rigorous programs." Inevitably, they get the causality backwards and end up devaluing the credentials.

    Being a doctor is already not the picnic it once was:

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/1-million-mistake-becoming-a-doctor/

    You know, the top people typically get the spots.

    No they don’t.  Quite a few years ago I knew a young lady who was aiming for med school.  There was ONE slot open (for her school? not clear on this) at the local university for a combined undergrad-med program.  It went to a minority.

    Doubling the number of doctors, as SafeNow suggests, would probably increase the rate of incompetent doctors.

    Kermit Gosnell got the M.D. after his name anyway.  If you want competent doctors, eliminate affirmative action and immigration.  If you want to compensate doctors decently without causing rampant medical inflation, stop piling on reporting and other mandates which add expenses without a single second of actual patient care.

    • Agree: Stan d Mute
    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    Two other factors that have contributed to runaway inflation in healthcare costs are litigation and specialization. Both got out of control in the 1970’s. Since the trial lawyers lobby is 100% Democrat, it’s very safe to lay that one at their feet. Malpractice insurance expense, even for physicians never so much as accused of malpractice, put a lot of doctors out of work by the 1980’s. Concomitant to that explosion in expense was the rise of HMO/PPO and specialization that required family practitioners and general practitioners to refer patients to specialists for things as mundane as removing a wart. Suddenly you have a bill for your visit to your family doctor and a second bill for the specialist who did the work formerly done by your family doctor. In the 1970’s I have vivid memories of being bundled into the car by Dr Mom (a FP/GP) at 3am for a wild ride to the hospital to deliver a baby (no, I didn’t deliver them, I sat in the doctor’s lounge playing Dennis the Menace with nurses). Routine pregnancies were routinely handled by one’s regular doctor, not some OBGYN absurdly overpriced specialist who knew nothing about his patients, their families, or anything else. Women have been giving birth for at least a hundred years (or so I hear anyway), why suddenly in the 1970’s-1980’s did they require a “specialist” at 100X the cost of a midwife, nurse, or GP?
  58. @Cloudbuster
    I did the same search, and I'm not seeing it. That's a 32-year-old position paper. The conditions on the ground are far different now. In contrast:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3383155/

    "Introduction: In 2006, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) issued a recommendation that medical schools increase the supply of physicians by 30% to meet the patient needs of the new millennium."

    That recommendation looks to be reflected in graduation rates (interestingly, it looks like this happened by reversing a decades-long decline of male participation):

    https://www.aamc.org/download/493700/data/factsdatachart4.pdf

    Opening a new medical school, or making additional seats available, is probably a more difficult process than for almost any other career, due to the facilities and hands-on requirements.

    Medicare, the federal government health care program that largely influences the number of residency positions, has kept the number of slots about the same since 1997

    https://www.usnews.com/education/best-graduate-schools/top-medical-schools/articles/2013/06/27/how-increasing-medical-school-enrollment-affects-md-hopefuls

    I’ve been immersed in the shenanigans of the field since I was adopted as an infant by a physician. But I’m not going to do your research on the subject for you. Believe me or don’t, check the facts for yourself or don’t. You’re the one who will be alive to deal with the consequences, not me.

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    So, you make the claim, and then it's my responsibility to validate it? That sure is convenient for you.
  59. @Trevor H.
    Very good writing, brother.

    You see far and well, and the view isn't pretty.

    Thank you. Sincerely. There are a lot of commenters here with a wealth of wisdom far beyond anything else published anywhere (not to mention the outstanding service Ron Unz is performing or his growing stable of vigilant writers/bloggers). It’s nice to get some recognition for my minuscule additions.

  60. @Mr. Rational

    Imagine white working class males who have no job opportunities working at the DMV or Medicaid offices instead of sassy black women.
     
    Imagine White working-class males at Medicaid and the DMV each turning illegal aliens over to ICE agents several times a day.  This would fix SO many things very quickly, including our crisis in understaffing in the care system.  With hundreds of thousands removed and millions no longer daring to try to leech off the system, the problems with wait lists and such would be fixed pronto.

    This is good as it wouldn’t require new legislation. Legislation is always a net negative for us legacy Americans who have ancestral skin in the game.

    Another would be to force illegals to build the wall for us. The prohibition on slavery explicitly allows for slavery as punishment for crime (hence the existence of chain gangs and prison factories). So instead of paying $50K/yr for Pedro to sit on his burrito stained skivvies all day, force him to do wall construction for a few years before we dump his ass on the opposite side of it. As a keen student of mestizo/Indio construction crews, I know how quickly they could get the job done. And isn’t that why they’re here anyway – to do the jobs Americans won’t do?

    • LOL: Mr. Rational
  61. @Mr. Rational

    You know, the top people typically get the spots.
     
    No they don't.  Quite a few years ago I knew a young lady who was aiming for med school.  There was ONE slot open (for her school? not clear on this) at the local university for a combined undergrad-med program.  It went to a minority.

    Doubling the number of doctors, as SafeNow suggests, would probably increase the rate of incompetent doctors.
     
    Kermit Gosnell got the M.D. after his name anyway.  If you want competent doctors, eliminate affirmative action and immigration.  If you want to compensate doctors decently without causing rampant medical inflation, stop piling on reporting and other mandates which add expenses without a single second of actual patient care.

    Two other factors that have contributed to runaway inflation in healthcare costs are litigation and specialization. Both got out of control in the 1970’s. Since the trial lawyers lobby is 100% Democrat, it’s very safe to lay that one at their feet. Malpractice insurance expense, even for physicians never so much as accused of malpractice, put a lot of doctors out of work by the 1980’s. Concomitant to that explosion in expense was the rise of HMO/PPO and specialization that required family practitioners and general practitioners to refer patients to specialists for things as mundane as removing a wart. Suddenly you have a bill for your visit to your family doctor and a second bill for the specialist who did the work formerly done by your family doctor. In the 1970’s I have vivid memories of being bundled into the car by Dr Mom (a FP/GP) at 3am for a wild ride to the hospital to deliver a baby (no, I didn’t deliver them, I sat in the doctor’s lounge playing Dennis the Menace with nurses). Routine pregnancies were routinely handled by one’s regular doctor, not some OBGYN absurdly overpriced specialist who knew nothing about his patients, their families, or anything else. Women have been giving birth for at least a hundred years (or so I hear anyway), why suddenly in the 1970’s-1980’s did they require a “specialist” at 100X the cost of a midwife, nurse, or GP?

  62. @Stan d Mute

    Medicare, the federal government health care program that largely influences the number of residency positions, has kept the number of slots about the same since 1997
     
    https://www.usnews.com/education/best-graduate-schools/top-medical-schools/articles/2013/06/27/how-increasing-medical-school-enrollment-affects-md-hopefuls

    I’ve been immersed in the shenanigans of the field since I was adopted as an infant by a physician. But I’m not going to do your research on the subject for you. Believe me or don’t, check the facts for yourself or don’t. You’re the one who will be alive to deal with the consequences, not me.

    So, you make the claim, and then it’s my responsibility to validate it? That sure is convenient for you.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    It might be different if I gave a crap about you. But I don’t. I gave up on trying to convince fools to think or the blind to see when this internet thing came of age twenty years ago. If you care, look it up yourself. If you don’t, it makes me no difference whatever. I stated the case and even wasted some of my precious time showing you that the number of physician slots hasn’t increased since 1997 (only because I thought there may be some others who believed your nonsense “fact” and I will on occasion spend my time disproving stupidity). JAMA & NEJM have discussed this issue for the best part of 50 years - as long as I’ve been exposed to them anyway. I’d cite them, but I’m not interested in taking the time to search for something I already know to be true.

    In my experience, the people who respond to comments with, “Nyah, nyah, prove it!” are dumbass trolls. If they could offer real refutation they would, but they can’t and instead attempt to make you do a bunch of wholly unnecessary work when there’s zero chance of changing their empty minds in the first place.
    , @TomSchmidt
    No, it's your responsibility to CLICK THE LINK HE SUPPLIED, which states that a critical factor in training doctors, Medicare-paid residency slots, has not increased, so even graduating more doctors won't increase the supply.

    After you've clicked his link, your responsibility is to accept it, or refute it. I'd welcome a refutation.

    Inventing new "market based" healthcare systems doesn't refute it, unless you and what army have the votes to repeal all the regulations that restrict supply based on available residency slots.
  63. GOP circa 2055

    But these experiences stayed with me and made me think. Were these two individuals simply angry at life? Were they looking for an argument with a white male? Do I come across as an arrogant, aggressive white man, even when I don’t think I am?

    I never met these individuals before or after, so I can’t know anything about them. Of course, they could just be unpleasant human beings, but I think there is a bigger chance that their past experiences with white people have made them suspect racism or rudeness when they encounter a white person.

    If that’s the case, I should admire rather than resent their willingness to engage in confrontation.

    I have now resolved to try and look demurer and friendlier, extra polite and extra careful, when I deal with black strangers in the future.

    But wouldn’t it be dishonest and racist in its own way to treat black people differently from white people?

    Well, that’s our reality in South Africa right now. After a quarter of a century since the political power had been transferred from the white minority to the black majority, many or most of us are still trying to figure out how to deal with race.

    It gets worse.

    At the same time, I don’t think it’s going to do anyone any good if we all tiptoed around matters of race. I’m not one of those “good whites” who believe white people should shut up and not take part in public debates. I do believe, however, that there is an onus on white people to be more respectful and to choose their words more carefully when they engage on these matters.

    Perhaps one day my great-grandchildren, if they’re going to be white like me, will be released from this burden.

    Four generations on, whether your people are dead or blurred, they will still hate you. And that’s why Mr. DuPreez gets a check to be the Judas Goat.

    https://www.news24.com/Columnists/MaxduPreez/when-will-we-be-released-from-the-burden-of-racism-20190102

  64. anon[274] • Disclaimer says:

    In a Shutdown, IRS Will Take Your Money, but Give No Refunds

    They finally found something someone cares about.

    I think a lot of government produced economic statistics will shut down. Not that I follow this stuff. Quarterly data produced at leisure would be roughly as useful. There is an endless market for more granular, frequent data releases.

  65. @El Dato

    The impending government shutdown is the new Y2K bug.
     
    Not nice. Problems due to two-digit-year fields didn't happen BECAUSE a lot of effort was spent in fixing potential problems before time was up. Further down the road, this effort helped in reviving/replacing undocumented and unmaintainable code, an investment for the 10 years post-1999.99. Money well spent.

    Let's take a look at...

    https://thenextweb.com/dd/2017/10/26/developers-wish-people-remember-big-deal-y2k-bug/

    The reason why it wasn’t as bad as some forecasted (some predictions were positively apocalyptic) was largely due to the vast amounts of money thrown at the problem (between $200 billion and $600 billion), and most importantly, the hard work of engineers, developers, and sysadmins. Those folks don’t particularly enjoy having their contributions minimized, as the following caustically-sweary tweets show.


    I was a software engineer in late 90s. I spent 2 or 3 years fixing dangerous millennium bugs. Rees-Mogg is an uninformed, gobby arsehole. https://t.co/cSYY0hpbwP

    — Russ
     

     

    That money was largely wasted. The real problems that could occur were due to real time programming which used clocks that repeatedly rolled over. The representation most used in computers is called twos complement. That representation has the property of giving the correct value when the clock rolls over and you subtract the current time from the previous time to get the elapsed time.

    The problems that could occur in the financial field were already discovered in the 1970’s when mortgage amortization tables blew up when the mortgage was to be paid off in the year 2000.

    Managers panicked and hired a bunch of old COBOL programmers to go through the old code and make fixes if they were needed. I doubt much was done. At the company I worked at we allocated 300K and after asking the programmers if there were problems they didn’t spend any money. Just date stamping an event won’t cause problems. That was as much as we did with the calendar clock. Everything else was real time clocks which rolled over about every 65 seconds.

  66. @prime noticer
    social security was one of the worst things to ever happen to the united states in it's over 200 year history. social security is WORSE than any war the US participated in. you can recover from a war, even a major war. you can't recover from forever growing socialism. social security never goes away, and just continues to make things worse, decade after decade. it robs you of your income, and gives you a horrendous ROI too. plus, you have to pay taxes on it again, even if you live long enough to collect. it's total nonsense. there's a reason the US did not have it for over 150 years. it was not a mistake, it was not an oversight, it was not the case that they didn't realize they could have something like that. it deliberately did not exist.

    medicare is equally bad, but in a different way. so we are correct to fight with everything we have, to keep them from creating a forced, legally required, national healthcare system with mandated pay in under the thread of the government's guns. and again, there's a reason the US does not have it. no, it's not an oversight. no, it's not because they didn't realize they could have it. it deliberately does not exist. it's very on purpose that america does not have a single payer national healthcare system. it's a terrible idea that smarter, better men realized was shit, hundreds of years ago, and deep sixed any movement towards such a thing.

    democrats are trying to force on the US, every bad idea that's been repeated a hundred times in the old world. there's a reason 2 million third worlders are trying to come to the US every year, and are willing to risk their life to get there.

    it's because the US DOESN'T have stuff like a national healthcare system, VAT, total civilian disarmament, and so forth. those are the things that create that 3% GDP growth or higher, and enable people to own a half acre lot with a 2000 square foot house with air conditioning and a big SUV with 2 dollar gasoline. we used to be able to say, it's also because it doesn't have a national income tax, or a central bank that meddles in everything and causes inflation, or something stupid like social security, but we can't say those things anymore. democrats relentlessly want to steer the US into being just like any other garbage socialist country with crushing taxes, complete regulation, 1% GDP growth, and a disarmed population. previous americans rejected all that. contrary to modern doctrine, social security, medicare, and single payer healthcare are all actually HUGE steps backwards. they're not 'progress' at all. in many ways, the US in 1800 was the most advanced nation in the history of the world, in terms of political thinking and opportunity maximization. it didn't even have property tax.

    Well if the financial sector hadn’t destroyed people’s private savings and pension plans in the 1930s we wouldn’t have Social Security. If the medical system wasn’t bankrupting seniors we wouldn’t have Medicare. The government operates in response to the failures of the free market system.

    • Agree: densa
    • Replies: @Stan d Mute

    if the financial sector hadn’t destroyed people’s private savings and pension plans in the 1930s we wouldn’t have Social Security.
     
    It’s called “moral hazard”. Should I be able to force you, at gunpoint, to reimburse my losses in Vegas? Buying “shares” of a company over which I have zero influence or control is exactly the same as betting on sportsball team A to win against sportsball team B. You speculate and often enough you’ll lose. Tough shit.


    If the medical system wasn’t bankrupting seniors we wouldn’t have Medicare.

    You mean the narcissistic assholes who think they’re entitled to a cure for old age and death? Palliative care costs almost nothing. You get cancer or organ failure when you’re an octogenarian, accept the end of your run and die with the dignity of not saddling kids with mountains of debt that at best might enable you to shit your pants an extra year or two while slurping flavorless sugar free jello and staring at the idiot box. There once was a time, true story, when parents strove to leave wealth to their kids instead of debt. No foolin’ - look it up! Another fun fact, there’s no cure for old age! And last, shocking tho it may be, everybody who has ever lived has or will die. The only variable is how you chose to do it.
  67. @Cloudbuster
    So, you make the claim, and then it's my responsibility to validate it? That sure is convenient for you.

    It might be different if I gave a crap about you. But I don’t. I gave up on trying to convince fools to think or the blind to see when this internet thing came of age twenty years ago. If you care, look it up yourself. If you don’t, it makes me no difference whatever. I stated the case and even wasted some of my precious time showing you that the number of physician slots hasn’t increased since 1997 (only because I thought there may be some others who believed your nonsense “fact” and I will on occasion spend my time disproving stupidity). JAMA & NEJM have discussed this issue for the best part of 50 years – as long as I’ve been exposed to them anyway. I’d cite them, but I’m not interested in taking the time to search for something I already know to be true.

    In my experience, the people who respond to comments with, “Nyah, nyah, prove it!” are dumbass trolls. If they could offer real refutation they would, but they can’t and instead attempt to make you do a bunch of wholly unnecessary work when there’s zero chance of changing their empty minds in the first place.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "In my experience, the people who respond to comments with, “Nyah, nyah, prove it!” are dumbass trolls. If they could offer real refutation they would, but they can’t and instead attempt to make you do a bunch of wholly unnecessary work when there’s zero chance of changing their empty minds in the first place."

    You truly need a primer on how discourse works. Would you like to know more, citizen?
  68. @MarkinLA
    Well if the financial sector hadn't destroyed people's private savings and pension plans in the 1930s we wouldn't have Social Security. If the medical system wasn't bankrupting seniors we wouldn't have Medicare. The government operates in response to the failures of the free market system.

    if the financial sector hadn’t destroyed people’s private savings and pension plans in the 1930s we wouldn’t have Social Security.

    It’s called “moral hazard”. Should I be able to force you, at gunpoint, to reimburse my losses in Vegas? Buying “shares” of a company over which I have zero influence or control is exactly the same as betting on sportsball team A to win against sportsball team B. You speculate and often enough you’ll lose. Tough shit.

    If the medical system wasn’t bankrupting seniors we wouldn’t have Medicare.

    You mean the narcissistic assholes who think they’re entitled to a cure for old age and death? Palliative care costs almost nothing. You get cancer or organ failure when you’re an octogenarian, accept the end of your run and die with the dignity of not saddling kids with mountains of debt that at best might enable you to shit your pants an extra year or two while slurping flavorless sugar free jello and staring at the idiot box. There once was a time, true story, when parents strove to leave wealth to their kids instead of debt. No foolin’ – look it up! Another fun fact, there’s no cure for old age! And last, shocking tho it may be, everybody who has ever lived has or will die. The only variable is how you chose to do it.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    You work all your life for a company and are "promised" a pension. You save all your life and put the money in a bank because its safe. The banks all close and your company raids it's pension fund to save the company and it doesn't work.

    That was the reality of the Great Depression - moral hazard had nothing to do with it.

    In regards to Medicare you sign a piece of paper going in saying you are responsible for the bills and they send you a bill they can legally sue you for that is 10 times what the insurance company will pay. They take your house AND what you planned to leave to your kids and grandkids. While under their care you likely had little choice as to what was done - especially if you lost consciousness.

    That was the reality before Medicare.
    , @TomSchmidt
    The Virgin Mary was assumed into Heaven. So that's everybody who has ever lived, minus one ;-)
  69. @Stan d Mute

    if the financial sector hadn’t destroyed people’s private savings and pension plans in the 1930s we wouldn’t have Social Security.
     
    It’s called “moral hazard”. Should I be able to force you, at gunpoint, to reimburse my losses in Vegas? Buying “shares” of a company over which I have zero influence or control is exactly the same as betting on sportsball team A to win against sportsball team B. You speculate and often enough you’ll lose. Tough shit.


    If the medical system wasn’t bankrupting seniors we wouldn’t have Medicare.

    You mean the narcissistic assholes who think they’re entitled to a cure for old age and death? Palliative care costs almost nothing. You get cancer or organ failure when you’re an octogenarian, accept the end of your run and die with the dignity of not saddling kids with mountains of debt that at best might enable you to shit your pants an extra year or two while slurping flavorless sugar free jello and staring at the idiot box. There once was a time, true story, when parents strove to leave wealth to their kids instead of debt. No foolin’ - look it up! Another fun fact, there’s no cure for old age! And last, shocking tho it may be, everybody who has ever lived has or will die. The only variable is how you chose to do it.

    You work all your life for a company and are “promised” a pension. You save all your life and put the money in a bank because its safe. The banks all close and your company raids it’s pension fund to save the company and it doesn’t work.

    That was the reality of the Great Depression – moral hazard had nothing to do with it.

    In regards to Medicare you sign a piece of paper going in saying you are responsible for the bills and they send you a bill they can legally sue you for that is 10 times what the insurance company will pay. They take your house AND what you planned to leave to your kids and grandkids. While under their care you likely had little choice as to what was done – especially if you lost consciousness.

    That was the reality before Medicare.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute

    The banks all close and your company raids it’s pension fund to save the company and it doesn’t work.
     
    FDIC solves that problem in ‘33. No need for any entitlements. Not sure how you miss the obvious moral hazard of the Depression during our lifetimes however. Our children and their children won’t manage to pay off the public debt incurred in bailing out the speculators.

    While under their care you likely had little choice as to what was done – especially if you lost consciousness.
     
    In theory, a DNR solves this problem, but I’m living proof they’ll just ignore a DNR so they can bill your insurance $100,000+ so in fact it depends on whether you have insurance or known assets that can be attached.
  70. @densa
    Good comments about Medicare. End of life costs are a factor, but so is the raging inflation in the healthcare racket, which balloons costs well beyond the wages used to pay in.

    You might be right about when it will become fashionable to end it, but I think the end game is to continue to bankrupt the aged as a transition to everyone being on Medicaid. Money will be electronic,infinite and not a store value, private property (for the masses) will be a thing of the past.

    Cheers, no really, Happy New Year!

    Well, the costs of Medicare are lower than non-Medicare. One reason health “insurance” costs so much is that hospitals bill retail for non-Medicare customers instead of wholesale for Medicare (and sub-wholesale for Medicaid.) even so, plenty of hospitals are built to cater to Medicare patients, so the “low” reimbursements leave enough incentive to open them.

    The emergency room scam is ending for people without insurance now. Around NYC, CityMD provides emergency room services for non-emergencies (fevers, minor stitches) at a cost below 1k per visit, as opposed to the egregious (and highly profitable) charges at emergency rooms. As more and more of these places skim off the profitable emergency room patients, expect hospitals to go further in the red as only Medicaid and Medicare patients roll in.

    Happy New Year, if my imposing a Gregorian Catholic calendar on you doesn’t offend too much.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute

    One reason health “insurance” costs so much is that hospitals bill retail for non-Medicare customers instead of wholesale for Medicare (and sub-wholesale for Medicaid.)
     
    Also along that line, no competition nor national negotiators for private insurance. Another of Trumpster’s failed campaign promises was to introduce interstate insurance markets.
  71. @UrbaneFrancoOntarian
    Yup, things are going to get very ugly for them (and possibly me).

    Right now, the POC hospital staff (and staff everywhere) act with a certain level of manners and competence. Why? Because there is still some accountability and structure in place, largely because executives and upper staff are still white Baby Boomers.

    What happens when they retire? The structure is gone, and the same 3rd world corruption continues, in the formerly first world. Is a Muslim hospital executive really going to fire another Muslim for mistreating a white devil? The answer is no. 3rd worlders are tribalistic savages.

    Ignorance is bliss. This is why boomers and especially gen x are blind to the future. It feels bad to think that all non whites hate you. It doesn't feel nice to ask the hard questions, and receive the honest answers. So, they just ignore it, and kick the can a little bit further down the road.

    God knows what it'll look like by the time I'm in my sixties in 40 years. I suspect that once the legacy boomers are dying off it will become open season.

    Uh, every GenX male I know knows that the society they’ve lived in all their lives is against them, and that oblivious navel-gazing boomers CANNOT see the problem (and it’s probably past fixing.)

    Greenspan’s commission raising the SS contribution to 12.4% of payroll went into effect in 1983 or 1984, meaning that Xers essentially paid maximum SS their whole working lives, to pay off the Boomers and Silents. There won’t be a dime left when Xers turn 67 (another change that screwed Xers) since the “trust fund” evaporates in 2033 or so. Adding racial change to things only makes it worse, since there’s no way black and Hispanic youth are going to become tax slaves to transfer wealth to white late Boomers and Xers.

    Btw, this is exactly what the book The Fourth Turning mentions: Gen X is the generation that gets the short end of the stick from society throughout its life, and will be cut off in old age. The book theorizes that, because we don’t feel any love towards the existing social order, we are more likely to support changes to it that benefit future generations, even at cost to ourselves.

    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt

    Btw, this is exactly what the book The Fourth Turning mentions: Gen X is the generation that gets the short end of the stick from society throughout its life, and will be cut off in old age. The book theorizes that, because we don’t feel any love towards the existing social order, we are more likely to support changes to it that benefit future generations, even at cost to ourselves.

     

    Sounds about right.

    I like to think some Generation X leaders will be inspired by the movie Braveheart, and specifically the scene where the old warrior Scottish guy holds up the gate so the young warrior Scottish guys can get at the English guy who has been tyrannizing the Scottish. The old Scottish warrior knows he'll take a few arrows or spear throws, but he'll sacrifice himself to help the young overcome their enemy.

    Remember, the globalized central bankers bailed out the globalizer plutocrats and the baby boomers when they began the unprecedented monetary extremism that still continues.
    , @Stan d Mute

    Btw, this is exactly what the book The Fourth Turning mentions: Gen X is the generation that gets the short end of the stick from society throughout its life, and will be cut off in old age.
     
    Thank you. This is why I love Unz.com, I’ve been thinking along these lines for quite a while now but had never heard of Strauss-Howe until I searched the book title you mentioned. Now I can give a name to my thoughts and explore the authors’ much more in-depth analysis of the subject.

    You’re absolutely correct that we have been dealt the shit hand generationally and I'd gladly pay the full price so my late millennial progeny could enjoy a better life than I have. Sadly, I fear that won’t happen unless our financial system collapses very soon. I see a slow and relentless decline into an abyss from which it will be impossible to escape and almost entirely due to demographics. This “saeculum” is unlike any other in history as never before has our nation (has any nation?) voluntarily replaced itself with third world savages having zero history of advanced civilization or behavior. Wars we’ve had, invasions we’ve repelled, but not this insanity of inviting our conquerors from a vastly more primitive paradigm.

    The boomers killed America and probably Western Civilization itself, but much blame falls to my parents’ silent generation in mollycoddling the narcissistic shitbags.

    Anyway, I have a book to buy and read. Thanks again!
  72. @Audacious Epigone
    Great point. Xers, many of whom are childless, are a couple of decades away from hell. Not only will there be resentment over resources going to them instead of the young POC ascendancy, that resentment will manifest in the behaviors and actions of the POC nurse/care staffs that will attend to these childless people as they near the end. There are already horror stories of these things happening, but most of the oldsters now have children. The ones who have no one looking out for them are lambs for slaughter.

    Having never known a society as children or adults that wasn’t suicidal, we Xers will need to invent our own support in old age. It won’t, as you point out, come from outside.

    • Agree: Stan d Mute
    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    Good, because we millennials are psychologically the weakest generation in American history. We need someone to trail blaze for us. I'd assumed we were the first to have never known a society as children or adults that wasn't suicidal, but some of the better prognosticators among the Xers ranks are fully aware.
  73. @Cloudbuster
    I believe Medicare's vaunted administrative efficiency is largely a myth, completely overwhelmed by a) the vast amount of Medicare fraud that goes on -- in part due to the lack of administrative resources to fight it, and b) the harm it does to the healthcare market overall due to its distorting effects on prices and availability of care.

    I’d refer you to this article:
    http://content.time.com/time/subscriber/article/0,33009,2136864,00.html

    Warning: it’s long. It addresses the efficiency of Medicare. I used to think about fraud the way you do. I no longer do.

    As to fraud and inefficiency,
    https://www.courant.com/business/hc-biz-bertolini-2017-compensation-20180406-story.html
    “Mark Bertolini, chief executive officer of Aetna Inc., received compensation in 2017 of nearly $59 million…”

    Kindly tell me how the “market” figured out that 59million was the right amount to pay this health insurance CEO. Hint: it’s a rigged insider’s game.

  74. @TomSchmidt
    Uh, every GenX male I know knows that the society they've lived in all their lives is against them, and that oblivious navel-gazing boomers CANNOT see the problem (and it's probably past fixing.)

    Greenspan's commission raising the SS contribution to 12.4% of payroll went into effect in 1983 or 1984, meaning that Xers essentially paid maximum SS their whole working lives, to pay off the Boomers and Silents. There won't be a dime left when Xers turn 67 (another change that screwed Xers) since the "trust fund" evaporates in 2033 or so. Adding racial change to things only makes it worse, since there's no way black and Hispanic youth are going to become tax slaves to transfer wealth to white late Boomers and Xers.

    Btw, this is exactly what the book The Fourth Turning mentions: Gen X is the generation that gets the short end of the stick from society throughout its life, and will be cut off in old age. The book theorizes that, because we don't feel any love towards the existing social order, we are more likely to support changes to it that benefit future generations, even at cost to ourselves.

    Btw, this is exactly what the book The Fourth Turning mentions: Gen X is the generation that gets the short end of the stick from society throughout its life, and will be cut off in old age. The book theorizes that, because we don’t feel any love towards the existing social order, we are more likely to support changes to it that benefit future generations, even at cost to ourselves.

    Sounds about right.

    I like to think some Generation X leaders will be inspired by the movie Braveheart, and specifically the scene where the old warrior Scottish guy holds up the gate so the young warrior Scottish guys can get at the English guy who has been tyrannizing the Scottish. The old Scottish warrior knows he’ll take a few arrows or spear throws, but he’ll sacrifice himself to help the young overcome their enemy.

    Remember, the globalized central bankers bailed out the globalizer plutocrats and the baby boomers when they began the unprecedented monetary extremism that still continues.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    That's right. Xers might die looking out at the future. Others generations will die looking at their navels.
  75. @Cloudbuster
    So, you make the claim, and then it's my responsibility to validate it? That sure is convenient for you.

    No, it’s your responsibility to CLICK THE LINK HE SUPPLIED, which states that a critical factor in training doctors, Medicare-paid residency slots, has not increased, so even graduating more doctors won’t increase the supply.

    After you’ve clicked his link, your responsibility is to accept it, or refute it. I’d welcome a refutation.

    Inventing new “market based” healthcare systems doesn’t refute it, unless you and what army have the votes to repeal all the regulations that restrict supply based on available residency slots.

  76. @Dave Pinsen
    We could certainly save a lot of money on healthcare by not treating sick people.

    Years ago, Philip Morris got in trouble for a report to the Czech government on the benefit of cigarettes. The government would collect more in taxes, and because smokers die younger, pay out less in old age benefits. (Even better if they get cancer, which kills quickly and cheaply compared to emphysema, I guess.)

    I’m sure a profit-maximizing government can and will perform the same calculation. From birth to, say, 22, no taxes are collectible, just as from 65 on, in most cases. Both age groups are a drain on the fiscal resources, but the 0-22 crowd at least has upside in the future while the 65+ crowd has mostly cost.

    So not saving people from 0-50 will incur a cost, most likely. That will likely continue to be funded.

    It’s coming.

  77. @Cloudbuster
    What would happen if Social Security and Medicare payments stopped?

    In the long run? A new era of American prosperity (assuming the S.S. and Medicare taxes also stopped). Nothing has been more corrosive to American government and society than those two entitlement programs that sit astride the federal budget like giant, noxious leeches.

    Question: how much SS, Medicare, and Federal Income tax does a married man pay on (approximately) 80,000 dollars in qualified dividends? Run that one through Turbo Tax; create a fake taxpayer, give him 0 in salary and 78K in dividends.

    https://www.fool.com/investing/2018/06/18/your-2018-guide-to-dividend-taxes.aspx

    You’ll find that the total is 0. So you can stop SS and Medicare taxes now if you can be paid only in dividends, up to 78k, which, in after-tax money, might even be enough to live in San Francisco as a middle class person.

    The ability to do this exists NOW. Go do it. Your one hint: subchapter T.

  78. @Dave Pinsen
    Bear in mind that only 25% of the federal government is shutdown now.

    It's true that most federal employees are superfluous, and we wouldn't miss them if they never came back to work. But it's not true that we wouldn't miss the federal government if it were completely shutdown. What would happen if Social Security and Medicare payments stopped?

    “It’s true that most federal employees are superfluous, and we wouldn’t miss them if they never came back to work.”

    A barbell clearly hit your noggin’. Federal workers ensure food safety, investigate criminal activity, provide emergency care, develop science and technology, and serve in national parks and museums. Try to be careful next time.

    • Troll: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    You sure about that food safety thing? Provide emergency care? They pay for "research" at universities, but they're not developing.

    People will worship anything: God, Golden calves, the Federal Government. You'll suffer as the object of your veneration collapses, but will be better off after.
  79. @Stan d Mute
    It might be different if I gave a crap about you. But I don’t. I gave up on trying to convince fools to think or the blind to see when this internet thing came of age twenty years ago. If you care, look it up yourself. If you don’t, it makes me no difference whatever. I stated the case and even wasted some of my precious time showing you that the number of physician slots hasn’t increased since 1997 (only because I thought there may be some others who believed your nonsense “fact” and I will on occasion spend my time disproving stupidity). JAMA & NEJM have discussed this issue for the best part of 50 years - as long as I’ve been exposed to them anyway. I’d cite them, but I’m not interested in taking the time to search for something I already know to be true.

    In my experience, the people who respond to comments with, “Nyah, nyah, prove it!” are dumbass trolls. If they could offer real refutation they would, but they can’t and instead attempt to make you do a bunch of wholly unnecessary work when there’s zero chance of changing their empty minds in the first place.

    “In my experience, the people who respond to comments with, “Nyah, nyah, prove it!” are dumbass trolls. If they could offer real refutation they would, but they can’t and instead attempt to make you do a bunch of wholly unnecessary work when there’s zero chance of changing their empty minds in the first place.”

    You truly need a primer on how discourse works. Would you like to know more, citizen?

    • Troll: Mr. Rational
  80. So I live near Gettysburg

    My great-great grandfather is buried at the national cemetery in Gettysburg
    He was a good man, and I revere his legacy

    In a rather tasteless and tacky, politically-motivated move, the National Park Service has locked the gates to the cemetery. So I cannot visit his grave.

    Their grounds for locking the gates are totally baseless. There are almost never any guards or rangers there. I have never seen a guard or a ranger there. There was no need to lock the gates.

    This, I suppose, is what our federal government is for. It’s for stopping more educated Americans from honoring our ancestors.

    • Replies: @Hail

    In a rather tasteless and tacky, politically-motivated move, the National Park Service has locked the gates to the cemetery
     
    Can't people just hop over the wall?

    Not for all body types.

    Unless there is a large, barbed-wire Trumpian wall completely sealing off the cemetery, which would be very odd.

    , @Stan d Mute

    There are almost never any guards or rangers there. I have never seen a guard or a ranger there. There was no need to lock the gates.
     
    They did this during the Obola shutdown too. And as I wrote in another comment, they barricaded and posted armed guards at the Jefferson Memorial - which normally has no personnel at all. It’s just spite. The tax eating leeches are angry that we, their benefactors, are temporarily not paying their exorbitant salaries and they’re going to punish us like the spiteful entitled little bitches that they are.
    , @Audacious Epigone
    Their grounds aren't baseless, you're just not cynical enough. They have to make this utterly inconsequential 'partial shutdown' look and feel as bad as possible to keep the scam going. Trump is doing a huge service to the country by keeping this thing going.
  81. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    So I live near Gettysburg

    My great-great grandfather is buried at the national cemetery in Gettysburg
    He was a good man, and I revere his legacy

    In a rather tasteless and tacky, politically-motivated move, the National Park Service has locked the gates to the cemetery. So I cannot visit his grave.

    Their grounds for locking the gates are totally baseless. There are almost never any guards or rangers there. I have never seen a guard or a ranger there. There was no need to lock the gates.

    This, I suppose, is what our federal government is for. It's for stopping more educated Americans from honoring our ancestors.

    In a rather tasteless and tacky, politically-motivated move, the National Park Service has locked the gates to the cemetery

    Can’t people just hop over the wall?

    Not for all body types.

    Unless there is a large, barbed-wire Trumpian wall completely sealing off the cemetery, which would be very odd.

  82. Much hospital care in California is done by Filipinos, who do not seem to have the anti-white chips on their shoulders (yet).

  83. @prime noticer
    social security was one of the worst things to ever happen to the united states in it's over 200 year history. social security is WORSE than any war the US participated in. you can recover from a war, even a major war. you can't recover from forever growing socialism. social security never goes away, and just continues to make things worse, decade after decade. it robs you of your income, and gives you a horrendous ROI too. plus, you have to pay taxes on it again, even if you live long enough to collect. it's total nonsense. there's a reason the US did not have it for over 150 years. it was not a mistake, it was not an oversight, it was not the case that they didn't realize they could have something like that. it deliberately did not exist.

    medicare is equally bad, but in a different way. so we are correct to fight with everything we have, to keep them from creating a forced, legally required, national healthcare system with mandated pay in under the thread of the government's guns. and again, there's a reason the US does not have it. no, it's not an oversight. no, it's not because they didn't realize they could have it. it deliberately does not exist. it's very on purpose that america does not have a single payer national healthcare system. it's a terrible idea that smarter, better men realized was shit, hundreds of years ago, and deep sixed any movement towards such a thing.

    democrats are trying to force on the US, every bad idea that's been repeated a hundred times in the old world. there's a reason 2 million third worlders are trying to come to the US every year, and are willing to risk their life to get there.

    it's because the US DOESN'T have stuff like a national healthcare system, VAT, total civilian disarmament, and so forth. those are the things that create that 3% GDP growth or higher, and enable people to own a half acre lot with a 2000 square foot house with air conditioning and a big SUV with 2 dollar gasoline. we used to be able to say, it's also because it doesn't have a national income tax, or a central bank that meddles in everything and causes inflation, or something stupid like social security, but we can't say those things anymore. democrats relentlessly want to steer the US into being just like any other garbage socialist country with crushing taxes, complete regulation, 1% GDP growth, and a disarmed population. previous americans rejected all that. contrary to modern doctrine, social security, medicare, and single payer healthcare are all actually HUGE steps backwards. they're not 'progress' at all. in many ways, the US in 1800 was the most advanced nation in the history of the world, in terms of political thinking and opportunity maximization. it didn't even have property tax.

    With the exception of GU’s duly noted correction, great comment, Mr. Noticer!

    I didn’t start reading Mr. A.E.’s stuff until his latest post on the change in IQ scores vs. paper degrees over time. I’d have had lots to say on this one, but I’ll just say that I’m very glad to read posts (by our writer here) and comments by some good people with Libertarian views who understand freedom. That’s getting rarer and rarer these days.

    Nice job, all of you, but I reckon it’s too late to start replying to a number of comments here.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute

    Nice job, all of you, but I reckon it’s too late to start replying to a number of comments here.
     
    You didn’t get your invitation? Must have been due to the shutdown.
  84. @TomSchmidt
    Uh, every GenX male I know knows that the society they've lived in all their lives is against them, and that oblivious navel-gazing boomers CANNOT see the problem (and it's probably past fixing.)

    Greenspan's commission raising the SS contribution to 12.4% of payroll went into effect in 1983 or 1984, meaning that Xers essentially paid maximum SS their whole working lives, to pay off the Boomers and Silents. There won't be a dime left when Xers turn 67 (another change that screwed Xers) since the "trust fund" evaporates in 2033 or so. Adding racial change to things only makes it worse, since there's no way black and Hispanic youth are going to become tax slaves to transfer wealth to white late Boomers and Xers.

    Btw, this is exactly what the book The Fourth Turning mentions: Gen X is the generation that gets the short end of the stick from society throughout its life, and will be cut off in old age. The book theorizes that, because we don't feel any love towards the existing social order, we are more likely to support changes to it that benefit future generations, even at cost to ourselves.

    Btw, this is exactly what the book The Fourth Turning mentions: Gen X is the generation that gets the short end of the stick from society throughout its life, and will be cut off in old age.

    Thank you. This is why I love Unz.com, I’ve been thinking along these lines for quite a while now but had never heard of Strauss-Howe until I searched the book title you mentioned. Now I can give a name to my thoughts and explore the authors’ much more in-depth analysis of the subject.

    You’re absolutely correct that we have been dealt the shit hand generationally and I’d gladly pay the full price so my late millennial progeny could enjoy a better life than I have. Sadly, I fear that won’t happen unless our financial system collapses very soon. I see a slow and relentless decline into an abyss from which it will be impossible to escape and almost entirely due to demographics. This “saeculum” is unlike any other in history as never before has our nation (has any nation?) voluntarily replaced itself with third world savages having zero history of advanced civilization or behavior. Wars we’ve had, invasions we’ve repelled, but not this insanity of inviting our conquerors from a vastly more primitive paradigm.

    The boomers killed America and probably Western Civilization itself, but much blame falls to my parents’ silent generation in mollycoddling the narcissistic shitbags.

    Anyway, I have a book to buy and read. Thanks again!

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    You may also want to grab Generations first, by the same 2 guys, as that lays out the whole saeculum idea, all the generations from 1500-something on, the archtypes (Gen-X'ers being "Nomads") and the matrices to show how each generation acts during each of the 4 turnings of the cycles of history.

    Now that is not to say I believe all their stuff, Stan, by any means. For one thing, the book reads as very Statist, something you, me, and others here won't particularly cotton to. The authors act like everything important that happens is due to Government. Secondly, one can find an example of a quote, an action, etc. for any damn thing one wants to prove "how people are" in these different generations.

    I've been meaning to write a review on my site of these 2 books for the whole damn time I've had my site up, but I haven't yet.

    No, Strauss and Howe never could have imagined the immigration stupidity at the level it's come to, though the books were written in the late 90's or so. Remember this, the whole deal on the cycles of history as described in both books are based on English/American culture ONLY. The authors state that. If you change it, how do the books even apply anymore?

    One more thing, they never said each 4th turning has good results. I won't spoil the books though. Later, Stan.
    , @TomSchmidt
    See my reply to AE, the history of the X generation the book sketches out is mostly honest, and the future is grim. The idea is exactly as you outline: X takes the hit (again) and pays the price, cutting itself off to allow more resources to flow to children. It turns suffering into sacrifice.

    I wouldn't hate on the Boomers. If any generation should take crap, it's the Silents, 1926-1942. As a group, they will pay no net taxes to the Federal government; the oldest of them was 40 when the first Medicare taxes were taken from his paycheck, so they're collecting benefits that they did not pay for. Also, Silent awe of the Greatest was the impetus behind ideas like Medicare, endless SS COLAs, and other wealth transfers to the older generations. They kept raising SS taxes to turn most boomers into milk cows to pay benefits to the Greatest and Silent generations. The "trust fund" will be depleted by 2030, when the youngest Silent is 88. They went through the revolving door of life on someone else's push.
  85. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    So I live near Gettysburg

    My great-great grandfather is buried at the national cemetery in Gettysburg
    He was a good man, and I revere his legacy

    In a rather tasteless and tacky, politically-motivated move, the National Park Service has locked the gates to the cemetery. So I cannot visit his grave.

    Their grounds for locking the gates are totally baseless. There are almost never any guards or rangers there. I have never seen a guard or a ranger there. There was no need to lock the gates.

    This, I suppose, is what our federal government is for. It's for stopping more educated Americans from honoring our ancestors.

    There are almost never any guards or rangers there. I have never seen a guard or a ranger there. There was no need to lock the gates.

    They did this during the Obola shutdown too. And as I wrote in another comment, they barricaded and posted armed guards at the Jefferson Memorial – which normally has no personnel at all. It’s just spite. The tax eating leeches are angry that we, their benefactors, are temporarily not paying their exorbitant salaries and they’re going to punish us like the spiteful entitled little bitches that they are.

  86. @Achmed E. Newman
    With the exception of GU's duly noted correction, great comment, Mr. Noticer!

    I didn't start reading Mr. A.E.'s stuff until his latest post on the change in IQ scores vs. paper degrees over time. I'd have had lots to say on this one, but I'll just say that I'm very glad to read posts (by our writer here) and comments by some good people with Libertarian views who understand freedom. That's getting rarer and rarer these days.

    Nice job, all of you, but I reckon it's too late to start replying to a number of comments here.

    Nice job, all of you, but I reckon it’s too late to start replying to a number of comments here.

    You didn’t get your invitation? Must have been due to the shutdown.

  87. @TomSchmidt
    Well, the costs of Medicare are lower than non-Medicare. One reason health "insurance" costs so much is that hospitals bill retail for non-Medicare customers instead of wholesale for Medicare (and sub-wholesale for Medicaid.) even so, plenty of hospitals are built to cater to Medicare patients, so the "low" reimbursements leave enough incentive to open them.

    The emergency room scam is ending for people without insurance now. Around NYC, CityMD provides emergency room services for non-emergencies (fevers, minor stitches) at a cost below 1k per visit, as opposed to the egregious (and highly profitable) charges at emergency rooms. As more and more of these places skim off the profitable emergency room patients, expect hospitals to go further in the red as only Medicaid and Medicare patients roll in.

    Happy New Year, if my imposing a Gregorian Catholic calendar on you doesn't offend too much.

    One reason health “insurance” costs so much is that hospitals bill retail for non-Medicare customers instead of wholesale for Medicare (and sub-wholesale for Medicaid.)

    Also along that line, no competition nor national negotiators for private insurance. Another of Trumpster’s failed campaign promises was to introduce interstate insurance markets.

  88. @UrbaneFrancoOntarian
    Yup, things are going to get very ugly for them (and possibly me).

    Right now, the POC hospital staff (and staff everywhere) act with a certain level of manners and competence. Why? Because there is still some accountability and structure in place, largely because executives and upper staff are still white Baby Boomers.

    What happens when they retire? The structure is gone, and the same 3rd world corruption continues, in the formerly first world. Is a Muslim hospital executive really going to fire another Muslim for mistreating a white devil? The answer is no. 3rd worlders are tribalistic savages.

    Ignorance is bliss. This is why boomers and especially gen x are blind to the future. It feels bad to think that all non whites hate you. It doesn't feel nice to ask the hard questions, and receive the honest answers. So, they just ignore it, and kick the can a little bit further down the road.

    God knows what it'll look like by the time I'm in my sixties in 40 years. I suspect that once the legacy boomers are dying off it will become open season.

    Have kids who love you and allow them to take care of you in your dotage. My parents sure as hell aren’t ending up in nursing homes. We’ll always have room in the Epigone household.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute

    Have kids who love you and allow them to take care of you in your dotage.
     
    Or, be like Stan and abdicate. Sign a DNR and threaten your family with foul consequences for calling EMTs. If you don’t have cardiac issues or cancer there’s always the long Nembutal nap when you start needing to wear nappies again. No way is Stan Jr going to be wiping his daddy’s ass, in fact under no circumstances is anybody going to be wiping Stan’s ass except Stan himself.

    We all die in the end. Maybe it’s because young Stan often had to accompany Dr Mom on hospital and nursing home rounds, but Stan will take his dignity with him. Quality, not quantity, is what matters.
  89. @216
    Most federal government is outsourced to contractors, the civil service is capped because of the superior retirement benefits and inability to be fired.

    Further, not all fedgov workers are Dems, as working in fedgov is incentivized by something called "veterans preference". Veterans tend to be a bit more conservative than the average American, even black vets are about (20% GOP) compared to 10% at-large.

    Shutting down wholesale departments (Education being the easiest) is difficult because it requires cooperation with Congress. (HUD, Energy, Labor would be the next plausible). These agencies also mostly just dispense out "grants" to contractors and lower levels of government. Most of the Agriculture budget is food stamps.

    As the President is commander-in-chief, he can order a unilateral withdrawal from certain overseas engagements. Said money is already budgeted and could be re-allocated to building a wall.

    Some have discussed an EO to mandate E-Verify, that's a good idea, but I wonder how this squares with the written intent of the law that it is not mandatory. Of course, it would be bad optics for the California Attorney General to be arguing in the Supreme Court that they "need" illegal workers.

    I wonder how this squares with

    The side that is arguing procedure is the side that is losing. Trump should be issuing several executive orders from now until the end of his presidency. Make the courts thwart the will of Heritage America on behalf of the invaders again and again and again and again. When informed people like us are hearing about something for the hundredth time, a normie is hearing about it for the first time.

    • Agree: Stan d Mute, Hail
  90. @Stan d Mute

    Btw, this is exactly what the book The Fourth Turning mentions: Gen X is the generation that gets the short end of the stick from society throughout its life, and will be cut off in old age.
     
    Thank you. This is why I love Unz.com, I’ve been thinking along these lines for quite a while now but had never heard of Strauss-Howe until I searched the book title you mentioned. Now I can give a name to my thoughts and explore the authors’ much more in-depth analysis of the subject.

    You’re absolutely correct that we have been dealt the shit hand generationally and I'd gladly pay the full price so my late millennial progeny could enjoy a better life than I have. Sadly, I fear that won’t happen unless our financial system collapses very soon. I see a slow and relentless decline into an abyss from which it will be impossible to escape and almost entirely due to demographics. This “saeculum” is unlike any other in history as never before has our nation (has any nation?) voluntarily replaced itself with third world savages having zero history of advanced civilization or behavior. Wars we’ve had, invasions we’ve repelled, but not this insanity of inviting our conquerors from a vastly more primitive paradigm.

    The boomers killed America and probably Western Civilization itself, but much blame falls to my parents’ silent generation in mollycoddling the narcissistic shitbags.

    Anyway, I have a book to buy and read. Thanks again!

    You may also want to grab Generations first, by the same 2 guys, as that lays out the whole saeculum idea, all the generations from 1500-something on, the archtypes (Gen-X’ers being “Nomads”) and the matrices to show how each generation acts during each of the 4 turnings of the cycles of history.

    Now that is not to say I believe all their stuff, Stan, by any means. For one thing, the book reads as very Statist, something you, me, and others here won’t particularly cotton to. The authors act like everything important that happens is due to Government. Secondly, one can find an example of a quote, an action, etc. for any damn thing one wants to prove “how people are” in these different generations.

    I’ve been meaning to write a review on my site of these 2 books for the whole damn time I’ve had my site up, but I haven’t yet.

    No, Strauss and Howe never could have imagined the immigration stupidity at the level it’s come to, though the books were written in the late 90’s or so. Remember this, the whole deal on the cycles of history as described in both books are based on English/American culture ONLY. The authors state that. If you change it, how do the books even apply anymore?

    One more thing, they never said each 4th turning has good results. I won’t spoil the books though. Later, Stan.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    Shocking about the Fourth Turning is the specific predictions it makes about the coming years, and how many are correct. The book was written 22 years ago, but predictions are surprisingly on target. It also works well as a social history of the post-war period to give a lived experience of the time.

    One example: the mother of all budget-busting, wealth-skimming, youth-denuding programs in the Federal budget is Medicare. It was predicted when passed to cost $1,000,000,000 in 1990. You wonder: what were they thinking? The book makes clear: in 1965, the economy had essentially been booming for 19 years. No one had lived working experience of the return of hard times. If the economy had continued to grow for the next 19 years the way it had for the previous, paying for Medicare would have been a non-issue. Oh, and if the economy was to keep growing, it would need more people: maybe we loosen immigration?

    Disasters both, but at least you understand how people make these decisions.
  91. @MarkinLA
    You work all your life for a company and are "promised" a pension. You save all your life and put the money in a bank because its safe. The banks all close and your company raids it's pension fund to save the company and it doesn't work.

    That was the reality of the Great Depression - moral hazard had nothing to do with it.

    In regards to Medicare you sign a piece of paper going in saying you are responsible for the bills and they send you a bill they can legally sue you for that is 10 times what the insurance company will pay. They take your house AND what you planned to leave to your kids and grandkids. While under their care you likely had little choice as to what was done - especially if you lost consciousness.

    That was the reality before Medicare.

    The banks all close and your company raids it’s pension fund to save the company and it doesn’t work.

    FDIC solves that problem in ‘33. No need for any entitlements. Not sure how you miss the obvious moral hazard of the Depression during our lifetimes however. Our children and their children won’t manage to pay off the public debt incurred in bailing out the speculators.

    While under their care you likely had little choice as to what was done – especially if you lost consciousness.

    In theory, a DNR solves this problem, but I’m living proof they’ll just ignore a DNR so they can bill your insurance $100,000+ so in fact it depends on whether you have insurance or known assets that can be attached.

  92. @Stan d Mute
    This results from the open conspiracy to limit the number of spots in American med schools in order to inflate the income of doctors. It has the bug/feature of necessitating third world educated witch doctors that are now found in every hospital system in America. I live near a major medical school and even it is increasingly populated with witch doctors from hinpooh land and the cannibal continent. Add the affirmative action doctors educated here and by the end of this century you can expect to see albino parts dispensed at Walgreens or CVS.

    Meanwhile, the Medicare ATM will continue to saddle future generations with the bills for million dollar interventions to “save the life” of octogenarian narcissists. Just think of the profits to be made on albino parts! Of course what with the “OMG! opioid epidemic” palliative care will continue to wither away and die a silent death.

    Progress!

    Yes, from the outside looking in there is a real zero sum aspect to this that must be compounding problems in all kinds of different ways (reduced time per patient, increased labor cots, more Dr. Nicks, etc).

  93. @Audacious Epigone
    Have kids who love you and allow them to take care of you in your dotage. My parents sure as hell aren't ending up in nursing homes. We'll always have room in the Epigone household.

    Have kids who love you and allow them to take care of you in your dotage.

    Or, be like Stan and abdicate. Sign a DNR and threaten your family with foul consequences for calling EMTs. If you don’t have cardiac issues or cancer there’s always the long Nembutal nap when you start needing to wear nappies again. No way is Stan Jr going to be wiping his daddy’s ass, in fact under no circumstances is anybody going to be wiping Stan’s ass except Stan himself.

    We all die in the end. Maybe it’s because young Stan often had to accompany Dr Mom on hospital and nursing home rounds, but Stan will take his dignity with him. Quality, not quantity, is what matters.

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    Fair. Incontinence seems to be the point where most people draw the line. Still, we're in broad agreement--don't put your fate into the hands of invaders. Parenthetically, not only should you not do it when you're old, do NOT do it to your children, either. As bad as the leaked videos of elder whites being abused by POCs is, the videos of white babies being abused by POCs is even more gut-wrenching.
  94. @JimS
    I am very curious how you specifically think the economic crisis becomes a currency crisis, and leads to dissolution. In accordance with Nobel Laureate Krugman's theory for economic crises, "for whatever reason, a large part of the private sector tries to increase its cash reserves at the same time." (cf. https://isteve.blogspot.com/2008/10/i-had-not-realized-nobel-laureate-paul.html).

    I've tried to simulate this a little in my head, how it will go. The way I see it, something will cause a severe shortfall in cash buying U.S. debt, which must be taken up by printing money. This could be Chinese refusing to finance as much due to a trade war, or the required bailout of a state (e.g. http://usdebtclock.org/state-debt-clocks/state-of-california-debt-clock.html), or the overdue economic crisis, some other factor I can't think of, or a combination of all. When that happens, there will be nothing holding back a massive inflation.

    But will it be massive enough to take out the USD as the world reserve currency? What replaces it? EUR, I presume, or RMB (if anyone would trust it)? What level of inflation or other change would it really take for the USD to fall? A factor of 2 reduction in value in a year? More? (By the way, a quick reference for inflation rates is 7% will halve your currency's value in 10 years, 10% in 7 years).

    If the currency crisis does happen, what then of the states? Their individual state debts are then meaningless because the currency they are owed in is devalued, but so is every fixed income provided by the state. This, I think, is the only way out for CA in a post-Gray Davis world. What then would be the mechanism for dissolution? Everyone is then in the same currency boat, as it were. Is there a pensioner revolt?

    I agree all things are possible when this happens, but it does help to think through how it would go down. I certainly think that is the time when things will necessarily change, but I do not know if dissolution is the most straightforward prediction. Maybe it is. What do you think?

    Whew, those are all $64k questions.

    The most obvious answer for the what places the US dollar as the world’s reserve currency is simply another currency. The yen, maybe–it tends to track hard stores of value like gold unlike the dollar which does the opposite. While I’d love to say crypto will fill the void, I don’t believe it will.

    Re: the states, by bailing on the union and effectively–if not explicitly–abandoning their debts, fights will break out between the POC ascendancy wanting its welfare and senescent boomers wanting their pensions and social security. Both are going to get less than before.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute

    fights will break out between the POC ascendancy wanting its welfare and senescent boomers wanting their pensions and social security
     
    The two most entitled narcissistic breeds on the planet! Will it be a cage match? Pay per view?
  95. @TomSchmidt
    Having never known a society as children or adults that wasn't suicidal, we Xers will need to invent our own support in old age. It won't, as you point out, come from outside.

    Good, because we millennials are psychologically the weakest generation in American history. We need someone to trail blaze for us. I’d assumed we were the first to have never known a society as children or adults that wasn’t suicidal, but some of the better prognosticators among the Xers ranks are fully aware.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    Have you read The Fourth Turning? It's written by a pair of Boomer sociologists who are left/liberals, but they make the case clearly: GenX was the most put-upon of the Greatest/Silent/Boomer/Xer grouping. The generation before Greatest was the Lost generation, another "nomad" archetype. The book makes the point that the dying-off Lost generation handed the mantle of poorest generation to the Xers, another Nomad generation. 1/3rd of the generation never made it out of the birth canal.

    Long story short: the general putting upon of Xers is a feature, not a bug. Middle management at the time of crisis, they have been starved of sunlight in the Boomers' shadow their whole lives. Society greatly shifted resources to the older generations (Medicare started in 1965) just as they were being born, and crime laws (and drinking ages) were changed after the Baby Boom horse had fled the barn, so Xers served as the whipping boys for the youthful indiscretions of that group. In short, there's no great love or attachment of Xers to the existing order.

    Strauss and Howe say this is by design. In the Crisis, a new formulation of society must come about that sweeps away the old arrangements. The Boomers cannot do this, since they recall a society in the 50s and 60s that still focused on nurturing and caring for its own children. Xers don't recall that, but they know that it's wrong to denude youth of wealth. Strauss and Howe write that the Xers will willingly impoverish their old age, giving up SS, in exchange for writing a new social contract that better protectsa and cares for the young. It's a grim picture of old age for this generation.

    But it's the most hopeful thing I've read. At last, I understood: no, you're not crazy, and society really has had it in for your group. But it's not meaningless suffering if put to the task of recasting the molten society of the crisis into a fixed structure that is more just towards our children and grandchildren. That's worth taking the hit on.
  96. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    So I live near Gettysburg

    My great-great grandfather is buried at the national cemetery in Gettysburg
    He was a good man, and I revere his legacy

    In a rather tasteless and tacky, politically-motivated move, the National Park Service has locked the gates to the cemetery. So I cannot visit his grave.

    Their grounds for locking the gates are totally baseless. There are almost never any guards or rangers there. I have never seen a guard or a ranger there. There was no need to lock the gates.

    This, I suppose, is what our federal government is for. It's for stopping more educated Americans from honoring our ancestors.

    Their grounds aren’t baseless, you’re just not cynical enough. They have to make this utterly inconsequential ‘partial shutdown’ look and feel as bad as possible to keep the scam going. Trump is doing a huge service to the country by keeping this thing going.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    Six months, with the 10 of the 11 wealthiest counties that surround DC seeing a wave of foreclosures ought to be enough.
    , @Corvinus
    "Trump is doing a huge service to the country by keeping this thing going."

    Tell that to the families of the Coast Guard.

    https://www.militarytimes.com/news/pentagon-congress/2019/01/04/as-shutdown-continues-lawmakers-look-for-fix-on-coast-guard-pay/
  97. @Stan d Mute

    Have kids who love you and allow them to take care of you in your dotage.
     
    Or, be like Stan and abdicate. Sign a DNR and threaten your family with foul consequences for calling EMTs. If you don’t have cardiac issues or cancer there’s always the long Nembutal nap when you start needing to wear nappies again. No way is Stan Jr going to be wiping his daddy’s ass, in fact under no circumstances is anybody going to be wiping Stan’s ass except Stan himself.

    We all die in the end. Maybe it’s because young Stan often had to accompany Dr Mom on hospital and nursing home rounds, but Stan will take his dignity with him. Quality, not quantity, is what matters.

    Fair. Incontinence seems to be the point where most people draw the line. Still, we’re in broad agreement–don’t put your fate into the hands of invaders. Parenthetically, not only should you not do it when you’re old, do NOT do it to your children, either. As bad as the leaked videos of elder whites being abused by POCs is, the videos of white babies being abused by POCs is even more gut-wrenching.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    That’s a major Catch-22. To afford a “good” school you need two incomes which means you’re going to hand off your kids earlier and need those income streams earlier. Unless you live in an increasingly impoverished and job free whitopia where the rusting empty town factory stands as a monument to globalization and off-shored manufacturing. In which case you’re lucky to have even one job and income stream.

    Farming is a possibility if you can stomach being a welfare recipient, but then it’s got to be under your wife’s name since FedGov has no love for you deplorable crackers.
  98. @Cloudbuster
    This results from the open conspiracy to limit the number of spots in American med schools in order to inflate the income of doctors.

    Some evidence for your conspiracy, please? That doesn't sound plausible.

    You know, the top people typically get the spots. It's not clear to me that there a lot of highly-qualified people who want to get into medical school but are unable. And if there are a lot of highly-qualified candidates who can be educated at a profit, then a) Why aren't medical schools doing it already -- they have competing interests with the doctors, and b) Why would I trust top-down bureaucrats to achieve a better result than the market?

    Why would doctors be able to maintain such a conspiracy when at various times we've seen gluts in other highly-trained professions (currently law)?

    Doubling the number of doctors, as SafeNow suggests, would probably increase the rate of incompetent doctors. Does it matter much if the incompetent doctor is foreign or native?

    Cargo cult thinking: "People with college educations earn more, so lets get everyone a college education!" or "Doctors who graduate from rigorous programs are superior, so lets get more graduates from those rigorous programs." Inevitably, they get the causality backwards and end up devaluing the credentials.

    Being a doctor is already not the picnic it once was:

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/1-million-mistake-becoming-a-doctor/

    if there are a lot of highly-qualified candidates who can be educated at a profit, then a) Why aren’t medical schools doing it already — they have competing interests with the doctors

    Look at the org chart and faculty for a med school. They’ve all got credentials that begin with an “M.” but it ain’t an MBA (hint – it starts with an “M” and ends with a “D”). It’s a cartel. Why do you think state medical boards only yank licenses in the most outrageously flagrant and egregious cases of violations? Same thing, cartel. Dr Mom was euthanized in the state that sent Jack Kevorkian to prison and not an eye was batted. Why? Professional courtesy they call it – they have the decency to end suffering in one of their own but you are a cash cow they’ll keep alive as long as someone can be fleeced (yeah, I mix my metaphors, so what).

    and b) Why would I trust top-down bureaucrats to achieve a better result than the market?

    You tell me. Why do you? There is no market, it’s all either cartel or government (but I repeat myself).

    Oh, and since you earned your spot on my ignore list this reply isn’t for you, but the editorial “you” (ie those who are capable and worthy of guidance).

  99. @Audacious Epigone
    Whew, those are all $64k questions.

    The most obvious answer for the what places the US dollar as the world's reserve currency is simply another currency. The yen, maybe--it tends to track hard stores of value like gold unlike the dollar which does the opposite. While I'd love to say crypto will fill the void, I don't believe it will.

    Re: the states, by bailing on the union and effectively--if not explicitly--abandoning their debts, fights will break out between the POC ascendancy wanting its welfare and senescent boomers wanting their pensions and social security. Both are going to get less than before.

    fights will break out between the POC ascendancy wanting its welfare and senescent boomers wanting their pensions and social security

    The two most entitled narcissistic breeds on the planet! Will it be a cage match? Pay per view?

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    The Boom retains the demographic weight to have its interests protected. gen X does not, and is still largely white. expect X to get cut off or means-tested to tax the POC youth less.
  100. @Audacious Epigone
    Fair. Incontinence seems to be the point where most people draw the line. Still, we're in broad agreement--don't put your fate into the hands of invaders. Parenthetically, not only should you not do it when you're old, do NOT do it to your children, either. As bad as the leaked videos of elder whites being abused by POCs is, the videos of white babies being abused by POCs is even more gut-wrenching.

    That’s a major Catch-22. To afford a “good” school you need two incomes which means you’re going to hand off your kids earlier and need those income streams earlier. Unless you live in an increasingly impoverished and job free whitopia where the rusting empty town factory stands as a monument to globalization and off-shored manufacturing. In which case you’re lucky to have even one job and income stream.

    Farming is a possibility if you can stomach being a welfare recipient, but then it’s got to be under your wife’s name since FedGov has no love for you deplorable crackers.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    Of course there's no such thing as a "good" school. Just good neighborhoods that can fund them. As I'm sure you know.

    Loved this article:
    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-01-05/why-school-has-nothing-do-students
    Excerpt:

    A reader commented about this the other day in an email he sent me. He said no one paying attention actually thinks schooling is for the kids. It is really “free” daycare for parents.

    UTLA plans to launch its strike four days after students return from the holiday break. By inconveniencing parents—most of whom are low-income and rely on schools to take care of their children during working hours—the union aims to bring public pressure on the district.
     
    It’s true. Schooling has absolutely nothing to do with the students. They are the last concern, an afterthought if anything. And the school districts, teachers, unions, and unfortunately often the parents don’t really care how bad the education is at the public schools they send their kids to. It’s all about money, convenience, and political power.
  101. Get out of Babel and it becomes easier. It’s very doable throughout most of the Midwest and Mountain states. Admittedly it’s harder in cosmo imperial cities like NYC or LA.

  102. @Svigor
    You know these mopes are completely bereft of argument when they're leading with "[it] would be an absolute waste of taxpayer money."

    L...M...F...A...O. Why not just say, "we surrender"? The democrats give literally zero shits about wasting taxpayer money. Ever. In fact, wasting taxpayer money is why they live and breathe.

    Everyone...knows...this. Literally everyone knows this. Buy even the most duplicitous die-hard two-faced lying partisan hack donkey-waving blue-state leftist 3 shots and he will freely admit this.

    AGREED!

    My apologies if you have seen these links before, but anyone with any degree of numeracy, along with a knowledge of the scale of the US Feral budget, will understand that even with the usual cost overruns and corruption, this wall will be nothing but 1/2 day or less of US government annual spending. For maintenance, it’d be the same order of magnitude – see Border control vs. the interstate highway system and Border control maintenance vs. defending some Koreans against other Koreans.

    Maybe “bereft of arguments” is not the right way to put it, Svigor. How about “they know better, but this lie works better than the truth for them”? The truth is that they are in favor of open borders, not for economic reasons, not even for emotional reasons, but to destroy the American nation.

  103. @Audacious Epigone
    Good, because we millennials are psychologically the weakest generation in American history. We need someone to trail blaze for us. I'd assumed we were the first to have never known a society as children or adults that wasn't suicidal, but some of the better prognosticators among the Xers ranks are fully aware.

    Have you read The Fourth Turning? It’s written by a pair of Boomer sociologists who are left/liberals, but they make the case clearly: GenX was the most put-upon of the Greatest/Silent/Boomer/Xer grouping. The generation before Greatest was the Lost generation, another “nomad” archetype. The book makes the point that the dying-off Lost generation handed the mantle of poorest generation to the Xers, another Nomad generation. 1/3rd of the generation never made it out of the birth canal.

    Long story short: the general putting upon of Xers is a feature, not a bug. Middle management at the time of crisis, they have been starved of sunlight in the Boomers’ shadow their whole lives. Society greatly shifted resources to the older generations (Medicare started in 1965) just as they were being born, and crime laws (and drinking ages) were changed after the Baby Boom horse had fled the barn, so Xers served as the whipping boys for the youthful indiscretions of that group. In short, there’s no great love or attachment of Xers to the existing order.

    Strauss and Howe say this is by design. In the Crisis, a new formulation of society must come about that sweeps away the old arrangements. The Boomers cannot do this, since they recall a society in the 50s and 60s that still focused on nurturing and caring for its own children. Xers don’t recall that, but they know that it’s wrong to denude youth of wealth. Strauss and Howe write that the Xers will willingly impoverish their old age, giving up SS, in exchange for writing a new social contract that better protectsa and cares for the young. It’s a grim picture of old age for this generation.

    But it’s the most hopeful thing I’ve read. At last, I understood: no, you’re not crazy, and society really has had it in for your group. But it’s not meaningless suffering if put to the task of recasting the molten society of the crisis into a fixed structure that is more just towards our children and grandchildren. That’s worth taking the hit on.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I have a couple of things to add here:

    ... and society really has had it in for your group.
     
    Mr. A.E. says he's a Millenial. The Millenials are to be (per the somewhat-hokey book) the Hero archetypes that are supposed to be the actors in the Crisis to come, like, any time now.*

    The authors are very clear that not every Crisis period will end well, with a turning into a new High period. When you look at it 20-odd years later, I believe this is the last cycle. I hope I'm wrong, and am willing to fulfill my archetypical destiny.**

    Also, Tom, I'm not sure if you read all my comment above, but the 2 authors also stipulate that this whole cyclical business that the 2 books are about is for the English/American people. If they are going to be < half the population, how does any of their book apply, anyway? They never did say much about immigration, as I recall, especially even that of 150 years back from Southern/Eastern Europe, so they assume lots of assimilation into English-based American culture, a historically pretty-good assumption, but one that's completely erroneous now.

    .

    * That's not to be sarcastic. I do think that it'll be anytime, and I give credit to Strauss & Howe for their timetable being realistic.

    ** I really did read the books thoroughly and took them seriously, as they are fascinating if you do. There's one guy on the web who's guest articles used to appear on ZeroHedge, who treated this book like the Holy Bible.
  104. @Stan d Mute

    Btw, this is exactly what the book The Fourth Turning mentions: Gen X is the generation that gets the short end of the stick from society throughout its life, and will be cut off in old age.
     
    Thank you. This is why I love Unz.com, I’ve been thinking along these lines for quite a while now but had never heard of Strauss-Howe until I searched the book title you mentioned. Now I can give a name to my thoughts and explore the authors’ much more in-depth analysis of the subject.

    You’re absolutely correct that we have been dealt the shit hand generationally and I'd gladly pay the full price so my late millennial progeny could enjoy a better life than I have. Sadly, I fear that won’t happen unless our financial system collapses very soon. I see a slow and relentless decline into an abyss from which it will be impossible to escape and almost entirely due to demographics. This “saeculum” is unlike any other in history as never before has our nation (has any nation?) voluntarily replaced itself with third world savages having zero history of advanced civilization or behavior. Wars we’ve had, invasions we’ve repelled, but not this insanity of inviting our conquerors from a vastly more primitive paradigm.

    The boomers killed America and probably Western Civilization itself, but much blame falls to my parents’ silent generation in mollycoddling the narcissistic shitbags.

    Anyway, I have a book to buy and read. Thanks again!

    See my reply to AE, the history of the X generation the book sketches out is mostly honest, and the future is grim. The idea is exactly as you outline: X takes the hit (again) and pays the price, cutting itself off to allow more resources to flow to children. It turns suffering into sacrifice.

    I wouldn’t hate on the Boomers. If any generation should take crap, it’s the Silents, 1926-1942. As a group, they will pay no net taxes to the Federal government; the oldest of them was 40 when the first Medicare taxes were taken from his paycheck, so they’re collecting benefits that they did not pay for. Also, Silent awe of the Greatest was the impetus behind ideas like Medicare, endless SS COLAs, and other wealth transfers to the older generations. They kept raising SS taxes to turn most boomers into milk cows to pay benefits to the Greatest and Silent generations. The “trust fund” will be depleted by 2030, when the youngest Silent is 88. They went through the revolving door of life on someone else’s push.

    • Agree: Stan d Mute, Trevor H.
  105. @Achmed E. Newman
    You may also want to grab Generations first, by the same 2 guys, as that lays out the whole saeculum idea, all the generations from 1500-something on, the archtypes (Gen-X'ers being "Nomads") and the matrices to show how each generation acts during each of the 4 turnings of the cycles of history.

    Now that is not to say I believe all their stuff, Stan, by any means. For one thing, the book reads as very Statist, something you, me, and others here won't particularly cotton to. The authors act like everything important that happens is due to Government. Secondly, one can find an example of a quote, an action, etc. for any damn thing one wants to prove "how people are" in these different generations.

    I've been meaning to write a review on my site of these 2 books for the whole damn time I've had my site up, but I haven't yet.

    No, Strauss and Howe never could have imagined the immigration stupidity at the level it's come to, though the books were written in the late 90's or so. Remember this, the whole deal on the cycles of history as described in both books are based on English/American culture ONLY. The authors state that. If you change it, how do the books even apply anymore?

    One more thing, they never said each 4th turning has good results. I won't spoil the books though. Later, Stan.

    Shocking about the Fourth Turning is the specific predictions it makes about the coming years, and how many are correct. The book was written 22 years ago, but predictions are surprisingly on target. It also works well as a social history of the post-war period to give a lived experience of the time.

    One example: the mother of all budget-busting, wealth-skimming, youth-denuding programs in the Federal budget is Medicare. It was predicted when passed to cost $1,000,000,000 in 1990. You wonder: what were they thinking? The book makes clear: in 1965, the economy had essentially been booming for 19 years. No one had lived working experience of the return of hard times. If the economy had continued to grow for the next 19 years the way it had for the previous, paying for Medicare would have been a non-issue. Oh, and if the economy was to keep growing, it would need more people: maybe we loosen immigration?

    Disasters both, but at least you understand how people make these decisions.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I will say this, Tom. Maybe due to my younger age, and lack of a sense of history myself, I did not at all agree with the authors, as I read this book in the late 1990's, that we were in some kind of unraveling period. See, the internet 1.0 boom was starting up, and things looked pretty good, not just FOR me, but also TO me, as I had been following politics for a long while at this time. Though the Contract with America business (a hope of a return to conservatism) was in the garbage, the Hildabeast's Socialist healthcare plan had been trashed, and Bill took the conservative ball from them and pushed welfare reform. Immigration was not an issue in my mind at that time, just as with the 2 authors.

    I would say the writers were either less naive than me, being older, more acquainted with politics, and especially national finance, but also pretty prescient. I see now that the mid-1990's were the early stages of the unraveling. As a counter Strauss & Howe's statist attitude, though, one could do worse than to read my "When did the Feral Government get OUT OF CONTROL?" and Part 2 of the same.

    However, their long text/tables about all the cycles, though fascinating, could just as well be made to prove any other thing. As I wrote, there'd be 1,000 famous quotes and happenings in 1 year to prove that "this generation was like this at this particular time due to their parents being like that". It's like fortunetelling, IMO.
  106. @Audacious Epigone
    Their grounds aren't baseless, you're just not cynical enough. They have to make this utterly inconsequential 'partial shutdown' look and feel as bad as possible to keep the scam going. Trump is doing a huge service to the country by keeping this thing going.

    Six months, with the 10 of the 11 wealthiest counties that surround DC seeing a wave of foreclosures ought to be enough.

  107. @Hail
    There should be a ready-to-go plan to divide CA into several entities in the event of a CalExit crisis, one or more of which would be released as independent and one or more reincorporated into the USA. Like Virginia was split in two during the Civil War combined with some India-Pakistan-1947-like population exchanges.

    There is still a lot of salvageable territory in California, and millions of people who would not be a demographic burden (as the majority of CA now is). (Perhaps there should be a mechanism whereby White readmitees have to pass a political loyalty test to be readmitted to a California successor state.)

    Not to get too carried away, but it would be good to have such a "shovel ready" proposal on hand. We need institutions to argue our case, think tanks. It's a shame the relatively well funded National Policy Institute got bogged down and never became one.

    All the water resources are in the part of CA that would not be cut loose. They’ll never agree to that. Lose access to the Colorado and the Sierra Snowpack and the regions along the coast return to Indian population densities.

  108. @Stan d Mute

    fights will break out between the POC ascendancy wanting its welfare and senescent boomers wanting their pensions and social security
     
    The two most entitled narcissistic breeds on the planet! Will it be a cage match? Pay per view?

    The Boom retains the demographic weight to have its interests protected. gen X does not, and is still largely white. expect X to get cut off or means-tested to tax the POC youth less.

  109. @TomSchmidt
    Shocking about the Fourth Turning is the specific predictions it makes about the coming years, and how many are correct. The book was written 22 years ago, but predictions are surprisingly on target. It also works well as a social history of the post-war period to give a lived experience of the time.

    One example: the mother of all budget-busting, wealth-skimming, youth-denuding programs in the Federal budget is Medicare. It was predicted when passed to cost $1,000,000,000 in 1990. You wonder: what were they thinking? The book makes clear: in 1965, the economy had essentially been booming for 19 years. No one had lived working experience of the return of hard times. If the economy had continued to grow for the next 19 years the way it had for the previous, paying for Medicare would have been a non-issue. Oh, and if the economy was to keep growing, it would need more people: maybe we loosen immigration?

    Disasters both, but at least you understand how people make these decisions.

    I will say this, Tom. Maybe due to my younger age, and lack of a sense of history myself, I did not at all agree with the authors, as I read this book in the late 1990’s, that we were in some kind of unraveling period. See, the internet 1.0 boom was starting up, and things looked pretty good, not just FOR me, but also TO me, as I had been following politics for a long while at this time. Though the Contract with America business (a hope of a return to conservatism) was in the garbage, the Hildabeast‘s Socialist healthcare plan had been trashed, and Bill took the conservative ball from them and pushed welfare reform. Immigration was not an issue in my mind at that time, just as with the 2 authors.

    I would say the writers were either less naive than me, being older, more acquainted with politics, and especially national finance, but also pretty prescient. I see now that the mid-1990’s were the early stages of the unraveling. As a counter Strauss & Howe’s statist attitude, though, one could do worse than to read my “When did the Feral Government get OUT OF CONTROL?” and Part 2 of the same.

    However, their long text/tables about all the cycles, though fascinating, could just as well be made to prove any other thing. As I wrote, there’d be 1,000 famous quotes and happenings in 1 year to prove that “this generation was like this at this particular time due to their parents being like that”. It’s like fortunetelling, IMO.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    Numbers are wrong in a few aspects, AEN, on your first link. The Senate was Republican from 81-87 and flipped in the 86 election when Reagan wasn't hading the ticket. This led to the Bork confirmation disaster, eventually giving us Anthony Kennedy. The house and senate were Republican from 1952 to 1954. The house was run by Democrats for 40 years.

    What happened, again and again, was that the National voters entrusted all three branches of the Federal Government to Republicans. This happened 52-54, effectively 80-82, 2002-2006, and 2016-2018. In none of those periods was a single piece of the Democratic Government growth ratchet turned back. THe voters quickly fired the Republicans who would not rein in the growth; if you're going to get government largesse no matter who is in power, might as well hire the best.

    Eisenhower failed to cut back military spending enough. Reagan ballooned military spending for the greatest collection of WW2-fighting materiel ever assembled, and raised taxes in 1982 after cutting them in 1981, increasing taxation in Social Security which was soon commingled with general revenues while cutting it on the high-end financier types. W gave us Medicare Part D, the last payoff to the Greatest and Silents. And Trump didn't deliver a wall, but did give us the ridiculous and unasked for tax bill of 2017.

    That Trump is trying to force the Democratic House to fund the wall when he had TWO YEARS of full control to do so under Republicans is amusing and absurd. My guess is the Dems will cave, since it's their upper middle class around DC not getting paid.
    , @Stan d Mute

    As I wrote, there’d be 1,000 famous quotes and happenings in 1 year to prove that “this generation was like this at this particular time due to their parents being like that”. It’s like fortunetelling, IMO.
     
    Indeed. We see incessant contemporary examples in the news we are fed by MSM and government. History is nothing more than yesterday’s propaganda. It’s all spun to favor whatever narrative the fabulist wants us to believe. Actions are always more truthful than words, but even actions can be misleading. Currently the best way to ascertain Truth seems to be identifying the voices MSM/gov’t/elites try hardest to silence. But even there counter-examples can be found like the anti-Klan kabuki theater where a great show is made of trying to silence counterfeit voices that don’t exist in any real sense. Ron is onto something in his recent revisionist articles, the Truth might be most easily found (at least retrospectively) by identifying what was silenced/ignored and then memory-holed as if it never happened.
  110. @Charles Pewitt

    If we don’t need the federal government, maybe we don’t need a federal anything. Our walk down the path of political dissolution continues. Happy New Year!

     

    Audacious Epigone says maybe the federal government should go out of business completely. Maybe the states or other political units should go their own way?

    The American Empire is using the United States as a cover to rob and cheat and steal the future of White Core Americans.

    The American Empire must have massive amounts of dollars flowing overseas to keep all the imperial scams going. The American Empire must keep the dollar-wasting endless wars going and the American Empire must allow foreigners to send hundreds of billions of dollars out of the United States each year.

    The American Empire has to make sure the United States has the global reserve currency to keep the imperial gravy train rolling for the Deep State and its minions.

    Trump should propose a massive tax on remittances to pay for his wall, but he has stayed mum on that. Why?

    Some guy named Kevin MacDonald wants a 5 percent remittance tax to pay for the wall. I say make the tax 99 percent and remove the foreigners sending out the dollars. Remove the foreigners, keep the dollars -- sounds good to me!

    https://twitter.com/TOOEdit/status/1080336783831781376

    “Some guy named Kevin MacDonald.”

    Surely you know his status on the dissident right?

  111. @Stan d Mute

    if the financial sector hadn’t destroyed people’s private savings and pension plans in the 1930s we wouldn’t have Social Security.
     
    It’s called “moral hazard”. Should I be able to force you, at gunpoint, to reimburse my losses in Vegas? Buying “shares” of a company over which I have zero influence or control is exactly the same as betting on sportsball team A to win against sportsball team B. You speculate and often enough you’ll lose. Tough shit.


    If the medical system wasn’t bankrupting seniors we wouldn’t have Medicare.

    You mean the narcissistic assholes who think they’re entitled to a cure for old age and death? Palliative care costs almost nothing. You get cancer or organ failure when you’re an octogenarian, accept the end of your run and die with the dignity of not saddling kids with mountains of debt that at best might enable you to shit your pants an extra year or two while slurping flavorless sugar free jello and staring at the idiot box. There once was a time, true story, when parents strove to leave wealth to their kids instead of debt. No foolin’ - look it up! Another fun fact, there’s no cure for old age! And last, shocking tho it may be, everybody who has ever lived has or will die. The only variable is how you chose to do it.

    The Virgin Mary was assumed into Heaven. So that’s everybody who has ever lived, minus one 😉

    • LOL: Stan d Mute
  112. @prime noticer
    social security was one of the worst things to ever happen to the united states in it's over 200 year history. social security is WORSE than any war the US participated in. you can recover from a war, even a major war. you can't recover from forever growing socialism. social security never goes away, and just continues to make things worse, decade after decade. it robs you of your income, and gives you a horrendous ROI too. plus, you have to pay taxes on it again, even if you live long enough to collect. it's total nonsense. there's a reason the US did not have it for over 150 years. it was not a mistake, it was not an oversight, it was not the case that they didn't realize they could have something like that. it deliberately did not exist.

    medicare is equally bad, but in a different way. so we are correct to fight with everything we have, to keep them from creating a forced, legally required, national healthcare system with mandated pay in under the thread of the government's guns. and again, there's a reason the US does not have it. no, it's not an oversight. no, it's not because they didn't realize they could have it. it deliberately does not exist. it's very on purpose that america does not have a single payer national healthcare system. it's a terrible idea that smarter, better men realized was shit, hundreds of years ago, and deep sixed any movement towards such a thing.

    democrats are trying to force on the US, every bad idea that's been repeated a hundred times in the old world. there's a reason 2 million third worlders are trying to come to the US every year, and are willing to risk their life to get there.

    it's because the US DOESN'T have stuff like a national healthcare system, VAT, total civilian disarmament, and so forth. those are the things that create that 3% GDP growth or higher, and enable people to own a half acre lot with a 2000 square foot house with air conditioning and a big SUV with 2 dollar gasoline. we used to be able to say, it's also because it doesn't have a national income tax, or a central bank that meddles in everything and causes inflation, or something stupid like social security, but we can't say those things anymore. democrats relentlessly want to steer the US into being just like any other garbage socialist country with crushing taxes, complete regulation, 1% GDP growth, and a disarmed population. previous americans rejected all that. contrary to modern doctrine, social security, medicare, and single payer healthcare are all actually HUGE steps backwards. they're not 'progress' at all. in many ways, the US in 1800 was the most advanced nation in the history of the world, in terms of political thinking and opportunity maximization. it didn't even have property tax.

    The healthcare system of Germany seems to work pretty well. But then, it cares for EVERYBODY, not just serving as a suction device to transfer wealth to older people. They pay less, and are healthier (granted, we would need to compare Germans in Germany to German Americans; I wonder if those data exist?)

    Medicare is a MUCH bigger scam than Social Security. According to Kotlikoff, the unfunded liability of the Feds is about 200 trillion. social security is less than 20% of that,with a much bigger slice being Medicare:
    https://www.financialsense.com/contributors/laurence-kotlikoff/social-security-massive-looming-problem

    Oh, and we most certainly DO have a national healthcare system. Any hospital that takes even ONE dollar of Medicare or Medicaid money is forbidden to Bar ANYONE from receiving emergency room services, legal or no. Does the use of modern emergency rooms in a relatively non-third-world country like the USA encourage people to move here? I’d have to think it does.

    Do you know how to avoid paying SS and Medicare tax on up to 78K in income? It’s possible, and legal, so long as that income is in the form of qualified dividends. Start with Subchapter T, and stop worrying about big SUVs with 2 dollar gasoline; your life, and your children’s, and your generation’s, will be much better.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    It’s been pretty common in SE Michigan ever since the Big 3 made a big push to get employees off the payroll. I’ve found most employers are amenable to the deal, but some will try to pocket the 7.5% instead of handing it over and almost all will balk at converting healthcare premiums to cash payments. But the big SUVs aren’t such a bad deal either when you deduct them as expenses and claim no personal use. All non-collector cars are depreciating assets and there are times when you want more depreciation plus they’re fantastic for winter in the north, transporting big pets or broods of kids, and making Costco runs.
  113. @Charles Pewitt

    Btw, this is exactly what the book The Fourth Turning mentions: Gen X is the generation that gets the short end of the stick from society throughout its life, and will be cut off in old age. The book theorizes that, because we don’t feel any love towards the existing social order, we are more likely to support changes to it that benefit future generations, even at cost to ourselves.

     

    Sounds about right.

    I like to think some Generation X leaders will be inspired by the movie Braveheart, and specifically the scene where the old warrior Scottish guy holds up the gate so the young warrior Scottish guys can get at the English guy who has been tyrannizing the Scottish. The old Scottish warrior knows he'll take a few arrows or spear throws, but he'll sacrifice himself to help the young overcome their enemy.

    Remember, the globalized central bankers bailed out the globalizer plutocrats and the baby boomers when they began the unprecedented monetary extremism that still continues.

    That’s right. Xers might die looking out at the future. Others generations will die looking at their navels.

  114. @Corvinus
    "It’s true that most federal employees are superfluous, and we wouldn’t miss them if they never came back to work."

    A barbell clearly hit your noggin'. Federal workers ensure food safety, investigate criminal activity, provide emergency care, develop science and technology, and serve in national parks and museums. Try to be careful next time.

    You sure about that food safety thing? Provide emergency care? They pay for “research” at universities, but they’re not developing.

    People will worship anything: God, Golden calves, the Federal Government. You’ll suffer as the object of your veneration collapses, but will be better off after.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    People will worship anything: God, Golden calves, the Federal Government. You’ll suffer as the object of your veneration collapses, but will be better off after.
     
    Excellent comment!

    BTW, I agreed with Mr. Corvinus on another thread, so I think we are near the End Times, or at least the time of cats and dogs living together in harmony.
    , @Corvinus
    You really can't be this ignorant.

    "You sure about that food safety thing?"

    Government agencies are responsible for setting food safety standards, conducting inspections, ensuring that standards are met, and maintaining a strong enforcement program to deal with those who do not comply with standards.

    "Provide emergency care?"

    Indeed.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1470509

    "They pay for “research” at universities, but they’re not developing."

    Not "research". Just research. Moreover, the federal government plays a role in facilitating development.

    https://www.nsf.gov/statistics/showpub.cfm?TopID=4&SubID=36

    "People will worship anything: God, Golden calves, the Federal Government."

    It's not "worshiping the federal government". Rather, it is understanding that it plays a major role in several aspects of our lives.

  115. @TomSchmidt
    You sure about that food safety thing? Provide emergency care? They pay for "research" at universities, but they're not developing.

    People will worship anything: God, Golden calves, the Federal Government. You'll suffer as the object of your veneration collapses, but will be better off after.

    People will worship anything: God, Golden calves, the Federal Government. You’ll suffer as the object of your veneration collapses, but will be better off after.

    Excellent comment!

    BTW, I agreed with Mr. Corvinus on another thread, so I think we are near the End Times, or at least the time of cats and dogs living together in harmony.

  116. @Achmed E. Newman
    I will say this, Tom. Maybe due to my younger age, and lack of a sense of history myself, I did not at all agree with the authors, as I read this book in the late 1990's, that we were in some kind of unraveling period. See, the internet 1.0 boom was starting up, and things looked pretty good, not just FOR me, but also TO me, as I had been following politics for a long while at this time. Though the Contract with America business (a hope of a return to conservatism) was in the garbage, the Hildabeast's Socialist healthcare plan had been trashed, and Bill took the conservative ball from them and pushed welfare reform. Immigration was not an issue in my mind at that time, just as with the 2 authors.

    I would say the writers were either less naive than me, being older, more acquainted with politics, and especially national finance, but also pretty prescient. I see now that the mid-1990's were the early stages of the unraveling. As a counter Strauss & Howe's statist attitude, though, one could do worse than to read my "When did the Feral Government get OUT OF CONTROL?" and Part 2 of the same.

    However, their long text/tables about all the cycles, though fascinating, could just as well be made to prove any other thing. As I wrote, there'd be 1,000 famous quotes and happenings in 1 year to prove that "this generation was like this at this particular time due to their parents being like that". It's like fortunetelling, IMO.

    Numbers are wrong in a few aspects, AEN, on your first link. The Senate was Republican from 81-87 and flipped in the 86 election when Reagan wasn’t hading the ticket. This led to the Bork confirmation disaster, eventually giving us Anthony Kennedy. The house and senate were Republican from 1952 to 1954. The house was run by Democrats for 40 years.

    What happened, again and again, was that the National voters entrusted all three branches of the Federal Government to Republicans. This happened 52-54, effectively 80-82, 2002-2006, and 2016-2018. In none of those periods was a single piece of the Democratic Government growth ratchet turned back. THe voters quickly fired the Republicans who would not rein in the growth; if you’re going to get government largesse no matter who is in power, might as well hire the best.

    Eisenhower failed to cut back military spending enough. Reagan ballooned military spending for the greatest collection of WW2-fighting materiel ever assembled, and raised taxes in 1982 after cutting them in 1981, increasing taxation in Social Security which was soon commingled with general revenues while cutting it on the high-end financier types. W gave us Medicare Part D, the last payoff to the Greatest and Silents. And Trump didn’t deliver a wall, but did give us the ridiculous and unasked for tax bill of 2017.

    That Trump is trying to force the Democratic House to fund the wall when he had TWO YEARS of full control to do so under Republicans is amusing and absurd. My guess is the Dems will cave, since it’s their upper middle class around DC not getting paid.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Firstly, thanks for the corrections. I had flipped the signs (shoulda been negative) for those 2 Senate , periods ("10" S/B "-10"), and I do see the 1952-1954 anomaly on wiki page. I just fixed it. It was only up for a year and a half, so there's that ... ;-}

    I don't agree with you on lots here. I have a lot of respect still for President (and the man himself) Ronald Reagan. Mr. Reagan, along with Maggie Thatcher, the old (real) Pope, Konrad Adenauer, Lec Walesa, and millions of American soldiers, sailors, airmen, and mechanical/electrical engineers and technicians won the Cold War. That was worth the money.

    Mr. Reagan's problem was that, though he rightly didn't trust the Soviets, he erroneously trusted the Americans in the Congress and Senate on their words That was a bad, bad move in that amnesty deal, as he regretted later. He had had a deal with the D-party for a drawdown of the welfare state as he ramped up military spending. They reneged on that one too. Ronald Reagan did not raise taxes. The huge-majority-democratic House O' Representin' spends the money. Reagan lived with large numbers of the House (and later, as you corrected me) Senate against him.

    I also don't see 3 branches of Feral Gov. ever have been GOP, as the Supreme Court members may be appointed by a member of one party, that doesn't seem to mean much (as it shouldn't if they were to actually follow the US Constitution).

    I am in agreement that the GW Bush administration was a disaster, but anyone could have seen that coming, that neither he, nor his Dad, were conservatives. That "thousand points of light" and "New World Order" crap out of the Dad, and then the "Compassionate Conservationism" crap out of the son should have been warnings to all. Needless to say, I didn't vote for either one of those two.

  117. @TomSchmidt
    Have you read The Fourth Turning? It's written by a pair of Boomer sociologists who are left/liberals, but they make the case clearly: GenX was the most put-upon of the Greatest/Silent/Boomer/Xer grouping. The generation before Greatest was the Lost generation, another "nomad" archetype. The book makes the point that the dying-off Lost generation handed the mantle of poorest generation to the Xers, another Nomad generation. 1/3rd of the generation never made it out of the birth canal.

    Long story short: the general putting upon of Xers is a feature, not a bug. Middle management at the time of crisis, they have been starved of sunlight in the Boomers' shadow their whole lives. Society greatly shifted resources to the older generations (Medicare started in 1965) just as they were being born, and crime laws (and drinking ages) were changed after the Baby Boom horse had fled the barn, so Xers served as the whipping boys for the youthful indiscretions of that group. In short, there's no great love or attachment of Xers to the existing order.

    Strauss and Howe say this is by design. In the Crisis, a new formulation of society must come about that sweeps away the old arrangements. The Boomers cannot do this, since they recall a society in the 50s and 60s that still focused on nurturing and caring for its own children. Xers don't recall that, but they know that it's wrong to denude youth of wealth. Strauss and Howe write that the Xers will willingly impoverish their old age, giving up SS, in exchange for writing a new social contract that better protectsa and cares for the young. It's a grim picture of old age for this generation.

    But it's the most hopeful thing I've read. At last, I understood: no, you're not crazy, and society really has had it in for your group. But it's not meaningless suffering if put to the task of recasting the molten society of the crisis into a fixed structure that is more just towards our children and grandchildren. That's worth taking the hit on.

    I have a couple of things to add here:

    … and society really has had it in for your group.

    Mr. A.E. says he’s a Millenial. The Millenials are to be (per the somewhat-hokey book) the Hero archetypes that are supposed to be the actors in the Crisis to come, like, any time now.*

    The authors are very clear that not every Crisis period will end well, with a turning into a new High period. When you look at it 20-odd years later, I believe this is the last cycle. I hope I’m wrong, and am willing to fulfill my archetypical destiny.**

    Also, Tom, I’m not sure if you read all my comment above, but the 2 authors also stipulate that this whole cyclical business that the 2 books are about is for the English/American people. If they are going to be < half the population, how does any of their book apply, anyway? They never did say much about immigration, as I recall, especially even that of 150 years back from Southern/Eastern Europe, so they assume lots of assimilation into English-based American culture, a historically pretty-good assumption, but one that's completely erroneous now.

    .

    * That's not to be sarcastic. I do think that it'll be anytime, and I give credit to Strauss & Howe for their timetable being realistic.

    ** I really did read the books thoroughly and took them seriously, as they are fascinating if you do. There's one guy on the web who's guest articles used to appear on ZeroHedge, who treated this book like the Holy Bible.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    I think the post-war high was a side effect of increasing per-capita amounts of fossil fueled energy. US consumption of oil is about back to the level of 1965, having peaked somewhere in the early 70s, which is also when the great working class wage stagnation began. You might well be correct: this is the last upward-trending cycle, and the High, if it comes, will be a better society for children than the world into which genX was born, but it will be materially much poorer: there simply aren't exponentially supplies of hydrocarbons available to fuel that growth. It will have to be something else.

    I did see the comment on the saeculum as applied to Anglo Saxons. One thing about the crisis and resolution, though, is that it forges a new consensus. FDR, despite his offenses against Catholic subsidiarity, helped forge a society that was opposed to "hyphenated Americans," so that all were converged towards some idea of American. I think the mid-60s and the Great Society broke this, and the growth of identity politics has proceeded to today. In the crisis, if it resolves well, a new social consensus forms where identity politics as a centrifugal force are abandoned, and the centripetal identity as (Americans? New Englanders, or any of the other regional nations that emerge?) becomes stronger.

    Hard to imagine happening, but it could work out that way. The thing about "hard to imagine" is that that's what a crisis resolution can do: turn British subjects into Americans; turn a socialist-oriented proletariat into a well-satisfied working class in the suburbs. It can also turn defeated enemies into bitter segregationists and inflict a 90-year depression on an area like the South.
  118. @TomSchmidt
    Numbers are wrong in a few aspects, AEN, on your first link. The Senate was Republican from 81-87 and flipped in the 86 election when Reagan wasn't hading the ticket. This led to the Bork confirmation disaster, eventually giving us Anthony Kennedy. The house and senate were Republican from 1952 to 1954. The house was run by Democrats for 40 years.

    What happened, again and again, was that the National voters entrusted all three branches of the Federal Government to Republicans. This happened 52-54, effectively 80-82, 2002-2006, and 2016-2018. In none of those periods was a single piece of the Democratic Government growth ratchet turned back. THe voters quickly fired the Republicans who would not rein in the growth; if you're going to get government largesse no matter who is in power, might as well hire the best.

    Eisenhower failed to cut back military spending enough. Reagan ballooned military spending for the greatest collection of WW2-fighting materiel ever assembled, and raised taxes in 1982 after cutting them in 1981, increasing taxation in Social Security which was soon commingled with general revenues while cutting it on the high-end financier types. W gave us Medicare Part D, the last payoff to the Greatest and Silents. And Trump didn't deliver a wall, but did give us the ridiculous and unasked for tax bill of 2017.

    That Trump is trying to force the Democratic House to fund the wall when he had TWO YEARS of full control to do so under Republicans is amusing and absurd. My guess is the Dems will cave, since it's their upper middle class around DC not getting paid.

    Firstly, thanks for the corrections. I had flipped the signs (shoulda been negative) for those 2 Senate , periods (“10” S/B “-10”), and I do see the 1952-1954 anomaly on wiki page. I just fixed it. It was only up for a year and a half, so there’s that … ;-}

    I don’t agree with you on lots here. I have a lot of respect still for President (and the man himself) Ronald Reagan. Mr. Reagan, along with Maggie Thatcher, the old (real) Pope, Konrad Adenauer, Lec Walesa, and millions of American soldiers, sailors, airmen, and mechanical/electrical engineers and technicians won the Cold War. That was worth the money.

    Mr. Reagan’s problem was that, though he rightly didn’t trust the Soviets, he erroneously trusted the Americans in the Congress and Senate on their words That was a bad, bad move in that amnesty deal, as he regretted later. He had had a deal with the D-party for a drawdown of the welfare state as he ramped up military spending. They reneged on that one too. Ronald Reagan did not raise taxes. The huge-majority-democratic House O’ Representin’ spends the money. Reagan lived with large numbers of the House (and later, as you corrected me) Senate against him.

    I also don’t see 3 branches of Feral Gov. ever have been GOP, as the Supreme Court members may be appointed by a member of one party, that doesn’t seem to mean much (as it shouldn’t if they were to actually follow the US Constitution).

    I am in agreement that the GW Bush administration was a disaster, but anyone could have seen that coming, that neither he, nor his Dad, were conservatives. That “thousand points of light” and “New World Order” crap out of the Dad, and then the “Compassionate Conservationism” crap out of the son should have been warnings to all. Needless to say, I didn’t vote for either one of those two.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    Mr. Reagan, along with Maggie Thatcher, the old (real) Pope, Konrad Adenauer, Lec Walesa, and millions of American soldiers, sailors, airmen, and mechanical/electrical engineers and technicians won the Cold War. That was worth the money.

    Allow me to don my Professor's cap and recommend David Stockman's book, the Great Deformation. Stockman covers the period from Hoover up through the present day. Particularly illuminating is his view of budget shenanigans around the great Reagan defense boondoggle. I don't know if Stockman used the term, but if you read his (very long) book, you'll use it as well.

    Stockman freaked out because supply-side tax theory gave the Feds carte blanche to spend like drunken sailors on "defense," with a 600-ship Navy, with 12 or 15 carrier groups (carriers now having been rendered obsolete). There's an argument to be made that we borrowed a lot of money and bankrupted the Soviets; that ignores one thing that the USA did do, in accordance with our Saudi allies (who were funding Osama to fight the Soviets), which was to flood the world with cheap oil and drive down the Soviet Union's last source of currency in about 1986. The Berlin Wall fell three years later, and the Soviet Union went belly up five years later.

    Stockman points out that that defense buildup had a second, highly negative effect: now we had a lot of conventional weapons stockpiled, and no Fulda Gap to fight over. This greatly empowered the Neocons; the period from 1990 to 2003 was them using the useless surplus that Reagan's defense buildup handed them.

    Stockman points out that the last President who could really control out of control military spending was Ike, due to his having been the winning General in the conflict. His warning about the MICC in 1961 has largely come true; we spend about $1trln today (all in, with defense costs and interest on previous defense costs) on "defense." It's left our country a hollowed out shell with infrastructure that protects us from Chinese invasion, because they couldn't afford to repair it if they conquered us.
  119. @Achmed E. Newman
    I will say this, Tom. Maybe due to my younger age, and lack of a sense of history myself, I did not at all agree with the authors, as I read this book in the late 1990's, that we were in some kind of unraveling period. See, the internet 1.0 boom was starting up, and things looked pretty good, not just FOR me, but also TO me, as I had been following politics for a long while at this time. Though the Contract with America business (a hope of a return to conservatism) was in the garbage, the Hildabeast's Socialist healthcare plan had been trashed, and Bill took the conservative ball from them and pushed welfare reform. Immigration was not an issue in my mind at that time, just as with the 2 authors.

    I would say the writers were either less naive than me, being older, more acquainted with politics, and especially national finance, but also pretty prescient. I see now that the mid-1990's were the early stages of the unraveling. As a counter Strauss & Howe's statist attitude, though, one could do worse than to read my "When did the Feral Government get OUT OF CONTROL?" and Part 2 of the same.

    However, their long text/tables about all the cycles, though fascinating, could just as well be made to prove any other thing. As I wrote, there'd be 1,000 famous quotes and happenings in 1 year to prove that "this generation was like this at this particular time due to their parents being like that". It's like fortunetelling, IMO.

    As I wrote, there’d be 1,000 famous quotes and happenings in 1 year to prove that “this generation was like this at this particular time due to their parents being like that”. It’s like fortunetelling, IMO.

    Indeed. We see incessant contemporary examples in the news we are fed by MSM and government. History is nothing more than yesterday’s propaganda. It’s all spun to favor whatever narrative the fabulist wants us to believe. Actions are always more truthful than words, but even actions can be misleading. Currently the best way to ascertain Truth seems to be identifying the voices MSM/gov’t/elites try hardest to silence. But even there counter-examples can be found like the anti-Klan kabuki theater where a great show is made of trying to silence counterfeit voices that don’t exist in any real sense. Ron is onto something in his recent revisionist articles, the Truth might be most easily found (at least retrospectively) by identifying what was silenced/ignored and then memory-holed as if it never happened.

  120. @TomSchmidt
    The healthcare system of Germany seems to work pretty well. But then, it cares for EVERYBODY, not just serving as a suction device to transfer wealth to older people. They pay less, and are healthier (granted, we would need to compare Germans in Germany to German Americans; I wonder if those data exist?)

    Medicare is a MUCH bigger scam than Social Security. According to Kotlikoff, the unfunded liability of the Feds is about 200 trillion. social security is less than 20% of that,with a much bigger slice being Medicare:
    https://www.financialsense.com/contributors/laurence-kotlikoff/social-security-massive-looming-problem

    Oh, and we most certainly DO have a national healthcare system. Any hospital that takes even ONE dollar of Medicare or Medicaid money is forbidden to Bar ANYONE from receiving emergency room services, legal or no. Does the use of modern emergency rooms in a relatively non-third-world country like the USA encourage people to move here? I'd have to think it does.

    Do you know how to avoid paying SS and Medicare tax on up to 78K in income? It's possible, and legal, so long as that income is in the form of qualified dividends. Start with Subchapter T, and stop worrying about big SUVs with 2 dollar gasoline; your life, and your children's, and your generation's, will be much better.

    It’s been pretty common in SE Michigan ever since the Big 3 made a big push to get employees off the payroll. I’ve found most employers are amenable to the deal, but some will try to pocket the 7.5% instead of handing it over and almost all will balk at converting healthcare premiums to cash payments. But the big SUVs aren’t such a bad deal either when you deduct them as expenses and claim no personal use. All non-collector cars are depreciating assets and there are times when you want more depreciation plus they’re fantastic for winter in the north, transporting big pets or broods of kids, and making Costco runs.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    You mean Subchapter T has been pretty common? That would require some organizational changes. Google Mondragon.

    If they're paying employees as independent contractors, then there's no real opportunity to get tax-free dividends from work. You can write off a lot of expenses, but at the end of the day you still wind up paying 15.3% of the first 130,000 of "income" and then other taxes.

    Of course, if you instead became an employee of a corporation owned by someone not related to you, it might be able to reimburse you under an accountable plan for business travel. It could send you to the Cayman Islands and cut you a check to cover your meal and lodging expenses for $715 per diem; if it sent you on a 30-day business trip that would be over $21k in expense reimbursement. Cannes, $637. Paris (maybe to look up Detroit founding documents?) $580. Send someone on a 90day business trip to Paris and you can reimburse their expenses to the tune of over $52K. My guess is even I could live in Paris for 3 months for less than that.
  121. @TomSchmidt
    You sure about that food safety thing? Provide emergency care? They pay for "research" at universities, but they're not developing.

    People will worship anything: God, Golden calves, the Federal Government. You'll suffer as the object of your veneration collapses, but will be better off after.

    You really can’t be this ignorant.

    “You sure about that food safety thing?”

    Government agencies are responsible for setting food safety standards, conducting inspections, ensuring that standards are met, and maintaining a strong enforcement program to deal with those who do not comply with standards.

    “Provide emergency care?”

    Indeed.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1470509

    “They pay for “research” at universities, but they’re not developing.”

    Not “research”. Just research. Moreover, the federal government plays a role in facilitating development.

    https://www.nsf.gov/statistics/showpub.cfm?TopID=4&SubID=36

    “People will worship anything: God, Golden calves, the Federal Government.”

    It’s not “worshiping the federal government”. Rather, it is understanding that it plays a major role in several aspects of our lives.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    (Federal)Government agencies are responsible for setting food safety standards, conducting inspections, ensuring that standards are met, and maintaining a strong enforcement program to deal with those who do not comply with standards.

    What could we do without the Feds in food Safety? Oh, yes, this:

    Pennsylvania, no matter what its burden on interstate commerce, has every right to decide what baked goods can and cannot be sold within the state. Rather than make up a separate package for Pennsylvanians, most manufacturers incorporate “Reg. Penn. Dept. Agr.” into their standard design–and that includes Canadian as well as overseas operations (“Reg.,” by the way, stands for “registered with,” not “regulated by,” in case you were wondering).

    Naturally, Pennsylvanians find it impossible to dispatch agents to every bakery in the world. So they’ve developed a network of contacts with other state (and foreign) agriculture boards, all of which are happy to keep tabs on domestic production for the sake of clean-living Keystoners.
     
    “Provide emergency care?”

    Indeed.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1470509

    Do you even READ your links?

    Despite the lack of uniform federal legislation, regulations, or standards, and despite the absence of legislation, regulations, and standards in most states and cities, EMS was developing and providing care to patients. Most advances had occurred through interest by local physicians, hospitals, firefighters, government officials, or entrepreneurs.
     
    Seems local people were handling the issue. then the Feds decided to get involved. What happened?

    Although the federal government continued to view EMS as it had in the early 1960s—as a transportation agency that provided basic first aid—medical advances had revolutionized EMS. In 1972 the National Academy of Sciences–National Research Council released an analysis of the EMS system showing that the federal government, despite a stated EMS commitment, lacked a coherent policy and had failed to sufficiently advance EMS.
     
    Yes, that's typically what happens when Federal Bureaucrats, with no local skin in the game, try to seize control of an area. What happened next?

    These historical and medical forces have resulted in the unique characteristics of the EMS system present in the United States today. Changes have occurred in the EMS system since 1973. New technologies and medications have continued to increase the level of care provided by emergency medical technicians. The federal role has been reduced significantly, to a role now primarily of technical assistance and coordination by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
     
    So if I go by YOUR LINK, the Federal government does not "provide emergency care." Thank you for confirming it. It does seem like a whole host of local and regional agencies DO provide emergency care, of course, and they could probably do MORE of it with fewer dollars being showered on bureaucrats having to pay DC housing costs. I'd rather pay the housing costs of a bureaucrat near Albany or Trenton than DC, thank you.

    Not “research”. Just research.
    Ever looked at an NSF grant award? Seen the amount of indirect dollars that go the the institution the researcher works at? Here's a decent link:
    https://www.aau.edu/sites/default/files/AAU%20Files/Key%20Issues/Intellectual%20Property/Indirect-Cost-FAQ_2017.pdf?id=18472

    Quote: "In order to perform research on behalf of federal agencies, universities incur a variety of costs they would not otherwise have, both leading up to and while conducting a specific research
    project. Facilities and Administrative (F&A) costs, often referred to as indirect costs, cover a portion of the university’s infrastructure and operational costs related to federally-funded research. ... F&A costs also cover the personnel, paperwork, and other costs involved in complying with various federal, state, and local rules and regulations."
    So a very large number of dollars every year are used to support the bloated salaries of University administrators. You must know this?

    I obviously do not know what you worship. I suggest strongly to you that food safety, emergency services, and scientific research happened in the USA before the Federal power and money-grab. Given that some of these things are actually useful, it's comforting to know that, as the Federal Government has reached the point where mandatory spending plus defense now equals the total tax dollar take (all discretionary spending, like the three sometimes useful things you outlined, is essentially borrowed), when it is unable to fund any of these things that responsible local authorities, without the bureaucratic overhead, will still be around to provide them. Then maybe we can start to wonder what else we get, and cut out, oh, 500 billion dollars for "defense."
  122. @Audacious Epigone
    Their grounds aren't baseless, you're just not cynical enough. They have to make this utterly inconsequential 'partial shutdown' look and feel as bad as possible to keep the scam going. Trump is doing a huge service to the country by keeping this thing going.

    “Trump is doing a huge service to the country by keeping this thing going.”

    Tell that to the families of the Coast Guard.

    https://www.militarytimes.com/news/pentagon-congress/2019/01/04/as-shutdown-continues-lawmakers-look-for-fix-on-coast-guard-pay/

  123. @Corvinus
    You really can't be this ignorant.

    "You sure about that food safety thing?"

    Government agencies are responsible for setting food safety standards, conducting inspections, ensuring that standards are met, and maintaining a strong enforcement program to deal with those who do not comply with standards.

    "Provide emergency care?"

    Indeed.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1470509

    "They pay for “research” at universities, but they’re not developing."

    Not "research". Just research. Moreover, the federal government plays a role in facilitating development.

    https://www.nsf.gov/statistics/showpub.cfm?TopID=4&SubID=36

    "People will worship anything: God, Golden calves, the Federal Government."

    It's not "worshiping the federal government". Rather, it is understanding that it plays a major role in several aspects of our lives.

    (Federal)Government agencies are responsible for setting food safety standards, conducting inspections, ensuring that standards are met, and maintaining a strong enforcement program to deal with those who do not comply with standards.

    What could we do without the Feds in food Safety? Oh, yes, this:

    Pennsylvania, no matter what its burden on interstate commerce, has every right to decide what baked goods can and cannot be sold within the state. Rather than make up a separate package for Pennsylvanians, most manufacturers incorporate “Reg. Penn. Dept. Agr.” into their standard design–and that includes Canadian as well as overseas operations (“Reg.,” by the way, stands for “registered with,” not “regulated by,” in case you were wondering).

    Naturally, Pennsylvanians find it impossible to dispatch agents to every bakery in the world. So they’ve developed a network of contacts with other state (and foreign) agriculture boards, all of which are happy to keep tabs on domestic production for the sake of clean-living Keystoners.

    “Provide emergency care?”

    Indeed.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1470509
    Do you even READ your links?

    Despite the lack of uniform federal legislation, regulations, or standards, and despite the absence of legislation, regulations, and standards in most states and cities, EMS was developing and providing care to patients. Most advances had occurred through interest by local physicians, hospitals, firefighters, government officials, or entrepreneurs.

    Seems local people were handling the issue. then the Feds decided to get involved. What happened?

    Although the federal government continued to view EMS as it had in the early 1960s—as a transportation agency that provided basic first aid—medical advances had revolutionized EMS. In 1972 the National Academy of Sciences–National Research Council released an analysis of the EMS system showing that the federal government, despite a stated EMS commitment, lacked a coherent policy and had failed to sufficiently advance EMS.

    Yes, that’s typically what happens when Federal Bureaucrats, with no local skin in the game, try to seize control of an area. What happened next?

    These historical and medical forces have resulted in the unique characteristics of the EMS system present in the United States today. Changes have occurred in the EMS system since 1973. New technologies and medications have continued to increase the level of care provided by emergency medical technicians. The federal role has been reduced significantly, to a role now primarily of technical assistance and coordination by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

    So if I go by YOUR LINK, the Federal government does not “provide emergency care.” Thank you for confirming it. It does seem like a whole host of local and regional agencies DO provide emergency care, of course, and they could probably do MORE of it with fewer dollars being showered on bureaucrats having to pay DC housing costs. I’d rather pay the housing costs of a bureaucrat near Albany or Trenton than DC, thank you.

    Not “research”. Just research.
    Ever looked at an NSF grant award? Seen the amount of indirect dollars that go the the institution the researcher works at? Here’s a decent link:
    https://www.aau.edu/sites/default/files/AAU%20Files/Key%20Issues/Intellectual%20Property/Indirect-Cost-FAQ_2017.pdf?id=18472

    Quote: “In order to perform research on behalf of federal agencies, universities incur a variety of costs they would not otherwise have, both leading up to and while conducting a specific research
    project. Facilities and Administrative (F&A) costs, often referred to as indirect costs, cover a portion of the university’s infrastructure and operational costs related to federally-funded research. … F&A costs also cover the personnel, paperwork, and other costs involved in complying with various federal, state, and local rules and regulations.”
    So a very large number of dollars every year are used to support the bloated salaries of University administrators. You must know this?

    I obviously do not know what you worship. I suggest strongly to you that food safety, emergency services, and scientific research happened in the USA before the Federal power and money-grab. Given that some of these things are actually useful, it’s comforting to know that, as the Federal Government has reached the point where mandatory spending plus defense now equals the total tax dollar take (all discretionary spending, like the three sometimes useful things you outlined, is essentially borrowed), when it is unable to fund any of these things that responsible local authorities, without the bureaucratic overhead, will still be around to provide them. Then maybe we can start to wonder what else we get, and cut out, oh, 500 billion dollars for “defense.”

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "What could we do without the Feds in food Safety? Oh, yes, this:"

    Except that a number of states may not have those strict standards. Moreover, potentially dozens of different standards by each state for companies to abide by can be a daunting task. Such matters are best to have streamlined rules in place, with the option of states to impose even more rigorous criteria.

    "Seems local people were handling the issue. then the Feds decided to get involved."

    In coordination with local efforts to provide emergency care.

    "Seen the amount of indirect dollars that go the the institution the researcher works at?"

    Red herring.

    "&A costs also cover the personnel, paperwork, and other costs involved in complying with various federal, state, and local rules and regulations. So a very large number of dollars every year are used to support the bloated salaries of University administrators."

    Non sequitur.

    "I suggest strongly to you that food safety, emergency services, and scientific research happened in the USA..."

    Absolutely, on a small scale. The federal government, at the behest of citizens and companies, became more intricately involved.

    "before the Federal power and money-grab."

    No, that would be a false characterization.
  124. @Achmed E. Newman
    Firstly, thanks for the corrections. I had flipped the signs (shoulda been negative) for those 2 Senate , periods ("10" S/B "-10"), and I do see the 1952-1954 anomaly on wiki page. I just fixed it. It was only up for a year and a half, so there's that ... ;-}

    I don't agree with you on lots here. I have a lot of respect still for President (and the man himself) Ronald Reagan. Mr. Reagan, along with Maggie Thatcher, the old (real) Pope, Konrad Adenauer, Lec Walesa, and millions of American soldiers, sailors, airmen, and mechanical/electrical engineers and technicians won the Cold War. That was worth the money.

    Mr. Reagan's problem was that, though he rightly didn't trust the Soviets, he erroneously trusted the Americans in the Congress and Senate on their words That was a bad, bad move in that amnesty deal, as he regretted later. He had had a deal with the D-party for a drawdown of the welfare state as he ramped up military spending. They reneged on that one too. Ronald Reagan did not raise taxes. The huge-majority-democratic House O' Representin' spends the money. Reagan lived with large numbers of the House (and later, as you corrected me) Senate against him.

    I also don't see 3 branches of Feral Gov. ever have been GOP, as the Supreme Court members may be appointed by a member of one party, that doesn't seem to mean much (as it shouldn't if they were to actually follow the US Constitution).

    I am in agreement that the GW Bush administration was a disaster, but anyone could have seen that coming, that neither he, nor his Dad, were conservatives. That "thousand points of light" and "New World Order" crap out of the Dad, and then the "Compassionate Conservationism" crap out of the son should have been warnings to all. Needless to say, I didn't vote for either one of those two.

    Mr. Reagan, along with Maggie Thatcher, the old (real) Pope, Konrad Adenauer, Lec Walesa, and millions of American soldiers, sailors, airmen, and mechanical/electrical engineers and technicians won the Cold War. That was worth the money.

    Allow me to don my Professor’s cap and recommend David Stockman’s book, the Great Deformation. Stockman covers the period from Hoover up through the present day. Particularly illuminating is his view of budget shenanigans around the great Reagan defense boondoggle. I don’t know if Stockman used the term, but if you read his (very long) book, you’ll use it as well.

    Stockman freaked out because supply-side tax theory gave the Feds carte blanche to spend like drunken sailors on “defense,” with a 600-ship Navy, with 12 or 15 carrier groups (carriers now having been rendered obsolete). There’s an argument to be made that we borrowed a lot of money and bankrupted the Soviets; that ignores one thing that the USA did do, in accordance with our Saudi allies (who were funding Osama to fight the Soviets), which was to flood the world with cheap oil and drive down the Soviet Union’s last source of currency in about 1986. The Berlin Wall fell three years later, and the Soviet Union went belly up five years later.

    Stockman points out that that defense buildup had a second, highly negative effect: now we had a lot of conventional weapons stockpiled, and no Fulda Gap to fight over. This greatly empowered the Neocons; the period from 1990 to 2003 was them using the useless surplus that Reagan’s defense buildup handed them.

    Stockman points out that the last President who could really control out of control military spending was Ike, due to his having been the winning General in the conflict. His warning about the MICC in 1961 has largely come true; we spend about $1trln today (all in, with defense costs and interest on previous defense costs) on “defense.” It’s left our country a hollowed out shell with infrastructure that protects us from Chinese invasion, because they couldn’t afford to repair it if they conquered us.

  125. @Stan d Mute
    It’s been pretty common in SE Michigan ever since the Big 3 made a big push to get employees off the payroll. I’ve found most employers are amenable to the deal, but some will try to pocket the 7.5% instead of handing it over and almost all will balk at converting healthcare premiums to cash payments. But the big SUVs aren’t such a bad deal either when you deduct them as expenses and claim no personal use. All non-collector cars are depreciating assets and there are times when you want more depreciation plus they’re fantastic for winter in the north, transporting big pets or broods of kids, and making Costco runs.

    You mean Subchapter T has been pretty common? That would require some organizational changes. Google Mondragon.

    If they’re paying employees as independent contractors, then there’s no real opportunity to get tax-free dividends from work. You can write off a lot of expenses, but at the end of the day you still wind up paying 15.3% of the first 130,000 of “income” and then other taxes.

    Of course, if you instead became an employee of a corporation owned by someone not related to you, it might be able to reimburse you under an accountable plan for business travel. It could send you to the Cayman Islands and cut you a check to cover your meal and lodging expenses for $715 per diem; if it sent you on a 30-day business trip that would be over $21k in expense reimbursement. Cannes, $637. Paris (maybe to look up Detroit founding documents?) $580. Send someone on a 90day business trip to Paris and you can reimburse their expenses to the tune of over $52K. My guess is even I could live in Paris for 3 months for less than that.

  126. @Achmed E. Newman
    I have a couple of things to add here:

    ... and society really has had it in for your group.
     
    Mr. A.E. says he's a Millenial. The Millenials are to be (per the somewhat-hokey book) the Hero archetypes that are supposed to be the actors in the Crisis to come, like, any time now.*

    The authors are very clear that not every Crisis period will end well, with a turning into a new High period. When you look at it 20-odd years later, I believe this is the last cycle. I hope I'm wrong, and am willing to fulfill my archetypical destiny.**

    Also, Tom, I'm not sure if you read all my comment above, but the 2 authors also stipulate that this whole cyclical business that the 2 books are about is for the English/American people. If they are going to be < half the population, how does any of their book apply, anyway? They never did say much about immigration, as I recall, especially even that of 150 years back from Southern/Eastern Europe, so they assume lots of assimilation into English-based American culture, a historically pretty-good assumption, but one that's completely erroneous now.

    .

    * That's not to be sarcastic. I do think that it'll be anytime, and I give credit to Strauss & Howe for their timetable being realistic.

    ** I really did read the books thoroughly and took them seriously, as they are fascinating if you do. There's one guy on the web who's guest articles used to appear on ZeroHedge, who treated this book like the Holy Bible.

    I think the post-war high was a side effect of increasing per-capita amounts of fossil fueled energy. US consumption of oil is about back to the level of 1965, having peaked somewhere in the early 70s, which is also when the great working class wage stagnation began. You might well be correct: this is the last upward-trending cycle, and the High, if it comes, will be a better society for children than the world into which genX was born, but it will be materially much poorer: there simply aren’t exponentially supplies of hydrocarbons available to fuel that growth. It will have to be something else.

    I did see the comment on the saeculum as applied to Anglo Saxons. One thing about the crisis and resolution, though, is that it forges a new consensus. FDR, despite his offenses against Catholic subsidiarity, helped forge a society that was opposed to “hyphenated Americans,” so that all were converged towards some idea of American. I think the mid-60s and the Great Society broke this, and the growth of identity politics has proceeded to today. In the crisis, if it resolves well, a new social consensus forms where identity politics as a centrifugal force are abandoned, and the centripetal identity as (Americans? New Englanders, or any of the other regional nations that emerge?) becomes stronger.

    Hard to imagine happening, but it could work out that way. The thing about “hard to imagine” is that that’s what a crisis resolution can do: turn British subjects into Americans; turn a socialist-oriented proletariat into a well-satisfied working class in the suburbs. It can also turn defeated enemies into bitter segregationists and inflict a 90-year depression on an area like the South.

  127. @Stan d Mute
    That’s a major Catch-22. To afford a “good” school you need two incomes which means you’re going to hand off your kids earlier and need those income streams earlier. Unless you live in an increasingly impoverished and job free whitopia where the rusting empty town factory stands as a monument to globalization and off-shored manufacturing. In which case you’re lucky to have even one job and income stream.

    Farming is a possibility if you can stomach being a welfare recipient, but then it’s got to be under your wife’s name since FedGov has no love for you deplorable crackers.

    Of course there’s no such thing as a “good” school. Just good neighborhoods that can fund them. As I’m sure you know.

    Loved this article:
    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-01-05/why-school-has-nothing-do-students
    Excerpt:

    A reader commented about this the other day in an email he sent me. He said no one paying attention actually thinks schooling is for the kids. It is really “free” daycare for parents.

    UTLA plans to launch its strike four days after students return from the holiday break. By inconveniencing parents—most of whom are low-income and rely on schools to take care of their children during working hours—the union aims to bring public pressure on the district.

    It’s true. Schooling has absolutely nothing to do with the students. They are the last concern, an afterthought if anything. And the school districts, teachers, unions, and unfortunately often the parents don’t really care how bad the education is at the public schools they send their kids to. It’s all about money, convenience, and political power.

  128. @TomSchmidt
    (Federal)Government agencies are responsible for setting food safety standards, conducting inspections, ensuring that standards are met, and maintaining a strong enforcement program to deal with those who do not comply with standards.

    What could we do without the Feds in food Safety? Oh, yes, this:

    Pennsylvania, no matter what its burden on interstate commerce, has every right to decide what baked goods can and cannot be sold within the state. Rather than make up a separate package for Pennsylvanians, most manufacturers incorporate “Reg. Penn. Dept. Agr.” into their standard design–and that includes Canadian as well as overseas operations (“Reg.,” by the way, stands for “registered with,” not “regulated by,” in case you were wondering).

    Naturally, Pennsylvanians find it impossible to dispatch agents to every bakery in the world. So they’ve developed a network of contacts with other state (and foreign) agriculture boards, all of which are happy to keep tabs on domestic production for the sake of clean-living Keystoners.
     
    “Provide emergency care?”

    Indeed.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1470509

    Do you even READ your links?

    Despite the lack of uniform federal legislation, regulations, or standards, and despite the absence of legislation, regulations, and standards in most states and cities, EMS was developing and providing care to patients. Most advances had occurred through interest by local physicians, hospitals, firefighters, government officials, or entrepreneurs.
     
    Seems local people were handling the issue. then the Feds decided to get involved. What happened?

    Although the federal government continued to view EMS as it had in the early 1960s—as a transportation agency that provided basic first aid—medical advances had revolutionized EMS. In 1972 the National Academy of Sciences–National Research Council released an analysis of the EMS system showing that the federal government, despite a stated EMS commitment, lacked a coherent policy and had failed to sufficiently advance EMS.
     
    Yes, that's typically what happens when Federal Bureaucrats, with no local skin in the game, try to seize control of an area. What happened next?

    These historical and medical forces have resulted in the unique characteristics of the EMS system present in the United States today. Changes have occurred in the EMS system since 1973. New technologies and medications have continued to increase the level of care provided by emergency medical technicians. The federal role has been reduced significantly, to a role now primarily of technical assistance and coordination by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
     
    So if I go by YOUR LINK, the Federal government does not "provide emergency care." Thank you for confirming it. It does seem like a whole host of local and regional agencies DO provide emergency care, of course, and they could probably do MORE of it with fewer dollars being showered on bureaucrats having to pay DC housing costs. I'd rather pay the housing costs of a bureaucrat near Albany or Trenton than DC, thank you.

    Not “research”. Just research.
    Ever looked at an NSF grant award? Seen the amount of indirect dollars that go the the institution the researcher works at? Here's a decent link:
    https://www.aau.edu/sites/default/files/AAU%20Files/Key%20Issues/Intellectual%20Property/Indirect-Cost-FAQ_2017.pdf?id=18472

    Quote: "In order to perform research on behalf of federal agencies, universities incur a variety of costs they would not otherwise have, both leading up to and while conducting a specific research
    project. Facilities and Administrative (F&A) costs, often referred to as indirect costs, cover a portion of the university’s infrastructure and operational costs related to federally-funded research. ... F&A costs also cover the personnel, paperwork, and other costs involved in complying with various federal, state, and local rules and regulations."
    So a very large number of dollars every year are used to support the bloated salaries of University administrators. You must know this?

    I obviously do not know what you worship. I suggest strongly to you that food safety, emergency services, and scientific research happened in the USA before the Federal power and money-grab. Given that some of these things are actually useful, it's comforting to know that, as the Federal Government has reached the point where mandatory spending plus defense now equals the total tax dollar take (all discretionary spending, like the three sometimes useful things you outlined, is essentially borrowed), when it is unable to fund any of these things that responsible local authorities, without the bureaucratic overhead, will still be around to provide them. Then maybe we can start to wonder what else we get, and cut out, oh, 500 billion dollars for "defense."

    “What could we do without the Feds in food Safety? Oh, yes, this:”

    Except that a number of states may not have those strict standards. Moreover, potentially dozens of different standards by each state for companies to abide by can be a daunting task. Such matters are best to have streamlined rules in place, with the option of states to impose even more rigorous criteria.

    “Seems local people were handling the issue. then the Feds decided to get involved.”

    In coordination with local efforts to provide emergency care.

    “Seen the amount of indirect dollars that go the the institution the researcher works at?”

    Red herring.

    “&A costs also cover the personnel, paperwork, and other costs involved in complying with various federal, state, and local rules and regulations. So a very large number of dollars every year are used to support the bloated salaries of University administrators.”

    Non sequitur.

    “I suggest strongly to you that food safety, emergency services, and scientific research happened in the USA…”

    Absolutely, on a small scale. The federal government, at the behest of citizens and companies, became more intricately involved.

    “before the Federal power and money-grab.”

    No, that would be a false characterization.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    So, to sum up your reply:

    1) The Federal Role in Food safety is not all-encompassing, and can be replaced by states, as you wrote. So, not needed. Some states' citizens may vote to have different standards, and that might cause businesses more trouble. (Some might consider this roadblock to consolidation of the food supply a feature, not a bug; I'll guess you don't.) This experiment in regulation is considered a bad thing by you; one Federal ring of bureaucrats to rule them all is your preference.

    2)The Federal Government does NOT provide emergency care, as you originally wrote, but may help local government agencies coordinate.

    3) Federal dollars for "research" go partly for supporting actual research, and partly to support bloated administrative structures. You dismissed my characterization of research as "research" as a red herring, because... someone's gotta pay the bloated administrative salaries in academia? Haven't paid much attention to how much money universities pay to try to develop a research culture and get on the gravy train, destroying academia in the process, have you? I'll grant you that I did not qualify administrative bloat; you could, if you cared to educate yourself, read the following link:
    https://www.jamesgmartin.center/2017/06/administrative-bloat-campus-academia-shrinks-students-suffer/

    Yes, all that bloat for high admin salaries is part of the indirect costs universities tack on to research grants. From the article:

    Universities have increased spending, but very little of that increased spending has been related to classroom instruction; rather, it is being directed toward non-classroom costs. As a result, there has been a growth in academic bureaucracies, as universities focus on hiring employees to manage or administer people, programs, and regulations. Between 2001 and 2011, these sorts of hires have increased 50% faster than the number of classroom instructors. This trend…has become ubiquitous in…American higher education.
     
    4) You don't like calling the Progressive-era reformers power and money grabbers, calling it a false characterization. Allow me to quote Andrew Codevilla:

    As the 19th century ended, the educated class’s religious fervor turned to social reform: they were sure that because man is a mere part of evolutionary nature, man could be improved, and that they, the most highly evolved of all, were the improvers. ... progressives who imagined themselves the world’s examples and the world’s reformers dreamt big dreams of establishing order, justice, and peace at home and abroad. Neither were they shy about their desire for power. Wilson was the first American statesman to argue that the Founders had done badly by depriving the U.S. government of the power to reshape American society. Nor was Wilson the last to invade a foreign country (Mexico) to “teach [them] to elect good men.” ... The Progressives, for their part, found it fulfilling to attribute the failure of their schemes to the American people’s backwardness, to something deeply wrong with America. The American people had failed them because democracy in its American form perpetuated the worst in humanity. Thus Progressives began to look down on the masses, to look on themselves as the vanguard, and to look abroad for examples to emulate.
     
    We agree to differ, then. But it's gonna be sweet to see all those no-skin-in-the-game bureaucrats lose everything.
  129. @Corvinus
    "What could we do without the Feds in food Safety? Oh, yes, this:"

    Except that a number of states may not have those strict standards. Moreover, potentially dozens of different standards by each state for companies to abide by can be a daunting task. Such matters are best to have streamlined rules in place, with the option of states to impose even more rigorous criteria.

    "Seems local people were handling the issue. then the Feds decided to get involved."

    In coordination with local efforts to provide emergency care.

    "Seen the amount of indirect dollars that go the the institution the researcher works at?"

    Red herring.

    "&A costs also cover the personnel, paperwork, and other costs involved in complying with various federal, state, and local rules and regulations. So a very large number of dollars every year are used to support the bloated salaries of University administrators."

    Non sequitur.

    "I suggest strongly to you that food safety, emergency services, and scientific research happened in the USA..."

    Absolutely, on a small scale. The federal government, at the behest of citizens and companies, became more intricately involved.

    "before the Federal power and money-grab."

    No, that would be a false characterization.

    So, to sum up your reply:

    1) The Federal Role in Food safety is not all-encompassing, and can be replaced by states, as you wrote. So, not needed. Some states’ citizens may vote to have different standards, and that might cause businesses more trouble. (Some might consider this roadblock to consolidation of the food supply a feature, not a bug; I’ll guess you don’t.) This experiment in regulation is considered a bad thing by you; one Federal ring of bureaucrats to rule them all is your preference.

    2)The Federal Government does NOT provide emergency care, as you originally wrote, but may help local government agencies coordinate.

    3) Federal dollars for “research” go partly for supporting actual research, and partly to support bloated administrative structures. You dismissed my characterization of research as “research” as a red herring, because… someone’s gotta pay the bloated administrative salaries in academia? Haven’t paid much attention to how much money universities pay to try to develop a research culture and get on the gravy train, destroying academia in the process, have you? I’ll grant you that I did not qualify administrative bloat; you could, if you cared to educate yourself, read the following link:
    https://www.jamesgmartin.center/2017/06/administrative-bloat-campus-academia-shrinks-students-suffer/

    Yes, all that bloat for high admin salaries is part of the indirect costs universities tack on to research grants. From the article:

    Universities have increased spending, but very little of that increased spending has been related to classroom instruction; rather, it is being directed toward non-classroom costs. As a result, there has been a growth in academic bureaucracies, as universities focus on hiring employees to manage or administer people, programs, and regulations. Between 2001 and 2011, these sorts of hires have increased 50% faster than the number of classroom instructors. This trend…has become ubiquitous in…American higher education.

    4) You don’t like calling the Progressive-era reformers power and money grabbers, calling it a false characterization. Allow me to quote Andrew Codevilla:

    As the 19th century ended, the educated class’s religious fervor turned to social reform: they were sure that because man is a mere part of evolutionary nature, man could be improved, and that they, the most highly evolved of all, were the improvers. … progressives who imagined themselves the world’s examples and the world’s reformers dreamt big dreams of establishing order, justice, and peace at home and abroad. Neither were they shy about their desire for power. Wilson was the first American statesman to argue that the Founders had done badly by depriving the U.S. government of the power to reshape American society. Nor was Wilson the last to invade a foreign country (Mexico) to “teach [them] to elect good men.” … The Progressives, for their part, found it fulfilling to attribute the failure of their schemes to the American people’s backwardness, to something deeply wrong with America. The American people had failed them because democracy in its American form perpetuated the worst in humanity. Thus Progressives began to look down on the masses, to look on themselves as the vanguard, and to look abroad for examples to emulate.

    We agree to differ, then. But it’s gonna be sweet to see all those no-skin-in-the-game bureaucrats lose everything.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "So, to sum up your reply: 1) The Federal Role in Food safety is not all-encompassing, and can be replaced by states, as you wrote.'

    Actually, my response is that the federal role of food safety is of significant importance considering past failures at the state and local levels. States have the liberty to create tougher standards compared to the federal government. Ultimately, however consumer protection is a fundamental role of our government by way of interstate commerce. State oversight of food safety is a COMPLIMENT to federal oversight of food safety. So, the federal role in food safety is definitively required.

    "This experiment in regulation is considered a bad thing by you; one Federal ring of bureaucrats to rule them all is your preference."

    Actually, additional state regulations, if demanded by citizens here, can be a boon to the consumer. Again, the federal and state governments work in concert in this area.

    "2)The Federal Government does NOT provide emergency care, as you originally wrote, but may help local government agencies coordinate."

    Actually, by way of coordinate with state and local government agencies on emergency care, the federal governments provides it. The EMS is an intricate system, and each component has an essential role to perform as part of this coordinated and seamless system.

    "3) Federal dollars for “research” go partly for supporting actual research, and partly to support bloated administrative structures."

    Actually, federal dollars go for research (no quotes). The issue is that the recipients of those funds then create those structures, some of which people would characterize as "bloated". That is a SEPARATE issue. Grant money is used for indirect purposes** have more accountability. But, assuredly, that money by the federal government helps to facilitate technological, scientific, and medical advancements.

    **Facilities (F) refers to operational and maintenance costs (light, heat, telecommunications) that are consumed while performing the research, and include depreciation and use of buildings or equipment used for the research, and interest on debts associated with facilities and equipment.

    **Administrative (A) refers to general administrative expenses (costs associated with functions like financial management), unit administration expenses (clerical staff and supplies), sponsored projects administration (costs of administering and complying with regulations on projects and awards), student administration and services expenses. While this may sound trivial, this piece includes the critical infrastructure that is required to assure that research performed within the project adheres to federal regulations on the conduct of research and appropriate fiscal management of grant funds.

    Source --> https://uknow.uky.edu/research/facilities-administrative-costs-federal-grants-contracts-are-critical-uk-research

    "Haven’t paid much attention to how much money universities pay to try to develop a research culture and get on the gravy train, destroying academia in the process, have you?"

    The source you cited, which is a conservative nonprofit institute, does make legitimate points. Again, that is a separate issue. The fact remains that the federal government the federal government provides a strong foundation through its funding of basic and applied research, which creates a platform for commercialization, which spurs job creation and entrepreneurial growth.

    I am also familiar with Mr. Codevilla's work. He also has a distinct bias. The reality is that an educated class of people, consisting of middle and upper class folks from different walks of life, had witnessed perpetual abuses by corporations on citizen liberties. It was predicated on a desire to perform God's work. Clearly, a number of business owners had engaged in corruption of the democratic system. These reformers had designs to curb the power of corporations and their paid political operatives who shielded them from reform legislation. The Founding Fathers had warned specifically about the potential abuses of artificially created entities, i.e companies, and thus the Progressives, including Theodore Roosevelt and William Taft, took it upon themselves, with citizens at full throat for political and economic changes, to hold businesses accountable. It was the American people who had an appetite for mammon and power that had failed the principles of democracy. The Progressives looked to the masses for help at the ballot box to move forward their agenda.

    "But it’s gonna be sweet to see all those no-skin-in-the-game bureaucrats lose everything."

    Maybe. Then again, perhaps not.
  130. @TomSchmidt
    So, to sum up your reply:

    1) The Federal Role in Food safety is not all-encompassing, and can be replaced by states, as you wrote. So, not needed. Some states' citizens may vote to have different standards, and that might cause businesses more trouble. (Some might consider this roadblock to consolidation of the food supply a feature, not a bug; I'll guess you don't.) This experiment in regulation is considered a bad thing by you; one Federal ring of bureaucrats to rule them all is your preference.

    2)The Federal Government does NOT provide emergency care, as you originally wrote, but may help local government agencies coordinate.

    3) Federal dollars for "research" go partly for supporting actual research, and partly to support bloated administrative structures. You dismissed my characterization of research as "research" as a red herring, because... someone's gotta pay the bloated administrative salaries in academia? Haven't paid much attention to how much money universities pay to try to develop a research culture and get on the gravy train, destroying academia in the process, have you? I'll grant you that I did not qualify administrative bloat; you could, if you cared to educate yourself, read the following link:
    https://www.jamesgmartin.center/2017/06/administrative-bloat-campus-academia-shrinks-students-suffer/

    Yes, all that bloat for high admin salaries is part of the indirect costs universities tack on to research grants. From the article:

    Universities have increased spending, but very little of that increased spending has been related to classroom instruction; rather, it is being directed toward non-classroom costs. As a result, there has been a growth in academic bureaucracies, as universities focus on hiring employees to manage or administer people, programs, and regulations. Between 2001 and 2011, these sorts of hires have increased 50% faster than the number of classroom instructors. This trend…has become ubiquitous in…American higher education.
     
    4) You don't like calling the Progressive-era reformers power and money grabbers, calling it a false characterization. Allow me to quote Andrew Codevilla:

    As the 19th century ended, the educated class’s religious fervor turned to social reform: they were sure that because man is a mere part of evolutionary nature, man could be improved, and that they, the most highly evolved of all, were the improvers. ... progressives who imagined themselves the world’s examples and the world’s reformers dreamt big dreams of establishing order, justice, and peace at home and abroad. Neither were they shy about their desire for power. Wilson was the first American statesman to argue that the Founders had done badly by depriving the U.S. government of the power to reshape American society. Nor was Wilson the last to invade a foreign country (Mexico) to “teach [them] to elect good men.” ... The Progressives, for their part, found it fulfilling to attribute the failure of their schemes to the American people’s backwardness, to something deeply wrong with America. The American people had failed them because democracy in its American form perpetuated the worst in humanity. Thus Progressives began to look down on the masses, to look on themselves as the vanguard, and to look abroad for examples to emulate.
     
    We agree to differ, then. But it's gonna be sweet to see all those no-skin-in-the-game bureaucrats lose everything.

    “So, to sum up your reply: 1) The Federal Role in Food safety is not all-encompassing, and can be replaced by states, as you wrote.’

    Actually, my response is that the federal role of food safety is of significant importance considering past failures at the state and local levels. States have the liberty to create tougher standards compared to the federal government. Ultimately, however consumer protection is a fundamental role of our government by way of interstate commerce. State oversight of food safety is a COMPLIMENT to federal oversight of food safety. So, the federal role in food safety is definitively required.

    “This experiment in regulation is considered a bad thing by you; one Federal ring of bureaucrats to rule them all is your preference.”

    Actually, additional state regulations, if demanded by citizens here, can be a boon to the consumer. Again, the federal and state governments work in concert in this area.

    “2)The Federal Government does NOT provide emergency care, as you originally wrote, but may help local government agencies coordinate.”

    Actually, by way of coordinate with state and local government agencies on emergency care, the federal governments provides it. The EMS is an intricate system, and each component has an essential role to perform as part of this coordinated and seamless system.

    “3) Federal dollars for “research” go partly for supporting actual research, and partly to support bloated administrative structures.”

    Actually, federal dollars go for research (no quotes). The issue is that the recipients of those funds then create those structures, some of which people would characterize as “bloated”. That is a SEPARATE issue. Grant money is used for indirect purposes** have more accountability. But, assuredly, that money by the federal government helps to facilitate technological, scientific, and medical advancements.

    **Facilities (F) refers to operational and maintenance costs (light, heat, telecommunications) that are consumed while performing the research, and include depreciation and use of buildings or equipment used for the research, and interest on debts associated with facilities and equipment.

    **Administrative (A) refers to general administrative expenses (costs associated with functions like financial management), unit administration expenses (clerical staff and supplies), sponsored projects administration (costs of administering and complying with regulations on projects and awards), student administration and services expenses. While this may sound trivial, this piece includes the critical infrastructure that is required to assure that research performed within the project adheres to federal regulations on the conduct of research and appropriate fiscal management of grant funds.

    Source –> https://uknow.uky.edu/research/facilities-administrative-costs-federal-grants-contracts-are-critical-uk-research

    “Haven’t paid much attention to how much money universities pay to try to develop a research culture and get on the gravy train, destroying academia in the process, have you?”

    The source you cited, which is a conservative nonprofit institute, does make legitimate points. Again, that is a separate issue. The fact remains that the federal government the federal government provides a strong foundation through its funding of basic and applied research, which creates a platform for commercialization, which spurs job creation and entrepreneurial growth.

    I am also familiar with Mr. Codevilla’s work. He also has a distinct bias. The reality is that an educated class of people, consisting of middle and upper class folks from different walks of life, had witnessed perpetual abuses by corporations on citizen liberties. It was predicated on a desire to perform God’s work. Clearly, a number of business owners had engaged in corruption of the democratic system. These reformers had designs to curb the power of corporations and their paid political operatives who shielded them from reform legislation. The Founding Fathers had warned specifically about the potential abuses of artificially created entities, i.e companies, and thus the Progressives, including Theodore Roosevelt and William Taft, took it upon themselves, with citizens at full throat for political and economic changes, to hold businesses accountable. It was the American people who had an appetite for mammon and power that had failed the principles of democracy. The Progressives looked to the masses for help at the ballot box to move forward their agenda.

    “But it’s gonna be sweet to see all those no-skin-in-the-game bureaucrats lose everything.”

    Maybe. Then again, perhaps not.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    It's been interesting engaging with you, and I thank you for the thought stimulus. Much of the research I've had to do in responding has shown that much of the Federal interference in things is still run in a federalist style: the Feds offer money, as in education, but get control for the money without actually doing the work (as in emergency services, as you point out). Of course, supplying these goods means supplying two things: the goods themselves, and the knowledge of how to provide them. The latter is probably not valued on any balance sheet but will remain (at least for a few years) after the funding goes away.

    The Feds now spend all tax revenues on defense plus mandatory spending. The trillion or so dollars on discretionary is all borrowed. If the Feds lose access to the capital markets, then all that borrowed spending goes away. It's good to know that it need not mean the end of everything when that happens. (Before the cuts to granny, they'll cut defense to 1/4 its current size. Even doing that today would not lead to living within the tax revenues the Feds collect.)

    You might like John Michael Greer's Decline and Fall, about the end of the US Empire. Towards the end, he sketches out a vision of (local) government as overseer of local commons, providing goods like education and sewerage in accordance with local taxation and accountability. You'd find a lot in there to enervate you about the possibilities of the onrushing imperial collapse.
  131. President Trump isn’t going to get the wall. As his candidacy was a referendum on a wall so will the status of the wall in 2020 be a referendum on his presidency.

    Similarly, Brexit is likely to be overturned, because the majority of British MPs are pro-EU.

    Nothing good can come from either development. People will become even more cynical about the political process itself, especially the notion that it is democratic. “Liberals” believe that Trump is an extremist, but he is not. The next contrarian to be elected might be – and he will know that he needs to play a much harder game than Trump if he wants his program to be implemented.

  132. @Corvinus
    "So, to sum up your reply: 1) The Federal Role in Food safety is not all-encompassing, and can be replaced by states, as you wrote.'

    Actually, my response is that the federal role of food safety is of significant importance considering past failures at the state and local levels. States have the liberty to create tougher standards compared to the federal government. Ultimately, however consumer protection is a fundamental role of our government by way of interstate commerce. State oversight of food safety is a COMPLIMENT to federal oversight of food safety. So, the federal role in food safety is definitively required.

    "This experiment in regulation is considered a bad thing by you; one Federal ring of bureaucrats to rule them all is your preference."

    Actually, additional state regulations, if demanded by citizens here, can be a boon to the consumer. Again, the federal and state governments work in concert in this area.

    "2)The Federal Government does NOT provide emergency care, as you originally wrote, but may help local government agencies coordinate."

    Actually, by way of coordinate with state and local government agencies on emergency care, the federal governments provides it. The EMS is an intricate system, and each component has an essential role to perform as part of this coordinated and seamless system.

    "3) Federal dollars for “research” go partly for supporting actual research, and partly to support bloated administrative structures."

    Actually, federal dollars go for research (no quotes). The issue is that the recipients of those funds then create those structures, some of which people would characterize as "bloated". That is a SEPARATE issue. Grant money is used for indirect purposes** have more accountability. But, assuredly, that money by the federal government helps to facilitate technological, scientific, and medical advancements.

    **Facilities (F) refers to operational and maintenance costs (light, heat, telecommunications) that are consumed while performing the research, and include depreciation and use of buildings or equipment used for the research, and interest on debts associated with facilities and equipment.

    **Administrative (A) refers to general administrative expenses (costs associated with functions like financial management), unit administration expenses (clerical staff and supplies), sponsored projects administration (costs of administering and complying with regulations on projects and awards), student administration and services expenses. While this may sound trivial, this piece includes the critical infrastructure that is required to assure that research performed within the project adheres to federal regulations on the conduct of research and appropriate fiscal management of grant funds.

    Source --> https://uknow.uky.edu/research/facilities-administrative-costs-federal-grants-contracts-are-critical-uk-research

    "Haven’t paid much attention to how much money universities pay to try to develop a research culture and get on the gravy train, destroying academia in the process, have you?"

    The source you cited, which is a conservative nonprofit institute, does make legitimate points. Again, that is a separate issue. The fact remains that the federal government the federal government provides a strong foundation through its funding of basic and applied research, which creates a platform for commercialization, which spurs job creation and entrepreneurial growth.

    I am also familiar with Mr. Codevilla's work. He also has a distinct bias. The reality is that an educated class of people, consisting of middle and upper class folks from different walks of life, had witnessed perpetual abuses by corporations on citizen liberties. It was predicated on a desire to perform God's work. Clearly, a number of business owners had engaged in corruption of the democratic system. These reformers had designs to curb the power of corporations and their paid political operatives who shielded them from reform legislation. The Founding Fathers had warned specifically about the potential abuses of artificially created entities, i.e companies, and thus the Progressives, including Theodore Roosevelt and William Taft, took it upon themselves, with citizens at full throat for political and economic changes, to hold businesses accountable. It was the American people who had an appetite for mammon and power that had failed the principles of democracy. The Progressives looked to the masses for help at the ballot box to move forward their agenda.

    "But it’s gonna be sweet to see all those no-skin-in-the-game bureaucrats lose everything."

    Maybe. Then again, perhaps not.

    It’s been interesting engaging with you, and I thank you for the thought stimulus. Much of the research I’ve had to do in responding has shown that much of the Federal interference in things is still run in a federalist style: the Feds offer money, as in education, but get control for the money without actually doing the work (as in emergency services, as you point out). Of course, supplying these goods means supplying two things: the goods themselves, and the knowledge of how to provide them. The latter is probably not valued on any balance sheet but will remain (at least for a few years) after the funding goes away.

    The Feds now spend all tax revenues on defense plus mandatory spending. The trillion or so dollars on discretionary is all borrowed. If the Feds lose access to the capital markets, then all that borrowed spending goes away. It’s good to know that it need not mean the end of everything when that happens. (Before the cuts to granny, they’ll cut defense to 1/4 its current size. Even doing that today would not lead to living within the tax revenues the Feds collect.)

    You might like John Michael Greer’s Decline and Fall, about the end of the US Empire. Towards the end, he sketches out a vision of (local) government as overseer of local commons, providing goods like education and sewerage in accordance with local taxation and accountability. You’d find a lot in there to enervate you about the possibilities of the onrushing imperial collapse.

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