The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 Andrew Napolitano ArchiveBlogview
America at Christmas
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments

What if Christmas is a core value of belief in a personal God who lived among us and His freely given promise of eternal salvation that no believer should reject or apologize for? What if Christmas is the rebirth of Christ in the hearts of all believers? What if Christmas is the potential rebirth of Christ in every heart that will have Him, whether a believer or not?

What if Jesus Christ was born about 2,000 years ago in Bethlehem? What if He is true God and true man? What if this is a mystery and a miracle? What if this came about as part of God’s plan for the salvation of all people? What if Jesus was sent into the world to atone for our sins by offering Himself as a sacrifice? What if He was sinless? What if His life was the most critical turning point in human history? What if the reason we live is that He died?

What if after He died, He rose from the dead? What if He was murdered by the government because it feared a revolt if it did not murder Him? What if the government thought He was crazy when He said He is a king but His kingdom is not of this world? What if He was not crazy but divine? What if when He said that He could forgive sins, He was referring to Himself as God?

What if He is one of the three parts of a triune God? What if this is an inexplicable mystery? What if there is no power without mystery? What if the power He possessed, He exercised only for the good? What if He truly gave sight to the blind, hearing to the deaf, musculature to the lame, hope to the disillusioned, courage to the weak and even life to the dead?

What if He freely did these things but sought no acclamation for them? What if after each of these miracles, He disappeared into the temple precincts or walked well past the crowd, lest the crowd hail him as a temporal or secular leader?

What if there was in that towering personality a deep thread of shyness? What if He was shy about His Godness? What if He was shy about His goodness? What if He loved saving us? What if He was joyful but did not want us to see His joy?

What if He knew all along how profoundly untimely and utterly painful the end of His life on earth would be but He neither feared nor avoided it? What if His greatest display of love was self-restraint on the Cross?

What if most of the world that He came to save has rejected Him? What if He still loves those who have rejected Him? What if He still offers them salvation? What if His offer is real and forever?

What if many folks today have rejected the true God for government-as-god? What if the government-as-god has set itself up as providing for all secular needs in return for fidelity to it? What if this seductive offer has been accepted by millions in America?

What if the acceptance of this seductive offer of government-as-god has ruined individual initiative, destroyed personal work ethic, fostered cancerous laziness, enhanced deep poverty and impelled thoughtless obedience to government in those who have accepted it? What if the defiance inherent in the belief of government-as-god chills the exercise of personal freedoms for fear of the loss of the government’s munificence? What if government charity is really munificence with money it has taken from those who work and earn it? What if it’s then given to those who don’t? What if it is impossible to be truly charitable with someone else’s money?

What if Jesus came to set us free from the yoke of government oppression and the chains of personal sin? What if freedom is our birthright, given to us by the true God, not by the government-as-god? What if the true God made us in His own image and likeness? What if the most similar likeness between us mortals and the true God is freedom? What if just as God is perfectly free, so are we perfectly free? What if we have failed to preserve freedom and have permitted governments to take it from us? What if we are not full people without full freedom?

What if the world was full of darkness before He came into it? What if there is darkness still today but yet much light? What if we recognize that He is the Light of the World? What if Christmas is the birthday of the Son of God and the Son of Mary? What if we recognize the presence of the Son of God and the Son of Mary in our hearts and among us? What if the God-as-baby whose birthday we celebrate is the Savior of the World? What if we don’t mask this but live it?

What if we say with our hearts and mean with our words — Merry Christmas?

Copyright 2016 Andrew P. Napolitano. Distributed by Creators.com.

 
• Tags: Christianity 
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>
18 Comments to "America at Christmas"
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
    []
  1. Mr. Napolitano, certainly those of us who embrace the Incarnate Son of God
    as Lord and Saviour, and see Him as the great Hope and Light for all mankind,
    should make no apologies for proclaiming Him as such to a dying world.

    He brings peace, joy, hope, and goodwill to this dark and struggling world.
    May many men, women, and children come to His Light this new year. Merry Christmas!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
    Sharing Comment via Twitter
    http://www.unz.com/anapolitano/america-at-christmas-2/#comment-1701281
    More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  2. What if the good Judge gets off this what if kick? What if he first check his facts before writing this what if stuff. What if it turns out that Christ did not show restraint on the cross? His cry to God who had forsaken him does not show restraint. There are others.

    Read More
  3. Merry Christmas to you and all Christians everywhere Judge. And to all non-Christians who for some reason wish to celebrate the occasion I say Happy Holidays.

    Read More
    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Understand your distinction, but shouldn't we wish the peace, love, and compassion of Jesus to everyone, nonchristians as much as Christians? Merry Christmas to you and yours, WorkingClass, and to all people of good will everywhere.
  4. @WorkingClass
    Merry Christmas to you and all Christians everywhere Judge. And to all non-Christians who for some reason wish to celebrate the occasion I say Happy Holidays.

    Understand your distinction, but shouldn’t we wish the peace, love, and compassion of Jesus to everyone, nonchristians as much as Christians? Merry Christmas to you and yours, WorkingClass, and to all people of good will everywhere.

    Read More
    • Replies: @David

    Let those who... would erect for us such a contemplative and immaterial an exercise of religion, not wonder if there be some who think it had vanished and melted through their fingers had it not more upheld itself among us as a mark, title, and instrument of division and faction, than by itself.

     

    Montaigne
  5. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    By now, I quit reading after the few second it takes to see it’s yet one more installment in the What if series.

    If many did, perhaps this would come to a constructive end.

    Read More
  6. @RadicalCenter
    Understand your distinction, but shouldn't we wish the peace, love, and compassion of Jesus to everyone, nonchristians as much as Christians? Merry Christmas to you and yours, WorkingClass, and to all people of good will everywhere.

    Let those who… would erect for us such a contemplative and immaterial an exercise of religion, not wonder if there be some who think it had vanished and melted through their fingers had it not more upheld itself among us as a mark, title, and instrument of division and faction, than by itself.

    Montaigne

    Read More
  7. @David

    Let those who... would erect for us such a contemplative and immaterial an exercise of religion, not wonder if there be some who think it had vanished and melted through their fingers had it not more upheld itself among us as a mark, title, and instrument of division and faction, than by itself.

     

    Montaigne

    Huh?

    Read More
    • Replies: @David
    "Those who" are the likes of Martin Luther. Basically, Montaigne seems to be saying that when religion ceases to be "a mark, title, and instrument of division and faction," it largely ceases to be.

    "shouldn't we wish the peace, love, and compassion of Jesus to everyone, non-Christians as much as Christians? Merry Christmas to you and yours, Working Class, and to all people of good will everywhere."

    In proposing Christianity as a universal religion for "everyone," you feel it slipping away, later constraining it to "people of good will." We both know Jesus came for those with bad will too, but we still choose our friends like God selecting the saved from the damned.

    We know what morality is, we're just trying to figure out who deserves it.

  8. What an idiot. Jesus never existed. The birth of the “son” was barrowed from the birth of the “sun” from Heathen Germanic Religions that predate Christianity by several centuries. Varg Vikernes has written two very good books on the subject. The idea that people that are supposed to be intelligent cling to myth and considered it truth without any attempt to verify is moronic at best and a delusional subjective psychological issue that must be treated.

    Read More
  9. “What if Jesus Christ was born about 2,000 years ago in Bethlehem?”

    Unlikely. I suspect that, on the balance of probabilities, Jesus did exist. Assuming that he was indeed “Jesus of Nazareth” then the odds are that that was where he was born too. Since the two Nativity stories, in Matthew and Luke, are obvious Greek fabrications intruded into otherwise Jewish tales, everything about them can be rejected as mere invention, including the claims that he was born in Bethlehem.

    “… a triune God? What if this is an inexplicable mystery?” It certainly is.

    “What if Jesus came to set us free from the yoke of government oppression”: it seems unlikely. Was the Tetrarch of Galilee particularly oppressive?

    “What if Christmas is the birthday …”: oh come off it. That’s like believing in Santa and the tooth fairy. The gospels aren’t even clear on his year of birth or year of death, never mind the ruddy days of birth and death.

    “What if we say with our hearts and mean with our words — Merry Christmas?” At last a measure of agreement: I despise The War Against “Merry Christmas”.

    Read More
  10. @RadicalCenter
    Huh?

    “Those who” are the likes of Martin Luther. Basically, Montaigne seems to be saying that when religion ceases to be “a mark, title, and instrument of division and faction,” it largely ceases to be.

    “shouldn’t we wish the peace, love, and compassion of Jesus to everyone, non-Christians as much as Christians? Merry Christmas to you and yours, Working Class, and to all people of good will everywhere.”

    In proposing Christianity as a universal religion for “everyone,” you feel it slipping away, later constraining it to “people of good will.” We both know Jesus came for those with bad will too, but we still choose our friends like God selecting the saved from the damned.

    We know what morality is, we’re just trying to figure out who deserves it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    "Peace on earth to men of good will" is a Gospel quote (Luke 2:14). I once heard a sermon in which the priest argued that peace was contingent upon good will; that is, that ill will destroys the peace in men's hearts; I think this is the meaning generally taken.
    , @Kyle McKenna
    Alas, Montaigne also claimed that a life of evildoing could be morally undone on one's deathbed with the right incantations. Accept the Lord properly with your dying breath and we'll forget about all that other stuff you did.

    It was at that point I began to part ways with M. Michel, which was sad for me because he was a very clever man. But I fervently believe the opposite of him: I say that how you die matters not. It's how you live that makes all the difference.
  11. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @David
    "Those who" are the likes of Martin Luther. Basically, Montaigne seems to be saying that when religion ceases to be "a mark, title, and instrument of division and faction," it largely ceases to be.

    "shouldn't we wish the peace, love, and compassion of Jesus to everyone, non-Christians as much as Christians? Merry Christmas to you and yours, Working Class, and to all people of good will everywhere."

    In proposing Christianity as a universal religion for "everyone," you feel it slipping away, later constraining it to "people of good will." We both know Jesus came for those with bad will too, but we still choose our friends like God selecting the saved from the damned.

    We know what morality is, we're just trying to figure out who deserves it.

    “Peace on earth to men of good will” is a Gospel quote (Luke 2:14). I once heard a sermon in which the priest argued that peace was contingent upon good will; that is, that ill will destroys the peace in men’s hearts; I think this is the meaning generally taken.

    Read More
  12. I like the Judge. Top ten mind, top five or two or three, maybe in Conservative, common sense-speak. But man, this “What if” series is a real downer. I anticipate his scribblings and then it’s a “What if”. Ah well, what the Hell.

    Merry Christmas, Judge and thanks for your steady and stable wisdom in the weirdest year in the history of the world, at least in my life. Ok, ok, 1968 was weird too.

    Read More
  13. @David
    "Those who" are the likes of Martin Luther. Basically, Montaigne seems to be saying that when religion ceases to be "a mark, title, and instrument of division and faction," it largely ceases to be.

    "shouldn't we wish the peace, love, and compassion of Jesus to everyone, non-Christians as much as Christians? Merry Christmas to you and yours, Working Class, and to all people of good will everywhere."

    In proposing Christianity as a universal religion for "everyone," you feel it slipping away, later constraining it to "people of good will." We both know Jesus came for those with bad will too, but we still choose our friends like God selecting the saved from the damned.

    We know what morality is, we're just trying to figure out who deserves it.

    Alas, Montaigne also claimed that a life of evildoing could be morally undone on one’s deathbed with the right incantations. Accept the Lord properly with your dying breath and we’ll forget about all that other stuff you did.

    It was at that point I began to part ways with M. Michel, which was sad for me because he was a very clever man. But I fervently believe the opposite of him: I say that how you die matters not. It’s how you live that makes all the difference.

    Read More
  14. man gets religion

    free range primate sees
    zig zag zap
    joshua tree;
    says to himself,
    lord,
    it cudda been me.

    Read More
  15. What if the failure of his pious people to prevail against the pagan Romans had unhinged him? What if he was not a failed revolutionary but a neurotic escapist?

    http://robertmagill.wordpress.com

    Read More
  16. Me, too. Hate these What if columns. As soon as I see that’s what we’ve got again, I stop reading.

    Read More
Current Commenter says:

Leave a Reply - Comments on articles more than two weeks old will be judged much more strictly on quality and tone


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
Submitted comments become the property of The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Andrew Napolitano Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
While other top brass played press agents for the administration’s war, William Odom told the truth about Iraq—though few listened.
A thousand years of meritocracy shaped the Middle Kingdom.