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Vita Zaverukha, Heroine of the ATO
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She was a member of Aidar, which is known for its brutality and ill-discipline even relative to the other Ukrainian Neo-Nazi volunteer batallions.

vita-zaverukha

Though she wasn’t seen much at the front, as there were more important matters to be seen to in the rest of Ukraine, such as corporate raids on “separatist” companies in her native Vinnitsya.

She might have participated in the incineration of the Odessa Trade Unions House, and certainly celebrated its anniversary in style.

zaverukha-happy-about-odessa

EDIT: Glossy adds some background/translations.

In general, her VK profile (Russia’s Facebook) is… interesting. Chockablock with Nazi slogans and hatemongering of all sorts. You might want to check it out soon, since it’s like to be closed any hour now in light of recent events.

zaverukha-jews-control-ukraine

In her postings, she evidences a latent obsession with virile Russian men (see left), and the political and financial power of the Jews (see right):

The evil Jews rule us! But we’re even worse than them… we sold our grandfathers’ glory, and Jews tied us to their yoke! – Taras Shevchenko.

None of this was much of a hindrance to her getting featured on the front cover of Elle magazine (right EDIT: they even managed to mix this up, left).

elle-021

And today, we come to the last of her adventures for what will hopefully be a long time.

On May 4th, two masked gunmen robbed a gas station, making away with 800 grivnas (40 US dollars). They shot the gas station attendant in the arm, threatened to kill him if he called the police, and made a getaway with a couple of other accomplices. He called the police anyway and they set off in pursuit. Their task was presumably made easier by the ПТН-ПНХ (“Putin go fuck yourself”) sticker attached to their vehicle, but this turned out badly for them, as the band took out automatic weapons and made cheddar cheese of the pursuing police jeep, killing one of them and putting the other three into a critical condition (one of whom later died). Both of the killed police officers happened to be former Berkut members, and one figured in a list of people who had allegedly persecuted Maidan activists. Life for people on such lists is dangerous in modern day Ukraine.

But back to the chase. Reinforcements were called up, cameras fixed their escape, and soon they were surrounded in their apartment hideout. One was killed in a standoff back by the vehicle, while the other three surrendered. After their arrests it soon became clear that they were also implicated in an earlier armed attack on a traffic police outpost on May 2nd that had not resulted in any casualties.

It soon emerged that the conspiracy stretched deeper, involving several other people including Vita Zaverukha, who has since been taken into custody as well.

The far right band had initially planned a terrorist attack on the May 1st parade in Kiev, but for whatever reason failed to carry through with it. The attack on the traffic police station was an attempt to acquire more weaponry. Vita Zaverukha was “tightly linked” with the three men suspected in the killings of the police officers, and participated directly in the May 2nd attack on the traffic police station. After that they upgraded their plans to a terrorist attack on Communists and World War 2 veterans in Kiev on Victory Day on May 9th. In a confession by one of the men posted to YouTube by the Ukrainian police, one “Vita” was supposed to have “covered” the gang while “Morgan” would fire at the veterans.

Only their puzzling but ultimate fortuitous turn towards pure banditry on May 4th saved potentially dozens of World War 2 veterans from cold-blooded murder at the hands of fascists 70 years after they had crushed their ideological forebears in open combat.

The modern Ukrainian state gives its pet Nazis a lot of leeway. For instance, in this video from late March – well after the Minsk II ceasefire – our heroine was filmed firing a grenade launcher on a civilian village. The video was soon scrubbed off YouTube, it being a war crime and all, but not before it was downloaded and reposted by Novorossiya supporters.

Nothing was done about this. But not even the Poroshenko regime can allow these Nazis to openly kill state officials and so blatantly undermine their putative monopoly on violence. She will now likely be going away to prison. As she herself pointed out, “the less time an action takes, the longer lasts its effect.”

zaverukha-victory

Victory can only be achieved through radical action – agitation and murder. Meetings, pickets, and other shows will achieve nothing. Action should always be decisive. The less time an action takes, the longer lasts its effect.

Hopefully the effect lasts for a long time.

 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: Junta, Nazism, Ukrainian Crisis 
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  1. SFG says:

    You just gave half of the far-right commenters on here some serious wankoff material. ;)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

    Many Nazis. Many hot chicks. So quite a few hot Nazi chicks.

    Here's moar.
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  2. “[She] participated directly in the May 2nd attack on the traffic police station.” Do we know what she did?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    http://www.aif.ru/society/people/ledi_genocid_v_kieve_arestovali_19-letnyuyu_nacistku_vitu_zaveruhu

    Как сообщает прокуратура Киева, Днепровский районный суд по ходатайству следствия принял решение об аресте 19-летней жительницы Винницы, задержанной в рамках расследования дела о налёте на АЗС и расстреле милиционеров. «Установлено, что девушка, находясь в тесных отношениях с тремя подозреваемыми в убийстве милиционеров, участвовала в организации обстрела поста ГАИ в Быковне, который был совершён накануне, 2 мая, этой же группой лиц«,— добавили в ведомстве.
     
    "It is established, that the young woman, who is in close relations wth the three suspects in the murder of the policemen, participated in the organization of the attack on the traffic police outpost in Bykovna, which was committed on the day before, May 2nd, by the same group."
  3. @SFG
    You just gave half of the far-right commenters on here some serious wankoff material. ;)

    ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

    Many Nazis. Many hot chicks. So quite a few hot Nazi chicks.

    Here’s moar.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SFG
    I was poking fun at some of the Unz commenters, but thanks anyway ;)
  4. @Frank Deschamps
    "[She] participated directly in the May 2nd attack on the traffic police station." Do we know what she did?

    http://www.aif.ru/society/people/ledi_genocid_v_kieve_arestovali_19-letnyuyu_nacistku_vitu_zaveruhu

    Как сообщает прокуратура Киева, Днепровский районный суд по ходатайству следствия принял решение об аресте 19-летней жительницы Винницы, задержанной в рамках расследования дела о налёте на АЗС и расстреле милиционеров. «Установлено, что девушка, находясь в тесных отношениях с тремя подозреваемыми в убийстве милиционеров, участвовала в организации обстрела поста ГАИ в Быковне, который был совершён накануне, 2 мая, этой же группой лиц«,— добавили в ведомстве.

    “It is established, that the young woman, who is in close relations wth the three suspects in the murder of the policemen, participated in the organization of the attack on the traffic police outpost in Bykovna, which was committed on the day before, May 2nd, by the same group.”

    Read More
  5. Would be nice if you could provide a translation for the Facebook screenshots and the Youtube videos. I can’t even read Cyrillic, let alone understand Russian or Ukrainian so apart from the obvious elements (the Nazi symbols, the antisemitic imagery) the inclusion of those pictures and videos is pretty useless to me.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Glossy
    The picture where two molotov cocktails flank a coat of arms with a sea anchor on it refers to the Odessa massacre of May 2nd, 2014. On that day more than 40 unarmed anti-junta protestors were burned alive by pro-junta men shouting "Glory to the Ukraine!" The junta's thugs (football hooligans, I'm told) chased the anti-junta protestors into a building and then set fire to it by throwing molotov cocktails at its windows. Some of the anti-junta people who jumped out of the burning building were finished off on the ground with bats.

    The words on that picture flip the meaning of a phrase that you often see on tombstones in Russia and the Ukraine. The original translates as "We remember! We grieve!" The picture with the molotov cocktails instead has "I remember! I'm proud! Odessa. 5/02/2014". The city's coat of arms, pictured there, features an anchor because Odessa is an important sea port.

    Immediately below we see a picture with the words "Russian weeks at KFC. Separatist grill" above a photo of the charred body of one of the victims of the Odessa massacre.

    I think the whole thing makes for a pretty fair representation of the spirit of the Maidan movement. Any time you skim some article about the "pro-democracy movement" or "pro-Western protesters" in the Western press, you're essentially reading about these guys. These pcitures aren't about their typical day of course. Even during a shooting war most of what they do must feel boring even to them. But their dreams, aspirations, the essense of their cause are captured here well.
  6. Glossy says:
    @German_reader
    Would be nice if you could provide a translation for the Facebook screenshots and the Youtube videos. I can't even read Cyrillic, let alone understand Russian or Ukrainian so apart from the obvious elements (the Nazi symbols, the antisemitic imagery) the inclusion of those pictures and videos is pretty useless to me.

    The picture where two molotov cocktails flank a coat of arms with a sea anchor on it refers to the Odessa massacre of May 2nd, 2014. On that day more than 40 unarmed anti-junta protestors were burned alive by pro-junta men shouting “Glory to the Ukraine!” The junta’s thugs (football hooligans, I’m told) chased the anti-junta protestors into a building and then set fire to it by throwing molotov cocktails at its windows. Some of the anti-junta people who jumped out of the burning building were finished off on the ground with bats.

    The words on that picture flip the meaning of a phrase that you often see on tombstones in Russia and the Ukraine. The original translates as “We remember! We grieve!” The picture with the molotov cocktails instead has “I remember! I’m proud! Odessa. 5/02/2014″. The city’s coat of arms, pictured there, features an anchor because Odessa is an important sea port.

    Immediately below we see a picture with the words “Russian weeks at KFC. Separatist grill” above a photo of the charred body of one of the victims of the Odessa massacre.

    I think the whole thing makes for a pretty fair representation of the spirit of the Maidan movement. Any time you skim some article about the “pro-democracy movement” or “pro-Western protesters” in the Western press, you’re essentially reading about these guys. These pcitures aren’t about their typical day of course. Even during a shooting war most of what they do must feel boring even to them. But their dreams, aspirations, the essense of their cause are captured here well.

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader
    Many thanks for the translation. I knew about the Odessa massacre...the comments of that Nazi babe are pretty disgusting, good that she's going to be behind bars.
    I probably disagree with your and Mr Karlins interpretation of the Ukraine crisis (I think Russia's actions in Eastern Ukraine are unacceptable neo-imperialism), but undoubtedly the Ukrainian side isn't wholly blameless either...the indulgence shown to fascists and Bandera-worshippers certainly is very problematic.
    , @AP

    I think the whole thing makes for a pretty fair representation of the spirit of the Maidan movement.
     
    Utter and complete nonsense. A majority of western and central Ukrainians and plurality of Ukrainians supported Maidan. You are suggesting that this Nazi hooligan-girl represents the spirit that they support. This is akin to your bizarre belief that Galicians (Ukrainians from the former Austro-Hungarian Empire) have low Balkan-level IQs.*

    Western and central Ukrainians were asked what the Maidan was all about, during the protests in January-February 2014. Their answers reveal the motivations, and unsurprisingly differed from your story.

    http://www.kiis.com.ua/?lang=eng&cat=reports&id=231&page=1

    Skip to the second chart.

    Number one reason: outrage at Yanukovich (68% of Western Ukrainians and 55% of central Ukrainians endorsed this).

    Number two reason: to make Ukraine civilized like other European countries (52.5% western Ukrainians, 31% central Ukrainians)

    Number three reason: feeling of civic dignity. Number four: anger at Berkut/authority heavy-handedness. Number 5: economics.

    Nationalism was the sixth most popular reason for Maidan according to western and central Ukrainians - the people who made and supported Maidan. This reason was endorsed by 10% of western and 17% of central Ukrainians.

    The Russian narrative that Maidan was all about "Evil nationalism" and "wanting to get rich like Europe" is an inversion of the actual motivations of the people who supported Maidan.

    AK has provided a valuable piece of information that is indeed ignored in the Western media. But keep in mind that there are plenty of Vita's among the anti-Kiev fighters too. And some of them are much more prominent than was Vita, who was just a criminal marginal now under arrest. Remember the infamous neo-Nazi puppy-beheader from St. Petersburg, Alexei Milchakov?

    (warning: some graphic pics at the link)

    http://ukraineatwar.blogspot.com/2014/07/this-is-how-sick-it-can-get-in-lugansk.html

    He is now a commander of the Rusich armed group in Donbas:

    http://fortruss.blogspot.com/2015/01/rusich-commander-talks-about-batmans.html

    In your opinion glossy, does Milchakov represent the spirit of the anti-Maidan movement?


    * BTW, currently the #1 female chess champion, Mariya Muzychuk, is a girl from a Galician village. A man from another Galician village, Vassily Ivanchuk, was ranked #2 chess player in the world as recently as 2007. Not bad for a region with 5 million people. Any Romanians, Bulgarians, Serbs, or Albanians on that level?

  7. Glossy says:

    The text next to Vita Zaverucha’s picture in Elle magazine:

    Vita, 18, became an adult the night of her first battle. “I fear becoming disabled more than dying.”

    They were students, secretaries, fashion journalists. From the Maidan revolution to the war against Russian separatists, Ukrainian women can now be found on every front. Report.

    Read More
  8. The geniuses at Elle mixed up the two girls. The one on the left is Vita, even though the caption says Sveta. It’s easy to tell that the girl from the pictures on top of Anatoly’s post (Nazi salute, swastika shirt) is the girl on the left. But hey, if you can’t even tell which side of the border the troops are on, how can you be expected not to mix up pictures of two blond girls?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Glossy
    I think you're right.
    , @Anatoly Karlin
    I was paying almost exclusive attention to the text, not the pictures. Something did feel off but I couldn't pinpoint it. Thanks for the correction.

    @German_Reader,

    Sorry about that. I will try to be more comprehensive with translations/explanations of context in the future.

    The meme about Jews was translated from the start. Glossy's excellent comment cleared up everything else I think.
  9. Glossy says:
    @Mark Eugenikos
    The geniuses at Elle mixed up the two girls. The one on the left is Vita, even though the caption says Sveta. It's easy to tell that the girl from the pictures on top of Anatoly's post (Nazi salute, swastika shirt) is the girl on the left. But hey, if you can't even tell which side of the border the troops are on, how can you be expected not to mix up pictures of two blond girls?

    I think you’re right.

    Read More
  10. @Mark Eugenikos
    The geniuses at Elle mixed up the two girls. The one on the left is Vita, even though the caption says Sveta. It's easy to tell that the girl from the pictures on top of Anatoly's post (Nazi salute, swastika shirt) is the girl on the left. But hey, if you can't even tell which side of the border the troops are on, how can you be expected not to mix up pictures of two blond girls?

    I was paying almost exclusive attention to the text, not the pictures. Something did feel off but I couldn’t pinpoint it. Thanks for the correction.

    @German_Reader,

    Sorry about that. I will try to be more comprehensive with translations/explanations of context in the future.

    The meme about Jews was translated from the start. Glossy’s excellent comment cleared up everything else I think.

    Read More
  11. Glossy says:

    What kind of parents let their 18 year-old DAUGHTER sign up with a death squad during time of war? You’ve got to realize that the junta never had more than 70k people figthing for it. That’s in a country of 40 million. All the caring, functional parents in the Ukraine have already sent their draft-age sons abroad or bought medical papers declaring them schizofrenic paraplegics.

    This is what’s left. I’m going to diagnose a broken home and romantic involvement with a Banderite football hooligan/gangster wannabe.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP
    Well, you are probably right about the girl.
  12. @Glossy
    The picture where two molotov cocktails flank a coat of arms with a sea anchor on it refers to the Odessa massacre of May 2nd, 2014. On that day more than 40 unarmed anti-junta protestors were burned alive by pro-junta men shouting "Glory to the Ukraine!" The junta's thugs (football hooligans, I'm told) chased the anti-junta protestors into a building and then set fire to it by throwing molotov cocktails at its windows. Some of the anti-junta people who jumped out of the burning building were finished off on the ground with bats.

    The words on that picture flip the meaning of a phrase that you often see on tombstones in Russia and the Ukraine. The original translates as "We remember! We grieve!" The picture with the molotov cocktails instead has "I remember! I'm proud! Odessa. 5/02/2014". The city's coat of arms, pictured there, features an anchor because Odessa is an important sea port.

    Immediately below we see a picture with the words "Russian weeks at KFC. Separatist grill" above a photo of the charred body of one of the victims of the Odessa massacre.

    I think the whole thing makes for a pretty fair representation of the spirit of the Maidan movement. Any time you skim some article about the "pro-democracy movement" or "pro-Western protesters" in the Western press, you're essentially reading about these guys. These pcitures aren't about their typical day of course. Even during a shooting war most of what they do must feel boring even to them. But their dreams, aspirations, the essense of their cause are captured here well.

    Many thanks for the translation. I knew about the Odessa massacre…the comments of that Nazi babe are pretty disgusting, good that she’s going to be behind bars.
    I probably disagree with your and Mr Karlins interpretation of the Ukraine crisis (I think Russia’s actions in Eastern Ukraine are unacceptable neo-imperialism), but undoubtedly the Ukrainian side isn’t wholly blameless either…the indulgence shown to fascists and Bandera-worshippers certainly is very problematic.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov

    the indulgence shown to fascists and Bandera-worshippers certainly is very problematic.
     
    Hm, I thought it was the "thing" which explains a lot, if not the most, of issues of the present Ukrainian situation, but what do I know?
    , @5371
    "Unacceptable neo-imperialism" was the creation of a Ukrainian state within its current borders in the first place, and then the US-planned coup of 2014.
    , @AP

    I knew about the Odessa massacre
     
    There's a Ukrainian version of those events here:

    http://khpg.org/index.php?id=1424029464

    It links to a fairly detailed UN report:

    http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Countries/UA/HRMMUReport15June2014.pdf

    That deals with the Odessa events (pg. 9).
    , @Tom Sullivan
    Russia's actions in Eastern Ukraine are unacceptable neo-imperialism?

    NATO has, contrary to promises, pushed its sphere of influence right up to Russia's borders. Is that not neo-imperialism?

    The United States, through that disgusting creature Nuland, has been involved in the toppling of a legitimately elected government half away around the globe and its replacement with junta made up of oligarchs pre-chosen for their sympathy with the neo-liberal agenda. Is that not neo-imperialism?

    Despite the fact that those in Ukraine who identify themselves as Russian have been under constant attack from the likes of the harpie who is the subject of this article, Russia has done comparatively little in response. Hardly the behaviour of a neo-imperialist, is it?

    According to those singing from Washington's hymnsheet, Russia "annexed" Crimea. Of course, it did no such thing. Crimea decided through a democratic process that they wanted no part of the burgeoning kleptocratic banana republic that Ukraine had become. They also decided they wanted to rejoin the country they had been part of since 1783 until some (Ukrainian) idiot decided to gift their to Ukraine in the 1950s.
  13. Andrei Martyanov [AKA "SmoothieX12"] says: • Website
    @German_reader
    Many thanks for the translation. I knew about the Odessa massacre...the comments of that Nazi babe are pretty disgusting, good that she's going to be behind bars.
    I probably disagree with your and Mr Karlins interpretation of the Ukraine crisis (I think Russia's actions in Eastern Ukraine are unacceptable neo-imperialism), but undoubtedly the Ukrainian side isn't wholly blameless either...the indulgence shown to fascists and Bandera-worshippers certainly is very problematic.

    the indulgence shown to fascists and Bandera-worshippers certainly is very problematic.

    Hm, I thought it was the “thing” which explains a lot, if not the most, of issues of the present Ukrainian situation, but what do I know?

    Read More
  14. E. Harding says: • Website

    Anatoly Karlin, what proportion of your audience do you think is not Russian-speaking and needs translations? I’m Russian-speaking, so I am among those with no need for translations.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    Probably 90%?

    No, German_reader's point was a very valid one. I do usually try to provide comprehensive translations. This time I missed bits out because I wrote this post in a hurry.
  15. @E. Harding
    Anatoly Karlin, what proportion of your audience do you think is not Russian-speaking and needs translations? I'm Russian-speaking, so I am among those with no need for translations.

    Probably 90%?

    No, German_reader’s point was a very valid one. I do usually try to provide comprehensive translations. This time I missed bits out because I wrote this post in a hurry.

    Read More
  16. 5371 says:
    @German_reader
    Many thanks for the translation. I knew about the Odessa massacre...the comments of that Nazi babe are pretty disgusting, good that she's going to be behind bars.
    I probably disagree with your and Mr Karlins interpretation of the Ukraine crisis (I think Russia's actions in Eastern Ukraine are unacceptable neo-imperialism), but undoubtedly the Ukrainian side isn't wholly blameless either...the indulgence shown to fascists and Bandera-worshippers certainly is very problematic.

    “Unacceptable neo-imperialism” was the creation of a Ukrainian state within its current borders in the first place, and then the US-planned coup of 2014.

    Read More
  17. AP says:
    @Glossy
    The picture where two molotov cocktails flank a coat of arms with a sea anchor on it refers to the Odessa massacre of May 2nd, 2014. On that day more than 40 unarmed anti-junta protestors were burned alive by pro-junta men shouting "Glory to the Ukraine!" The junta's thugs (football hooligans, I'm told) chased the anti-junta protestors into a building and then set fire to it by throwing molotov cocktails at its windows. Some of the anti-junta people who jumped out of the burning building were finished off on the ground with bats.

    The words on that picture flip the meaning of a phrase that you often see on tombstones in Russia and the Ukraine. The original translates as "We remember! We grieve!" The picture with the molotov cocktails instead has "I remember! I'm proud! Odessa. 5/02/2014". The city's coat of arms, pictured there, features an anchor because Odessa is an important sea port.

    Immediately below we see a picture with the words "Russian weeks at KFC. Separatist grill" above a photo of the charred body of one of the victims of the Odessa massacre.

    I think the whole thing makes for a pretty fair representation of the spirit of the Maidan movement. Any time you skim some article about the "pro-democracy movement" or "pro-Western protesters" in the Western press, you're essentially reading about these guys. These pcitures aren't about their typical day of course. Even during a shooting war most of what they do must feel boring even to them. But their dreams, aspirations, the essense of their cause are captured here well.

    I think the whole thing makes for a pretty fair representation of the spirit of the Maidan movement.

    Utter and complete nonsense. A majority of western and central Ukrainians and plurality of Ukrainians supported Maidan. You are suggesting that this Nazi hooligan-girl represents the spirit that they support. This is akin to your bizarre belief that Galicians (Ukrainians from the former Austro-Hungarian Empire) have low Balkan-level IQs.*

    Western and central Ukrainians were asked what the Maidan was all about, during the protests in January-February 2014. Their answers reveal the motivations, and unsurprisingly differed from your story.

    http://www.kiis.com.ua/?lang=eng&cat=reports&id=231&page=1

    Skip to the second chart.

    Number one reason: outrage at Yanukovich (68% of Western Ukrainians and 55% of central Ukrainians endorsed this).

    Number two reason: to make Ukraine civilized like other European countries (52.5% western Ukrainians, 31% central Ukrainians)

    Number three reason: feeling of civic dignity. Number four: anger at Berkut/authority heavy-handedness. Number 5: economics.

    Nationalism was the sixth most popular reason for Maidan according to western and central Ukrainians – the people who made and supported Maidan. This reason was endorsed by 10% of western and 17% of central Ukrainians.

    The Russian narrative that Maidan was all about “Evil nationalism” and “wanting to get rich like Europe” is an inversion of the actual motivations of the people who supported Maidan.

    AK has provided a valuable piece of information that is indeed ignored in the Western media. But keep in mind that there are plenty of Vita’s among the anti-Kiev fighters too. And some of them are much more prominent than was Vita, who was just a criminal marginal now under arrest. Remember the infamous neo-Nazi puppy-beheader from St. Petersburg, Alexei Milchakov?

    (warning: some graphic pics at the link)

    http://ukraineatwar.blogspot.com/2014/07/this-is-how-sick-it-can-get-in-lugansk.html

    He is now a commander of the Rusich armed group in Donbas:

    http://fortruss.blogspot.com/2015/01/rusich-commander-talks-about-batmans.html

    In your opinion glossy, does Milchakov represent the spirit of the anti-Maidan movement?

    * BTW, currently the #1 female chess champion, Mariya Muzychuk, is a girl from a Galician village. A man from another Galician village, Vassily Ivanchuk, was ranked #2 chess player in the world as recently as 2007. Not bad for a region with 5 million people. Any Romanians, Bulgarians, Serbs, or Albanians on that level?

    Read More
    • Replies: @jimbojones
    Hey, AP:
    A majority / plurality / whatever of Ukrainians democratically elected Yanukovich -> elementary historical fact.
    A majority / plurality / whatever of West / East / in-between Ukrainians supported the Maidan -> your prejudiced and bigoted opinion, backed by the ridiculous propaganda of an outright CIA front.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyiv_International_Institute_of_Sociology

    See the difference?
    Let's try it again.

    Nazi freaks -> a regretful reality, captured, as we like it to be on the Internet, on video. "Pics or didn't happen."
    Nazis being Russian propaganda -> an absurdity.

    So, how does it feel to support Nazi brutes? Eradicate any untermenschen lately? Have you ever been to Nuremberg? They say it's a fine place.
    Happy Victory Day.
    , @Glossy
    Right Sector was very important at the Maidan. There were lots of those wolfsangel symbols there. The Azov regiment is completely fascist.

    There is an enormous sea of cynicism and apathy - "they're all thieves" or, to translate a Russian saying, "my house is at the edge of the village". This sea is interspersed with rare flashes of passion. On the Maidan side the passion - the kind that makes people want to risk their lives for a cause, not the kind that thieving oligarchs have - often wears the wolfsangel symbol. Sometimes a swastika. The thieving oligarchs encourage this passion even though it scares them a little because they have common enemies with the Banderites - Russia and Putin.

    I remember an online discussion about some Western political talk show that dedicated a segment to the war. The guy who saw the show said that the host asked the person who represented the Ukrainian point of view why Kiev doesn't just fire the people who use fascist symbols. The pro-Kiev person said that the Ukraine would lose the war.

    I would guess that the Mariupol portion of the front would collapse without Azov. And the firing of everyone from the other volunteer death squads who's ever used any fascist symbols would weaken the Ukraine's position generally.

    The junta's army is to a large extent supplied by volunteers. Same thing - no one is going to volunteer anything out of love for Porky or Yatsenyuk. Throughout history and throughout the world political passion has always been mainly tribal.

    At the top of the poll that you cited is outrage at Yanukovich. Outrage for what? The answer that's given for Western consumption is "for corruption and subserviance to the Kremlin." But everyone on the ground - the Banderites, the apathetic majority and the future separatists - understood that the Maidan's leaders were going to be at least as currupt and that they were subservient to the US. And that's exactly how they turned out to be.

    So where did the Western Ukrainian outrage against Yanukovich come from? West Ukrainian Nationalism of course.

    Number four: anger at Berkut/authority heavy-handedness. Number 5: economics.

    Pure comedy. And it was all predictable.
  18. AP says:
    @Glossy
    What kind of parents let their 18 year-old DAUGHTER sign up with a death squad during time of war? You've got to realize that the junta never had more than 70k people figthing for it. That's in a country of 40 million. All the caring, functional parents in the Ukraine have already sent their draft-age sons abroad or bought medical papers declaring them schizofrenic paraplegics.

    This is what's left. I'm going to diagnose a broken home and romantic involvement with a Banderite football hooligan/gangster wannabe.

    Well, you are probably right about the girl.

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  19. AP says:
    @German_reader
    Many thanks for the translation. I knew about the Odessa massacre...the comments of that Nazi babe are pretty disgusting, good that she's going to be behind bars.
    I probably disagree with your and Mr Karlins interpretation of the Ukraine crisis (I think Russia's actions in Eastern Ukraine are unacceptable neo-imperialism), but undoubtedly the Ukrainian side isn't wholly blameless either...the indulgence shown to fascists and Bandera-worshippers certainly is very problematic.

    I knew about the Odessa massacre

    There’s a Ukrainian version of those events here:

    http://khpg.org/index.php?id=1424029464

    It links to a fairly detailed UN report:

    http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Countries/UA/HRMMUReport15June2014.pdf

    That deals with the Odessa events (pg. 9).

    Read More
  20. @AP

    I think the whole thing makes for a pretty fair representation of the spirit of the Maidan movement.
     
    Utter and complete nonsense. A majority of western and central Ukrainians and plurality of Ukrainians supported Maidan. You are suggesting that this Nazi hooligan-girl represents the spirit that they support. This is akin to your bizarre belief that Galicians (Ukrainians from the former Austro-Hungarian Empire) have low Balkan-level IQs.*

    Western and central Ukrainians were asked what the Maidan was all about, during the protests in January-February 2014. Their answers reveal the motivations, and unsurprisingly differed from your story.

    http://www.kiis.com.ua/?lang=eng&cat=reports&id=231&page=1

    Skip to the second chart.

    Number one reason: outrage at Yanukovich (68% of Western Ukrainians and 55% of central Ukrainians endorsed this).

    Number two reason: to make Ukraine civilized like other European countries (52.5% western Ukrainians, 31% central Ukrainians)

    Number three reason: feeling of civic dignity. Number four: anger at Berkut/authority heavy-handedness. Number 5: economics.

    Nationalism was the sixth most popular reason for Maidan according to western and central Ukrainians - the people who made and supported Maidan. This reason was endorsed by 10% of western and 17% of central Ukrainians.

    The Russian narrative that Maidan was all about "Evil nationalism" and "wanting to get rich like Europe" is an inversion of the actual motivations of the people who supported Maidan.

    AK has provided a valuable piece of information that is indeed ignored in the Western media. But keep in mind that there are plenty of Vita's among the anti-Kiev fighters too. And some of them are much more prominent than was Vita, who was just a criminal marginal now under arrest. Remember the infamous neo-Nazi puppy-beheader from St. Petersburg, Alexei Milchakov?

    (warning: some graphic pics at the link)

    http://ukraineatwar.blogspot.com/2014/07/this-is-how-sick-it-can-get-in-lugansk.html

    He is now a commander of the Rusich armed group in Donbas:

    http://fortruss.blogspot.com/2015/01/rusich-commander-talks-about-batmans.html

    In your opinion glossy, does Milchakov represent the spirit of the anti-Maidan movement?


    * BTW, currently the #1 female chess champion, Mariya Muzychuk, is a girl from a Galician village. A man from another Galician village, Vassily Ivanchuk, was ranked #2 chess player in the world as recently as 2007. Not bad for a region with 5 million people. Any Romanians, Bulgarians, Serbs, or Albanians on that level?

    Hey, AP:
    A majority / plurality / whatever of Ukrainians democratically elected Yanukovich -> elementary historical fact.
    A majority / plurality / whatever of West / East / in-between Ukrainians supported the Maidan -> your prejudiced and bigoted opinion, backed by the ridiculous propaganda of an outright CIA front.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyiv_International_Institute_of_Sociology

    See the difference?
    Let’s try it again.

    Nazi freaks -> a regretful reality, captured, as we like it to be on the Internet, on video. “Pics or didn’t happen.”
    Nazis being Russian propaganda -> an absurdity.

    So, how does it feel to support Nazi brutes? Eradicate any untermenschen lately? Have you ever been to Nuremberg? They say it’s a fine place.
    Happy Victory Day.

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  21. AP says:

    A majority / plurality / whatever of Ukrainians democratically elected Yanukovich -> elementary historical fact.

    Actually, a plurality and not a majority.

    Opposition parties who collectively supported Maidan won the popular vote in the next parliamentary election. Yanukovich-era rules kept them from controlling the parliament, but they won the popular vote.

    A majority / plurality / whatever of West / East / in-between Ukrainians supported the Maidan -> your prejudiced and bigoted opinion, backed by the ridiculous propaganda of an outright CIA front.

    And out comes the tinfoil hat.

    KIIS ran that study with Levada. Also a CIA front? Or a Freemason one? Zionist? Illuminati? Trotskyite?

    Nazi freaks -> a regretful reality, captured, as we like it to be on the Internet, on video. “Pics or didn’t happen.”

    In that case, did you like the pics of rebel commander Milchakov? They are right here:

    http://ukraineatwar.blogspot.com/2014/07/this-is-how-sick-it-can-get-in-lugansk.html

    There are Nazi degenerates on both sides. The Western media conveniently ignored the ones on the Ukrainian side but don’t pretend that the Novorossiya side doesn’t have them in large amounts too.

    Read More
  22. Glossy says:
    @AP

    I think the whole thing makes for a pretty fair representation of the spirit of the Maidan movement.
     
    Utter and complete nonsense. A majority of western and central Ukrainians and plurality of Ukrainians supported Maidan. You are suggesting that this Nazi hooligan-girl represents the spirit that they support. This is akin to your bizarre belief that Galicians (Ukrainians from the former Austro-Hungarian Empire) have low Balkan-level IQs.*

    Western and central Ukrainians were asked what the Maidan was all about, during the protests in January-February 2014. Their answers reveal the motivations, and unsurprisingly differed from your story.

    http://www.kiis.com.ua/?lang=eng&cat=reports&id=231&page=1

    Skip to the second chart.

    Number one reason: outrage at Yanukovich (68% of Western Ukrainians and 55% of central Ukrainians endorsed this).

    Number two reason: to make Ukraine civilized like other European countries (52.5% western Ukrainians, 31% central Ukrainians)

    Number three reason: feeling of civic dignity. Number four: anger at Berkut/authority heavy-handedness. Number 5: economics.

    Nationalism was the sixth most popular reason for Maidan according to western and central Ukrainians - the people who made and supported Maidan. This reason was endorsed by 10% of western and 17% of central Ukrainians.

    The Russian narrative that Maidan was all about "Evil nationalism" and "wanting to get rich like Europe" is an inversion of the actual motivations of the people who supported Maidan.

    AK has provided a valuable piece of information that is indeed ignored in the Western media. But keep in mind that there are plenty of Vita's among the anti-Kiev fighters too. And some of them are much more prominent than was Vita, who was just a criminal marginal now under arrest. Remember the infamous neo-Nazi puppy-beheader from St. Petersburg, Alexei Milchakov?

    (warning: some graphic pics at the link)

    http://ukraineatwar.blogspot.com/2014/07/this-is-how-sick-it-can-get-in-lugansk.html

    He is now a commander of the Rusich armed group in Donbas:

    http://fortruss.blogspot.com/2015/01/rusich-commander-talks-about-batmans.html

    In your opinion glossy, does Milchakov represent the spirit of the anti-Maidan movement?


    * BTW, currently the #1 female chess champion, Mariya Muzychuk, is a girl from a Galician village. A man from another Galician village, Vassily Ivanchuk, was ranked #2 chess player in the world as recently as 2007. Not bad for a region with 5 million people. Any Romanians, Bulgarians, Serbs, or Albanians on that level?

    Right Sector was very important at the Maidan. There were lots of those wolfsangel symbols there. The Azov regiment is completely fascist.

    There is an enormous sea of cynicism and apathy – “they’re all thieves” or, to translate a Russian saying, “my house is at the edge of the village”. This sea is interspersed with rare flashes of passion. On the Maidan side the passion – the kind that makes people want to risk their lives for a cause, not the kind that thieving oligarchs have – often wears the wolfsangel symbol. Sometimes a swastika. The thieving oligarchs encourage this passion even though it scares them a little because they have common enemies with the Banderites – Russia and Putin.

    I remember an online discussion about some Western political talk show that dedicated a segment to the war. The guy who saw the show said that the host asked the person who represented the Ukrainian point of view why Kiev doesn’t just fire the people who use fascist symbols. The pro-Kiev person said that the Ukraine would lose the war.

    I would guess that the Mariupol portion of the front would collapse without Azov. And the firing of everyone from the other volunteer death squads who’s ever used any fascist symbols would weaken the Ukraine’s position generally.

    The junta’s army is to a large extent supplied by volunteers. Same thing – no one is going to volunteer anything out of love for Porky or Yatsenyuk. Throughout history and throughout the world political passion has always been mainly tribal.

    At the top of the poll that you cited is outrage at Yanukovich. Outrage for what? The answer that’s given for Western consumption is “for corruption and subserviance to the Kremlin.” But everyone on the ground – the Banderites, the apathetic majority and the future separatists – understood that the Maidan’s leaders were going to be at least as currupt and that they were subservient to the US. And that’s exactly how they turned out to be.

    So where did the Western Ukrainian outrage against Yanukovich come from? West Ukrainian Nationalism of course.

    Number four: anger at Berkut/authority heavy-handedness. Number 5: economics.

    Pure comedy. And it was all predictable.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP

    Right Sector was very important at the Maidan.
     
    Important perhaps. But critical? I heard different from people who were there. RS tended to disappear when things got rough and claim "glory" afterward. Here's a list of people who died during Euromaidan; it probably it is roughly representative of the movement:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_people_killed_during_Euromaidan

    Although there are youths there also, in general the ages and profiles of these people don't match the "young neo-Nazi hoodlum" types. A few Afghan vets, a couple professors, journalists, etc.

    There were lots of those wolfsangel symbols there. The Azov regiment is completely fascist.
     
    Azov regiment is not "completely" fascist. But it certainly has a lot of, not fascists - but Nazis. It's a nasty bunch. But there are nasty ones on the other side too.

    On the Maidan side the passion – the kind that makes people want to risk their lives for a cause, not the kind that thieving oligarchs have – often wears the wolfsangel symbol. Sometimes a swastika.
     
    "Often" and "sometimes" are not precise terms. It's certainly not a majority.

    The guy who saw the show said that the host asked the person who represented the Ukrainian point of view why Kiev doesn’t just fire the people who use fascist symbols. The pro-Kiev person said that the Ukraine would lose the war.
     
    Quite possible, in the beginning when Ukraine's army was still totally disorganized. And how well would Novorossiya be doing if there were no Russian nationalists?

    At the top of the poll that you cited is outrage at Yanukovich. Outrage for what? The answer that’s given for Western consumption is “for corruption and subserviance to the Kremlin.”
     
    Those two, plus violence against protesters representing the majority of the locals, plus rejecting Europe in favor of Russia.

    But everyone on the ground – the Banderites, the apathetic majority and the future separatists – understood that the Maidan’s leaders were going to be at least as currupt and that they were subservient to the US.
     
    Evidence of everyone or even most people believing this? Ukraine's corruption index, while still dismal, has improved slightly.
  23. Dimitar says:

    “You are suggesting that this Nazi hooligan-girl represents the spirit that they support”

    Well, Euromaidan did have a nice anti-Russian tone to it no? Or was I dreaming about the “he who does not jump is a Moscal” saying? I do remember speaking to you last year about your selective memory. Remember when I pointed out kidnappings which were increasing in commonality while you played the ignorant game? Shall we talk about the thousands who are now imprisoned due to not following the political thought assigned by the Maidan “heroes”? The term separatist can be applied to anyone who opposes Maidan policy and their culture of Russophobia.

    In terms of Galicians, I really don’t know what you are trying to prove. It is Galicia which is currently worshipping Bandera as their cultural patron, it is Galicia which seeks to be part of the west (quite like Poland), but forgets their heroes were murdering the very Poles they try to emulate. Is it any wonder why the Bandera ideology has made prostitutes out of Ukrainian women? The current influx of Ukrainians in Poland (who are also openly pro-Bandera) are the same ones who open their legs for a few zloty. There’s no problem with immigration from Ukraine, it’s just that many Galicians (and an increasing amount of Ukrainians from other regions) won’t leave their Bandera views at the border.

    Why were Galicians so loud about Yanukovitch but readily cheered on as APCs were sent by unelected government to eastern Ukraine? Why do Galicians notice Yanukovitch corruption but ignore Poroshenko’s chocolate oligarchy? Why was it ok for Lviv to declare independence last year, but “Bandera forbid” Donetsk or Lugansk does the same?

    Ukraine is cannibalising itself as we speak. The ones at fault are the idiots who foment revolutions every half a decade, only to usher in an identical system with different masters.

    Perhaps there may be some truth when Glossy surmised the Balkan IQ of Galicians ;)

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP

    I do remember speaking to you last year about your selective memory.
     
    You were mostly either lying or engaging in childish insults, as you are here.

    http://darussophile.com/2014/05/impressions-of-the-st-petersburg-international-economic-forum/#comment-28627

    Brief example:

    Dimitar: “You are implying that Galicia and Zakarpattia are voting the same – so that’s a lie.

    I quite explicitly stated :

    “Zakarpattia did not display “the same apathy.” The most heavily populated districts in that oblast, including the capital, had turnout between 60% and 65%. This was a huge drop from the Galician ones right on the other side of the Carpathians (turnout over 80%), ”
  24. Dimitar says:

    I wouldn’t trust much about AP’s sources when it comes to Odessa. I’d imagine there’d be a Ukrainian fairytale version of how the Ukrainian ultras were attacked akin to how AP near-defended it last year.

    http://darussophile.com/2014/05/massacre-in-odessa/

    “If a Molotov cocktail thrown by the pro-Maidan crowd started the blaze, it was more like an accident (manslaughter, in American legal understanding) rather than murder.”

    Notice how AP has the Ukrainian side absolved -if- they were perpetrators. Well the Ukrainian side did have a few tasteful views of the victims:

    http://off-guardian.org/2015/05/01/odessa-mom-burns-when-right-sector-boasted-of-odessa-massacre/

    I’d think video compilations would be far more telling than any report Kiev (or Moscow) releases. The following video (with English subs) is a good start.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP
    Report by UN monitoring mission about events in Odessa:

    http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Countries/UA/HRMMUReport15June2014.pdf

    B. Investigations into human rights violations related to 2 May Odesa violence
    Summary of events

    37. The most serious single incident of significant loss of life in Ukraine since the killings
    on Maidan occurred in Odesa on 2 May 2014.
    7
    The events occurred on the same day that a football match was due to take place between the Kharkiv football team “Metallist” and the Odesa football team “Chernomorets”. On 1 May, the police authorities issued an official statement announcing that due to possible disorder
    because of the football game, an additional 2,000 police officers would patrol the
    streets of Odesa.

    38. Early in the morning of 2 May, at least 600 football fans arrived from Kharkiv. Football
    fans from both teams are known to have strong “Pro-Unity” sympathies. A pre-match rally for “United Ukraine” had been planned for 3.00 p.m. on Sobornaya square and gathered, at least, 2,000 people, including supporters of the two football teams, Right Sector activists, members of so-called self-defence units, and other “Pro-Unity” supporters. Right Sector and “self-defence” unit supporters were observed by the HRMMU wearing helmets and masks, and armed with shields, axes, wooden/metallic sticks and some with firearms. By 3:00 p.m. the HRMMU had observed 15 police officers on Sobornaya square and two buses of riot police officers parked nearby.

    39. Meanwhile, the HRMMU observed that about 450 metres away from Sobornaya street, “Pro-Federalism” activists, comprising approximately 300 activists from “Odesskaya Druzhina” (radical “Pro-Federalism” movement), had also gathered one hour earlier. They reportedly intended to prevent the “Pro-Unity” rally; and were wearing helmets, shields, masks, axes, wooden/metal sticks and some of them with firearms.

    40. The HRMMU observed an insufficient and inadequate police presence to manage and ensure security, and crowd control of the “United Ukraine” march towards the football stadium. The HRMMU noted that additional police officers arrived at the scene, but were unable to stop the violent confrontation.

    41. At 3.15 p.m., the “Pro-Federalism Odesskaya Drujina”, “Narodnaya Drujina” and other activists approached the Sobornaya square and started to provoke the participants of the “United Ukraine” rally. Clashes arose and quickly turned into mass disorder, which lasted for several hours until 6.30 p.m. Police officers and supporters from both sides were injured during the afternoon. Six men were killed by gunshots fired by activists.

    42. The HRMMU observed that following the clashes in the city centre, some “ProFederalism”
    activists ran from the area chased by “Pro-Unity” supporters. Approximately 60 “Pro-Federalism” activists took refuge in the “Afina” shopping centre, which had been closed during the day. The “Afina” shopping centre was then surrounded by “Pro-Unity” activists. Riot police (Special Forces “SOKOL”) arrived on the scene, and reportedly took away 47 “Pro-Federalism” activists, while letting women out of the complex. Other “Pro-Federalism” supporters ran from the clashes to the tent camp at the Kulikovo Pole square, where approximately 200 supporters had gathered (including all the “Pro-Federalism” leaders) during the afternoon.

    43. Some “Pro-Unity” politicians called upon their supporters to march towards the Kulikovo Pole square. At 7.00 p.m., the “Pro-Unity” supporters marched in that direction, accompanied behind them by approximately 60 riot police.

    44. The “Pro-Federalism” leaders were informed that “Pro-Unity” supporters were heading towards the tent camp, and between 6.00 – 6.30 p.m., they decided to take refuge in the nearby Trade Union Building.

    45. At 7.30 p.m., when the “Pro-Unity” supporters reached Kulikovo Pole square, they burned all the “Pro-Federalism” tents. The “Pro-Federalism” activists, who had hidden in the Trade Union Building, and the “Pro-Unity” activists, then reportedly started throwing Molotov cocktails at each other. Gunshots could reportedly be heard coming from both sides. At around 8.00 p.m., the “Pro-Unity” activists entered the Trade Union Building where the “Pro-Federalism” supporters had sought refuge.

    46. During the evening a fire broke out in the Trade Union Building. At 7.43 p.m., the HRMMU called the fire brigade, which has its base located 650 metres from the Trade Union Building. Reportedly, the fire brigade only arrived 40 minutes after receiving the first phone call about the fire. According to fire brigade officials, this was due to the fact that the police did not create a safe and secure perimeter allowing the fire brigade to easily access the Trade Union Building. The cause of the fire remains unclear at this stage.

    47. As a result of the fire, officially 42 people died: 32 (including 6 females) were trapped and unable to leave the building and 10 (including one female and one minor) died jumping from windows.

    48. The HRMMU has received information from credible resources that some “Pro-Unity” protesters were beating up “Pro-Federalism” supporters as they were trying to escape the Trade Union Building, while others were trying to help them.

    49. 247 other people were brought from the scene requiring medical assistance: 27 people
    with gunshot wounds, 31 with stab wounds, 26 with burns and intoxication caused by
    combustible products and 163 with injuries by blunt objects. Of these, 99 people were
    hospitalised, including 22 policemen, with 35 in serious condition. According to
    various sources, all those who died were Ukrainian citizens. There are no more official
    reports of people missing in relation to 2 May events. Seven of those injured remain in
    hospital. The HRMMU received allegations that many who were treated in hospitals
    did not give their real names and addresses. Moreover, some people who were heavily
    injured from the violence did not go to hospital for fear of retaliation.

    50. During the evening, it was reported to the HRMMU that a bare minimum police force
    was present at the Kulikovo Pole square. Even when the special riot police force
    arrived at the scene, the officers did not intervene in the violence that took place on the
    Kulikovo Pole square. The HRMMU was told by high ranking police officers that the
    reason for this is that they did not receive any formal order to intervene.

    ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

    So according to the UN monitoring mission - violence started when anti-Maidan attacked pro-Maidan. UN reports doesn't say, but first killed person seems to have been a pro-Maidan:

    http://novosti.dn.ua/details/224158/

    According to the UN report, at the Trade Union buildings, both sides were armed, and anti-Maidan were throwing Molotov cocktails from the trade union building (meaning that the building probably had stockpiled cocktails - perhaps explaining the intensity of the fire) as well as having cocktails thrown at them. Anti-Maidan were also shooting out, as pro-Maidan were shooting in.

    The fire seems to have been was an ugly brawl gone deadly, not a premeditated act.

  25. AP says:
    @Glossy
    Right Sector was very important at the Maidan. There were lots of those wolfsangel symbols there. The Azov regiment is completely fascist.

    There is an enormous sea of cynicism and apathy - "they're all thieves" or, to translate a Russian saying, "my house is at the edge of the village". This sea is interspersed with rare flashes of passion. On the Maidan side the passion - the kind that makes people want to risk their lives for a cause, not the kind that thieving oligarchs have - often wears the wolfsangel symbol. Sometimes a swastika. The thieving oligarchs encourage this passion even though it scares them a little because they have common enemies with the Banderites - Russia and Putin.

    I remember an online discussion about some Western political talk show that dedicated a segment to the war. The guy who saw the show said that the host asked the person who represented the Ukrainian point of view why Kiev doesn't just fire the people who use fascist symbols. The pro-Kiev person said that the Ukraine would lose the war.

    I would guess that the Mariupol portion of the front would collapse without Azov. And the firing of everyone from the other volunteer death squads who's ever used any fascist symbols would weaken the Ukraine's position generally.

    The junta's army is to a large extent supplied by volunteers. Same thing - no one is going to volunteer anything out of love for Porky or Yatsenyuk. Throughout history and throughout the world political passion has always been mainly tribal.

    At the top of the poll that you cited is outrage at Yanukovich. Outrage for what? The answer that's given for Western consumption is "for corruption and subserviance to the Kremlin." But everyone on the ground - the Banderites, the apathetic majority and the future separatists - understood that the Maidan's leaders were going to be at least as currupt and that they were subservient to the US. And that's exactly how they turned out to be.

    So where did the Western Ukrainian outrage against Yanukovich come from? West Ukrainian Nationalism of course.

    Number four: anger at Berkut/authority heavy-handedness. Number 5: economics.

    Pure comedy. And it was all predictable.

    Right Sector was very important at the Maidan.

    Important perhaps. But critical? I heard different from people who were there. RS tended to disappear when things got rough and claim “glory” afterward. Here’s a list of people who died during Euromaidan; it probably it is roughly representative of the movement:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_people_killed_during_Euromaidan

    Although there are youths there also, in general the ages and profiles of these people don’t match the “young neo-Nazi hoodlum” types. A few Afghan vets, a couple professors, journalists, etc.

    There were lots of those wolfsangel symbols there. The Azov regiment is completely fascist.

    Azov regiment is not “completely” fascist. But it certainly has a lot of, not fascists – but Nazis. It’s a nasty bunch. But there are nasty ones on the other side too.

    On the Maidan side the passion – the kind that makes people want to risk their lives for a cause, not the kind that thieving oligarchs have – often wears the wolfsangel symbol. Sometimes a swastika.

    “Often” and “sometimes” are not precise terms. It’s certainly not a majority.

    The guy who saw the show said that the host asked the person who represented the Ukrainian point of view why Kiev doesn’t just fire the people who use fascist symbols. The pro-Kiev person said that the Ukraine would lose the war.

    Quite possible, in the beginning when Ukraine’s army was still totally disorganized. And how well would Novorossiya be doing if there were no Russian nationalists?

    At the top of the poll that you cited is outrage at Yanukovich. Outrage for what? The answer that’s given for Western consumption is “for corruption and subserviance to the Kremlin.”

    Those two, plus violence against protesters representing the majority of the locals, plus rejecting Europe in favor of Russia.

    But everyone on the ground – the Banderites, the apathetic majority and the future separatists – understood that the Maidan’s leaders were going to be at least as currupt and that they were subservient to the US.

    Evidence of everyone or even most people believing this? Ukraine’s corruption index, while still dismal, has improved slightly.

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    • Replies: @AP

    Evidence of everyone or even most people believing this? Ukraine’s corruption index, while still dismal, has improved slightly.
     
    I should have provided a link:

    http://www.transparency.org/news/pressrelease/a_year_after_maidan_ukraine_is_still_the_most_corrupt_country_in_europe

    Anticorruption laws weren't adopted until October 2014. So it's still early.

    "Having received only one additional point, in comparison with 2013, Ukraine remains in the club of the most corrupt countries.

    This year Ukraine scored 26 of 100 and took 142nd place of 175 in the CPI by Transparency International. Again Ukraine shares scores with Uganda and the Comoros as one of the most corrupt countries in the world.

    The disappointing results according to the international anti-corruption community are caused by the hardly noticeable progress in destruction of corruption schemes that remained after the previous ruling regimes since Ukraine became independent. Indeed, despite “the façade change”, Ukraine continues treading water. The newly-adopted laws have not yet given the tangible results in anti-corruption fighting.

    Oleksii Khmara, Executive Director of Transparency International Ukraine, stresses that the state has adopted certain laws and shown its intention to move towards the reforms, but it is not enough: “Anti-corruption laws that were adopted on October 14, 2014 give the ground for reforms. Soon we’ll see the real situation with the reforms; it’ll happen already in December. The new Government together with the new Parliament shall work on the state budget 2015. A question remains, whether the budget will allocate money for the Anti-Corruption Bureau or electronic system of the officials’ declarations. Political will does not mean only vigorous calls from the rostrum. It means practical steps for implementing new anti-corruption laws, for example, transparent staff selection for the new anti-corruption bodies, punishment of all who are involved in corrupt schemes, non-interference with the work of those who fight against corruption. Ukraine needs it to raise its results in the CPI”.

    Ukraine still stays in the club of the countries with extremely corrupt authorities. However, Тransparency International notes some anti-corruption steps of our country –bureaucracy is not as strangling for business as it was before; export and import became freer of bribes."

  26. AP says:
    @Dimitar
    "You are suggesting that this Nazi hooligan-girl represents the spirit that they support"

    @AP

    Well, Euromaidan did have a nice anti-Russian tone to it no? Or was I dreaming about the "he who does not jump is a Moscal" saying? I do remember speaking to you last year about your selective memory. Remember when I pointed out kidnappings which were increasing in commonality while you played the ignorant game? Shall we talk about the thousands who are now imprisoned due to not following the political thought assigned by the Maidan “heroes”? The term separatist can be applied to anyone who opposes Maidan policy and their culture of Russophobia.

    In terms of Galicians, I really don't know what you are trying to prove. It is Galicia which is currently worshipping Bandera as their cultural patron, it is Galicia which seeks to be part of the west (quite like Poland), but forgets their heroes were murdering the very Poles they try to emulate. Is it any wonder why the Bandera ideology has made prostitutes out of Ukrainian women? The current influx of Ukrainians in Poland (who are also openly pro-Bandera) are the same ones who open their legs for a few zloty. There’s no problem with immigration from Ukraine, it’s just that many Galicians (and an increasing amount of Ukrainians from other regions) won’t leave their Bandera views at the border.

    Why were Galicians so loud about Yanukovitch but readily cheered on as APCs were sent by unelected government to eastern Ukraine? Why do Galicians notice Yanukovitch corruption but ignore Poroshenko’s chocolate oligarchy? Why was it ok for Lviv to declare independence last year, but "Bandera forbid" Donetsk or Lugansk does the same?

    Ukraine is cannibalising itself as we speak. The ones at fault are the idiots who foment revolutions every half a decade, only to usher in an identical system with different masters.

    Perhaps there may be some truth when Glossy surmised the Balkan IQ of Galicians ;)

    I do remember speaking to you last year about your selective memory.

    You were mostly either lying or engaging in childish insults, as you are here.

    http://darussophile.com/2014/05/impressions-of-the-st-petersburg-international-economic-forum/#comment-28627

    Brief example:

    Dimitar: “You are implying that Galicia and Zakarpattia are voting the same – so that’s a lie.

    I quite explicitly stated :

    “Zakarpattia did not display “the same apathy.” The most heavily populated districts in that oblast, including the capital, had turnout between 60% and 65%. This was a huge drop from the Galician ones right on the other side of the Carpathians (turnout over 80%), ”

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  27. AP says:
    @Dimitar
    I wouldn't trust much about AP's sources when it comes to Odessa. I'd imagine there'd be a Ukrainian fairytale version of how the Ukrainian ultras were attacked akin to how AP near-defended it last year.

    http://darussophile.com/2014/05/massacre-in-odessa/

    "If a Molotov cocktail thrown by the pro-Maidan crowd started the blaze, it was more like an accident (manslaughter, in American legal understanding) rather than murder."

    Notice how AP has the Ukrainian side absolved -if- they were perpetrators. Well the Ukrainian side did have a few tasteful views of the victims:

    http://off-guardian.org/2015/05/01/odessa-mom-burns-when-right-sector-boasted-of-odessa-massacre/

    I'd think video compilations would be far more telling than any report Kiev (or Moscow) releases. The following video (with English subs) is a good start.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxcB0PI4ZLg

    Report by UN monitoring mission about events in Odessa:

    http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Countries/UA/HRMMUReport15June2014.pdf

    B. Investigations into human rights violations related to 2 May Odesa violence
    Summary of events

    37. The most serious single incident of significant loss of life in Ukraine since the killings
    on Maidan occurred in Odesa on 2 May 2014.
    7
    The events occurred on the same day that a football match was due to take place between the Kharkiv football team “Metallist” and the Odesa football team “Chernomorets”. On 1 May, the police authorities issued an official statement announcing that due to possible disorder
    because of the football game, an additional 2,000 police officers would patrol the
    streets of Odesa.

    38. Early in the morning of 2 May, at least 600 football fans arrived from Kharkiv. Football
    fans from both teams are known to have strong “Pro-Unity” sympathies. A pre-match rally for “United Ukraine” had been planned for 3.00 p.m. on Sobornaya square and gathered, at least, 2,000 people, including supporters of the two football teams, Right Sector activists, members of so-called self-defence units, and other “Pro-Unity” supporters. Right Sector and “self-defence” unit supporters were observed by the HRMMU wearing helmets and masks, and armed with shields, axes, wooden/metallic sticks and some with firearms. By 3:00 p.m. the HRMMU had observed 15 police officers on Sobornaya square and two buses of riot police officers parked nearby.

    39. Meanwhile, the HRMMU observed that about 450 metres away from Sobornaya street, “Pro-Federalism” activists, comprising approximately 300 activists from “Odesskaya Druzhina” (radical “Pro-Federalism” movement), had also gathered one hour earlier. They reportedly intended to prevent the “Pro-Unity” rally; and were wearing helmets, shields, masks, axes, wooden/metal sticks and some of them with firearms.

    40. The HRMMU observed an insufficient and inadequate police presence to manage and ensure security, and crowd control of the “United Ukraine” march towards the football stadium. The HRMMU noted that additional police officers arrived at the scene, but were unable to stop the violent confrontation.

    41. At 3.15 p.m., the “Pro-Federalism Odesskaya Drujina”, “Narodnaya Drujina” and other activists approached the Sobornaya square and started to provoke the participants of the “United Ukraine” rally. Clashes arose and quickly turned into mass disorder, which lasted for several hours until 6.30 p.m. Police officers and supporters from both sides were injured during the afternoon. Six men were killed by gunshots fired by activists.

    42. The HRMMU observed that following the clashes in the city centre, some “ProFederalism”
    activists ran from the area chased by “Pro-Unity” supporters. Approximately 60 “Pro-Federalism” activists took refuge in the “Afina” shopping centre, which had been closed during the day. The “Afina” shopping centre was then surrounded by “Pro-Unity” activists. Riot police (Special Forces “SOKOL”) arrived on the scene, and reportedly took away 47 “Pro-Federalism” activists, while letting women out of the complex. Other “Pro-Federalism” supporters ran from the clashes to the tent camp at the Kulikovo Pole square, where approximately 200 supporters had gathered (including all the “Pro-Federalism” leaders) during the afternoon.

    43. Some “Pro-Unity” politicians called upon their supporters to march towards the Kulikovo Pole square. At 7.00 p.m., the “Pro-Unity” supporters marched in that direction, accompanied behind them by approximately 60 riot police.

    44. The “Pro-Federalism” leaders were informed that “Pro-Unity” supporters were heading towards the tent camp, and between 6.00 – 6.30 p.m., they decided to take refuge in the nearby Trade Union Building.

    45. At 7.30 p.m., when the “Pro-Unity” supporters reached Kulikovo Pole square, they burned all the “Pro-Federalism” tents. The “Pro-Federalism” activists, who had hidden in the Trade Union Building, and the “Pro-Unity” activists, then reportedly started throwing Molotov cocktails at each other. Gunshots could reportedly be heard coming from both sides. At around 8.00 p.m., the “Pro-Unity” activists entered the Trade Union Building where the “Pro-Federalism” supporters had sought refuge.

    46. During the evening a fire broke out in the Trade Union Building. At 7.43 p.m., the HRMMU called the fire brigade, which has its base located 650 metres from the Trade Union Building. Reportedly, the fire brigade only arrived 40 minutes after receiving the first phone call about the fire. According to fire brigade officials, this was due to the fact that the police did not create a safe and secure perimeter allowing the fire brigade to easily access the Trade Union Building. The cause of the fire remains unclear at this stage.

    47. As a result of the fire, officially 42 people died: 32 (including 6 females) were trapped and unable to leave the building and 10 (including one female and one minor) died jumping from windows.

    48. The HRMMU has received information from credible resources that some “Pro-Unity” protesters were beating up “Pro-Federalism” supporters as they were trying to escape the Trade Union Building, while others were trying to help them.

    49. 247 other people were brought from the scene requiring medical assistance: 27 people
    with gunshot wounds, 31 with stab wounds, 26 with burns and intoxication caused by
    combustible products and 163 with injuries by blunt objects. Of these, 99 people were
    hospitalised, including 22 policemen, with 35 in serious condition. According to
    various sources, all those who died were Ukrainian citizens. There are no more official
    reports of people missing in relation to 2 May events. Seven of those injured remain in
    hospital. The HRMMU received allegations that many who were treated in hospitals
    did not give their real names and addresses. Moreover, some people who were heavily
    injured from the violence did not go to hospital for fear of retaliation.

    50. During the evening, it was reported to the HRMMU that a bare minimum police force
    was present at the Kulikovo Pole square. Even when the special riot police force
    arrived at the scene, the officers did not intervene in the violence that took place on the
    Kulikovo Pole square. The HRMMU was told by high ranking police officers that the
    reason for this is that they did not receive any formal order to intervene.

    ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

    So according to the UN monitoring mission – violence started when anti-Maidan attacked pro-Maidan. UN reports doesn’t say, but first killed person seems to have been a pro-Maidan:

    http://novosti.dn.ua/details/224158/

    According to the UN report, at the Trade Union buildings, both sides were armed, and anti-Maidan were throwing Molotov cocktails from the trade union building (meaning that the building probably had stockpiled cocktails – perhaps explaining the intensity of the fire) as well as having cocktails thrown at them. Anti-Maidan were also shooting out, as pro-Maidan were shooting in.

    The fire seems to have been was an ugly brawl gone deadly, not a premeditated act.

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  28. AP says:
    @AP

    Right Sector was very important at the Maidan.
     
    Important perhaps. But critical? I heard different from people who were there. RS tended to disappear when things got rough and claim "glory" afterward. Here's a list of people who died during Euromaidan; it probably it is roughly representative of the movement:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_people_killed_during_Euromaidan

    Although there are youths there also, in general the ages and profiles of these people don't match the "young neo-Nazi hoodlum" types. A few Afghan vets, a couple professors, journalists, etc.

    There were lots of those wolfsangel symbols there. The Azov regiment is completely fascist.
     
    Azov regiment is not "completely" fascist. But it certainly has a lot of, not fascists - but Nazis. It's a nasty bunch. But there are nasty ones on the other side too.

    On the Maidan side the passion – the kind that makes people want to risk their lives for a cause, not the kind that thieving oligarchs have – often wears the wolfsangel symbol. Sometimes a swastika.
     
    "Often" and "sometimes" are not precise terms. It's certainly not a majority.

    The guy who saw the show said that the host asked the person who represented the Ukrainian point of view why Kiev doesn’t just fire the people who use fascist symbols. The pro-Kiev person said that the Ukraine would lose the war.
     
    Quite possible, in the beginning when Ukraine's army was still totally disorganized. And how well would Novorossiya be doing if there were no Russian nationalists?

    At the top of the poll that you cited is outrage at Yanukovich. Outrage for what? The answer that’s given for Western consumption is “for corruption and subserviance to the Kremlin.”
     
    Those two, plus violence against protesters representing the majority of the locals, plus rejecting Europe in favor of Russia.

    But everyone on the ground – the Banderites, the apathetic majority and the future separatists – understood that the Maidan’s leaders were going to be at least as currupt and that they were subservient to the US.
     
    Evidence of everyone or even most people believing this? Ukraine's corruption index, while still dismal, has improved slightly.

    Evidence of everyone or even most people believing this? Ukraine’s corruption index, while still dismal, has improved slightly.

    I should have provided a link:

    http://www.transparency.org/news/pressrelease/a_year_after_maidan_ukraine_is_still_the_most_corrupt_country_in_europe

    Anticorruption laws weren’t adopted until October 2014. So it’s still early.

    “Having received only one additional point, in comparison with 2013, Ukraine remains in the club of the most corrupt countries.

    This year Ukraine scored 26 of 100 and took 142nd place of 175 in the CPI by Transparency International. Again Ukraine shares scores with Uganda and the Comoros as one of the most corrupt countries in the world.

    The disappointing results according to the international anti-corruption community are caused by the hardly noticeable progress in destruction of corruption schemes that remained after the previous ruling regimes since Ukraine became independent. Indeed, despite “the façade change”, Ukraine continues treading water. The newly-adopted laws have not yet given the tangible results in anti-corruption fighting.

    Oleksii Khmara, Executive Director of Transparency International Ukraine, stresses that the state has adopted certain laws and shown its intention to move towards the reforms, but it is not enough: “Anti-corruption laws that were adopted on October 14, 2014 give the ground for reforms. Soon we’ll see the real situation with the reforms; it’ll happen already in December. The new Government together with the new Parliament shall work on the state budget 2015. A question remains, whether the budget will allocate money for the Anti-Corruption Bureau or electronic system of the officials’ declarations. Political will does not mean only vigorous calls from the rostrum. It means practical steps for implementing new anti-corruption laws, for example, transparent staff selection for the new anti-corruption bodies, punishment of all who are involved in corrupt schemes, non-interference with the work of those who fight against corruption. Ukraine needs it to raise its results in the CPI”.

    Ukraine still stays in the club of the countries with extremely corrupt authorities. However, Тransparency International notes some anti-corruption steps of our country –bureaucracy is not as strangling for business as it was before; export and import became freer of bribes.”

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  29. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    In her postings, she evidences a latent obsession with virile Russian men (see left), and the political and financial power of the Jews

    Not completely daft, then.

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  30. @German_reader
    Many thanks for the translation. I knew about the Odessa massacre...the comments of that Nazi babe are pretty disgusting, good that she's going to be behind bars.
    I probably disagree with your and Mr Karlins interpretation of the Ukraine crisis (I think Russia's actions in Eastern Ukraine are unacceptable neo-imperialism), but undoubtedly the Ukrainian side isn't wholly blameless either...the indulgence shown to fascists and Bandera-worshippers certainly is very problematic.

    Russia’s actions in Eastern Ukraine are unacceptable neo-imperialism?

    NATO has, contrary to promises, pushed its sphere of influence right up to Russia’s borders. Is that not neo-imperialism?

    The United States, through that disgusting creature Nuland, has been involved in the toppling of a legitimately elected government half away around the globe and its replacement with junta made up of oligarchs pre-chosen for their sympathy with the neo-liberal agenda. Is that not neo-imperialism?

    Despite the fact that those in Ukraine who identify themselves as Russian have been under constant attack from the likes of the harpie who is the subject of this article, Russia has done comparatively little in response. Hardly the behaviour of a neo-imperialist, is it?

    According to those singing from Washington’s hymnsheet, Russia “annexed” Crimea. Of course, it did no such thing. Crimea decided through a democratic process that they wanted no part of the burgeoning kleptocratic banana republic that Ukraine had become. They also decided they wanted to rejoin the country they had been part of since 1783 until some (Ukrainian) idiot decided to gift their to Ukraine in the 1950s.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SWSpires
    Minor point here, but this is something that irritates me a little. Of course Russia annexed Crimea; that's the word we use for this situation in English. It's annexation even if it's popular.

    Note for example "annexation of Texas." This popular annexation gets a different term in Russian: Присоединение Техаса (literally "joining of Texas"). There is another word in Russian, cognate with the English, which I suppose means forcible annexation. Probably the confusion stems from this.
  31. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Spamming the thread with copy-paste rubbish won’t make your rose-tinted views any less red. I admit the Zakarpatiye mistake, my wording of it could’ve been better (I did get a little ahead of myself with turnout figures and I apologise), but I do not espouse the same schadenfreude as you did in that Odessa thread. Don’t even pretend you care.

    You say the extremist factions have little influence on Euromaidan Ukraine, but what explains Right Sector now forming the spearhead of Ukraine’s military? Why is the average Ukrainian sent to kill another average Ukrainian with little or no equipment, while the National Guard get the shiniest tools to go after the “vata” and “coloradoes”? You are either blind or lying about their influence; I’d say the latter.
    Let’s look at what Euromaidan’s promises have achieved one year on:

    1) Kick out or kill all Moscal….Crimea is gone, the east is now disintegrating. Ukraine will most likely end up in a few pieces by the end of this debacle. The Russians may leave, but it seems they are taking their land with them.

    2) Kick all oligarchs out….Euromaidanites vote for chocolate oligarch Poroshenko in an election with a “healthy” turnout. HA HA!
    Less corruption…..I’ll try not to laugh. According to the average Banderophile, only Moscali can be corrupt ;)

    3) Bringing “European civilisation” to Ukraine….if you are talking about the civilisation of the 1930s, consider this achieved.

    4) A Ukraine independent of all great powers…What explains the American rubber boot marks on the forehead of most of the Ukrainian politicians?

    5) A “fairer” Ukraine….Yes, fairer for Bandera’s children who have now fully rehabilitated their UPA heritage.

    “Azov regiment is not “completely” fascist. But it certainly has a lot of, not fascists – but Nazis. It’s a nasty bunch. But there are nasty ones on the other side too.”

    Well, well, well….nice to see where your sympathies are. You’ll find my sympathies are similar to my grandparents’ who know Bandera’s ilk quite well (look not east of Kiev, but west for their heritage). You’ll also find my sympathies are with the ordinary Ukrainians (whether ethnic Ukrainian, Russian, or something else) who’ve seen their country hijacked by Bandera’s dogs backed by apologists like yourself.

    See you in another year; let’s see if the number of female chess players Galicia produces outnumbers the number of Azov recruits by then. I’ll leave you with a patriotic slogan which will bring tears to the eyes of Banderites like Vita Zaverukha:

    Glory to Bandera! Glory to the patron of prostitutes and their fathers who fathered them!

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    • Replies: @Dimitar
    Sorry, I should've signed my comment (May 10, 2015 at 2:35 pm GMT) "Dimitar".

    Glory to Ukraine, glory to the whores ;)
  32. Dimitar says:
    @Anonymous
    @AP

    Spamming the thread with copy-paste rubbish won't make your rose-tinted views any less red. I admit the Zakarpatiye mistake, my wording of it could’ve been better (I did get a little ahead of myself with turnout figures and I apologise), but I do not espouse the same schadenfreude as you did in that Odessa thread. Don't even pretend you care.

    You say the extremist factions have little influence on Euromaidan Ukraine, but what explains Right Sector now forming the spearhead of Ukraine’s military? Why is the average Ukrainian sent to kill another average Ukrainian with little or no equipment, while the National Guard get the shiniest tools to go after the “vata” and “coloradoes”? You are either blind or lying about their influence; I’d say the latter.
    Let's look at what Euromaidan’s promises have achieved one year on:

    1) Kick out or kill all Moscal....Crimea is gone, the east is now disintegrating. Ukraine will most likely end up in a few pieces by the end of this debacle. The Russians may leave, but it seems they are taking their land with them.

    2) Kick all oligarchs out....Euromaidanites vote for chocolate oligarch Poroshenko in an election with a “healthy” turnout. HA HA!
    Less corruption.....I'll try not to laugh. According to the average Banderophile, only Moscali can be corrupt ;)

    3) Bringing “European civilisation" to Ukraine....if you are talking about the civilisation of the 1930s, consider this achieved.

    4) A Ukraine independent of all great powers...What explains the American rubber boot marks on the forehead of most of the Ukrainian politicians?

    5) A "fairer" Ukraine....Yes, fairer for Bandera's children who have now fully rehabilitated their UPA heritage.

    “Azov regiment is not "completely" fascist. But it certainly has a lot of, not fascists - but Nazis. It's a nasty bunch. But there are nasty ones on the other side too.”

    Well, well, well….nice to see where your sympathies are. You’ll find my sympathies are similar to my grandparents’ who know Bandera’s ilk quite well (look not east of Kiev, but west for their heritage). You’ll also find my sympathies are with the ordinary Ukrainians (whether ethnic Ukrainian, Russian, or something else) who’ve seen their country hijacked by Bandera’s dogs backed by apologists like yourself.

    See you in another year; let’s see if the number of female chess players Galicia produces outnumbers the number of Azov recruits by then. I’ll leave you with a patriotic slogan which will bring tears to the eyes of Banderites like Vita Zaverukha:

    Glory to Bandera! Glory to the patron of prostitutes and their fathers who fathered them!

    Sorry, I should’ve signed my comment (May 10, 2015 at 2:35 pm GMT) “Dimitar”.

    Glory to Ukraine, glory to the whores ;)

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  33. SFG says:
    @Anatoly Karlin
    ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

    Many Nazis. Many hot chicks. So quite a few hot Nazi chicks.

    Here's moar.

    I was poking fun at some of the Unz commenters, but thanks anyway ;)

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  34. SWSpires says:
    @Tom Sullivan
    Russia's actions in Eastern Ukraine are unacceptable neo-imperialism?

    NATO has, contrary to promises, pushed its sphere of influence right up to Russia's borders. Is that not neo-imperialism?

    The United States, through that disgusting creature Nuland, has been involved in the toppling of a legitimately elected government half away around the globe and its replacement with junta made up of oligarchs pre-chosen for their sympathy with the neo-liberal agenda. Is that not neo-imperialism?

    Despite the fact that those in Ukraine who identify themselves as Russian have been under constant attack from the likes of the harpie who is the subject of this article, Russia has done comparatively little in response. Hardly the behaviour of a neo-imperialist, is it?

    According to those singing from Washington's hymnsheet, Russia "annexed" Crimea. Of course, it did no such thing. Crimea decided through a democratic process that they wanted no part of the burgeoning kleptocratic banana republic that Ukraine had become. They also decided they wanted to rejoin the country they had been part of since 1783 until some (Ukrainian) idiot decided to gift their to Ukraine in the 1950s.

    Minor point here, but this is something that irritates me a little. Of course Russia annexed Crimea; that’s the word we use for this situation in English. It’s annexation even if it’s popular.

    Note for example “annexation of Texas.” This popular annexation gets a different term in Russian: Присоединение Техаса (literally “joining of Texas”). There is another word in Russian, cognate with the English, which I suppose means forcible annexation. Probably the confusion stems from this.

    Read More
  35. […] small compared to its potential. Among the fighters of both sides, mercenaries and wackjobs are well documented. And yet, in Crimea, it is the professional Russian army that is occupying the place. They took it […]

    Read More

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