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"Patriarchal" Russia Has the Most Female Business Leaders
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That is the latest finding a just-out report from Grant Thornton.

female-business-leaders-2015

Not that you’d guess it from the hysterical screechings of Western feminists and SJWs about Pussy Riot, quaint traditions like giving women flowers, and snide digs at Russians’ penchant for unapologetic masculinity (which is, incidentally, what really lies behind the psychological complex known as Putin Derangement Syndrome).

The fact that Russian, and indeed most women from the ex-socialist bloc, show that women don’t need Womyn’s Studies departments (there is just one in all of Russia) or legally-mandated quotas (like you have in France and Sweden) must enrage those harpy losers all the more.

This is also why almost nobody in Russia, neither men nor women, care much for feminism. It’s just not an issue. Equity feminism – equality before the law, formal political and civil rights, getting paid the same for the same work, sovereignty over one’s body – had long been achieved in the USSR when similar processes began to get underway in the West. This, as well as the Marxist cocoon that covered it until the 1990s, ironically immunized it against gender feminism, one of the many mutant spawns of the Frankfurt School/Cultural Marxism that aggressively sought to “equalize” the genders by denying basic biological facts attacking traditional feminine virtues while loudly denigrating and even criminalizing broad swathes of traditional masculinity in an elite-supported campaign that continues to this day.

But the joke is ultimately on the SJWs. While they can scream as loud as they want at astrophysicists in loud shirts and juicing dudebro Gamergaters on Twitter, they still ain’t getting promoted by the capitalist big dogs.

 
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  1. “Equity feminism – equality before the law, formal political and civil rights, getting paid the same for the same work, sovereignty over one’s body – had long been achieved in the USSR when similar processes began to get underway in the West.”

    Well, I hate playing devil’s advocate on behalf of the feminists, but I’d like to point out that our own feminists might have reason to be upset if we haven’t achieved now what the USSR managed all those years ago. And it also appears that the conservative elements in Russia’s ruling party want to roll back at least some of these Soviet achievements: witness the Patriarch’s call to ban abortion.

    Also, were the Soviets really as progressive as you make out? Peter Frost notes that Stalin cracked down on adultery and abortion after the social ill effects became known during the early, more revolutionary years. Like with “human rights” and “freedom of religion”, there seems to have a been a disconnect between Soviet rhetoric and Soviet policy on gender equality.

  2. Anonymous • Disclaimer says: • Website

    But the joke is ultimately on the SJWs. While they can scream as loud as they want at astrophysicists in loud shirts and juicing dudebro Gamergaters on Twitter, they still ain’t getting promoted by the capitalist big dogs.

    It’s amusing how gamergate has turned into a bogeyman that represents everything SJWs hate even though most of the people involved in it are ideologically identical to them.

    Those damn MRA Dudebro Neoreactionary Nazi Basement dwelling PUA pissbabies!

  3. Western governments’ paternalism toward women discourages Western women from taking any initiative, because they don’t have to. Chinese women are also much better at business than Western women, because they aren’t so pampered as their Western counterparts.

    If Russians provided women with all the advantages they have in the West, their women would drop out of the rat race, too.

  4. About 1992 my college math classes filled up with Russians. They talked all the time and flagrantly cheated on tests but were otherwise smart and engaged. In a way I’d never encountered up to that time, they embodied their educations. I will never forget being at Brownies in NY having a drunk Russian shout at me, “but the truth is fixed and eternal!” Before the Russians, women were very under-represented in my classes. The new comers were about half and half. Cultural factors likely mater most, but is there any chance that some of the cognitive gender differences we take for granted in northern Europeans don’t exist in Russians? The female Russian math students were also aggressive in a very agreeable way, setting themselves apart from American dames in those days, too.

  5. M says:

    Probably these are due to structural differences in corporate and economic structure. Similar companies in different countries have very different corporate structures and very different “on paper” senior roles.

    You could look at the wealth distribution of men and women in different countries for another comparison. If women have a lot of senior roles, but not actually much money, then there is some question of whether those senior roles are a “manager in name only” phenomenon.

    Russia’s odd sex ratio – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_sex_ratio also probably plays into it.

    There is the issue of quality of the men in a management environment – Japan for’ex is an outlier in low levels of female senior participation, and also stereotypically, obviously pretty good at turning boys into starchy, responsible, patrician businessmen and salarymen. Former Communist Europe perhaps not so much – historically, I think, the region did not push men very hard into becoming skilled white collar managers. The culture was, stereotypically again, proletarian-bureaucratic-intellectual, maybe not a culture which passes on many leadership skills to men or creates much enthusiasm among them. Japan also has a cooperative culture between men, so men may be unlikely to purge male rivals as much as in other nations, possibly to the detriment of women seeking power.

  6. So the smartest women in Russia are running companies rather than making babies. Yay conservatism?!?

    I don’t believe in a meritocratic society with formal equality before the law women would end up with women as 40% of leaders. As the report implies, I suspect that this has to do with lack of ambition and drunkenness among Russian men.

    Russia is also considered more corrupt than these other countries. If leaders are putting their offspring or relatives in positions of power, it might matter less if they’re men or women.

    • Replies: @Documented Uncitizen
    "I suspect that this has to do with lack of ambition and drunkenness among Russian men."

    No, I really don't think there are any discernible lack of drunkenness among Russian men.
  7. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    In most of the world there are 10 men for every woman with an attribute I’ll vaguely call business tenacity.

    In at least three parts of the world, the ratio decreases from 10 to 5 (number in place just for illustration).

    -Eastern Europe/Russia (not just Slavic countries but also Romania)
    -East Asia (excluding South Korea)
    -Bantu speaking sub-Sahara Africa

    Some countries in these regions are patriarchal, but women are equipped with better gene expression to overcome the circumstances.

  8. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Pretty much all the countries in the top 10 are former Communist — Georgia, Poland, and Latvia are right up there with Russia. Which, bully for Communism! But you’ll have some difficulty trying to find a model that fits the non-former-Communist countries; Sweden and South Africa are almost identical, as are Nigeria and New Zealand. Is it because these countries are adopting the same sorts of feminism? Somehow I think not.

    I note that the report is defining top management as C-Suite jobs. Now, wunderkinds and silverbacks notwithstanding, about 3/4 of all C-Suite jobs worldwide belong to people between 50 and 65. So there’s a generational issue here: we’re talking about women born 1950-65, who came of age in the golden age of Communist gender equality from 1970 to 1990. Their mothers had a much tougher time of it. And so, one suspects, will their daughters.

    The reason women got economic power under Communism was that they were handed a solid slab of political power. The Party was, by its own ideology, compelled to be gender-blind: a Party group that let either its membership or its leadership be too greatly dominated by males would be condemned as backwards and deviationist. So, while you’re glorifying Russia’s gender equality, don’t forget that it was imposed by force from the top down by means of a flat-out quota system: from Khrushchev’s time onwards, local Soviets had to be 50% female, and Republic-level legislatures had to be at least 1/3. (Sometimes this led to odd results — as in Moldova, where the 1/3 was filled out with Romanophone women from Moldova proper, so that the rest of Moldova’s legislature could be disproportionately dominated by Russophone men from Transnistria.)

    Communism granted Russia and its former possessions and satellites a positive social legacy of gender equality. But that says nothing about the virtues of Russian society today. That legacy is now inherited social capital, which may be increased or spent down. My guess is that it’s being spent down pretty fast. The quotas of the Soviet union died with it; the Duma today is less than 15% female, and female representation at other levels of politics is quite low. I suspect that female participation in senior management will track female participation in politics, subject to a generational lag time, and that the Grant Thornton report of 2025 will show a sharp decline in C-Suite Russian women. I’d be fine with being wrong, mind.

    Doug M.

    • Replies: @Documented Uncitizen
    "The reason women got economic power under Communism was that they were handed a solid slab of political power."

    Perhaps that's one of the main reasons for the collapse, and lack of success, of the USSR.

    Think twice before you hire women to important, especially leadership, positions - and work to have their right to vote abolished.
  9. @Hepp
    So the smartest women in Russia are running companies rather than making babies. Yay conservatism?!?

    I don't believe in a meritocratic society with formal equality before the law women would end up with women as 40% of leaders. As the report implies, I suspect that this has to do with lack of ambition and drunkenness among Russian men.

    Russia is also considered more corrupt than these other countries. If leaders are putting their offspring or relatives in positions of power, it might matter less if they're men or women.

    “I suspect that this has to do with lack of ambition and drunkenness among Russian men.”

    No, I really don’t think there are any discernible lack of drunkenness among Russian men.

  10. “BY ANATOLY KARLIN AND ANATOLYKARLIN”

    Really?

  11. @Anonymous
    Pretty much all the countries in the top 10 are former Communist -- Georgia, Poland, and Latvia are right up there with Russia. Which, bully for Communism! But you'll have some difficulty trying to find a model that fits the non-former-Communist countries; Sweden and South Africa are almost identical, as are Nigeria and New Zealand. Is it because these countries are adopting the same sorts of feminism? Somehow I think not.

    I note that the report is defining top management as C-Suite jobs. Now, wunderkinds and silverbacks notwithstanding, about 3/4 of all C-Suite jobs worldwide belong to people between 50 and 65. So there's a generational issue here: we're talking about women born 1950-65, who came of age in the golden age of Communist gender equality from 1970 to 1990. Their mothers had a much tougher time of it. And so, one suspects, will their daughters.

    The reason women got economic power under Communism was that they were handed a solid slab of political power. The Party was, by its own ideology, compelled to be gender-blind: a Party group that let either its membership or its leadership be too greatly dominated by males would be condemned as backwards and deviationist. So, while you're glorifying Russia's gender equality, don't forget that it was imposed by force from the top down by means of a flat-out quota system: from Khrushchev's time onwards, local Soviets had to be 50% female, and Republic-level legislatures had to be at least 1/3. (Sometimes this led to odd results -- as in Moldova, where the 1/3 was filled out with Romanophone women from Moldova proper, so that the rest of Moldova's legislature could be disproportionately dominated by Russophone men from Transnistria.)

    Communism granted Russia and its former possessions and satellites a positive social legacy of gender equality. But that says nothing about the virtues of Russian society today. That legacy is now inherited social capital, which may be increased or spent down. My guess is that it's being spent down pretty fast. The quotas of the Soviet union died with it; the Duma today is less than 15% female, and female representation at other levels of politics is quite low. I suspect that female participation in senior management will track female participation in politics, subject to a generational lag time, and that the Grant Thornton report of 2025 will show a sharp decline in C-Suite Russian women. I'd be fine with being wrong, mind.


    Doug M.

    “The reason women got economic power under Communism was that they were handed a solid slab of political power.”

    Perhaps that’s one of the main reasons for the collapse, and lack of success, of the USSR.

    Think twice before you hire women to important, especially leadership, positions – and work to have their right to vote abolished.

    • Replies: @Featherless Biped
    Don't tread on me, bro.
  12. @Documented Uncitizen
    "The reason women got economic power under Communism was that they were handed a solid slab of political power."

    Perhaps that's one of the main reasons for the collapse, and lack of success, of the USSR.

    Think twice before you hire women to important, especially leadership, positions - and work to have their right to vote abolished.

    Don’t tread on me, bro.

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