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PEW Poll of International Relations (2017)
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Results of the new PEW poll on international relations.

ROG-ZOG alliance on Trump.

pew-trump-support-2017

Russia is also the major country where approval of the US went up since Trump’s election.

pew-usa-approval

These figures are however a bit outdated (they were gathered this spring).

Levada, which keeps track of Russian opinion of foreign countries, showed US approval falling from 37% in March 2017 back to 24% in May 2017 – not far from the nadir under Obama – in what must have been a response to the US strikes on Syria.

levada-russia-usa-approval

Young people are universally more supportive of American customs coming to their countries.

I can state that the figures for Russia are definitely correct.

pew-us-customs

Australians and Israelis have the only rightists who support Trump.

pew-us-support-ideology

By “far right” party opinion:

pew-us-support-ideology-2

Pretty much everyone opposes Trump’s wall, though it is perhaps hard to see how it is anybody’s except Mexico’s business.

pew-support-wall

More Indians and Africans (!) want Trump to create Tropical Hyperborea than Russians. How sad.

pew-support-trump-climate-withdrawal

Here is how Trump stacks up against Merkel, Xi Jinping, and Putin.

pew-trump-putin-merkel

 
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  1. lol, Swedes really seem to be the cuckiest people ever, even worse than Germans.
    Also irritating how many people, especially young ones, are happy about “American ideas and customs” infiltrating their countries…is this still like the 1950s when almost everybody (apart from commies and some nationalists) looked up to the US? I would have thought there would be more anti-Americanism around. I wonder though what people understand by “American ideas and customs” (probably rap videos, “antiracism” and McDonalds rather than the writings of the founding fathers I’d guess).
    Some of the results are just depressing (large majorities against the US border wall? Can only be explained by people mindlessly regurgitating what they see in the media…and Merkel most trusted politician???). Confirms once again that most people are a waste of space and that a severe culling of the global population might be a good idea.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon

    Also irritating how many people, especially young ones, are happy about “American ideas and customs” infiltrating their countries…is this still like the 1950s when almost everybody (apart from commies and some nationalists) looked up to the US?
     
    1950s? What about 1990s when were even less commies and nationalists in Germany and America was just as dominant?
    , @Greasy William

    Confirms once again that most people are a waste of space and that a severe culling of the global population might be a good idea.
     
    Now you're speaking my language.

    Even populist Europeans really despise Trump. No question that this hurt Le Pen in France and that she probably would have hit 40% if not for Trump's win.
    , @5371
    Trusting Merkel is an answer specifically restricted to foreign affairs ... still pretty much shorthand for being a normie though. I don't have much trust in the Pew institute or this poll.
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  2. It’s pretty hypocritical for countries like Japan, South Korea, and Hungary; all of whom have strict immigration policies/their own border walls to oppose the Trumpenfurher’s wall. Sad!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Greasy William
    Ahmadinejad wrote to Trump in an open letter after Trump was elected that Trump had no right to restrict immigration because America did not belong to the American people but rather to all peoples of the world.

    Big A was speaking not only for himself, nor only on behalf of Iranians, but rather he was speaking on behalf of all non Americans. Non Americans really do think that America just as much belongs to them as it does to the American people.
    , @reiner Tor
    Opposition leaders have already agreed that the border fence would be torn down, should they win. Though I'm sure some Hungarians are hypocritical, the Hungarian border fence itself doesn't have a strong majority in Hungary.
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  3. Ukie says:

    Trump only talks about a wall then foreigners go home and stay home. He does not need a wall if he keeps foreigners out. Other smaller countries do not have the Trump luxury of talk. They need walls to protect their countries.

    Read More
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  4. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @German_reader
    lol, Swedes really seem to be the cuckiest people ever, even worse than Germans.
    Also irritating how many people, especially young ones, are happy about "American ideas and customs" infiltrating their countries...is this still like the 1950s when almost everybody (apart from commies and some nationalists) looked up to the US? I would have thought there would be more anti-Americanism around. I wonder though what people understand by "American ideas and customs" (probably rap videos, "antiracism" and McDonalds rather than the writings of the founding fathers I'd guess).
    Some of the results are just depressing (large majorities against the US border wall? Can only be explained by people mindlessly regurgitating what they see in the media...and Merkel most trusted politician???). Confirms once again that most people are a waste of space and that a severe culling of the global population might be a good idea.

    Also irritating how many people, especially young ones, are happy about “American ideas and customs” infiltrating their countries…is this still like the 1950s when almost everybody (apart from commies and some nationalists) looked up to the US?

    1950s? What about 1990s when were even less commies and nationalists in Germany and America was just as dominant?

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    • Replies: @German_reader
    I'd say by the 1990s America's image already was somewhat tarnished in many parts of the world because it was associated with such negative issues as the Vietnam war, race riots and massive levels of crime. That wouldn't have been the case in the 1950s when many people in Western Europe must have looked up with hope and admiration to the Americans who seemed to be doing everything right.
    That's just what would seem plausible to me, don't have any data to support that view.
    , @Randal
    In the 1950s much of the world (and in particular the bits newly incorporated into the US sphere - UK and western Europe) were devastated by the catastrophe of WW2 and its costs, which the US had been able to profiteer on from a safe distance. Inevitably the US looked infinitely more attractive than their own bombed out, occupied and/or generally ruined countries, and the greatest propaganda machine in the history of the world to date, Hollywood, was in its prime to make sure they saw what they were missing.

    In the 1990s there was a very different dynamic in western Europe and Britain. Although the US was more globally powerful than ever before due to the collapse of its only rival, Europe and Britain were not in a devastated state. The attitude in the countries of the Eastern Bloc towards the US and American stuff in the 1990s was probably similar to that in western Europe and Britain in the 1950s, though.
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  5. @Anon

    Also irritating how many people, especially young ones, are happy about “American ideas and customs” infiltrating their countries…is this still like the 1950s when almost everybody (apart from commies and some nationalists) looked up to the US?
     
    1950s? What about 1990s when were even less commies and nationalists in Germany and America was just as dominant?

    I’d say by the 1990s America’s image already was somewhat tarnished in many parts of the world because it was associated with such negative issues as the Vietnam war, race riots and massive levels of crime. That wouldn’t have been the case in the 1950s when many people in Western Europe must have looked up with hope and admiration to the Americans who seemed to be doing everything right.
    That’s just what would seem plausible to me, don’t have any data to support that view.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    Tarnished or not, in the 1990s there was no (effective) counterweight to America and American ideas and customs.

    In the 1950, there was the USSR and the old European states were not cucked yet.

    Also keep in mind that issues like the Vietnam war were much less important to people who grow up during the 1990s and 2000s.
    , @DB Cooper
    Brent Scrowcoft's observation probably is most to the point. He said that there was a time when America stumbled and did things wrong, at least no one would question America's motivation. But that is not the case anymore. In the 1990s America probably still enjoyed that kind of trust from people in the world at large.
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  6. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @German_reader
    I'd say by the 1990s America's image already was somewhat tarnished in many parts of the world because it was associated with such negative issues as the Vietnam war, race riots and massive levels of crime. That wouldn't have been the case in the 1950s when many people in Western Europe must have looked up with hope and admiration to the Americans who seemed to be doing everything right.
    That's just what would seem plausible to me, don't have any data to support that view.

    Tarnished or not, in the 1990s there was no (effective) counterweight to America and American ideas and customs.

    In the 1950, there was the USSR and the old European states were not cucked yet.

    Also keep in mind that issues like the Vietnam war were much less important to people who grow up during the 1990s and 2000s.

    Read More
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  7. @German_reader
    lol, Swedes really seem to be the cuckiest people ever, even worse than Germans.
    Also irritating how many people, especially young ones, are happy about "American ideas and customs" infiltrating their countries...is this still like the 1950s when almost everybody (apart from commies and some nationalists) looked up to the US? I would have thought there would be more anti-Americanism around. I wonder though what people understand by "American ideas and customs" (probably rap videos, "antiracism" and McDonalds rather than the writings of the founding fathers I'd guess).
    Some of the results are just depressing (large majorities against the US border wall? Can only be explained by people mindlessly regurgitating what they see in the media...and Merkel most trusted politician???). Confirms once again that most people are a waste of space and that a severe culling of the global population might be a good idea.

    Confirms once again that most people are a waste of space and that a severe culling of the global population might be a good idea.

    Now you’re speaking my language.

    Even populist Europeans really despise Trump. No question that this hurt Le Pen in France and that she probably would have hit 40% if not for Trump’s win.

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    • Replies: @Yevardian
    Possibly this has more to do with Trump's clownish persona, twitter shitposting and kitsch tastes than what he put he putatively represents/represented. But that might just be wishful thinking. Even the Front National is pretty damn milquetoast.

    But those poll numbers even on countries such as Hungary, Czechia and Israel really are depressing. Arguably Mexicans aren't anyway near on the same tier as Mahslems, but you'd think they'd understand. Though probably an outright majority of the young hip n' progressive Hungarian generation feel the same about Orban as Drumpf.
    Honestly though most of us are as guilty of consuming American 'culture' as anyone else, I mean Akarlin himself just did a review of some American pop 'culture' this week.

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  8. @Lemurmaniac
    It's pretty hypocritical for countries like Japan, South Korea, and Hungary; all of whom have strict immigration policies/their own border walls to oppose the Trumpenfurher's wall. Sad!

    Ahmadinejad wrote to Trump in an open letter after Trump was elected that Trump had no right to restrict immigration because America did not belong to the American people but rather to all peoples of the world.

    Big A was speaking not only for himself, nor only on behalf of Iranians, but rather he was speaking on behalf of all non Americans. Non Americans really do think that America just as much belongs to them as it does to the American people.

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    • Replies: @Anon

    Big A was speaking not only for himself, nor only on behalf of Iranians, but rather he was speaking on behalf of all non Americans. Non Americans really do think that America just as much belongs to them as it does to the American people.
     
    He was right. If America wants to rule the world, we should get a say, we should get voting rights and vote in their elections.
    , @melanf

    Ahmadinejad wrote to Trump in an open letter after Trump was elected that Trump had no right to restrict immigration because America did not belong to the American people but rather to all peoples of the world.
    Big A was speaking not only for himself, nor only on behalf of Iranians, but rather he was speaking on behalf of all non Americans.
     
    In this case, all non-Americans with the exception of Russian. In Russia such ideas ("America did not belong to the American people" ) just do not exist

    But (in the Russian mass consciousness) to Western politicians attribute the imperative "Russia did not belong to the Russian people" but rather the "Western" oligarchy

    , @Lemurmaniac
    Can't blame the guy for holding America to the standard the borg elites set, especially when its to his advantage (non whites are more likely to side against Israel and with Iran). If you don't respect yourself, why should anyone else?

    It is funny though when Tehran suppresses minorities (quite rightly) like the kurds who try to change the character of the Shia-Persian polity, but demands white countries accommodate Muslims.

    , @Excal
    This is a surprisingly common view, encouraged by America itself, and by its very nature: whereas most nations are the territory of a people, or possibly a few peoples having made some sort of agreement, America is the territory of a group of people who happen to have agreed on a creed. Almost anyone who says that they agree to that creed can, in theory, be an American citizen.

    Most Americans are trained from childhood to hold this view: therefore, they think it very reasonable that border controls should be cursory, or perhaps abolished altogether.

    Europeans were many years ago convinced that the American style of nationhood is the best way to preserve peace (they treat the US Civil War as an anomaly, I suppose). Their only question at this point is how to convert a collection of traditional ethnic nations into a collection of American-style states. Whether this is a good idea or not is, as they say, settled science by now.
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  9. Those numbers for Israel are skewed because of the 750,000 non Jewish ethnic Russians who live in Israel. They are further skewed because Israelis are racist against blacks to an absurd degree. Israelis really did hate Obama because Obama was black.

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    • Replies: @visitor
    I visited Israel a few years ago. I look like a typical Aryan. The security guards at the entrance of malls stopped black Jews(with visible kippas) but I was never once searched or even stopped. I'm not Jewish nor was there anything on my clothing to suggest I was.

    People often forget that most Jews in Israel are from the Middle-East(most of whom are essentially Arabs). These Mizrahi Jews constitute between 50-70% of the Jewish population(50% if you only count those with Arab ancestry on both sides of the family or 75% if you count those with Ashkenazi/Mizrahi mixture). Of course, Ashkenazis themselves have 50% Semitic blood and 50% European, so the true amount of Arabic blood in Israel is even higher.

    On top of that, outside the Jewish population, the vast majority of the non-Jewish groups are other Arabs.

    Point is, the ruling class in Israel are no more than perhaps 10-15% of the total population, especially if you include the West Bank, which has all but been colonised by now, irreversibly.

    This also shows when you see the country. Israel was surprisingly dirty. Their train stations looked like something I'd see in Morocco. If you didn't know that they had a decent per capita GDP, you'd be forgiven for thinking they were much poorer. Tel Aviv in particular was drab and filthy. Jersusalem, though far more religious, was actually cleaner.
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  10. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Greasy William
    Ahmadinejad wrote to Trump in an open letter after Trump was elected that Trump had no right to restrict immigration because America did not belong to the American people but rather to all peoples of the world.

    Big A was speaking not only for himself, nor only on behalf of Iranians, but rather he was speaking on behalf of all non Americans. Non Americans really do think that America just as much belongs to them as it does to the American people.

    Big A was speaking not only for himself, nor only on behalf of Iranians, but rather he was speaking on behalf of all non Americans. Non Americans really do think that America just as much belongs to them as it does to the American people.

    He was right. If America wants to rule the world, we should get a say, we should get voting rights and vote in their elections.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Greasy William
    No, you don't get a say. We'll continue to do whatever we want, wherever we want, whenever we want and you will continue to be prohibited from immigrating here or getting to vote in our elections.
    , @Darin

    He was right. If America wants to rule the world, we should get a say, we should get voting rights and vote in their elections.
     
    Social War 2.0?

    ttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_War_(91–88_BC)

    (the most bizarre war in history, when the Italians declared war on Rome ... to join Roman republic as Roman citizens)
    , @Randal
    Absolutely. No annihilation without representation.
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  11. @Anon

    Big A was speaking not only for himself, nor only on behalf of Iranians, but rather he was speaking on behalf of all non Americans. Non Americans really do think that America just as much belongs to them as it does to the American people.
     
    He was right. If America wants to rule the world, we should get a say, we should get voting rights and vote in their elections.

    No, you don’t get a say. We’ll continue to do whatever we want, wherever we want, whenever we want and you will continue to be prohibited from immigrating here or getting to vote in our elections.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    It's unlikely the US will continue its interventionist foreign policy while prohibiting immigration significantly. It would be able to rollback its interventionism and lose its freedom of action abroad and prohibit immigration, but it wouldn't be able to continue it and prohibit immigration. In order for the US to have freedom of action action abroad and interventionism, it has to bribe other countries, and one of the ways it bribes them is via lax immigration.
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  12. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Reveal those hidden comments!

    Read More
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  13. AP says:

    More Indians and Africans (!) want Trump to create Tropical Hyperborea than Russians. How sad.

    While I doubt such people are thinking ahead, if Africa and India become uninhabitable odds are high that those people will all settle in the north (its is doubtful that Europe and America will let all those billions die, or even more – actively force them back to their deadly sweltering homelands should they try to escape). Long-term, any efforts to limit immigration are completely overshadowed by the potential of the equator to become uninhabitable. If that becomes the case, expect hundreds of millions, if not billions, of settlers.

    The American Right’s rejection of climate change is very stupid.

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    • Agree: German_reader
    • Replies: @Mark P Miller
    When push comes to shove (e.g. catastrophic climate change), a race war of total genocidal extermination should not be completely discounted. If it's a challenge to divide an inheritance among heirs and the historical record shows how coordinated action on a global scale is difficult even in the best of times, I would say the odds of this (while small) are clearly non-zero.
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  14. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Greasy William
    No, you don't get a say. We'll continue to do whatever we want, wherever we want, whenever we want and you will continue to be prohibited from immigrating here or getting to vote in our elections.

    It’s unlikely the US will continue its interventionist foreign policy while prohibiting immigration significantly. It would be able to rollback its interventionism and lose its freedom of action abroad and prohibit immigration, but it wouldn’t be able to continue it and prohibit immigration. In order for the US to have freedom of action action abroad and interventionism, it has to bribe other countries, and one of the ways it bribes them is via lax immigration.

    Read More
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  15. melanf says:
    @Greasy William
    Ahmadinejad wrote to Trump in an open letter after Trump was elected that Trump had no right to restrict immigration because America did not belong to the American people but rather to all peoples of the world.

    Big A was speaking not only for himself, nor only on behalf of Iranians, but rather he was speaking on behalf of all non Americans. Non Americans really do think that America just as much belongs to them as it does to the American people.

    Ahmadinejad wrote to Trump in an open letter after Trump was elected that Trump had no right to restrict immigration because America did not belong to the American people but rather to all peoples of the world.
    Big A was speaking not only for himself, nor only on behalf of Iranians, but rather he was speaking on behalf of all non Americans.

    In this case, all non-Americans with the exception of Russian. In Russia such ideas (“America did not belong to the American people” ) just do not exist

    But (in the Russian mass consciousness) to Western politicians attribute the imperative “Russia did not belong to the Russian people” but rather the “Western” oligarchy

    Read More
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  16. @Greasy William
    Ahmadinejad wrote to Trump in an open letter after Trump was elected that Trump had no right to restrict immigration because America did not belong to the American people but rather to all peoples of the world.

    Big A was speaking not only for himself, nor only on behalf of Iranians, but rather he was speaking on behalf of all non Americans. Non Americans really do think that America just as much belongs to them as it does to the American people.

    Can’t blame the guy for holding America to the standard the borg elites set, especially when its to his advantage (non whites are more likely to side against Israel and with Iran). If you don’t respect yourself, why should anyone else?

    It is funny though when Tehran suppresses minorities (quite rightly) like the kurds who try to change the character of the Shia-Persian polity, but demands white countries accommodate Muslims.

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  17. Antoly, how seriously do you view the openness to American values by Russian youth?

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    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    I am actually quite fine with it, LOL.

    The older generations here have some overly traditionalistic and irrational ways of thinking that youth are less prone to. I would very much like to see Russia "Americanized" in the way it does business. Such a Russia would be more efficient and a nicer place to live in.
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  18. DB Cooper says:
    @German_reader
    I'd say by the 1990s America's image already was somewhat tarnished in many parts of the world because it was associated with such negative issues as the Vietnam war, race riots and massive levels of crime. That wouldn't have been the case in the 1950s when many people in Western Europe must have looked up with hope and admiration to the Americans who seemed to be doing everything right.
    That's just what would seem plausible to me, don't have any data to support that view.

    Brent Scrowcoft’s observation probably is most to the point. He said that there was a time when America stumbled and did things wrong, at least no one would question America’s motivation. But that is not the case anymore. In the 1990s America probably still enjoyed that kind of trust from people in the world at large.

    Read More
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  19. Darin says:
    @Anon

    Big A was speaking not only for himself, nor only on behalf of Iranians, but rather he was speaking on behalf of all non Americans. Non Americans really do think that America just as much belongs to them as it does to the American people.
     
    He was right. If America wants to rule the world, we should get a say, we should get voting rights and vote in their elections.

    He was right. If America wants to rule the world, we should get a say, we should get voting rights and vote in their elections.

    Social War 2.0?

    ttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_War_(91–88_BC)

    (the most bizarre war in history, when the Italians declared war on Rome … to join Roman republic as Roman citizens)

    Read More
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  20. Darin says:

    Bad news for all fans of tropical Hyperborea:

    http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/3/3/e1601430.full

    TL;DR: this is how your Hyperborean paradise will look like:

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    • Replies: @Darin
    The pic does not show, as if TPTB wanted to hide how Hyperborean future will look like. They will not pass!

    http://i.imgur.com/1SEci0K.jpg
    , @Anatoly Karlin
    Global warming to create literal bugmen! :)
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  21. @Lemurmaniac
    It's pretty hypocritical for countries like Japan, South Korea, and Hungary; all of whom have strict immigration policies/their own border walls to oppose the Trumpenfurher's wall. Sad!

    Opposition leaders have already agreed that the border fence would be torn down, should they win. Though I’m sure some Hungarians are hypocritical, the Hungarian border fence itself doesn’t have a strong majority in Hungary.

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    • Agree: Lemurmaniac
    • Replies: @Greasy William
    so Hungarians want more refugees?
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  22. Darin says:
    @Darin
    Bad news for all fans of tropical Hyperborea:

    http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/3/3/e1601430.full

    TL;DR: this is how your Hyperborean paradise will look like:

    https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/f9/4e/fb/f94efb7d0f57c0d20c72ca7f9ae64068--gnome-garden-enchanted-garden.jpg

    The pic does not show, as if TPTB wanted to hide how Hyperborean future will look like. They will not pass!

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    • LOL: German_reader
    • Replies: @DNC
    At least all the gnomes are white
    , @anon
    The second guy from the right is raping a squirrel?
    Yuck! No way! No perverts in our Hyperborea.

    http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4112/4997622130_7dc226aa5b_o.jpg
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  23. I happened to be somewhat familiar with Jordan, and I don’t think the 2% for Putin (in the last section) is the real number. Putin is very popular there.

    May I suggest that this whole thing is probably mostly bullshit? Obviously Pew itself doesn’t have any internal capacity or internal expertise for conducting this poll. So they probably outsource it to the most pro-western local company in each country. The local company would probably ask their sponsor (in the case of Jordan: the Jordanian information ministry or the US embassy) what results they would like to see – and voila.

    Also, Jordan (10 million people) is there, but China, with 1.4 billion isn’t? That’s just cuckoo. Couldn’t find a reliably pro-western pollster?

    Also, how do they calculate their ‘global median’? Looks like they’re dividing by the number of countries, so that Jordan has the same weight as Vietnam and India. Sure, very meaningful.

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    • Agree: anonymous coward
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  24. 5371 says:
    @German_reader
    lol, Swedes really seem to be the cuckiest people ever, even worse than Germans.
    Also irritating how many people, especially young ones, are happy about "American ideas and customs" infiltrating their countries...is this still like the 1950s when almost everybody (apart from commies and some nationalists) looked up to the US? I would have thought there would be more anti-Americanism around. I wonder though what people understand by "American ideas and customs" (probably rap videos, "antiracism" and McDonalds rather than the writings of the founding fathers I'd guess).
    Some of the results are just depressing (large majorities against the US border wall? Can only be explained by people mindlessly regurgitating what they see in the media...and Merkel most trusted politician???). Confirms once again that most people are a waste of space and that a severe culling of the global population might be a good idea.

    Trusting Merkel is an answer specifically restricted to foreign affairs … still pretty much shorthand for being a normie though. I don’t have much trust in the Pew institute or this poll.

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    • Replies: @German_reader
    I don't know, it seems quite plausible to me (note the very low approval ratings for Merkel in Greece, also relatively bad ratings in Italy, Hungary, Poland and Spain, which I'd attribute to the Euro crisis/austerity for the Southern Europeans, the refugee crisis for Poland and Hungary, and traditional mistrust of Germany). It's just shocking that Merkel is still seen so positively in Sweden, UK, Netherlands.
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  25. DNC says:
    @Darin
    The pic does not show, as if TPTB wanted to hide how Hyperborean future will look like. They will not pass!

    http://i.imgur.com/1SEci0K.jpg

    At least all the gnomes are white

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  26. Yevardian says:
    @Greasy William

    Confirms once again that most people are a waste of space and that a severe culling of the global population might be a good idea.
     
    Now you're speaking my language.

    Even populist Europeans really despise Trump. No question that this hurt Le Pen in France and that she probably would have hit 40% if not for Trump's win.

    Possibly this has more to do with Trump’s clownish persona, twitter shitposting and kitsch tastes than what he put he putatively represents/represented. But that might just be wishful thinking. Even the Front National is pretty damn milquetoast.

    But those poll numbers even on countries such as Hungary, Czechia and Israel really are depressing. Arguably Mexicans aren’t anyway near on the same tier as Mahslems, but you’d think they’d understand. Though probably an outright majority of the young hip n’ progressive Hungarian generation feel the same about Orban as Drumpf.
    Honestly though most of us are as guilty of consuming American ‘culture’ as anyone else, I mean Akarlin himself just did a review of some American pop ‘culture’ this week.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon

    I mean Akarlin himself just did a review of some American pop ‘culture’ this week.
     
    Shame on him.
    GoT has become an abomination that must be banished.
    , @Jaakko Raipala
    For anyone buying the idea that Trump's persona is the problem, try this thought experiment: what if Trump was some hyper-intellectual PhD talking about human biodiversity? We would have endless stories comparing him to Mengele and painting him as a sinister genius who can't feel compassion for ordinary people. What if he was a general with a strict, austere personality that never slips into impulsive showmanship? We would have endless scaremongering about how he wants to be a ruthless dictator.

    You can't win by trying to make your enemies respect you. You have to convince the majorities but the thing is Trump hasn't even tried outside of America. The problem with American influence is that it's so one sided - Hollywood, neocons, Marxist academia all effectively on one side and they're pushing their influence globally. Trump supporters countered that in America but they're not interested in building a counter network in the rest of the world.

    The anti-Trump sentiment seems to track penetration by anti-Trump *American* media. Leaders in some countries have resisted American buy ups of their media (Russia, Vietnam etc) and in some Americans probably haven't bothered (those African countries). In most small Eastern European countries much of the press has been bought by Western oligarchs. It really is hard to explain the extent of propaganda here and how far it can go when there is not even a single critical voice writing in our language outside of blogs, comment sections and such.

    If you look at our press now, the vast majority of news articles about foreign affairs are simple straight translations of American media and I doubt most of the translators pretending to be journalists even realize what they're doing when they're pushing a neocon agenda.

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  27. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Yevardian
    Possibly this has more to do with Trump's clownish persona, twitter shitposting and kitsch tastes than what he put he putatively represents/represented. But that might just be wishful thinking. Even the Front National is pretty damn milquetoast.

    But those poll numbers even on countries such as Hungary, Czechia and Israel really are depressing. Arguably Mexicans aren't anyway near on the same tier as Mahslems, but you'd think they'd understand. Though probably an outright majority of the young hip n' progressive Hungarian generation feel the same about Orban as Drumpf.
    Honestly though most of us are as guilty of consuming American 'culture' as anyone else, I mean Akarlin himself just did a review of some American pop 'culture' this week.

    I mean Akarlin himself just did a review of some American pop ‘culture’ this week.

    Shame on him.
    GoT has become an abomination that must be banished.

    Read More
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  28. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Darin
    The pic does not show, as if TPTB wanted to hide how Hyperborean future will look like. They will not pass!

    http://i.imgur.com/1SEci0K.jpg

    The second guy from the right is raping a squirrel?
    Yuck! No way! No perverts in our Hyperborea.

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  29. Re: Anti-Americanism

    (Bear in mind that this mainly comes from observing Western Europeans and a few East Euros and Americans and mainly liberals and progressivists among that)

    My general impression (based on relatives, schoolmates, acquaintances etc.) is that there are two broad categories of Pro- and Anti-Americanism: Geopolitical and Cultural-Political.

    Cultural-Political Pro-Americanism is mainly, as mentioned above, “Antiracism, rap videos and McDonalds” etc. along with some “muh limited government and free enterprise” cultism.

    Cultural-Political Anti-Americanism seems basically to be (relative and/or absolute) reactionaries and nationalists reacying against that.

    Geopolitical Pro- and Anti-Americanism both holds that America was born with an original sin, the difference being that one side believes America has/can be redeemed while the other side doesn’t.

    When Geopolitical Pro-Americanists express hatred or dislike of America it is because, like Euro-American liberals in the USA, they believe America isn’t American enough, that she has deviated from the Holy Mission and is behaving hermetically. When America repents they are quick to revert i.e what that whole Obamania period was all about.

    Geopolitical Anti-Americanists believe that since America cannot be purified and will be eternally opposed to LGBTQWERTY, Palestine, Deproblematised Intersectional Polyamory for hipster progressivists and because of the warmongering behaviour will never stop for the more reasonable ones she must be defeated.

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  30. @Lemurmaniac
    Antoly, how seriously do you view the openness to American values by Russian youth?

    I am actually quite fine with it, LOL.

    The older generations here have some overly traditionalistic and irrational ways of thinking that youth are less prone to. I would very much like to see Russia “Americanized” in the way it does business. Such a Russia would be more efficient and a nicer place to live in.

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    • Replies: @Lemurmaniac
    Well, if you're talking about purging corruption fair point.

    But culturally speaking, learn from the Eternal Anglo, O Russian! If you introduce the morality of 'consent' and choice', combined with chasing ROGbux, you'll be well on the way to the cynical ironism that's dissolving Western Europe. The lower levels of cultural AIDS in Poland, Russia, Hungary and the like is the result of economies which never permitted bourgeois values to become dominant.

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  31. @Darin
    Bad news for all fans of tropical Hyperborea:

    http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/3/3/e1601430.full

    TL;DR: this is how your Hyperborean paradise will look like:

    https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/f9/4e/fb/f94efb7d0f57c0d20c72ca7f9ae64068--gnome-garden-enchanted-garden.jpg

    Global warming to create literal bugmen! :)

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  32. @Anatoly Karlin
    I am actually quite fine with it, LOL.

    The older generations here have some overly traditionalistic and irrational ways of thinking that youth are less prone to. I would very much like to see Russia "Americanized" in the way it does business. Such a Russia would be more efficient and a nicer place to live in.

    Well, if you’re talking about purging corruption fair point.

    But culturally speaking, learn from the Eternal Anglo, O Russian! If you introduce the morality of ‘consent’ and choice’, combined with chasing ROGbux, you’ll be well on the way to the cynical ironism that’s dissolving Western Europe. The lower levels of cultural AIDS in Poland, Russia, Hungary and the like is the result of economies which never permitted bourgeois values to become dominant.

    Read More
    • Agree: Randal
    • Replies: @Randal
    It's the siren song of the dollar, and the problem is young people always think they can just take the bits they approve of and leave the rest behind, but the corrosive shit comes with it willy nilly.
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  33. Randal says:
    @Lemurmaniac
    Well, if you're talking about purging corruption fair point.

    But culturally speaking, learn from the Eternal Anglo, O Russian! If you introduce the morality of 'consent' and choice', combined with chasing ROGbux, you'll be well on the way to the cynical ironism that's dissolving Western Europe. The lower levels of cultural AIDS in Poland, Russia, Hungary and the like is the result of economies which never permitted bourgeois values to become dominant.

    It’s the siren song of the dollar, and the problem is young people always think they can just take the bits they approve of and leave the rest behind, but the corrosive shit comes with it willy nilly.

    Read More
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  34. Randal says:
    @Anon

    Also irritating how many people, especially young ones, are happy about “American ideas and customs” infiltrating their countries…is this still like the 1950s when almost everybody (apart from commies and some nationalists) looked up to the US?
     
    1950s? What about 1990s when were even less commies and nationalists in Germany and America was just as dominant?

    In the 1950s much of the world (and in particular the bits newly incorporated into the US sphere – UK and western Europe) were devastated by the catastrophe of WW2 and its costs, which the US had been able to profiteer on from a safe distance. Inevitably the US looked infinitely more attractive than their own bombed out, occupied and/or generally ruined countries, and the greatest propaganda machine in the history of the world to date, Hollywood, was in its prime to make sure they saw what they were missing.

    In the 1990s there was a very different dynamic in western Europe and Britain. Although the US was more globally powerful than ever before due to the collapse of its only rival, Europe and Britain were not in a devastated state. The attitude in the countries of the Eastern Bloc towards the US and American stuff in the 1990s was probably similar to that in western Europe and Britain in the 1950s, though.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon

    Inevitably the US looked infinitely more attractive than their own bombed out, occupied and/or generally ruined countries, and the greatest propaganda machine in the history of the world to date, Hollywood, was in its prime to make sure they saw what they were missing.

     

    I would argue that Hollywood was later even more influential.
    At least in the 1950s, people remembered a time when America was not the cultural hegemon.
    In the 1990s, not so much.

    Although the US was more globally powerful than ever before due to the collapse of its only rival, Europe and Britain were not in a devastated state.
     
    But they were increasingly neutered.
    In the 1950s, Britain still had an empire and the will to defend British interests at least to some extend.
    In the 1990s, Britain elected the poodle Blair and supported the centralization of the European project.
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  35. Randal says:
    @Anon

    Big A was speaking not only for himself, nor only on behalf of Iranians, but rather he was speaking on behalf of all non Americans. Non Americans really do think that America just as much belongs to them as it does to the American people.
     
    He was right. If America wants to rule the world, we should get a say, we should get voting rights and vote in their elections.

    Absolutely. No annihilation without representation.

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  36. @5371
    Trusting Merkel is an answer specifically restricted to foreign affairs ... still pretty much shorthand for being a normie though. I don't have much trust in the Pew institute or this poll.

    I don’t know, it seems quite plausible to me (note the very low approval ratings for Merkel in Greece, also relatively bad ratings in Italy, Hungary, Poland and Spain, which I’d attribute to the Euro crisis/austerity for the Southern Europeans, the refugee crisis for Poland and Hungary, and traditional mistrust of Germany). It’s just shocking that Merkel is still seen so positively in Sweden, UK, Netherlands.

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    • Replies: @5371
    Yes, in Europe it should be more reliable. As I said, it mainly means that the sheeple are worried about Trump, China, Russia.
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  37. Absent from the survey: Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Pakistan, Syria.

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    • Replies: @Mao Cheng Ji

    Absent from the survey: Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Pakistan, Syria.
     
    ...and about 150 more states.
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  38. @The Big Red Scary
    Absent from the survey: Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Pakistan, Syria.

    Absent from the survey: Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Pakistan, Syria.

    …and about 150 more states.

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  39. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Randal
    In the 1950s much of the world (and in particular the bits newly incorporated into the US sphere - UK and western Europe) were devastated by the catastrophe of WW2 and its costs, which the US had been able to profiteer on from a safe distance. Inevitably the US looked infinitely more attractive than their own bombed out, occupied and/or generally ruined countries, and the greatest propaganda machine in the history of the world to date, Hollywood, was in its prime to make sure they saw what they were missing.

    In the 1990s there was a very different dynamic in western Europe and Britain. Although the US was more globally powerful than ever before due to the collapse of its only rival, Europe and Britain were not in a devastated state. The attitude in the countries of the Eastern Bloc towards the US and American stuff in the 1990s was probably similar to that in western Europe and Britain in the 1950s, though.

    Inevitably the US looked infinitely more attractive than their own bombed out, occupied and/or generally ruined countries, and the greatest propaganda machine in the history of the world to date, Hollywood, was in its prime to make sure they saw what they were missing.

    I would argue that Hollywood was later even more influential.
    At least in the 1950s, people remembered a time when America was not the cultural hegemon.
    In the 1990s, not so much.

    Although the US was more globally powerful than ever before due to the collapse of its only rival, Europe and Britain were not in a devastated state.

    But they were increasingly neutered.
    In the 1950s, Britain still had an empire and the will to defend British interests at least to some extend.
    In the 1990s, Britain elected the poodle Blair and supported the centralization of the European project.

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  40. 5371 says:
    @German_reader
    I don't know, it seems quite plausible to me (note the very low approval ratings for Merkel in Greece, also relatively bad ratings in Italy, Hungary, Poland and Spain, which I'd attribute to the Euro crisis/austerity for the Southern Europeans, the refugee crisis for Poland and Hungary, and traditional mistrust of Germany). It's just shocking that Merkel is still seen so positively in Sweden, UK, Netherlands.

    Yes, in Europe it should be more reliable. As I said, it mainly means that the sheeple are worried about Trump, China, Russia.

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  41. @Yevardian
    Possibly this has more to do with Trump's clownish persona, twitter shitposting and kitsch tastes than what he put he putatively represents/represented. But that might just be wishful thinking. Even the Front National is pretty damn milquetoast.

    But those poll numbers even on countries such as Hungary, Czechia and Israel really are depressing. Arguably Mexicans aren't anyway near on the same tier as Mahslems, but you'd think they'd understand. Though probably an outright majority of the young hip n' progressive Hungarian generation feel the same about Orban as Drumpf.
    Honestly though most of us are as guilty of consuming American 'culture' as anyone else, I mean Akarlin himself just did a review of some American pop 'culture' this week.

    For anyone buying the idea that Trump’s persona is the problem, try this thought experiment: what if Trump was some hyper-intellectual PhD talking about human biodiversity? We would have endless stories comparing him to Mengele and painting him as a sinister genius who can’t feel compassion for ordinary people. What if he was a general with a strict, austere personality that never slips into impulsive showmanship? We would have endless scaremongering about how he wants to be a ruthless dictator.

    You can’t win by trying to make your enemies respect you. You have to convince the majorities but the thing is Trump hasn’t even tried outside of America. The problem with American influence is that it’s so one sided – Hollywood, neocons, Marxist academia all effectively on one side and they’re pushing their influence globally. Trump supporters countered that in America but they’re not interested in building a counter network in the rest of the world.

    The anti-Trump sentiment seems to track penetration by anti-Trump *American* media. Leaders in some countries have resisted American buy ups of their media (Russia, Vietnam etc) and in some Americans probably haven’t bothered (those African countries). In most small Eastern European countries much of the press has been bought by Western oligarchs. It really is hard to explain the extent of propaganda here and how far it can go when there is not even a single critical voice writing in our language outside of blogs, comment sections and such.

    If you look at our press now, the vast majority of news articles about foreign affairs are simple straight translations of American media and I doubt most of the translators pretending to be journalists even realize what they’re doing when they’re pushing a neocon agenda.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    Trump's persona is troublesome to traditional conservatives, because it's so extremely not conservative. A general or an intellectual would fit that mold much better (eg. Franco and Salazar respectively).

    Though looking at the approval figures quoted for Obama makes me wonder just how many traditional conservatives there are in Europe anymore.
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  42. visitor says:
    @Greasy William
    Those numbers for Israel are skewed because of the 750,000 non Jewish ethnic Russians who live in Israel. They are further skewed because Israelis are racist against blacks to an absurd degree. Israelis really did hate Obama because Obama was black.

    I visited Israel a few years ago. I look like a typical Aryan. The security guards at the entrance of malls stopped black Jews(with visible kippas) but I was never once searched or even stopped. I’m not Jewish nor was there anything on my clothing to suggest I was.

    People often forget that most Jews in Israel are from the Middle-East(most of whom are essentially Arabs). These Mizrahi Jews constitute between 50-70% of the Jewish population(50% if you only count those with Arab ancestry on both sides of the family or 75% if you count those with Ashkenazi/Mizrahi mixture). Of course, Ashkenazis themselves have 50% Semitic blood and 50% European, so the true amount of Arabic blood in Israel is even higher.

    On top of that, outside the Jewish population, the vast majority of the non-Jewish groups are other Arabs.

    Point is, the ruling class in Israel are no more than perhaps 10-15% of the total population, especially if you include the West Bank, which has all but been colonised by now, irreversibly.

    This also shows when you see the country. Israel was surprisingly dirty. Their train stations looked like something I’d see in Morocco. If you didn’t know that they had a decent per capita GDP, you’d be forgiven for thinking they were much poorer. Tel Aviv in particular was drab and filthy. Jersusalem, though far more religious, was actually cleaner.

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  43. visitor says:

    It’s not surprising that Trump has somewhat high approval ratings in Israel. He’s basically not going to interfere at all as Israel continues its colonisation of Palestinians. Basically, he’s Bush 2.0 in that respect. He has outsourced his Middle Eastern policies to his Jewish son-in-law, who is a Jewish ethnonationalist.

    The only thing that surprises me is how stingy the Jews are with their approval. This is incredible amount of influence, which apparently nobody sees fit to talk about. Instead we get endless hysteria about non-existent ‘Russian influence’. Tell me when an Ethno-nationalist Russian-American gets in charge of Eurasian policy. That’s basically the equivalent of what the Jews have now.

    Despite that, they only give 58% or so. Shows how accustomed they are to being serviced by the slavish goyim. Always want more.

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  44. Kimppis says:

    “Trump supporters countered that in America but they’re not interested in building a counter network in the rest of the world.”

    That’s a very good point.

    And it’s clear that anglo MSM’s propaganda crusade is working really well against Trump and Putin, in some countries. It’s indeed sadly true that “our” media (Northern Europe) often just simply copy pastes the articles from US/UK MSM, so no wonder.

    That said, it’s nice to see that Vlad is still quite liked in some countries, most importantly in China, where he’s apparently very popular (missing from the list). So the demonization/”isolation” campaign has its limits, he’s not viewed like… Kim Jong Un or Saddam Hussein, etc. really anywhere. There’s clearly a certain level of “respect”. He’s probably liked in East Germany as well (25% for the country overall).

    However, it’s too bad that Putin/Russia is not more popular in India. I’d image that young people/middle class largely support Western “values”, including the media.

    But seriously Sweden liked Obama that much!? Cucked indeed, absolutely pathetic. Not that I had that much issues with Obama, but that percentage is ridiculously high.

    It’s also seems that Putin is really unpopular in Spain for some reason. I really wonder why? I mean, Spain is far from Russia, so shouldn’t their views be quite… “neutral”?

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  45. @reiner Tor
    Opposition leaders have already agreed that the border fence would be torn down, should they win. Though I'm sure some Hungarians are hypocritical, the Hungarian border fence itself doesn't have a strong majority in Hungary.

    so Hungarians want more refugees?

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    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    It's complicated, but basically because That's Not Who We Are.

    First, everybody understands that the vast majority of these refugees are not about to stay in Hungary. They are going to greener pastures. This means that you don't really have to "want more refugees" in order to oppose the fence.

    Second, they look up to Merkel as some kind of substitute head of The Free World (in the absence of a good American president like Obama). And Merkel is opposed to the fence. (At least publicly.) This, of course, means that the country who is supposed to take in the refugees is opposed to it, which means Orbán was unnecessary mean (for the sake of meanness) to build this fence. Racists are evil for the sake of evil!

    Third, of course, cargo cultism, "the Germans are much smarter than us stupid Hungarians, they are taking in the refugees because, you see, it's good for them, the refugees will pay for their pensions!"

    And fourth, even if it costs something (like taking in the refugee quota of thousand-odd refugees), still we have to pay for goodwhite reasons, because they are bombed out and also hundreds of thousands of Hungarian refugees were taken in by the West, so now it's our duty, etc.

    But most people on the left just don't care for this issue, because "unlike Orbán's corruption, it's not a real issue, very few will stay here anyway", so the first point is probably the most important.
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  46. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Jaakko Raipala
    For anyone buying the idea that Trump's persona is the problem, try this thought experiment: what if Trump was some hyper-intellectual PhD talking about human biodiversity? We would have endless stories comparing him to Mengele and painting him as a sinister genius who can't feel compassion for ordinary people. What if he was a general with a strict, austere personality that never slips into impulsive showmanship? We would have endless scaremongering about how he wants to be a ruthless dictator.

    You can't win by trying to make your enemies respect you. You have to convince the majorities but the thing is Trump hasn't even tried outside of America. The problem with American influence is that it's so one sided - Hollywood, neocons, Marxist academia all effectively on one side and they're pushing their influence globally. Trump supporters countered that in America but they're not interested in building a counter network in the rest of the world.

    The anti-Trump sentiment seems to track penetration by anti-Trump *American* media. Leaders in some countries have resisted American buy ups of their media (Russia, Vietnam etc) and in some Americans probably haven't bothered (those African countries). In most small Eastern European countries much of the press has been bought by Western oligarchs. It really is hard to explain the extent of propaganda here and how far it can go when there is not even a single critical voice writing in our language outside of blogs, comment sections and such.

    If you look at our press now, the vast majority of news articles about foreign affairs are simple straight translations of American media and I doubt most of the translators pretending to be journalists even realize what they're doing when they're pushing a neocon agenda.

    Trump’s persona is troublesome to traditional conservatives, because it’s so extremely not conservative. A general or an intellectual would fit that mold much better (eg. Franco and Salazar respectively).

    Though looking at the approval figures quoted for Obama makes me wonder just how many traditional conservatives there are in Europe anymore.

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    • Replies: @Jaakko Raipala
    How often do you see mainstream conservatives defending Franco or Salazar compared to how often you see them internalizing left-wing narratives about how horrible it was the the West supported evil dictators during the Cold War? Even in Spain Franco's legacy is being dismantled and future "right-wing" Spaniards will be cucking about how much they promise to be "respectable traditional conservatives" and not at all like evil Franco.

    One of the developments with increasing American influence has indeed been the rise of the "conservatives" who stick to "respectable" opinions and methods as defined by the leftist media and academia. What we need is our own Trumps to smash these people.
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  47. Though looking at the approval figures quoted for Obama makes me wonder just how many traditional conservatives there are in Europe anymore.

    A traditional European conservative is going to be a nationalist. Meaning Frenchie will instinctively want to know – what’s in it for France? Trump withdrawing the nuclear umbrella would not be good for France. Trump insisting on France keeping its military expenditures up instead of diverting it to the welfare state would also not be good for France in the sense that it’s always better to get free protection than to spend money on it yourself. Then there’s the sense among Europeans, including the French, that the only danger to Europe is blowback from rash actions elsewhere by the US, so why bother spending any money on defense? And yet they are up in arms when Trump suggests that NATO is obsolete, which is perhaps a hop and a skip away from dismantling it. Bottom line is that it’s a weird mess of contradictory views, like much else in politics.

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  48. @Anon
    Trump's persona is troublesome to traditional conservatives, because it's so extremely not conservative. A general or an intellectual would fit that mold much better (eg. Franco and Salazar respectively).

    Though looking at the approval figures quoted for Obama makes me wonder just how many traditional conservatives there are in Europe anymore.

    How often do you see mainstream conservatives defending Franco or Salazar compared to how often you see them internalizing left-wing narratives about how horrible it was the the West supported evil dictators during the Cold War? Even in Spain Franco’s legacy is being dismantled and future “right-wing” Spaniards will be cucking about how much they promise to be “respectable traditional conservatives” and not at all like evil Franco.

    One of the developments with increasing American influence has indeed been the rise of the “conservatives” who stick to “respectable” opinions and methods as defined by the leftist media and academia. What we need is our own Trumps to smash these people.

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    • Agree: reiner Tor
    • Replies: @Excal
    It is very interesting, and very telling, that Franco has so few defenders among American conservatives; and the reaction of America to the Spanish Civil War is one of the most revealing topics in history since 1800.

    Everyone who is interested in this ought to read The Cypresses Believe in God.
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  49. Excal says:
    @Greasy William
    Ahmadinejad wrote to Trump in an open letter after Trump was elected that Trump had no right to restrict immigration because America did not belong to the American people but rather to all peoples of the world.

    Big A was speaking not only for himself, nor only on behalf of Iranians, but rather he was speaking on behalf of all non Americans. Non Americans really do think that America just as much belongs to them as it does to the American people.

    This is a surprisingly common view, encouraged by America itself, and by its very nature: whereas most nations are the territory of a people, or possibly a few peoples having made some sort of agreement, America is the territory of a group of people who happen to have agreed on a creed. Almost anyone who says that they agree to that creed can, in theory, be an American citizen.

    Most Americans are trained from childhood to hold this view: therefore, they think it very reasonable that border controls should be cursory, or perhaps abolished altogether.

    Europeans were many years ago convinced that the American style of nationhood is the best way to preserve peace (they treat the US Civil War as an anomaly, I suppose). Their only question at this point is how to convert a collection of traditional ethnic nations into a collection of American-style states. Whether this is a good idea or not is, as they say, settled science by now.

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    • Replies: @Jaakko Raipala
    In other words, America has been slowly turning into a totalitarian tyranny but the ship is sinking so slowly that a lot of people think climbing aboard to party is a good idea.

    What are you supposed to do if you're born in a "proposition nation" and you don't agree with the proposition? What if you're born American and you have no other identity, you've never been to any other state and your leaders tell you that to be American is to hold a specific set of beliefs that you can't identify with?

    The present generation has been told by elites that to be American you have to believe in homosexual liberation, multiculturalism, free markets, spreading democracy around the world and so on. What do you do if you're born in America and don't believe in that? Well, you're one of the deplorable people who have no place anywhere, who aren't allowed any sort of an identity and who are just supposed to disappear.

    As America has been losing its WASP identity and turning into a "proposition nation" it has developed an ever intensifying Cold War over what the proposition is supposed to be and it will eventually get resolved by hot war, break up or tyranny where elites impose their proposition by force, judging by the history of proposition nations (which, of course, have been tried before, with disastrous results).
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  50. @Excal
    This is a surprisingly common view, encouraged by America itself, and by its very nature: whereas most nations are the territory of a people, or possibly a few peoples having made some sort of agreement, America is the territory of a group of people who happen to have agreed on a creed. Almost anyone who says that they agree to that creed can, in theory, be an American citizen.

    Most Americans are trained from childhood to hold this view: therefore, they think it very reasonable that border controls should be cursory, or perhaps abolished altogether.

    Europeans were many years ago convinced that the American style of nationhood is the best way to preserve peace (they treat the US Civil War as an anomaly, I suppose). Their only question at this point is how to convert a collection of traditional ethnic nations into a collection of American-style states. Whether this is a good idea or not is, as they say, settled science by now.

    In other words, America has been slowly turning into a totalitarian tyranny but the ship is sinking so slowly that a lot of people think climbing aboard to party is a good idea.

    What are you supposed to do if you’re born in a “proposition nation” and you don’t agree with the proposition? What if you’re born American and you have no other identity, you’ve never been to any other state and your leaders tell you that to be American is to hold a specific set of beliefs that you can’t identify with?

    The present generation has been told by elites that to be American you have to believe in homosexual liberation, multiculturalism, free markets, spreading democracy around the world and so on. What do you do if you’re born in America and don’t believe in that? Well, you’re one of the deplorable people who have no place anywhere, who aren’t allowed any sort of an identity and who are just supposed to disappear.

    As America has been losing its WASP identity and turning into a “proposition nation” it has developed an ever intensifying Cold War over what the proposition is supposed to be and it will eventually get resolved by hot war, break up or tyranny where elites impose their proposition by force, judging by the history of proposition nations (which, of course, have been tried before, with disastrous results).

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    • Replies: @Excal
    'What are you supposed to do if you’re born in a “proposition nation” and you don’t agree with the proposition?' What, indeed?

    Perhaps something like an answer can be found in Solzhenitsyn. But Russia was a real nation before it was conquered by the Bolsheviks, and it remains a real nation today, if a severely damaged one. Perhaps America too was a real nation, or part of one, before it was conquered. But perhaps it has already been dissolved past any possibility of reconstitution.

    I think you are very much correct to say that a "nation" founded on a mere set of propositions cannot last long. It might extend its existence somewhat by being a conquering enterprise, which keeps its subjects and its enemies preoccupied with work and goals.

    It seems that most significant proposition nations have been conquering nations: the Soviet Union, for instance. America may be unique in conquering chiefly by media: conquering not territory, but hearts and minds, by means of signs and wonders.

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  51. @Greasy William
    so Hungarians want more refugees?

    It’s complicated, but basically because That’s Not Who We Are.

    First, everybody understands that the vast majority of these refugees are not about to stay in Hungary. They are going to greener pastures. This means that you don’t really have to “want more refugees” in order to oppose the fence.

    Second, they look up to Merkel as some kind of substitute head of The Free World (in the absence of a good American president like Obama). And Merkel is opposed to the fence. (At least publicly.) This, of course, means that the country who is supposed to take in the refugees is opposed to it, which means Orbán was unnecessary mean (for the sake of meanness) to build this fence. Racists are evil for the sake of evil!

    Third, of course, cargo cultism, “the Germans are much smarter than us stupid Hungarians, they are taking in the refugees because, you see, it’s good for them, the refugees will pay for their pensions!”

    And fourth, even if it costs something (like taking in the refugee quota of thousand-odd refugees), still we have to pay for goodwhite reasons, because they are bombed out and also hundreds of thousands of Hungarian refugees were taken in by the West, so now it’s our duty, etc.

    But most people on the left just don’t care for this issue, because “unlike Orbán’s corruption, it’s not a real issue, very few will stay here anyway”, so the first point is probably the most important.

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  52. Excal says:
    @Jaakko Raipala
    In other words, America has been slowly turning into a totalitarian tyranny but the ship is sinking so slowly that a lot of people think climbing aboard to party is a good idea.

    What are you supposed to do if you're born in a "proposition nation" and you don't agree with the proposition? What if you're born American and you have no other identity, you've never been to any other state and your leaders tell you that to be American is to hold a specific set of beliefs that you can't identify with?

    The present generation has been told by elites that to be American you have to believe in homosexual liberation, multiculturalism, free markets, spreading democracy around the world and so on. What do you do if you're born in America and don't believe in that? Well, you're one of the deplorable people who have no place anywhere, who aren't allowed any sort of an identity and who are just supposed to disappear.

    As America has been losing its WASP identity and turning into a "proposition nation" it has developed an ever intensifying Cold War over what the proposition is supposed to be and it will eventually get resolved by hot war, break up or tyranny where elites impose their proposition by force, judging by the history of proposition nations (which, of course, have been tried before, with disastrous results).

    ‘What are you supposed to do if you’re born in a “proposition nation” and you don’t agree with the proposition?’ What, indeed?

    Perhaps something like an answer can be found in Solzhenitsyn. But Russia was a real nation before it was conquered by the Bolsheviks, and it remains a real nation today, if a severely damaged one. Perhaps America too was a real nation, or part of one, before it was conquered. But perhaps it has already been dissolved past any possibility of reconstitution.

    I think you are very much correct to say that a “nation” founded on a mere set of propositions cannot last long. It might extend its existence somewhat by being a conquering enterprise, which keeps its subjects and its enemies preoccupied with work and goals.

    It seems that most significant proposition nations have been conquering nations: the Soviet Union, for instance. America may be unique in conquering chiefly by media: conquering not territory, but hearts and minds, by means of signs and wonders.

    Read More
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  53. Excal says:
    @Jaakko Raipala
    How often do you see mainstream conservatives defending Franco or Salazar compared to how often you see them internalizing left-wing narratives about how horrible it was the the West supported evil dictators during the Cold War? Even in Spain Franco's legacy is being dismantled and future "right-wing" Spaniards will be cucking about how much they promise to be "respectable traditional conservatives" and not at all like evil Franco.

    One of the developments with increasing American influence has indeed been the rise of the "conservatives" who stick to "respectable" opinions and methods as defined by the leftist media and academia. What we need is our own Trumps to smash these people.

    It is very interesting, and very telling, that Franco has so few defenders among American conservatives; and the reaction of America to the Spanish Civil War is one of the most revealing topics in history since 1800.

    Everyone who is interested in this ought to read The Cypresses Believe in God.

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  54. songbird says:

    This is pretty fascinating. I always pictured people outside of NA and Europe to be pretty ambivalent about US politics. I think there is probably some bias built into the poll, but still the differential seem to be meaningful on some level.

    The Merkel numbers I frankly question. I think it has more to do with Germany no longer being a real military power, compared to the US, which despite much rot, is still incredibly powerful and can and often does project that power, though to arguably no gain.

    One funny thought I had recently about open immigration to Europe was the hypothetical of what the Pope would opine about borders if the old Papal States still existed and the Vatican wasn’t just a walled-in area of less than 1/5 of a square mile.

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  55. @AP

    More Indians and Africans (!) want Trump to create Tropical Hyperborea than Russians. How sad.
     
    While I doubt such people are thinking ahead, if Africa and India become uninhabitable odds are high that those people will all settle in the north (its is doubtful that Europe and America will let all those billions die, or even more - actively force them back to their deadly sweltering homelands should they try to escape). Long-term, any efforts to limit immigration are completely overshadowed by the potential of the equator to become uninhabitable. If that becomes the case, expect hundreds of millions, if not billions, of settlers.

    The American Right's rejection of climate change is very stupid.

    When push comes to shove (e.g. catastrophic climate change), a race war of total genocidal extermination should not be completely discounted. If it’s a challenge to divide an inheritance among heirs and the historical record shows how coordinated action on a global scale is difficult even in the best of times, I would say the odds of this (while small) are clearly non-zero.

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    • Replies: @AP
    Odds of Europeans and Americans exterminating people from the equator who are literally dying due to the climate changes that they themselves caused, rather than letting them peacefully settle by the hundreds of millions, are indeed probably not zero, but pretty low. Africa's population will be 4 billion in a few decades. If their homeland becomes inhospitable for humans due to high temperatures and desertification, even if only 10% escape North this will be 400 million people. And then there are India, Latin America...

    Keeping the equatorial regions habitable ought to be much more of a priority than the Wall. The likely cost of not doing so dwarfs the consequences of no wall.
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  56. AP says:
    @Mark P Miller
    When push comes to shove (e.g. catastrophic climate change), a race war of total genocidal extermination should not be completely discounted. If it's a challenge to divide an inheritance among heirs and the historical record shows how coordinated action on a global scale is difficult even in the best of times, I would say the odds of this (while small) are clearly non-zero.

    Odds of Europeans and Americans exterminating people from the equator who are literally dying due to the climate changes that they themselves caused, rather than letting them peacefully settle by the hundreds of millions, are indeed probably not zero, but pretty low. Africa’s population will be 4 billion in a few decades. If their homeland becomes inhospitable for humans due to high temperatures and desertification, even if only 10% escape North this will be 400 million people. And then there are India, Latin America…

    Keeping the equatorial regions habitable ought to be much more of a priority than the Wall. The likely cost of not doing so dwarfs the consequences of no wall.

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