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Russia blogger Paul Robinson was in Moscow, presenting his new book on the history of Russian Conservatism. I will post about that shortly, and will review the book once I read it. A large group of us ended up going to Staryy Sichuan, which is the successor to Druzhba and what is IMO the best authenticity/quality-optimized Chinese restaurant in Moscow. The hong shao rao was really good (4/5) – have to say that Mao did not have bad taste (it was his favorite dish), even if he was a peasant who lugged his chamber pot around with him. Baijiu was every bit as disgusting as I thought it’d be – first time I drank it, and also last time. 1/5

I also met up with the Twitter user @PyotrNemets. Be sure to give him a follow if you’re on Twitter, especially his book reviews.

Wizzair return flights Moscow-London now available at $50. Barring visa issues, London is now functionally as close to Muscovites as Sochi or SPB; 2x as close as Berlin, Frankfurt, Milan, Rome, Istanbul (major trade partners); 3x closer than Paris &, ironically, than most of the former socialist camp countries. I wonder if we might be returning to the pre-2014 days when substantial numbers of British financiers made weekly or biweekly commutes between London and Moscow.

GeForce Now – basically cloud GPU for video games – now available in Russia for $15/month (h/t Polish Perspective for first informing me of this thing). Translates to ~2 years worth of an upper-medium GPU like GeForce RTX 2060 or GTX 1080. Not suitable ofc for pro gamers (where every millisecond counts), or for people who like to use mods.

Rod Dreher asked for some restaurant recommendations in Moscow. I suppose now is as good a time to mention that I have been slowly filling in details on a Moscow Expat Guide: https://akarlin.com/travel/moscow/

It’s only perhaps a third complete, but the basics are already there. This may be followed by similar guides to SPB and, eventually, Sochi/Krasnodar. I will also eventually post some version of it here, but since I see myself updating it pretty regularly – by dint of living here – it seems wiser to maintain it as a page, rather than a blog post. Smaller, self-contained towns that I visit will continue to received travel posts on here. I plan to do an update on Volokolamsk (which has improved significantly since 2017), and on Obninsk & Borovsk.

I have also made a start on a glossary: https://akarlin.com/glossary/ . Again, it’s very much incomplete, but most of the basics are there. I will feature this pages more prominently once they’re in a more finished state.

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Powerful Takes

  • William Wang: “The most Chinese story today. A man in Guangxi paid 2m to have a competitor killed. The guy kept half, hired another for 1m, then another until the 5th was hired for 100k. Figured not worth to kill for so little, he contacted the target trying to fake a death. All 6 in jail now.”
  • Some Guy summarizes the Katechon Hypothesis.

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  1. This is the current Open Thread, where anything goes – within reason.

    If you are new to my work, start here.

    • Replies: @Nodwink
  2. And the big news of the week. Russia cuts interest rates to 6.5%.

    Baring Vostok executives are still in jail for want, in any other country, would be a civil case.

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    , @Gerard2
  3. Venezuela to hand over PDVSA to Rosneft in lieu of debt repayment?

    This is almost certainly a fake. El Nacional is opposition-controlled newspaper in Venezuela. They have an agenda. Tass is a lame propaganda website, run by lazy, low-IQ people.

    Baring Vostok executives are still in jail for want, in any other country, would be a civil case.

    This isn’t “any other country”. Should they be released just because they have Western passports?

  4. @Philip Owen

    Baring Vostok executives are still in jail for want, in any other country, would be a civil case.

    Would have been nice to find a better target, but legal niceties have gone out of the window so far as US hostage-taking goes and Russia needs to respond in kind.

  5. An amazing building.

    Open Thread discussion question: What percentage of jobs in America are makework?

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    , @Nodwink
    , @Realist
  6. AP says:

    Insomniac Resurrected: Stepan Bandera Suffocated Cats

    This came from a single source: a Soviet journalist writing during Soviet times. Buzina was dishonest to present it as a solid claim and Insomniac Resurrected was gullible to repeat it as such. Bandera was a bastard whether or not he killed cats, of course.

    • Agree: Mr. XYZ
  7. songbird says:

    Existence of USSR doesn’t appear to have had any strong effect on growth of welfare state in the West

    If anything, by gut I would say it retarded it, but just to take the counterpoint… what about military benefits?They are a large component of the US Federal budget. Sure, they started earlier, but would they have continued without Domino Theory?

    Plus, the chart arguably doesn’t seem to include the real substance of what I would call diversity welfare. The nature of welfare changed radically in the US, and probably in other places as well. In the US, you had to go down to townhall to get wheels of cheese. It was all on a local level and meant to be embarrassing.

    Some in Germany believe the Cold War is why the Turks are there. (Frankly, I don’t believe it, I think it was just the treachery of German elites, looking for cheap labor.) But, at least, in America, I believe the Feds were really worried about blacks in the 1960s and sought to mollify them. Partly, it was because a lot of young white men were drafted overseas.

    Heck, one might even make the argument that that is why so many Somalis are in the West.

    • Replies: @Korenchkin
  8. Mr. XYZ says:

    Introduction to Aldehyde-Stabilized Cryopreservation (h/t DC)

    This part appears to be much ado about nothing, since mind-uploading would only create a copy of you rather than actually revive you.

  9. Not Raul says:
    @Not My Economy

    My estimate: about 2% of jobs are make-work.

  10. AP says:

    Big Wall Street Journal article about free land in Russia. It appears that they don’t offer enough land to make the program really worthwhile:

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/on-russias-vast-frontier-lots-of-free-land-and-few-takers-11571909402

    By Ann M. Simmons | Photographs by Arthur Bondar for The Wall Street Journal
    Updated Oct. 24, 2019 5:51 am ET

    [MORE]

    PRIMORSKY KRAI, Russia—Three years ago, Russia set out a bold plan to revive its vast Far East, handing out free land to reverse depopulation in an area rich in timber, minerals and oil that has drawn interest from Chinese investors and businesses.

    But the ambitious program to arrest the decadeslong outflow of residents to the bright lights of big cities, including Moscow and St. Petersburg, hasn’t lived up to expectations. Pioneers of this five-year pilot program now in its third year have been stymied by poor transportation, meager power links and unexpected costs, leaving some locals worried they will be unable to keep up with the Chinese economic juggernaut.

    The homesteading program sought to rejuvenate an area that accounts for 41% of Russia’s entire territory but is now sparsely populated and economically weak.

    The outflow of people and businesses has facilitated the arrival of Chinese investors, who have leased millions of acres of land to farm soybean or develop new factories in the area. According to some demographers, about 300,000 Chinese, some unregistered, could now be settled in Russia’s Far East.

    The Kremlin set its sights on expanding the number of Russians in the Far East to 8.7 million by 2025, up from 6.2 million earlier this year. It recently added two more regions to the territory, adding another two million people, but didn’t adjust its re-population target. Of the 200 million hectares (close to 494 million acres) made available for homesteaders, just 49,000 have been allocated.

    Property lawyer Oleg Kuchma found that the free hectare, or 2½ acres, he was allocated is blanketed with trees and brush. He planned to build a water-bottling plant or sports center, but local engineers told him it would cost the equivalent of $61,000 to set up infrastructure to get electricity to the site. He would also have to drill a well for fresh water.

    “The hectare itself is free, but everything else is a headache,” said Mr. Kuchma, whose land overlooks the Sea of Japan. “It’s madness.”

    There is also confusion over what people can do with their land. Mr. Kuchma found that his plot was zoned for a narrow range of projects, such as a police station, a lifeguard base or a dump, limiting his options.

    “I don’t know if I’ll ever develop my hectare,” said the 43-year-old, who is now thinking of staying put in Vladivostok, two hours away by car. “It’s too expensive and too tiring to come so far for just a barbecue and a swim.”

    Some homesteaders in Primorsky Krai, the most popular region in the program, discovered the lots they had chosen, sight unseen, were in swampland—a factor that wasn’t immediately obvious from just looking at a map. Others have squabbled over conflicting claims to the same parcel of land. They have also encountered a chilly reception from some locals. Life for many is simply harsher than many pioneers expected.

    Yuri Bugayev has already given up. The St. Petersburg resident organized a group of 100 other Cossacks from the country’s famous military caste to claim an interconnected patchwork of plots and pool their resources to build roads and power lines.

    “There was one reason after another as to why it wasn’t possible,” he said.

    People normally move to another place when there are good job prospects, better weather, more culture or better public services, said Pavel Minakir, scientific head at the Economic Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences Far East branch in Vladivostok. The Far East, an eight-hour flight and seven time zones from Moscow, doesn’t have much to offer in that regard.

    The government says the land program is progressing. There is a 24-hour hotline to help navigate some of the zoning issues, and officials are working to streamline the procedures to apply for a plot of land and prevent multiple applications for the same lot.

    “It’s in demand and continues to move forward with confident steps,” said Dmitri Ferapontov, the program’s coordinator, speaking at the Far East Development Program’s offices in Vladivostok. Every month, there are between 1,000 and 1,500 new applicants for plots, he said.

    Russian President Vladimir Putin, who has called development of the Far East and Siberia “a national priority,” recently acknowledged the challenges.

    “The population continues to decrease almost everywhere in the Far East,” Mr. Putin said at an investment forum in Vladivostok last month. “The inflow is increasing, but it does not cover the number of people leaving the region.”

    Meanwhile, protests are increasing against Chinese expansion inside Russia. Mr. Putin has made a geopolitical and economic pivot toward China in recent years, keen for investment as well as political support from the Asian giant in his standoff with the West.

    However, dissent has greeted Chinese investors and newcomers, including in areas that have suffered depopulation and a decline in economic prospects. For instance, locals in Siberia—another area the Kremlin is trying to repopulate—have complained about Chinese-funded ventures such as a water bottling plant on historic Lake Baikal and timber logging in the Siberian forests.

    National leaders dismiss fears of a “Chinese invasion,” as some local residents describe the influx of Chinese. Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov was recently cited in a Moscow weekly newspaper as saying “attempts to promote the myth of the ‘Chinese’ threat are the work of those who are concerned about the constructive development of Russian-Chinese ties.”

    Some Far East homesteaders are happy. Andrei Popov, a 45-year-old videographer from Vladivostok, took up the government’s offer to fulfill his dream of having a country home and living off his own garden. He has combined his hectare with six neighbors and has begun tilling the land to grow shiitake mushrooms for export. He later plans to raise quail and chickens.

    “It’s a gift,” Mr. Popov said. “It has allowed me to change my life.”

    Alexander and Natasha Sukharnikov are also eager to make a go of it. They sold all their belongings and moved 4,000 miles east, he by car, his wife on the train with their three small children.

    Mr. Sukharnikov, 47, bought a tractor and farm tools and since March has been plowing the plot where he and his wife, a former math and computer science teacher, said they aim to farm corn, peas and maybe some watermelons.

    But many homesteaders simply want the land to build vacation homes, rather than farm the land or use it to develop new businesses, undermining the project’s potential impact on the local economy. Program participants don’t have to pay land taxes for the first five years.

    And some are discovering they need one specific resource to make a success of it, and it’s something many of them lack: money.

    Ilnar Iscandarov acquired land not far from the Sukharnikovs, but the 24-year-old doesn’t have the cash to develop it. He arrived from Bashkiria near the Volga River in August 2018, and since then has been living rough, sometimes sleeping in a tent near a stream at the edge of his property.

    He is banking on a group of friends from home who have promised to move east and pool resources to help launch a venture rearing goats and cattle with the aim of producing halal meat.

    “They must come with money,” Mr. Iscandarov said. “For this land program to work, I think you need millions.”

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
  11. songbird says:
    @AP

    Killing cats and dogs used to be a common part of life. I’m surprised it would be considered scandalous in the USSR.

    Look at old registrations of dogs by sex, about 9 out of 10 are male. That was how they controlled the population – by killing females.

    When Isaac Asimov was a college student in NYC, it was part of his homework to capture a stray cat to dissect. When I was in high school, we saw graphic videos of people dissecting dogs – in one the heart was still beating – that was the point of the video to show that the heart still beats if you cut it up.

    • Replies: @AP
  12. Also, what was the most powerful state in 1923? 1932? 1939? I think USA for 1923, Soviet Union for 1932, and either USA, Germany, or Soviet Union in 1939.

    Also, can anybody explain why Britain and France did so much decolonization without being forced to? Britain gave up all of its dominions in 1931 instead of incorporating them into an ever closer union. Dumbest geostrategic decision of the twentieth century (though far from the most disastrous). Why’d they give up India (its most valuable imperial possession) so quickly, for example?

  13. Anatoly please, talking about Canadian Secession movement is the same hopeful bullshit of people saying Russia will collapse or be eaten up by China

  14. i.e., no, China not understating its growth rate

    Well, that’s not the complaint, is it 🙂 Seriously, I think the only way to know how big China’s overstatement of its growth rate is is International Comparison Program results, possibly as late as 10 years into the future (since the understatement is probably at most by 2 points per year). Not all output indicators have shown consistent growth throughout the 2010s in China; Chinese auto sales have seen a decline for 15 months straight (though that quasi-recession appears to be ending) and steel production showed no growth in 2014, 15, or 16 (though 2017 and 2018 saw recovery). I think China’s economy grew by about 60% this decade.

    Also, A. Karlin, I asked you this on Twitter, but do you know what’s up with this:

    ?

    It looks really bizarre.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  15. songbird says:

    Charles Murray’s new book Human Diversity now on presale (to be published January 28

    I’m a bit torn. I’m fascinated by all this stuff, but I hate the tedious political lipservice that always goes into these types of books. It doesn’t prevent personal attacks, and I think we would all be better off without it. Anyway, I at least wish there would be an abridged version for based people.

  16. MEH 0910 says:

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  17. AP says:
    @songbird

    I’ve known plenty of normal people who killed wildlife while shooting in the woods (birds, squirrels, woodchucks, etc.) but no one other than criminals who killed cats or dogs.

  18. As an automation engineer, I can tell you Robin Hansen’s observation is spot-on. Some time ago some (Robin Hansen??) wrote that several indicators should be present if we are entering a wave of massive increase in automation based productivity.

    1) There should be boom in the equities of companies that make automation hardware and software. This would include everything from Rockwell to Wodnerware to Boston Dynamics.

    2) There should be increase of young people pursuing degrees in the hard sciences and real engineering.

    3) There should be a wave of unemployment due to automation.

    Another indicator I thought of earlier today is that labor productivity in specific companies as well as industry in general should be increasing.

    To date, I observe NONE of these indicators whatsoever.

    This suggests the wave of technology driven unemployment as talked about by Yang and Ford is nothing more than hype.

    • Agree: Thorfinnsson
    • Disagree: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @LondonBob
  19. I think that AI, quantum computing, and to a lesser extent, the self-driving car; are all hype.

    What is real is what Brian Wang called the “Mondane” singularity. This is a collection of technologies based mostly on real physical engineering that we believe will be developed over the next 20 years or so. This includes stuff like advanced Gen IV fission power, fusion power (start-ups, NOT ITER at all), all kinds of additive manufacturing and robotics, and bio-engineering (both anti-aging and regeneration). Another one not on most people’s radar screen is printable electronics. I believe all of these will be realized in the next 20 years or so. More importantly, I believe these will dramatically increase the capability for individuals and small self interested groups to do things that can only be done by large corporations and governments today. Like Peter Thiel, I believe this latter trend is ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIALL for the preservation and expansion of liberty and openness. Like blogger “Al FIN” I believe the purpose of life is the creation of an open future of limitless openness and radical abundance.

  20. Based Xi.

  21. @E. Harding

    Well, that’s not the complaint, is it

    Plenty of people think they are overstating their growth.

    This is on top of studies by prominent Chinese academics in Uni of Chicago among others. Even the “growth skeptics” seem to agree that any potential downrevision would be fairly mild and most of them seem to accept that growth up until about 2010 was accurate. The disagreements concern the period post-2011.

    So the cumulative effect on total Chinese GDP is fairly modest. I frankly view all of this discussion as a sideshow even if the skeptics were right. Much more important has been the virtual explosion of Chinese debt/leverage, which receives far less attention in the Western press. Most of this has been corporate debt:

    But Household and State/Public debt is also increasingly rapidly, though from a low base. Taking it all together, total debt to GDP in China is already north of 300%, higher than the US but at only 1/6th the per capita income. Unless China does a massive debt jubilee, it will be facing similar problems that Japan did but far earlier in its development path. A debt jubilee has its own complications and would be very hard to pull off (lots of domestic actors would be screwed and trust in an economy is a critical component. Why lend in the future if the borrower can just be bailed out by the government?) but at least the Chinese were wise enough to accumulate their debt in their national currency, unlike Turkey, Argentina and other countries who swallowed the Washington Concensus hook, line and sinker, which they are now paying for.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  22. @songbird

    If anything, by gut I would say it retarded it

    The reason Americans didn’t get Healthcare after WW2 was because senators would poison the well by calling it “Socialist Medicine”

    • Replies: @songbird
  23. @Thulean Friend

    (lots of domestic actors would be screwed and trust in an economy is a critical component. Why lend in the future if the borrower can just be bailed out by the government?)

    I think you meant to ask: why lend if the government can cancel debts (ie deprive the lender of an asset). A government “bailing out” borrowers carries the connotation that the government has paid the borrowers’ debts for them (which would make lending safer, not riskier).

    unlike Turkey, Argentina and other countries who swallowed the Washington Concensus hook, line and sinker, which they are now paying for.

    The Washington Consensus was basically just a summary of mainstream economics’ views of macroeconomic best-practice, essentially aimed at encouraging greater openness to trade, fiscal discipline and market orientation. There was nothing sinister about it (which is what leftard sneering at it tends to insinuate), and plenty of countries around the world have economically benefited from just such policies. I think the most powerful criticisms of it relate to industrial policy and capital controls; but most criticism is just standard leftard bitching.

  24. songbird says:
    @Korenchkin

    IMO, Americans have always been concerned about the free-rider problem because of their visible minorities and different ethnic groups.

    But American efforts at making healthcare more affordable have never invited confidence in the system to do so. For instance, some studies indicate that Medicare and Medicaid were the primary driver of costs. On a personal level, I don’t say that it is impossible to have universal healthcare, I just think it may be impossible for America.

    • Replies: @Korenchkin
  25. dfordoom says: • Website
    @E. Harding

    Also, can anybody explain why Britain and France did so much decolonization without being forced to? Britain gave up all of its dominions in 1931 instead of incorporating them into an ever closer union. Dumbest geostrategic decision of the twentieth century (though far from the most disastrous). Why’d they give up India (its most valuable imperial possession) so quickly, for example?

    Britain was broke after WW1. They couldn’t afford to defend the Empire. The disaster at Gallipoli alienated Australia, and Australia found out the hard way in WW2 that Britain could not defend its empire in the Far East and the British didn’t care. In the First World War their Japanese allies defended that empire for them. In 1922 the British, under American pressure, scrapped their alliance with Japan. That was the truly the dumbest geostrategic decision of all time.

    After WW2 Britain had neither the money nor the will to keep its imperial possessions. And the disastrous surrender in Singapore made their empire in the Far East totally non-viable – the Japanese had demonstrated that Asians could kick the asses of the British. No Asian was going to respect the British after Singapore. The British were regarded with contempt. They were regarded with contempt by Australians as well.

    The Canadians never forgave the British for Dieppe.

    The worthwhile profitable bits of the British Empire were all in Asia (especially Malaya). The empire in Africa was an economic drain, apart from Kenya. Much of the empire was only valuable for its usefulness in defending India, which is why the Brits were eager to get out of Palestine.

    The British Empire was an illusion. It was held by bluff. When the Japanese called their bluff it collapsed.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  26. @neutral

    https://www.rt.com/news/471846-butina-leaves-prison-florida/

    I wonder what Butina is going to do now.

    I think she needs to thank and meet up with and go out to dinner with her great defender and admirer, Anatoly Karlin. They’d make a good couple and have a brood of high-IQ kids.

    As they’re leaving the restaurant in Moscow Maria accidentally drops her purse and spills its contents. Anatoly, dutifully playing his new chivalrous role, reaches down to scoop up the contents. As he’s putting them back in the purse he spots a badge and creds that read: ‘Слу́жба вне́шней разве́дки Российской Федерации’.

    Karlin, stunned, never having read such a scenario in any book he’s read, doesn’t know how to react. Maria plays it off. “What, you didn’t really think I wasn’t a spy now, did you? Haha.”

    There is an awkward, silent walk back to their car as Anatoly is trying to figure out how to write about all this in a blog post.

    When they get into the car Maria tries to put Anatoly at ease and tells him, “When I get to know you better I’ll tell you how I liquidated Berezovsky and made it look like a suicide. Or how I poisoned the Skripals and made it look like a botched assassination to make British intelligence claims look ludicrous. And when I get to know you really well I’ll tell how my team used cheap, innocuous Facebook ads to secretly hack the minds of voters.”

    Anatoly, almost in a state of cerebral hypoxia from what he’s just heard, decides to reorient the conversation to something a little more prosaic.

    “So, um, Maria, what do you think about transhumanism?”

  27. @E. Harding

    Why’d they give up India (its most valuable imperial possession) so quickly, for example?

    You underestimate just how battered the British Empire was after WW2, they would eventually have to ask the IMF to help them with financial troubles and would get denied
    If they didn’t the Indians would’ve likely forced them out, though the suddenness of the British departure created problems that might be just as big if they had been kicked out, I don’t think there was a good solution to that situation

    Interestingly enough the Japanese were hoping that the Hindus would rebel and side with the Japanese army and navy during the war (I think the poster Vishnugupta mentioned several mutinies happening, but I’m not an expert on the topic)
    Japs wanted to appear as liberators and perhaps create and Asian NATO or WP, but that turned out to be too big of a bite for them

    • Replies: @German_reader
  28. @songbird

    Really? Even when the US was 85%+ White?
    Even when White Flight hadn’t happened yet and Baltimore was a nice town?

    • Replies: @songbird
  29. Nodwink says:
    @Not My Economy

    I haven’t been able to get my hands on a copy, but this book makes some bold claims on this topic: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bullshit_Jobs

  30. Matra says:

    Rod Dreher asked for some restaurant recommendations in Moscow.

    Jesus, does this guy think about anything other than his belly?

    Franco exhumated in Spain. The spiritual descendants of the Reds not returning the Francoist favor of not desecrating their graves.

    Spanish leftists have always had a ghoulish streak.

    • Replies: @Nodwink
    , @S
  31. Nodwink says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    Please don’t tell me you called your blog your personal “safe space.” This is what Tumblr SJWs do!

  32. Nodwink says:
    @Matra

    I wonder if Rod had time to do any exorcisms in Moscow. He could do Putin.

  33. songbird says:
    @Korenchkin

    By my very strict standards, I don’t know if I ‘d ever have called Baltimore a nice town. Maryland is still part of the South, and there were race riots there over a hundred years ago. Although, in comparison to today, when the Doom is descending on it, to make it the next Detroit, I take your point. Anyway, what happened to Northern cities should make people cry.

    Before white flight, I think it was probably the different ethnicities. Like the Walloons and Flemings, only more complicated. At least that is my take.

    Alternative explanation might be that immigrants who left the old country tended to be go-getters, and so had a different political leaning. Also, I have heard the theory that it had something to do with the US being a republic – that it required a smaller bureaucracy than a monarchy (which needs a lot of patronage to exist) and this created less of a welfare state. I’d add that Europe had more of a revolutionary history than America, so that might have been another factor.

  34. @Korenchkin

    Interestingly enough the Japanese were hoping that the Hindus would rebel and side with the Japanese army and navy during the war

    They even created an army out of Indian pows which took part on the Japanese side in their attempt to invade India in 1944:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_National_Army

    But yes, British rule over India simply wasn’t viable after WW2 anymore, it was clear that an attempt to continue it would lead to major unrest in India, and Britain was dependent on the Americans who were opposed to the European colonial empires anyway (Churchill’s belief that the Atlantic charter didn’t apply to the British empire wasn’t shared by them). And without Indian troops (the real value of India by the 20th century was use of India’s “martial peoples” as an imperial garrison and police force in other parts of the empire), the rest of the Asian empire couldn’t be held anymore either. The war-weary public in Britain with its recently elected Socialist government probably wouldn’t have accepted throwing away the lives of British national servicemen in a war to keep Burma and other possessions under British rule.

  35. The Guardian has a big Think Piece™ on why GloboHomo isn’t advancing fast enough in Eastern Europe.

    How liberalism became the ‘god that failed’ in Eastern Europe

    It’s an amusing read, but I am not sure it is terribly informative. To my mind, the 1989 revolutions were primarily nationalist in nature. Just as the Vietnamese were revolting against Western colonialism (first french, then American). That’s something former US defence secretary McNamara admitted years later: they misjudged what they thought was an ideological communist uprising when it actually was just a nationalist revolution. Same can be applied to 1989. It wasn’t so much an ideological repudiation of communism in favor of liberalism as much as it was about throwing off the yoke of foreign influence, either direct or indirect from Moscow. It just so happened the only alternative had liberalism as its ruling ideology, so that became the ‘choice’ by default.

    I would also question just how “liberal” some of these western regimes are in actuality. Alain Sorral was just sentenced to two years of prison for sharing a Youtube video. The yellow vests were treated with harsh police brutality that if it had happened in Hong Kong would prompt various media shills to blow the trump about humanitarian interventions or at least sanctions. There is great suppression of nationalists in all Western countries. The authors buy into a fairyland conception that the West has with itself, which is far removed from actual reality. As always with liars: the best ones tend to believe their own lies.

    • Agree: Denis
    • Replies: @utu
    , @Denis
  36. utu says:
    @Thulean Friend

    https://www.politico.eu/article/in-defense-of-poland-ruling-party-law-and-justice-pis/

    “But the country is also something of a test case: Is it possible to have a (fairly) liberal democracy without pandering to identity politics and all the rest of it? So far, the answer is yes.”

    “Poles are sick of being branded as unenlightened, primitive, bigoted, nationalistic, anti-Semitic, right-wing extremists just because they don’t think patriotism is a dirty word. They do not like having the “liberal” agenda currently in vogue foisted on them, their narrative usurped, their sovereignty made light of. So they fight back. And this, too, is frowned upon.”

  37. @Boston Sid

    If the badge said that, with those diacritics etc, I’d run for cover because that would surely mean she was an unusually crappy CIA plant not supposed to last, so prolly some explosive suicide drone.

  38. Dmitry says:
    @MEH 0910

    At least, she is famous now so her future prospects are good, not like an average person released after false imprisonment.

    In the future, she will be writing against the mass imprisonment of the population in America and Russia, high rate of false confessions, etc.

    She has explained how they have a system forced labour in American prisons. (She was earning 28 dollars a day as a dishwasher of the prison). They are using prisoners as a kind of an industrial resource.

  39. Dmitry says:
    @Dmitry

    They are using prisoners as a kind of an industrial resource.

    And verifying on the search engine (lol Victoria’s Secret lingerie, made by prisoner labour)

    Whole Foods

    You ever wonder how Whole Foods can afford to keep their prices so low (sarcasm)? Whole Foods’ coffee, chocolate and bananas might be “fair trade,” but the corporation has been offsetting the “high wages” paid to third-world producers with not-so-fair-wages here in America.

    The corporation, famous for its animal welfare rating system, apparently was not as concerned about the welfare of the human “animals” working for them in Colorado prisons until April of this year.

    You know that $12-a-pound tilapia you thought you were buying from “sustainable, American family farms?” It was raised by prisoners in Colorado, who were paid as little as 74 cents a day. And that fancy goat cheese? The goats were raised and milked by prisoners too.

    McDonald’s

    The world’s most successful fast food franchise purchases a plethora of goods manufactured in prisons, including plastic cutlery, containers, and uniforms. The inmates who sew McDonald’s uniforms make even less money by the hour than the people who wear them.

    Wal-Mart

    Although their company policy clearly states that “forced or prison labor will not be tolerated by Wal-Mart,” basically every item in their store has been supplied by third-party prison labor factories. Wal-Mart purchases its produce from prison farms, where laborers are often subjected to long hours in the blazing heat without adequate food or water.

    Victoria’s Secret

    Female inmates in South Carolina sew undergarments and casual-wear for the pricey lingerie company. In the late 1990’s, two prisoners were placed in solitary confinement for telling journalists that they were hired to replace “Made in Honduras” garment tags with “Made in USA” tags.

    BP (British Petroleum)

    When BP spilled 4.2 million barrels of oil into the Gulf coast, the company sent a workforce of almost exclusively African-American inmates to clean up the toxic spill while community members, many of whom were out-of-work fisherman, struggled to make ends meet. BP’s decision to use prisoners instead of hiring displaced workers outraged the Gulf community, but the oil company did nothing to reconcile the situation.

    https://www.cagedbirdmagazine.com/single-post/2017/03/28/50-Companies-Supporting-Modern-American-Slavery

    • Replies: @Dreadilk
  40. songbird says:
    @Dmitry

    She has explained how they have a system forced labour in American prisons. (She was earning 28 dollars a day as a dishwasher of the prison). They are using prisoners as a kind of an industrial resource.

    It is kind of a funny thing. I think there are laws that supposedly prevent prisoners from being used to compete with private industries, but I don’t know. I know that they do make furniture in some places. I vaguely recall a case where they were subcontracted to answer phones or something, and they were scamming old people, stealing their identity. The US has a kind of odd relationship with prisons. It is a big industry here, even if you leave out prisoner labor.

    Now, China is even more interesting, IMO. For many years (possibly still?), they had a large export industry based around prison labor. There were giant warehouses and many factories centered together. It was kind of secretive, because they had to hide the source. I think they have some rule there, where the prisons must pay for themselves.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  41. Mr. XYZ says:
    @AP

    Makes one wonder just how many Chinese and Indians will show up in eastern Russia if Russia extended the offer of free eastern land to them. A little diversity can be a good thing. For instance, Siberia and the Russian Far East could get a Chinatown and more curry! Seriously. For instance, the US and UK are enlivened by their Chinese and Indian communities.

  42. Mr. XYZ says:
    @E. Harding

    Maybe France for 1923? After all, didn’t Britain and the US rapidly demilitarize following the end of WWI while France always had to be prepared for an eventual German resurgence due to its common border with Germany?

  43. @Dmitry

    Yes, we’ve taken a despiccable Soviet institution and made it fit for everyone involved.

  44. @Boston Sid

    In addition to being notorious (not a desirable quality in a woman), Butina is busted and extremely old.

    AK can do better.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  45. @dfordoom

    A very good description. Interesting that Churchill had something to do with both Gallipoli and Dieppe, so the two military adventures which alienated the two most important dominions.

    I think a different mindset and different policies might have healed those wounds, and Australia being fully independent is certainly not any safer than being a part of the British Empire (Britain has also been allied to the US since WW2, so saying that they now have the US alliance is meaningless in that context; besides, the Americans won’t care any more if or when some Asian power will credibly threaten Australia), so even not being able to provide security doesn’t sound like a very good argument.

    But yes, the way the British elites behaved and thought there was no way to keep together even the Anglo dominions. I’d argue that’d be a good thing, because cutting them loose made both the UK and those dominions more deracinated in outlook. Especially once Québec seceded from Canada, which would have been far likelier under that scenario, and one which a more racially or ethnically conscious British leadership might even have encouraged, as a part of shedding all the non-Anglo parts of the Empire. Only the fate of South Africa might have been an open question. Perhaps Rhodesia, too. But eventually I’d have just gotten rid of them, too.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
  46. Sean says:

    Allele variant for small exocrine gland development (EDAR370A) and dull locks is such an HBD mystery. Take a look at this, paying close attention to two enormous points of interest

    The type of selection to have eliminated that from the gene pool of Europeans (Swedes once had it) is obvious. I speak of vitamin D of course https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29686092

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  47. @Thorfinnsson

    She got notorious because of false rumors spread about her by American propaganda. Otherwise she’s just like any other thirty-year-old woman, except smarter than average and a gun rights advocate. It’s also not an extremely old age, though of course, ceteris paribus, younger women are better. It’s still possible to have four children with her, and Karlin doesn’t strike me as someone who would have more than four anyway, so I don’t think age is that important for her.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    , @Dmitry
  48. @AP

    If you did this with no body armor most cats would remove chunks of your flesh with their claws on their way out.

  49. @Boston Sid

    Unz Gold: Daniel Chieh

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
  50. jimy says:

    What about going off the grid? Shouldn’t all construction be sustainable/carbon neutral?

  51. Dmitry says:
    @songbird

    She says that if you do not work in the prison, then you go to solitary.

    You can start to understand how America economically is able to continue to sustain its world’s largest prison population.

    US has a kind of odd relationship with prisons.

    There’s something problematic in the quantity of people in prison… (someone should have shown about this to Butina before she went to the “land of the free” – which phrase she would have interpreted non-ironically before).

    In 1970 it was at least only around twice today’s normal level for developed countries.

    • Replies: @AP
  52. @E. Harding

    The Dominions refused to form a Free Trade area. I’ve blogged it here.

    https://waleseuroperussiafuture.blogspot.com/2017/06/why-not-commonwealth.html

    India was a financial drain from 1870 onwards. Most of Africa was acquired to stop someone else getting it. Malayasia made money. Rubber and tin in particular.

    It is easy to underestimate the post 1918 British Empire especially in the late 1930’s. Britain had pacifist anti war governments so the armed forces, Navy apart, were small and the generals and air marshals unprepared. However, technologically the British were world leading. Mechanized infantry from the word go, equipped with improved Bren-brno guns (when the ammo supply reached them – my father in law had guns at Dunkirk but never ammo) the best sub machine of the war, radar, high climb rate fighters, later strategic bombers, tanks were uneven but the Matildas (incompetently used) and Comets were best in class. The bomb used at Hiroshima was the British design. Jets ahead of the US. Code breaking at scale. And of course a slightly dated but huge navy that maintained an effective blockade on Germany from day one. The British sten gun was technically primitive but very cheap and easy to make. The AK-47 of its day.

    • Replies: @Gabru_Ak47
  53. Mr. Hack says:
    @Boston Sid

    Are you suggesting that Karlin is somehow limited?

    He’s got Russian politics down.
    He’s not bad at reviewing food and restaurants.
    His travelogues are a big hit.
    He’s decent at reviewing books and video games.
    He’s suppoedly working in his PhD (that he seems loathe to write about?).

    And tying it all together, is that he’s patient and seems to be a pretty nice guy. If he somehow were able to trade in the blackshirts in his wardrobe for some vyshivankas, he’d be a well rounded guy too. 🙂

    I agree with Thorfinnsson, that Karlin could do much better.

  54. @Mr. XYZ

    I don’t feel enlivened by the presence of strange aliens.

  55. @reiner Tor

    I’m aware of the miscarriage of justice that took place, which was and is absolutely disgraceful. It’s none the less a fact that she’s now notorious and famous as a result, which are not desirable qualities in a girlfriend.

    And sorry, but thirty is incredibly old for femoids. Older than I can even possibly imagine a woman being. Women should just be given funerals when they turn thirty.

    • LOL: Yevardian
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  56. Mr. Hack says:
    @Sean

    The vitamin D is in full display during Eckberg’s frolicking romp starting at around 3:02. This kind of fun cannot be staged:

    Russian dubbing too!

    • Replies: @Sean
  57. Dmitry says:
    @reiner Tor

    she’s just like any other thirty-year-old woman

    She is not exactly a normal thirty-year-old woman, even if it is a sympathetic and charming kind of crazy person .

    Incompetent American agents honestly could not believe that anyone could be crazy enough to be so naive as she actually is.

    In prison they tried to torture her (with solitary and lack of access to toilet breaks) so that she would tell them her spying secrets, and the problem was they could not believe she has nothing to tell them, and they were simply persecuting an’eccentric and naive political activist (and at least productively, also generating a lot of clickbait for the CNN website and cable news shows).

  58. Our boy Branko Milanovic has lots of important things to say about the Chilean protests:

    Chile: The poster boy of neoliberalism who fell from grace

    Some context:

    Chile has done well on the surface, but it is also a country where a very large share of the growth has been captured by the elite, which is why blindly looking at per capita income is misleading.

    He talks about how the bottom 5% of Chile earns the same amount as the bottom 5% in Mongolia but the top 2% earns the same amount as the top 2% in Germany. Neoliberalism is a failed ideology. The whole “it’s either facsism or communism” is a retarded meme. It’s neither. And if fascism allies itself with looting oligarchs, then it loses the mandate of the people and deserves to be purged. Which is why Pinera has panicked and fired his entire cabinet. Won’t work.

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    , @Dmitry
  59. https://www.berggruen.org/the-worldpost/articles/beware-the-rise-of-far-right-environmentalism/

    Folks over at Berggruen are far smarter than their opponents on the right. They know where the weaknessess of the current system lies.

  60. @Thulean Friend

    I recall an income diagram comparing Argentina and Chile. Basically the same, except that Chile had a vastly richer upper-middle class and up.

    It does much better in various institutions ratings, and I hear infrastructure is better. Of course flip side is risk of flareups like this.

    Which were, of course, organized by Putler:

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    , @songbird
  61. Dmitry says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    This conspiracy theory is probably inspired by Latin American people seeing that the whole day of RT Spanish is against “racism” of Argentina and Chile (or white people in Mexico), and against the evil Chicago School, and then about how brown Indians needs to rebel, and the continent can be saved by Evo Morales and Maduro. Then followed by some documentary about Castro and Chavez, or how supermarkets are actually have a lot of nice food in Venezuela.

  62. Dmitry says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Did you understand this graph from the Credit Suisse report this week? I ask because I would like to know the concept or what they were intending to say.

    By the way this is what they report on Chile: its average wealth of an adult is 5 times more than in Argentina, and 2 times more than in Brazil.

    Chile has the highest wealth per adult in Latin America.
    The comparison with its neighbors is striking. Chile’s GDP
    per adult is only one-third higher than Argentina’s and 70%
    greater than Brazil’s, but its average wealth is over five
    times greater than Argentina’s
    and more than twice Brazil’s.
    Since the turn of the century, wealth per capita has risen
    at an annual average rate of 6.5% in US dollars. In the last
    two years this growth has turned slightly negative in US
    dollars, but wealth per adult has continued to rise in real
    domestic currency terms.
    Chilean household assets are slightly tipped toward the
    financial form, with financial assets making up 55% of total
    household assets overall. Holdings of financial assets have
    been encouraged by low inflation, well-developed financial
    markets and a strong pension system. The high urban
    home-ownership rate of 69% exceeds the 64% found in
    the United States and contributes to substantial holdings
    of real estate. At 15% of gross assets, household liabilities
    are moderate by international standards.
    Chile’s wealth per adult, at USD 56,972, is below the world
    average of USD 70,400, but is high relative to most emerging
    market countries. It has a smaller fraction of adults with
    wealth below USD 10,000 than the world as a whole (39%
    versus 58%), but also slightly fewer above USD 100,000
    (9% versus 11%). Chile’s wealth Gini coefficient is 80%,
    which is somewhat high by international standards. By our
    estimates, Chile has 64,000 USD millionaires and 70,000
    adults in the top 1% of global wealth holders.

    Complete report:
    https://www.credit-suisse.com/media/assets/corporate/docs/about-us/research/publications/global-wealth-report-2019-en.pdf

  63. AP says:
    @Dmitry

    Other developed countries do not have a huge African ex-slave population. High level of incarceration keeps crime down to acceptable levels.

    This is what happens when law enforcement is cut back in a diverse society:

    https://www.city-journal.org/progressive-policies-urban-dysfunction

  64. @Mr. XYZ

    “Enlivened” he says. Da fuck outta here.

  65. @Dmitry

    Did you understand this graph from the Credit Suisse report this week? I ask because I would like to know the concept or what they were intending to say.

    The market capitalization is the market value of a publicly traded company — number of shares multiplied by the share price. The total market cap is the value of all publicly traded companies. This total market cap can be compared to the value of housing — the market cap to house prices ratio used in the graph.

    The graph relates changes in the market cap:house price ratio to changes in the proportion of wealth owned by the wealthiest 1% of the population.

    The graph helps to gain insight into the question of what happens to the proportion of wealth held by the richest people when either gains equities (stocks) exceed gains in housing prices or vice versa.

    In every data point in the graph save for Hong Kong the market cap:house price ratio increased — for argument’s sake, let’s say from 2:1 to, in some cases, perhaps 2.2:1 and in more extreme cases to 4:1 — meaning gains in equities exceeded rises in house prices. And in every such instance save one — again, Hong Kong — the proportion of wealth owned by the richest 1% also increased.

    Essentially, in countries where the wealth of the richest 1% is relatively more concentrated in ownership of companies, the proportion of wealth they owned increased to a greater degree than in countries where the wealth of the richest 1% is relatively more concentrated in real estate.

    By the way this is what they report on Chile: its average wealth of an adult is 5 times more than in Argentina, and 2 times more than in Brazil.

    I don’t regard average wealth as a particularly meaningful statistic, since so much of it is a consequence of home ownership — especially among the bottom 50% of the population, who tend to own very low levels (5-15%) of financial assets . It is “wealth,” but it doesn’t produce an income, and trying to derive an income from it requires selling one’s home and then either renting or trading down to a cheaper home, which most homeowners are unwilling to do.

    So to use the examples of Argentina and Chile, if you take an adult in each and say they earn $1,000 a month from their jobs, live in the same quality house which they own, and in the same quality of neighborhood, with the same quality of schools, hospitals etc, but the only difference is the Chilean’s home is worth $200,000 and the Argie’s is only worth $100,000 then I think it’s absurd to think of the Chilean as being twice as well off as the Argie, despite his being twice as wealthy.

  66. @Dmitry

    Did you understand this graph from the Credit Suisse report this week? I ask because I would like to know the concept or what they were intending to say.

    The market capitalization is the market value of a publicly traded company — number of shares multiplied by the share price. The total market cap is the value of all publicly traded companies. This total market cap can be compared to the value of housing — the market cap to house prices ratio used in the graph.

    The graph relates changes in the market cap:house price ratio to changes in the proportion of wealth owned by the wealthiest 1% of the population.

    The graph helps to gain insight into the question of what happens to the proportion of wealth held by the richest people when either gains equities (stocks) exceed gains in housing prices or vice versa.

    In every data point in the graph save for Hong Kong the market cap:house price ratio increased — for argument’s sake, let’s say from 2:1 to, in some cases, perhaps 2.2:1 and in more extreme cases to 4:1 — meaning gains in equities exceeded rises in house prices. And in every such instance save one — again, Hong Kong — the proportion of wealth owned by the richest 1% also increased.

    Essentially, in countries where the wealth of the richest 1% is relatively more concentrated in ownership of companies, the proportion of wealth they owned increased to a greater degree than in countries where the wealth of the richest 1% is relatively more concentrated in real estate.

    By the way this is what they report on Chile: its average wealth of an adult is 5 times more than in Argentina, and 2 times more than in Brazil.

    I don’t regard average wealth as a particularly meaningful statistic, since so much of it is a consequence of home ownership — especially among the bottom 50% of the population, who tend to own very low levels (5-15%) of financial assets . It is “wealth,” but it doesn’t produce an income, and trying to derive an income from it requires selling one’s home and then either renting or trading down to a cheaper home, which most homeowners are unwilling to do.

    So to use the examples of Argentina and Chile, if you take an adult in each and say they earn $1,000 a month from their jobs, live in the same quality house which they own, and in the same quality of neighborhood, with the same quality of schools, hospitals etc, but the only difference is the Chilean’s home is worth $200,000 and the Argie’s is only worth $100,000 then I think it’s absurd to think of the Chilean as being twice as well off as the Argie, despite his being twice as wealthy.

    • Agree: Denis, Yevardian
    • Replies: @Dmitry
  67. Realist says:
    @Not My Economy

    What percentage of jobs in America are makework?

    Of course it depends on the industry and company. But in government jobs it is greater than 50%.

  68. Eurostat came out with a report this week about first residence permits. This includes all categories (work, refugee, students, family etc). Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

    I knew Ukraine would be high but I was not expecting so many from Belarus. Given their much smaller population, in per capita terms they are not far behind Ukraine. It’s a major problem if you’re a Russian nationalist that these two countries are increasingly bleeding citizens to the EU.

    This is also interesting. What are the top 3 countries that that these nationalties go to?

    The big takeaway for me is that Indians are rising and will likely supercede Chinese next year. Almost half of Chinese are going to the UK and the vast majority of them are there for studies. Most are going back home. Whereas Indians are “stickier”. Even students often tend to stick around and more Indians come on work visas than student visas anyway. So if you’d look at *net* migration then Indians would already be ahead but this is a gross measurement so we’ll have to wait for next year until this change happens in that sense, too.

    Whole document is here. Note, this is only about non-EU/EES migration. If you included intra-EU migration then Germany would be number 1.

  69. Beckow says:
    @Boston Sid

    At the core of all good stories there is a fantasy that can never happen. Secret agents don’t carry badges, and Butina only dates elder men with guns…

  70. Yevardian says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Didn’t know there were so many Ukrainians immigrating to Hungary over so many other places. I thought the language would be a major barrier but of course now everyone speaks Engl*sh.

    What is the ‘other’ statistic mostly made up of? I was thinking refugees, but the extremely high figures from Belarus make me wonder, unless all such people emigrating there are claiming to be political dissidents or whatnot.

  71. Epigon says:
    @Thulean Friend

    It’s a major problem if you’re a Russian nationalist that these two countries are increasingly bleeding citizens to the EU.

    Generally, either the most digruntled, most pro-EU/Westernophile and/or the least patriotic/svidomy leave.

    None of these groups are of interest to Russians.

    In fact, in case of Belarus, it is in Russian interest to have them emigrate to West, while every population loss of Ukraine is a boon to Russians either directly or indirectly.
    Ideally, only the svidomy madmen and repressed, internalized Russians remained while the country is ran to the ground.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    , @AP
  72. Donald Trump has just accomplished no less than the 6th killing of ISIS leader Al-Baghdadi … killed previously by Russians as well

    From ‘The Multiple Deaths of Boogeyman al-Baghdadi’:

    Al-Baghdadi was ‘found dead in a hole in the ground inside a house’ in 2010, per Reuters

    Al-Baghdadi was ‘killed in a US airstrike’ in 2013

    Al-Baghdadi was ‘killed in a US drone strike’ in April 2015

    Al-Baghdadi was ‘killed in a US airstrike in Raqqa’ in June 2016

    Al-Baghdadi was ‘killed in a Russian air strike in Raqqa’ on 16 June 2017′

    Mossad asset Rita Katz of SITE, tho, was able to release a ‘video of Al-Baghdadi’ in April 2019

    Yet, in 2007 Reuters quoted US Brigadier General Kevin Bergner as saying al-Baghdadi “did not exist”, and the New York Times had a similar quote in 2007 from a ‘military spokesman’.

    As often pointed out, al-Baghdadi does look a lot like one of the guys in the photos of those who met with the late US Senator John McCain in his ‘Syria moderate rebel freedom fighter’ meetings … Islamic State head Dr Abu Bakr Al Baghdadi widely thought to have been Israeli Mossad officer, Simon Elliot – Shimon Elliot – Sham’oun Ayloot

    If Barack Obama can kill a bin Laden who apparently died a decade earlier, why can’t Trump kill Al-Baghdadi again, that seems fair

    Wasn’t ISIS really the US-backed ‘Israeli Special Intelligence Services’?

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  73. Sean says:
    @Mr. Hack

    We know the big white skin gene the Caucasian gene only swept to fixation in Europe after the Yamnaya turned up 4800 years ago.

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/the-caucasian-gene/#comment-2345249
    there are very very very few copies of the ancestral allele across so much of europe. this seems to be a recent feature of the last 5,000 years.the % isn’t really the most interesting thing. it is that there are very very very few copies of the ancestral allele across so much of europe. this seems to be a recent feature of the last 5,000 years. the impact on skin color is dominant toward lightness (see the original 2005 paper). so it is very strange that if lightness is driving the selection that heterozygotes are so much less fit than homozygotes. lactase persistence allele is maxed out at ~90% because it is dominant it. this allele should have been similar, but it’s not.

    We know from the tiny Motala grouplet that Mesolithic Swedes had some of the light skin ect genes but not fixed. They also had the Amerindian and especially Han Edar variant. I think there was sexual selection and that is why light colouring genes increased in Sweden while the small breasts and coarse unshiney hair variant of Edar disappeared from the land of …

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  74. Mr. Hack says:
    @Sean

    So where did the pronounced wide hips come from that sway so hypnotically to the undulating music?

    • Replies: @Sean
  75. songbird says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    I might move to Latin America, just for the comedic benefit of seeing the word “jefe” in more political headlines. Or, I guess I could just switch to Spanish-language media – easy enough in America.

  76. Mr. Hack says:
    @Epigon

    Sure, some of those Ukrainians with residence permits will stay put, but a large portion of those that go and work in one of these countries will go for 6 months, and then travel back home and visit for another 6 months. The countries are all real close bye.

  77. songbird says:
    @Thulean Friend

    In the US college system, Chinese are really the only big group of foreign ethnic students, where you ever hear people express a positive opinion of going home. I find it rather endearing.

    With Africans – even African women – you will often hear them rage and drop f-bombs towards graduation time. Angry at the US (and I believe at white people) for only giving them a student visa. My solution would be to stop letting them come.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  78. AP says:
    @Thulean Friend

    I knew Ukraine would be high but I was not expecting so many from Belarus. Given their much smaller population, in per capita terms they are not far behind Ukraine.

    Per capita Belarus actually exceeds Ukraine according to these figures.

    Hmmm..wonder why Russian nationalists never mention Belarus emigration?

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  79. AP says:
    @Epigon

    It’s a major problem if you’re a Russian nationalist that these two countries are increasingly bleeding citizens to the EU.

    Generally, either the most digruntled, most pro-EU/Westernophile and/or the least patriotic/svidomy leave.

    From Belarus? Don’t know.

    From Ukraine? Plenty of pro-Russians have left Ukraine, even to the West which offers much more money than does Russia. It seems Estonia may be sick of them. Here is Estonia’s interior minister:

    https://www.lrt.lt/en/news-in-english/19/1096844/estonian-minister-calls-to-revoke-visa-free-travel-for-ukrainians-calling-them-russia-s-trojan-horse

    Estonian Interior Minister Mart Helme from the right-wing EKRE party has called on the country to review its visa-free regime with Ukraine and accused Ukrainians in Estonia of being Russia’s “Trojan horse”.

    “This Trojan horse works, among other things, on Russia’s behalf, since those who have been coming here are not Ukrainians so much as Russians from Eastern Ukraine, or Russians from Russia, or simply ‘homo sovieticus’,” Helme was quoted by ERR News.

    it is in Russian interest to have them emigrate to West, while every population loss of Ukraine is a boon to Russians either directly or indirectly. Ideally, only the svidomy madmen and repressed, internalized Russians remained while the country is ran to the ground.

    Too bad then, that Ukraine has been seeing consistent improvement starting in the last quarter of 2015, after the adjustment of 2014-2015.

    • Replies: @Denis
  80. Peter Frost says: • Website
    @E. Harding

    “Britain gave up all of its dominions in 1931 instead of incorporating them into an ever closer union.”

    The dominions were already self-governing by then. Britain simply recognized a fait accompli.

    Independence did not come to Canada as it did to most countries. It was a default option that Canada drifted into because the other options couldn’t rally a majority of Canadians. A slight majority of English Canadians wanted stronger ties with Britain and the other “white” dominions, but that option was opposed by a large minority who wanted stronger ties with the U.S. As for the French Canadians, they were opposed to the prospect of stronger ties with either the U.S. or Britain (which would have submerged them linguistically and culturally).

    So we gradually became more and more independent, not because we passionately desired independence but because that seemed to be the only workable option. Even in the 1960s the idea of a “Canadian” identity was still very weak. Canada did not adopt its own flag until 1965, and that flag wasn’t broadly accepted until the early 1970s.

  81. Dreadilk says:
    @Dmitry

    I would be probably thankfull that BP used prison labor instead of locals. Cancer is no fun.

  82. Dmitry says:
    @silviosilver

    silviosilver Thanks for the interesting comment which I enjoyed reading.

    I found the text about this figure, in the report on page 29.

    “Our data provides confirmation of the tendency for wealth inequality to increase when financial wealth grows faster than non-financial wealth. Figure 6 compares the change in the share of the top 1% with the change in the ratio of equity market capitalization to house prices across a representative selection of countries. For the period 2008–18 (limited by the availability of house price data), the cross-tabulation shows a strong positive relationship between these variables. This is illustrated by the experience of Russia, where a 13-point rise in the wealth share of the top 1% has accompanied equity prices rising three times faster than house prices. Among the countries considered, Hong Kong SAR is the only place where house prices rose faster than equity prices, and the only place where the share of the top 1% declined.”
    https://www.credit-suisse.com/media/assets/corporate/docs/about-us/research/publications/global-wealth-report-2019-en.pdf

    I don’t regard average wealth as a particularly meaningful statistic, since so much of it is a consequence of home ownership.

    You can buy a small new apartment outside an important city in Russia, for $30,000. For the same small apartment in St John’s Wood in London, it could be $1 million.

    You could close the curtains, and everything will feel the same.

    However, if your parents need an emergency cancer operation, then the person in London could sell their apartment and send parents for years of treatment in the best specialist in the world. While the Russian equivalent – can buy a few consultations.

    Similarly, if you want to study a PhD in Stanford or Cambridge. Your apartment in Russia will pay for maybe 1 year, while the person selling in London could study until they are around 45 years old.

    I think the difference matches quite well our intuitive concept of wealth.

    This kind of wealth might be inconvenient to access, and have no impact on present life conditions. But it represents real difference in eventual possibilities, and approaches the metaphor of a “cushion” or “parachute”.

    Chilean’s home is worth $200,000 and the Argie’s is only worth $100,000 then I think it’s absurd to think of the Chilean as being twice as well off as the Argie, despite his being twice as wealthy.

    I have read that it is common in Argentina, that people will spend their month’s paycheck immediately on consumer products (large television, new washing machine, etc) at the beginning of the month, because prices might be higher at the end of the month.

    So the erosion of wealth in Argentina, definitely has behavioural effects, beyond only a number “on paper”.

    Chilean as being twice as well off as the Argie, despite his being twice as wealthy.

    This Chilean can sell his apartment in Santiago, buy two similar apartments in Buenos Aires, rent one, and live in the other (maybe not a realistic example, because you would have to be crazy to invest your main asset in Argentina).

    Sure, it’s inconvenient, most of the people would not do this, etc. But there are real differences in possibilities in this example..

    Chilean in the example has the option to be twice as wealthy as the Argentina man in Buenos Aires, if they move to Buenos Aires.

    Alternatively, the apartment in Buenos Aires or Santiago might be inherited from parents to a hedonistic child who only likes consumer products.

    Child who inherits the apartment in Buenos Aires, can buy 100 large televisions, while in Santiago, they can buy 200 large televisions.

  83. Dmitry says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Millions of Poles have emigrated to UK and Germany, often to work in proletarian jobs that saxons refuse to do.

    Then Poland, to replace its missing local labour, now imports a vast flood of workers from Ukraine and Belarus. There some kind of surreal hierarchy of immigration.

    Ukraine and Belarus now needs to find someone lower than themselves to import, and Poland is short-circuiting the option for Belarus by directly importing Ukrainians, who otherwise Belarus could have imported to replace its people emigrating to Poland.

    • Replies: @AP
  84. Dmitry says:
    @Dmitry

    erosion of wealth in Argentina

    At 3:55 in this video below they talk about this kind of topic we are discussing. (Quite an interesting video report about Argentina.)

    • Agree: Thulean Friend
  85. songbird says:

    So, what is the takeaway for witch stats in Europe? Mostly state politics? I got that vague impression when reading about the last witch killed in Germany, although my memory on it is poor.

    That is to say, my theory would be something like this: where a state feels the need to show its power, it will more readily allow witch accusations to result in executions.

  86. @Brabantian

    Wasn’t ISIS really the US-backed ‘Israeli Special Intelligence Services’?

    Yes, which is why they are desperate to get him assassinated to remove all traces. The US, under the auspices of their Israeli masters, has funded and supported a whole bevy of Islamist shocktroops. Many of them have now been rolled into Turkey’s brutes in their war against the kurds. It’s extremely amusing to see US media concern-troll about how these groups now behave given that they were literally funded by the US and Israel, but back then the media covered for them by either not reporting on their atrocities or outright calling them “freedom fighters” or “moderate rebels”. The war in Syria has really opened my eyes to the extent that the media in the west is 100% controlled puppet show. The “free media” is a total sham.

    Just a word on Turkey. Their whining is also hypocritical. They were more than willing to allow their border be a literal highway for jihadis for years. It was only in 2016 when A) it became clear that Russia was turning the tide and B) a US-sponsored coup failed that Turkey started to shift position. I support Turkey’s forceful relocation of rapefugees, but I am zero patience for their crying about how unfair the west is. In many ways, their current operation is a clean-up for the mess they helped co-create.

    And yes, it should all remind us how critically important it is to cut off the EU from the US, given that the latter is a golem lemming of Israel when it comes to middle eastern policy. It is in Israel’s interest to see their neighbours in perpetual turmoil, the weaker those around them are, they stronger they are. That is also why they support the kurds, who are a rapidly growing 40 million fifth column stretching from Turkey, Syria, Iraq and Iran. It’s not in our interest to destabilise these countries by fanning the flames of separatism, given the rapefugee implication it has if there’s a serious conflict, but this is the direction and logical conclusion of “muh kurds”. Good for Israel, not good for the West, but that distinction is no longer possible to make in the Western “free press”. We have to take the rapefugees but israel gets none. Israel wins on both counts: Europe gets less white *and* their neighbours get weakened by inner turmoil. Anyone who supports a pro-jihadist tactic abroad is a fool because of these long-term effects.

    • Agree: Epigon, RadicalCenter
  87. @songbird

    My solution would be to stop letting them come.

    The Africans who come to the US to study are the local elites. Some of them are economically useful, many of them are even more useful politically abroad as a foreign contact waiting to be activated. When the time comes and a certain African country is pursuing a line different to US objectives, having a loyal core of puppets (with extended family members in the US for easier blackmail) ready to supplant the ruling dispensation can prove invaluable. For that reason alone, I do not think that the international students will stop coming from those parts of the world any time soon. It’s an economically very efficient way to gain a significant foothold.

    The Chinese students are interesting. You’re correct that they seem one of the few groups who are largely patriotic and want to come back. But the Chinese students are key in AI and other core technologies, something think tanks like the Paulson Institute’s sub-division MarcoPolo have highlighted. Other than Indians and Europeans, they are the only talent group which the US needs to select from abroad and probably the most important of the foreign student populations overall in these core technological areas.

    So the US is in a bind. On the one hand, it would need many of them to supercharge technology, on the other there is a growing suspicion that many of them have divided loyalties. I listened to an interview with Jake Sullivan, who was one of the big shots in Obama’s foreign policy circle and he was adamantly against cutting Chinese student visas. He and other democrats understand these nuanced concerns in a way like a boomer like Trump and his mediocre coterie does not. It’ll be interesting to see how the dilemma unfolds going forward, and whether the increased tension causes more Chinese to stay away. I am much less sanguine about India’s economic prospects, so I think that country will send its elites to stay in the US for decades to come. India’s economic elite is so westernised by now that many have fooled its government into thinking that having massive brain drain is good for India’s national interest.

  88. @AP

    Per capita Belarus actually exceeds Ukraine according to these figures.

    Ukraine’s real population is likely at most in the mid-30s millions. Possibly lower. So in that sense, I am not sure if Belarus really exceeds Ukraine in per capita, but it is certainly far higher than I expected.

    Hmmm..wonder why Russian nationalists never mention Belarus emigration?

    Probably just ignorance. Most people know about massive Ukrainian outflows. Large Belarussian outflows is not on the radar. I didn’t know about it until today and I doubt most others here knew it either – and this is a blog with many commenters with a deep interest in the region.

    The topic deserves a follow-up. What causes this outflow? It seems to be rather sudden development. It’s also worth mentioning that over 90% of them go to Poland. But by next year, Germany will open its gates to foreigners from non-EU countries even wider by significant visa liberalisation for work migration. So we’ll see how many Ukrainians and Belorussians go there instead. It isn’t that much further to go and while the language is harder to learn, gross nominal wages are 3X higher than what Poland can offer. Money talks.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @RadicalCenter
  89. There were elections in the German state of Thuringia today.
    AfD became the 2nd strongest party (gaining 13%) with 23,6% (provsional results, might still change somewhat), after the ex-commie Die Linke with 29,8% (who profited from the popularity of their top candidate, the incumbent minister president Ramelow). Which is pretty remarkable, given that the Thuringian AfD is led by extremely controversial Björn Höcke who is widely considered a Nazi.
    The Christian Democrats lost more than 11% and are now at about 22% in 3rd place…the latest in an unending series of defeats for them 🙂
    It won’t change anything about the larger political situation (though it will embolden the more radical section of the AfD around Höcke…remains to be seen how this play out), but the election results will make forming a government difficult. It looks like it will either be a minority government, or there’ll be a coalition between the Linke and the Christian Democrats…which would have seemed completely absurd even a few years ago, but now might be the only way to preserve the “antifascist” consensus.

    • Replies: @Hail
  90. Germany’s annual EU budget bill set to double to €33bn

    Under the current proposal, Germany would replace the Netherlands as the single biggest per capita contributor. The EU parliament wants the EU budget to rise to 1.3% of GNI. The Southern laggards want 1.15% of thereabout. The “frugal five” – Germany, Sweden, Denmark, Austria and the Netherlands – which they could just rename as the Germanic Union, are pushing for a number below 1%. I’m perfectly happy with that, but it wouldn’t be enough. We also need reform in how the money is spent, not just the amount.

    I’d prefer money to be shifted away from agriculture. A lot of people focus on redistribution away from richer to poorer countries but this is around 1/3rd of the buget. Just as big are the various agricultural subsidies, which is frankly a money sink designed by largely French, Italian and Spanish agrarian interests. I’d take money from that and put it into R&D instead.

    This is the total per capita funds received up to 2020. Note these include not just redistribution but also agricultural subsidies and rebates, which is why everyone has a positive balance.

    The biggest beneficiaries have not been the easterners, but the southerners and these are also the countries have a big stake in the agricultural subsidies. There is talk to use the “rule of law” bullshit mechanism to shift even more money to the laggard south. What a mess. Instead of investing for the future, we’re getting stuck into agrarian appeasement.

    • Replies: @Yevardian
  91. Oh and Happy Diwali guys.

    Enjoy it by being extra nice to your local Indians this coming week and get a good biryani for yourself.

    • Replies: @Gabru_Ak47
  92. @Dmitry

    Money can’t buy love, education or good medical care. Sorry. We delude ourselves that if the worst happens we could buy some more quality time, but it doesn’t work like that. Even Steve Jobs couldn’t buy a cancer cure.

    • Replies: @songbird
  93. songbird says:
    @anonymous coward

    Even Steve Jobs couldn’t buy a cancer cure.

    Quite probably true, but difficult to tell for sure, since he was a fruitarian nutcase, who waited too late.

    • Replies: @Sean
  94. LondonBob says:
    @Abelard Lindsey

    In investment banking huge numbers of back and middle office jobs have been automated.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    , @Denis
  95. Denis says:
    @Thulean Friend

    It’s an amusing read, but I am not sure it is terribly informative. To my mind, the 1989 revolutions were primarily nationalist in nature.

    I read that piece a little while ago, and I agree that it’s uninformative. It reflects the somewhat petulant attitude that some liberals have towards Eastern Europe’s generally more conservative slant.

    Also, I agree that 1989 was primarily nationalist in nature. When talking with some eastern Europeans (especially, but not exclusively, those from older generations), I almost get the impression that they imagined abandoning Communism and joining the EU/west was like seceding from the Golden Horde to join some kind of 4th Reich.

  96. LondonBob says:
    @reiner Tor

    Neither Gallipoli nor Dieppe had a negative impact on the attitudes of Canadians and Australians to the mother country. Clueless comment.

    • Replies: @Matra
    , @utu
  97. LondonBob says:
    @LondonBob

    Of course the jobs being lost are people in India where such tasks were already outsourced to,

  98. Denis says:
    @AP

    From Ukraine? Plenty of pro-Russians have left Ukraine, even to the West which offers much more money than does Russia. It seems Estonia may be sick of them. Here is Estonia’s interior minister:

    Lol, Estonia isn’t really west

  99. Sean says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Cookbook hbd cannot explain such things, only a charge in the terms of female–female competition can.

    https://feminismandreligion.com/2017/12/11/marija-gimbutas-triumphant-colin-renfrew-concedes-by-carol-p-christ/

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  100. Sean says:
    @songbird

    Pancreatic is about the most feared of all cancers. Fructose, in nature only available for a few weeks in summer and thus instinctively gorged on, is the killer sugar.

  101. @Philip Owen

    O, ur welsh not wonder ur not a faggot.

    1750 No British Rule
    1800 British rule was just the coastlines.
    50 years later the entire country
    50 later de facto none of it.
    50 after that and you have India doing a reverse colonization through mass migration. 😐
    50 after that like 2050 AD you may literally have Indians ruling large parts of Anglo-sphere. :shrug:

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
  102. Denis says:

    *zrada* Insomniac Resurrected: Arkady Babchenko About The Sausage Emigrants

    Holy shit, first AP and then this guy, both going on about how awesome Moscow is. I’ve really got to go there sometime.

  103. @Mr. XYZ

    Lol import a few Lakh Sikh/Panjabis & China will never invade!

  104. Matra says:
    @LondonBob

    I don’t know about Australians and Gallipoli but you are right about Canadians and Dieppe. The guy who said it, dfordoom, is a blowhard, and almost certainly someone who was born in the 40s or early 50s. The most distinguishing characteristic of men from that generation is their absolute certitude on topics they know nothing about.

  105. Yevardian says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Romania and Bulgaria receive less development funds than many much richer countries like Spain and Czechia. Slightly surprising since they’re probably the most pro-EU members in the whole union.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  106. Denis says:
    @Dmitry

    Child who inherits the apartment in Buenos Aires, can buy 100 large televisions, while in Santiago, they can buy 200 large televisions.

    This seems to support Silvio’s point rather than yours, given that no reasonable person would do something like buy 200 televisions (for personal use, anyways). Such a difference (200 televisions vs. 100 televisions) would hardly make a difference in a person’s quality of life.

    Also, if someone could afford to spend a million dollars on real estate, and their intent was to use it to make money later on, the obvious thing to do would be to buy cheaper rental properties and rent them out. This way, they can mortgage the property if they have a large sudden expense, while also generating income in the meantime. This makes a lot more sense than buying a million-dollar home, which you live in, so that you can sell it in case you need money later on.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  107. Max Payne says:
    @Boston Sid

    That is literally the gayest shit I have ever read…

  108. Mr. Hack says:
    @Sean

    It’s interesting to note that Marija Gimbutas’ theories regarding the Aryan invasion of Europe that was spearheaded from the Kurgan culture of Southern Ukraine has recently been resuscitated through DNA sequencing studies. The pendelum has swung back in her favor this time. I don’t see how all of this impacts the evolution of female hip structure, on full display in Eckberg’s improvisational dance displayed within the dance sequence?

    • Replies: @Sean
  109. utu says:
    @LondonBob

    “Neither Gallipoli nor Dieppe had a negative impact on the attitudes of Canadians and Australians to the mother country. Clueless comment.”

    Really? No impact? Zilch? And you know it for sure?

    Time to End the British Monarchy in Canada. ( May 16, 2018)
    https://theglobepost.com/2018/05/16/british-monarchy-canada/

    Many Canadians point proudly to the emancipation of the Canadian constitution and foreign policy from the grips of British Empire control. They point to the Boer War at the turn of the 20th century as the moment when Canada began to assert its independence vis-a-vis the British crown. Canadian approval for Empire use of its troops became necessary.

    This movement accentuated itself throughout the World Wars as Canada gradually began to make its own decisions. It was patchy, however, and the memory of the British bungling during the raid at Dieppe in 1942 with huge losses amongst the Canadian troops and the sacrifice of the entire Newfoundland regiment to the WWI war effort remains fresh to this day.

    Other emerging colonial powers like Australia, New Zealand, and others can point to their own Dieppe in the desert and elsewhere when Great Britain squandered its colonial troops to the benefit of the enemy. The French were no better with their black and Muslim colonial units from Africa.

    Selling Disaster: How the Canadian Public was Informed of Dieppe
    https://dspace.library.uvic.ca/bitstream/handle/1828/459/balzer_2004.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

    People took pride in the heroic sacrifice of French-Canadian troops, but also saw the raid as a symbol of British imperialism. As a military operation, Dieppe was perceived to be a disaster, indicating the message of the publicity campaign failed in French Canada. ‘ There was also no unity of English-speaking Canadian opinion about the raid, but public relations were more successful than in Quebec and it is possible that a majority accepted the government version.

    See page 14 here

    https://books.google.com/books?id=zGdtBQAAQBAJ&pg=PA14&lpg=PA14&dq=attitudes+towards+britain+in+canada+and+dieppe&source=bl&ots=2AOSUme06l&sig=ACfU3U1tvB_by6drvb_REuIfjZYKiqzE3g&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi0mse51b3lAhWG2FkKHaEIB744ChDoATAHegQICRAB#v=onepage&q=attitudes%20towards%20britain%20in%20canada%20and%20dieppe&f=false

    on how the Canadians refused to salute their (and British) officers after Dieppe.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    , @Peter Frost
  110. Dmitry says:

    According to sources in the Turkish media – Turkey is close to agreement to order 36 Su-35.

    Turkey wants some part in the production of the planes.

    https://ria.ru/20191025/1560236618.html

    Although the number is small, it is possibly quite a significant news for ОАК, to the extent this is important. As it means there will be likely further orders of planes, training and related equipment in upcoming years.

    If we look at the Turkish air force currently, they have only American and EU planes.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_active_aircraft_of_the_Turkish_Air_Force

    Their weapons are American, so this will result in a change here as well:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_modern_weapons_of_the_Turkish_Air_Force

    Turkish air force was established almost a century ago, and this would be their first order of a Russian plane in its history. It’s quite a surprised change of path from Turkey or Erdogan, especially as NATO and Russian weapons will not be easily compatible with each other.

  111. Denis says:
    @LondonBob

    Yes but when we discuss the negative effects of automization usually it’s with blue-collar working-class people in mind, not operations personnel in investment banks.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
  112. AP says:
    @Thulean Friend

    “Hmmm..wonder why Russian nationalists never mention Belarus emigration?”

    Probably just ignorance. Most people know about massive Ukrainian outflows. Large Belarussian outflows is not on the radar. I didn’t know about it until today and I doubt most others here knew it either – and this is a blog with many commenters with a deep interest in the region.

    If Belarus followed a pro-Western course its emigration rate would be broadcast loudly by Russian nationalist media. It is off the radar because the country has not been pro-Western.

    Also, the fact that Belarus is not much poorer than Russian provinces suggests that if much of provincial Russia were in the same place on the map as Belarus, so close to Poland, emigration rates would be comparable.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    , @Dmitry
  113. AP says:
    @Dmitry

    Poland is short-circuiting the option for Belarus by directly importing Ukrainians, who otherwise Belarus could have imported to replace its people emigrating to Poland.

    Belarus wages are too close to Ukrainian wages to make it worthwhile for Ukrainians leave their families and to go to Belarus for work, even of there were no Poland next door (numbers are from last year, Ukraine has improved significantly since that time):

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  114. Dmitry says:
    @Denis

    My example of buying 100 or 200 televisions is not intended as a “realistic life option”, the scenario is just to show that the difference of wealth is real.

    Although maybe there are some people in the world who actually desire owning 200 televisions?

    If similar apartments are valued $200,000 in Santiago, and $100,000 in Buenos Aires – but otherwise look the same?

    Silvio argues, that it is absurd to say you are twice as rich in Santiago as you are in Buenos Aires.

    Sure, his point true, to the extent the asset is maintained illiquid.

    But the moment you liquify the asset, then the person who sells in Santiago is really twice as rich. Real life is messy, and there are issues of mobility – you still might have to buy/rent an comparatively more expensive apartment in Santiago, and the wealth difference will not be realized in practical life. But there is a difference of wealth, which becomes very real and practical when you compare what the person who chooses to buy other types of assets (whether televisions, cars, or steaks) after they liquify the money that was frozen in their property.

  115. Dmitry says:
    @AP

    Sure, I agree, from what I can see jobs commercials in Minsk offer salaries quite similarly low to in Kiev.

    However, in this diagram you post, there has to be something wrong with the claim that Germany has almost double salaries of the UK? Also this difference between salaries of Spain and Portugal is surely inaccurate?

    Salaries for North West European countries seem far too low as well, compared to real life.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    , @AP
  116. Dmitry says:
    @AP

    I have not just followed this new story, and this Belarus emigration situation is very recent, after Lukashenko must have signed some immigration agreement with Poland (?).

    The data I had seen until recent years – showed how little emigration from Belarus excluding emigration to Russia.(a large part of all emigration excluding to Russia, was just some people with Jewish roots going to Israel or Germany after attaining citizenship there)

    This is the annual inflow/outflow of immigration/emigration of Belarus until 2010, excluding Russia from the data.

  117. Dmitry says:
    @AP

    Very few (apart from some eccentrics) dreams of immigrating to Poland as a first choice.

    If Russia has open labour movement with the EU (including UK, before Brexit), then most of the young people will be emigrating to London tomorrow. (Not to Poland!) MacDonald’s and Starbucks in London, would have a thousand applicants, for every job – considering how much higher wages are in London for the same jobs than Russia, quite rationally.

    This is why, fortunately for all sides’s survival (both Russia and the EU), Russia will never have such open movement of labour with the EU.

    But we cannot say that same for Ukraine. Ukraine is planning to join the EU. The situation with the flood of Ukrainian workers to Poland is just a preview of what might happen if Ukraine joins the EU. When Ukrainians can work all over the EU, there will be a great flood of Ukrainian immigrants into Western Europe, and Ukraine will have a problem of losing so much of its workers. (Although there will be positives for Ukraine also, in the form of remittances and the other benefits of EU membership).

    • Agree: TheTotallyAnonymous
  118. @Dmitry

    Click to enlarge.

    That’s about as accurate as it gets for Europe if you want decently fresh data. I’d prefer median wages but the latest such data I could find from Eurostat was from 2014 and there has been rapid wage growth in CEE since then, so it wouldn’t be that accurate anymore. This graph does not cover Belarus or Ukraine, but it shows the alternatives they have.

    I prefer gross nominal wages (the blue bars) because taxes that a country may choose not to levy on a worker’s wage can easily be compensated for in other taxes, so net wages are not always indicative of actual purchasing power. Nominal is better than PPP because nominal matters a lot more for remittances. PPP matters more if you just earn for yourself, which many of these workers don’t.

    Wages in hours is better because some countries, like Germany, Denmark or Norway have low average annual hours worked precisely because compensation is high. I’d wish they’d sort by blue bars instead, since that is more relevant for workers, but this is designed from the PoV of an investor. Still, for our purposes, if we focus on the blue bars it tells us the basic story.

    Despite all the talk of “the end of cheap labour”, East-Central Europe is still very much competing on cheap labour. The gross hourly wage in Germany €28, whereas in Poland it is just €8. That’s a 3.5X difference, even higher than I had previously estimated. If a Ukrainian would go to Norway instead, he’d make 5X more than in Poland. Norway is not liberalising its work visas right now, because their wages are so high that they are still getting plenty of Eastern Europeans even when comparably lower wage countries like the UK no longer do (even outside of Brexit effects).

    In short, if more high-wage countries in North-West Europe were to liberalise their work visas in the way that Germany is about to do, I expect many more not just Belarussians or Ukrainians to keep coming but perhaps even increasingly Russians to go, too.

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
  119. AP says:
    @Dmitry

    However, in this diagram you post, there has to be something wrong with the claim that Germany has almost double salaries of the UK? Also this difference between salaries of Spain and Portugal is surely inaccurate?

    It’s just what came up on googleimage. Maybe it reflected some Brexit problems from the UK?

    Here’s another one showing UK and Germany about the same, but Portugal still with much lower wages than Spain:

    Here are salaries in capital cities, early 2019:

    Kiev about the same as Minsk. So someone from a poor part of Ukraine would sooner move to Kiev than to Belarus. I am surprised that Warsaw is higher than Moscow but this is because of the fall of the ruble’s value.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    , @Anatoly Karlin
  120. Hail says: • Website
    @German_reader

    A great result for the AfD, confirming again the post-2015 realignment in German politics (following the Merkel-imposed Muslim-refugee disaster). A nationalist-tinged party to the right of the CDU has carved out its space, and is not going away, with the big players seemingly helpless to stop it.

    I would also note that former AfD leader Frauke Petry’s bid to create a new party has failed. Someone registered a “Blaue #TeamPetry Thüringen” as a party list and it got only 0.1%.

    _________________

    The final seat results in Thuringia appear to be:

    Total 90 seats

    BRD-Establishment parties (historically, anyway)
    – CDU 21 seats
    – SPD 8 seats
    = 29 seats [32% of seats]

    Left-wing parties (on the federal level, anyway)
    – Linke 29 seats
    – Green 5 seats
    = 34 seats [38% of seats]

    Nationalist-sympathetic parties (IMO)
    – AfD 22 seats
    – FDP 5 seats
    = 27 seats [30% of seats]

    __________________

    On the above categories and coalitions:

    [MORE]

    The CDU has plenty of soft-ethnonationalist sympathizers in it (arguably the default view as little as a generation ago), but their federal leadership would never allow them to act on it, would rather self-destruct than allow any “AfDization” of the CDU.

    The FDP is similar — many people with patriotic instincts I would call soft-ethnonationalist — but as it is smaller, comfortable in opposition, and much more maneuverable, unlike the CDU it does have the chance to act at critical stages. We saw FDP federal-level leader Christian Lindner do this in late 2017 when he pulled out of the then-proposed CDU-Green-FDP coalition over the Greens’ extremist immigration/asylum position. This was a risky but (from my perspective) heroic act by Lindner (b.1979) and the FDP federal leadership core.

    Lindner was back on German TV after this Thuringia election, calling for immigration restriction again. Therefore I would group today’s FDP as under the third group above, aware that many would disagree.

    In any case, to make 46 seats, there is no path without one of either:

    – CDU+Linke, or

    – Linke+AfD, or

    – CDU+AfD(+FDP)

    — all of which have said they will absolutely not do work with the other.

    If CDU does join Linke, which seems a very low-probability scenario, it would probably cause many to abandon CDU and turn primarily to the AfD.

    The only other possibility is the very-awkward and shaky coalition of Linke+SPD+Green+FDP, which appears to have 47 seats (46/90 for a majority). It would take only two (of the incoming five) FDP Landtag members to defect to take down such a government.

    • Replies: @Hail
  121. Hail says: • Website

    Kevin Michael Grace: Canada Fragments—Is Alberta Secession Next?

    Alberta is, today, in one of those politically intriguing 25-50-25 split situations (see comment-61 at the Kevin Michael Grace article); 25% pro-separation (as in would firmly vote YES on independence today), 25% anti-separation (firm NO on independence), and 50% in the middle but could vote YES on independence in the right conditions.

    [Alberta’s] 25-50-25 split…could go either way in the 2020s or 2030s, depending on political conditions, external conditions, luck, and/or leadership (depending on your view of history).

    The separatist 25% core has the advantage of the middle [50%] being favorably inclined to it; the anti-separatist 25% core has the advantage of representing the status quo.

    The pro-independence core also has the advantage of being much more rooted. It looks likely that the 25% anti-separation core is around, maybe, half immigrant in origin — entirely concentrated in the two large cities of Calgary and Edmonton.

    So Alberta is a microcosm of the US in this way. Worth paying attention.

  122. @Hail


    Was gonna post about this topic as well.

    I think that 2019/2020 mark the points where conservatives can no longer win an election in Canada/USA.

    India has one more election (2024) until the 33% Muslim newborn problem catches up.

    2025-2035 will see civil war in both the subcontinent & North America.

    I do think Trump will be re-elected and conservatives shouldn”t be that criticized.
    They’ve conserved or expanded the one right that matters in the United States.

  123. Sean says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Selection for the body that would appeal to exterminatory invader males. The edar variant for small mammaries may have been a serious liability. Non-white skin certainly was because it suddenly disappeared from Europe when the Yamnaya showed up

  124. @Yevardian

    There’s a rather sensible upper limit over how much EU funds could be sent as a percentage of GDP. The economy could hardly absorb more than that without serious distortions.

  125. @Thorfinnsson

    I understood you weren’t entirely serious, but I reacted because I think there’s this manosphere idea which creates unreasonable expectations and is also overall destructive.

    Cohorts are not of the same size (they are decreasing among all white peoples), so if 35 year old males started competing for 20 year old females (already happening, but not to the extent you seem to advocate for), then 20 year old guys would have no options for partners at all, because the 35 year old cohort is larger than the 20 year old cohort.

    Overall, a society where guys at age 25 (at the latest) would marry girls who are roughly the same age, or maybe 3-5 years younger might be better than a very late marriage society, but the “over 30 women are worthless” meme is just destructive.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    , @Thorfinnsson
  126. @reiner Tor

    One argument against the early marriage age is that with modern medicine and hygiene you don’t actually need more than 3 children in a healthy society. But maybe it’s better to have them earlier, so that as the kids get bigger, you can still get to enjoy your life. (Also, you’d still have the energy to help with your grandchildren at age 50, rather than at age 75.)

  127. LondonBob says:
    @Denis

    A lot of those jobs have already been outsourced though, the people losing their jobs are the outsourcers. Personal trainers and other similar roles largely can’t and won’t be automated.

  128. @reiner Tor

    Three part post:

    1. Healthy Society is one at war.
    2.
    Hail, realized something: SJWism & Lolbertarian bs is both White.
    Minorities want job security = “Bigger” Government

    3. Let’s talk about flashlights.

    18650 batteries cap out around 3-500 Lumens 125m $20 (Sorfin SC31)
    Larger Sizes like 21700 or 26650 3-5hrs at 750-1000 Lumen. 150-200m $75 (Fenix PD36)

    Get First, cheap disposable.

    Weapon Lights: Streamlight Protac Rail Mount 2. 650 Lumens. 225m Range. 2HR. $150

    The #s I mention are the average sustained output not 2-3min turbo modes.

    Headlamps: 2-300 Lumens? $20. 50-75M Flood. Energizer? More useful for the Red LEDs at night.

  129. LondonBob says:
    @utu

    Sounds a well balanced thoughtful newspaper article, definitely to be relied upon, as anything that appears in the press should be.

    Lets just pretend the largely British/Canadian D-Day landings didn’t happen two years later. Or that Australians didn’t volunteer in large numbers in WWII.

  130. neutral says:
    @Gabru_Ak47

    The difference between Canada and India is that Indias problem is not racial but religious. No matter how much you think its a big deal regarding Hindu vs Muslim, all this can change in one generation, Muslims become secular or convert for example. What is happening in Canada is for more fundamental, one cannot easily undo racial changes in society, which does interestingly include a big portion of Indians (racial) making up this change.

  131. @reiner Tor

    Having your first child at an elderly age is more dangerous for the woman and makes subsequent births harder, and carries bigger risks for birth defects and trauma for the child.

    Biologically, an ‘elderly age’ for childbirth is over 30.

    So, three kids when the first child was at 33 is vastly harder and more dangerous than three kids with the first child at 25.

    It’s an absolute crime that people don’t know basic facts about childbirth, meanwhile the heads of children are filled with industrial-sized loads of bullshit in school.

    Politicians and education administrators should be hung for this.

    • Agree: TheTotallyAnonymous
  132. Daniel.I says:
    @Mr. XYZ

    Are all Jews as lacking in self-awareness as you ?

    (on the assumption I’m not talking to a committed troll)

  133. Hail says: • Website
    @Hail

    If CDU does join Linke, which seems a very low-probability scenario, it would probably cause many to abandon CDU and turn primarily to the AfD.

    In a surprise move, the head of CDU Thuringia, Mike Mohring, has now come out (publicly) in favor of talks to form a CDU-Linke coalition… This happened not long after I wrote it was a “very low-probability scenario.”

    Mohring is still refusing to talk with the AfD and the triumphant Hoecke.

    So it’s a bizarre scenario to behold: In Nov. 2019, thirty years after the fall of the Berlin wall (Nov. 1989), the defacto West German regime party (CDU) and the East German regime party successor (Linke) could unite to form a government.

    _____________

    Profile of Mohring and an appraisal of his political position within the BRD today:

    Mike Mohring
    Head of the CDU in Thuriginia
    Single, unmarried

    [MORE]

    – born Dec. 1971 near Weimar, Thuringia [Thüringen], German Democratic Republic; blue-collar family;
    1989: Joins the new quasi political party Neues Forum as a high school student;
    1990: Chooses to get baptized as Christian (Evangelisch) and becomes active in the conservative wing of the Neues Forum, which by early 1990 is an umbrella political party;
    1993: First elected to represent the CDU on the Weimar local council (Mitglied des Kreisvorstandes) (at age 21); he soon heads the CDU delegation in the local council and is repeatedly re-elected;
    Mid 1990s: Studies Law at the University at Jena but takes no degree — his local political career was advancing rapidly;
    Sept. 1999: First elected to the Thuringia Landtag (at age 27) on the CDU party list — the CDU did very well that year, taking 49 of 88 seats; Mohring was a directly elected Landtag member thereafter, in 2004, 2009, 2014, and again in 2019. (In the 2000s, he moved up the party ranks quickly, holding various positions.)
    2010: Publishes book, “Was heißt heute konservativ? Freiheit – Verantwortung – Ordnung. Bausteine für einen modernen Konservativismus” (What does Conservative mean today? Freedom – Responsibility – Order: Cornerstones of a modern Conservatism);
    Dec. 2014: Becomes Landesvorsitzender [regional head] of the CDU in Thüringen.
    – Following the Merkel Migrant Disaster (Late Aug. 2015 to Spring 2016): Mohring emerges near the right-most wing of the CDU on immigration and ‘aslyum,’ against Chancellor Merkel’s open-door policy; Mohring would very likely have supported a removal of Merkel by the party in response to the disaster.
    Late 2010s: Has repeatedly condemned Björn Höcke for being an “extremist” — as of Oct. 2019, Höcke controls one more seat than the CDU in Thuringia.

    What I can tell of Mohring is that he is a talented politician, and probably an effective leader. He is also not a ‘Yes Man,’ as such, because he was willing to put himself on the line on the rightmost-wing of the CDU during the Merkel refugee crisis. But the man is terrified of venturing past the ‘cordon sanitaire;’ his attacks on the AfD have been regrettable but predictable.

    His sudden reversal, today, of his stated desire to never work with Linke is still surprising.

    I take special interest in this because if the CDU is to be taken down, moreso even that it has by now, it will need figures like Mohring to do the deed, and not let the Merkels and the AKKs continue to rule unopposed down the road of the managed de-Europeanization of Germany/Europe.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @German_reader
  134. AP says:
    @Hail

    In the 1930s, even the Catholic party refused to go into coalition with Communists, in order to keep actual Nazis out of power.

    • Replies: @Hail
  135. @neutral

    Racial genocide is easier than re-conversion.

    Secularism itself is the end result of Abrahamic practice.

    On different note,

    Aliens experiment on cows meaning Stopping Cow Slaughter is the correct ideology to take to space.

  136. Peter Frost says: • Website
    @utu

    “Really? No impact? Zilch? And you know it for sure?” [the Dieppe Raid]

    It had little impact in general, and certainly very little impact on the attitudes of English Canadians toward Great Britain. As a kid I talked at length with many veterans, and none of them brought up the subject. All of them had positive attitudes toward the war. It was the high point of their lives, a time of adventure and camaraderie. Strangely enough, those same veterans had lost some of their best buddies in that war.

    Whenever I bring up the Dieppe Raid with English Canadians, the general attitude is that it was very regrettable but “we learned valuable lessons.” One person even told me the raid was a “clever ruse.” While Canadians were being helplessly machine-gunned on the Dieppe beach, a top secret commando team made off with top secret information from a nearby German radar station. Oh those Germans! We sure pulled the wool over their eyes, didn’t we?

    I didn’t know what to say. Personally I believe the Dieppe Raid was a total disaster. But the blame didn’t lie with the British. It lay with the Canadian military, who threw our soldiers into one suicidal venture after another — to show the world that “our boys” can fight!

    • Agree: Matra
  137. @neutral

    Liberal vs Conservative
    Catholic vs Protestant

    Minorities are just pawns with no real agency.

    In the USA Marines & SOF are WHITE.
    In Canada same thing except some Infantry Officers are starting to become Sikh. 😀

  138. @Hail

    Single, unmarried

    I recently read insinuations on the net that he’s a homosexual (supposedly an open secret in his hometown Apolda).

    What I can tell of Mohring is that he is a talented politician, and probably an effective leader.

    Far too positive an assessment imo, people really should stop hoping for any positive change from the CDU, the party is rotten to the core. It always was pretty shit from a national perspective tbh and the change can’t just be attributed to Merkel; it’s telling that no prominent CDU or CSU politician from the Kohl era has ever openly condemned Merkel’s open borders policy – instead several have lauded it in the most enthusiastic tones as policy based on true Christian values.
    Mohring btw hasn’t merely called Höcke an “extremist”, but a Nazi; it’s entirely fitting that he’s now in favour of coalition talks with the Linke. I hope they’ll be successful, this should further erode CDU support.

    • Replies: @songbird
  139. songbird says:
    @German_reader

    The primary characteristic of politicians is spinelessness. This group spinelessness creates an environment of spinelessness, where smearing someone as a Nazi is an effective weapon, and defection is common, so there is effectively no platform or line of attack or defense for conservatism.

    One possible solution would be a party that isn’t blank-slatist. I am not even talking about the platform, which is secondary. I mean, a party that uses certain selection criteria, to pre-select its own candidates, so they will not be spineless shills, or secret radicals. You basically pick the worst pols, and try to come up with rules that would have eliminated them.

    For instance, under this system, Merkel would have been eliminated for having no children, and also redundantly for being the daughter of one of few crazies who went East, similar to Mathias Rust. As well as likely, redundantly for other reasons.

    Some of these rules would probably be derived from HBD. Like, perhaps men would need to have a certain level of T, or characteristics uncommon in pedophiles or gays. I wonder if this could really be one of the secrets of success for the Sikhs who conquered the Punjab, even though they were only 1/7 the population there. Beards would be an indication of T.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    , @Yevardian
  140. This is an interesting, though underreported development: after the Indian government got lashed by various globohomo EU liberals, it has started to cozy up to various populist right-wing parties.

    In the aftermath of the Kashmir/Article 370 abrogation crisis, India got a lot of support from various populist right MPs in the EU parliament. This is personal lobbying you’d see from Israelis. India is learning the ropes. Could one even see a populist right alliance with India? Maybe not, given that India has been tricked by its own westernised elites that having massive brain drain is in the national interest so it foolishly pursues policies to exarcabate that.

    As long as that delusion stays in place, there will be limits to how far this relationship can be carried. I have already noted that India is likely to become the #2 country among non-EU states getting first residence permit, passing China very shortly.

  141. @Thulean Friend

    Could one even see a populist right alliance with India?

    Because the attempts by right-wing populists to have constructive relations with Jews are such an encouraging precedent, lol.
    Face it, the white man has no friends. Even intra-European solidarity doesn’t exist to any meaningful degree (I’m certainly convinced that many Europeans would be happy to see Germany disappear, and if one reads the threads here quite a few commenters feel similarly about Britain or even France). Thinking about alliances with other groups whose civilizational roots are radically different is just fantasy.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    , @Dmitry
  142. @songbird

    I mean, a party that uses certain selection criteria, to pre-select its own candidates

    It would already help to select people who’ve done work outside of politics and don’t have degrees in subversive subjects like political science or sociology. Of course there’s a high risk that any anti-establishment party will eventually have similarly deformed people in its ranks who are mainly in politics for their personal advancement, access to patronage through party foundations etc. The issue is systemic imo and inherent to modern democracy.

    • Replies: @Hail
    , @silviosilver
  143. Dmitry says:
    @AP

    I guess some of these Milos Popovic maps might be adjusting for price purchasing parity, which is why they vary so wildly?

    For example, in Spain, prices are really quite low (not much higher than Russian prices in supermarkets and restaurants). So in price purchasing parity they might be not so much lower salaries than Northern Europe, although nominally Spain’s salaries will be much lower.

    However, the wild difference claimed in the first map, between Germany and UK salaries, does not seem plausible. It claims that Germany has 90% higher net salaries than the UK. (It’s basically impossible).

    some Brexit problems from the UK?

    Since 2016 when Brexit problems begin.

    Difference in GDP per capita for PPP between UK and Germany, has increased from around $5800 in 2016 to $7100.

    So after “Brexit problems”, PPP figure gap has not increased more than $1300 .

    Difference in GDP per capita for nominal between UK and Germany has increased from $1800 to $5475.

    So nominal gap has increased by $3675. (So even in nominal terms, GDP per capita difference between UK and Germany, when translated to monthly income, has only increased around $300 since 2019)

    Here is data for GDP per capita comparison of UK and Germany since 2003.
    https://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/weo/2019/01/weodata/weorept.aspx?pr.x=31&pr.y=12&sy=2003&ey=2019&scsm=1&ssd=1&sort=country&ds=.&br=1&c=134%2C112&s=NGDPDPC%2CPPPPC&grp=0&a=

  144. Dmitry says:
    @Thulean Friend

    India has an impossible to imagine large population. 1,4 billion people – it is simply absurd numbers of population.

    I don’t believe it is possible to talking about “brain draining” of India as a result of the relatively very small numbers of emigrants from India received in the West, relative to the vast population of India (The Indians are not a small race like the Estonians or Latvians).

    Factors limiting human capital in India will be far more their extreme poverty, unsanitary conditions, terrible ecological situation, lack of adequate educational institutions, etc.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  145. @German_reader

    I appreciate the pitch-black perspective of our German fellow who sees the glass not so much half-empty as cracked and shattered. I don’t think the comparison with jews is valid. The latter group has been living in Europe, uneasily, for almost a thousand years. Barring the last 70 or so years, they haven’t had a real homeland and that kind of permanent diaspora mentality has scarred them. Even today, the proportions of jews living outside to inside Israel is fairly balanced and many Israelis have 2nd and even 3rd passports.

    By contrast, the vast majority of Indians have never left India and India does not allow having 2nd passports. It is a much more rooted country. While it has been an independent country relatively recently, even during the Raj or the previous Mughal rule, many Hindus were largely left alone. Parts of southern India was never even part of Mughal rule at all and only briefly became associated with the Raj. When the British ruled, they delegated huge amounts of powers to local strongmen and largely stayed away from internal affairs, other than to cultivate a local elite that could be co-opted (with mixed success, it became more pro-western than pro-british per se).

    So, I think the starting points of these two groups are radically different and can’t really be compared so breezily.

    Even intra-European solidarity doesn’t exist to any meaningful degree

    This is true, but this is also largely a function of the rampant liberalism which is an outgrowth of the enlightenment. You continually resist accepting this inevitable conclusion for some kind of intellectual hangup which is not clear to me. Kevin MacDonald’s latest book goes through the ideas rather convincingly and traces the roots to the Enlightenment. I am not saying those ideas are all bad, they certainly propelled the West to its current position but we overdosed on them without moderation and the result is what we have today.

    Furthermore, there are more mundane reasons for this. Europe is, for all the talk about imminent collapse, race war and other fear-mongering, a rather safe and prosperous place, still. White people are not in collective or even mostly individually in danger, so the need for solidarity is low at this point in time. Only highly and atypically ethnocentric whites, many of whom are on this blog, would feel otherwise. But we are a tiny minority as of now, though we are growing rapidly.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  146. @Dmitry

    India has extremely selective migration to most Western – especially Anglo – countries. I don’t think the relevant metric is their total population but rather their Brahmin or at least “forward”/upper caste population. In the US, their population is overwhelmingly drawn from their urban, educated high-caste elites. It is not different in Canada, Australia etc IIRC. We’re starting to get more and more Indians here, too, and typically in IT engineer or other upper-middle class jobs. So we’re likely getting the cream of their society, too. Only 6% of Indians are fluent in English, even if a much larger share learn it in school, much of that effort is wasted effort. Many Indian pupils can barely read in their own vernacular language, so English is on a whole different level. So if you get a fluent English-speaking Indian to your country, that is an automatic marker of someone from a highly privileged background. And to work in Sweden, or other western countries, you need English fluency. Plus enough money to make the trip and the relevant skills. We’re getting the elite.

    Some people talk of “brain gain”, the idea that sending countries somehow gain in the long run by this process. I don’t buy it. If a country is losing its intellectual elite, that’s a big loss for them. Remittances don’t make up for it. India’s main challenge is two-fold. First, it doesn’t grow nearly as fast as China was at a comparative stage, and its growth is much less inclusive. Second, its elite is far more westernised and it has dominant access, and control over, academic and media institutions that is constantly pushing the government to liberalise outflows of Indian elites and to maintain a life in the diaspora.

    The pressure to allow a 2nd passport, while not granted, nevertheless resulted in the PIO(person of indian origin) card, which was merged in recent years into an even more liberalised card that gave even further access to India. Thus India’s elites can have their cake and eat it too. Live and work abroad, but visit family and friends in India and even invest in the country for some good ol’ fashioned profiteering even if the bulk of your work’s value is captured by Western countries. India now foolishly believes that exporting an even greater share of its intellectual elite is good for it. Despite attempts to copy the jewish lobby, it appears Indians are much more content just making money and not meddling too much. Plus the fact that they are far more divided. Hindus barely make up 52% of the US Indian population, for example.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  147. Dmitry says:
    @German_reader

    white man has no friends

    White man is a category not different to brown man, the yellow man and the black men. General racial categories (as opposed to specific nationalities) rarely include internal solidarity, but more often the opposite.

    Yellow men hate other yellow men – Chinese hate Japanese. Koreans hate Japanese.

    Brown men hate other brown men – Pakistanis hate Indians. Arabs hate Jews. Armenians hate Azerbaijanis. Sinhalese hate Tamils

    Black men hate other black men – Hutus genocide Tutsi.

    South Africans have pogroms against other black nationalities that immigrate there.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  148. @Thulean Friend

    India does not allow having 2nd passports

    To my surprise you’re partially (but not completely, see below) correct about this, thanks for bringing this to my attention.
    However:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overseas_Citizenship_of_India
    which seems to indicate there’s demand by the Indian diaspora for dual citizenship.
    I think you’re also correct about Indian history regarding the princely states etc., but I don’t quite see the relevance for Indian communities in Western countries…many of whose members seem to adopt a pro-multiculturalist, pro-immigration and sometimes explicitly anti-white attitude, e.g. I remember once reading something by this member of the Indian diaspora
    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-93/
    where she wrote how horrible and irritating it was for her when she was in Berlin and was the only non-white person in a room…with the explicit statement that this was a deficiency which should be remedied. It’s the same attitude as with many Jews or many other non-European (and sometimes even European) immigrants that European societies have to be changed, to be made more diverse and multiethic, so they don’t feel like strangers and are safe and secure. Complete disregard for the interests of the native majority.
    Indians may be nutcase nationalists in their own country, but abroad their interest is obviously for Western countries to be as open as possible.

    This is true, but this is also largely a function of the rampant liberalism which is an outgrowth of the enlightenment.

    No, it’s an outgrowth of the long history of wars and ethnic conflicts between different European nationalities (which existed well before the Enlightenment, even if one should beware of 19th century nationalist narratives with their stories of eternal, unchanging enmity). You’re from Sweden which hasn’t fought a war for 200 years, so this might be somewhat abstract for you. It’s less abstract when your own ancestors and other relatives participated in the world wars, the second of which was fought as a racial war in Eastern Europe.

  149. Dmitry says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Urban elites that leave India can easily be refilled, with other Indians – especially as the country urbanizes, and adds millions of more middle class people every year.

    I’m not saying this from any specific knowledge of India – but simply the numbers say it.

    Brown people in the Western Europe mainly have a bad reputation because of Muslims and Islam.

    However, in UK, there is a vast Indian Hindu population, who seem to be mainly middle class people. When you look at the statistics, there are 835,000 Hindus of the UK.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hinduism_in_the_United_Kingdom

    So for every 1000 Hindus in India, there is 1 Hindu in the United Kingdom.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hinduism_in_India

    These kind of numbers are just amazing. Even if the Hindus in the United Kingdom are higher quality on average, this will have no impact when 1000 are still in India for each 1 in the United Kingdom.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  150. Dmitry says:
    @German_reader

    If we look at political views of Hindus of the UK.

    In the EU relationship, Hindus are supporting it.

    Majority of Hindus supported EU.

    In terms of religious preference in the UK – Hindus are centre politics (42 for Labour and 42 for Conservative).

    Hindu politics is probably normal for their locations – Hindus are more common in London, where “Remain” was the most popular option.

    In terms of Hindus in USA.

    We can look at the USA vote of 2016.

    Hindus are supporting Democrats, which is likely a reflection of the education level and geographical location within America (they are living in California/New York).


    https://religioninpublic.blog/2017/03/10/the-2016-religious-vote-for-more-groups-than-you-thought-possible/

    Hindus are distributed in California or New York – so their voting is probably close to as expected for their location.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    , @EldnahYm
  151. @Dmitry

    Hindus supported EU.

    That’s to be expected. Brexit is not least a proxy vote about English nationalism, so no surprise Hindus are mostly against it.

    Hindus are supporting Democrats, which is likely a simple reflection of the education level and geographical location within America

    No, it’s because they’re an immigrant community with extremely shallow roots in America who feel alienated by the overwhelmingly white and Christian character of the Republicans, the party of core Americans.
    It’s not that complicated.

  152. @Gabru_Ak47

    Jai Ganesh to you too.

    • Agree: Gabru_Ak47
  153. @German_reader

    Actually, Dmitry might be correct. California has Democratic Soil, so people who move there simply become Democratic themselves. This is the reason why California has always voted Democratic, for example it elected the famous Democrat Ronald Reagan. Oops… actually, Reagan was a Republican, so maybe no, California doesn’t have Democratic Soil. That’s not a very good theory, then.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    , @silviosilver
  154. Dmitry says:
    @German_reader

    No,

    Where is your evidence or argument?

    it’s because they’re an immigrant community with extremely shallow roots in America who feel alienated by the overwhelmingly white and Christian character of the Republicans,

    This is unlikely they vote based on religious feeling, alienation and shallow roots , rather than the fact they are often post-graduated educated New Yorkers/Californians.

    The reason we can say this is because, New Yorker/Californian of all nationalities and depth of roots, vote mostly for Democrat (and especially in Northern California, where Hindus are concentrated).

    overwhelmingly white and Christian character of the Republicans,

    Republican is most passionately supported by Evangelical Christian, so their image of Republican is tied to image of Evangelical Christian. So it’s true Hindus have a half positive and half negative view of Evangelical Christians.

    But if we look at the Indian Americans – they are second highest income nationality in America after Jews.
    Incomes correlate with IQ and education level.

    Education level correlates with not voting for Trump (which is also cross-referenced with other highest education nationalities like Jews who also do not vote for Trump, despite his love of them).

    That’s aside from the fact (apart from Florida) Hindus live in states of America which are majority Democrat – it would be more weird or sign of alienation, if they voted differently to the majority of people where they live.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  155. @Dmitry

    See reiner tor’s previous comment: California was a solidly Republican state until it was permanently flipped over to the Democrats through mass immigration and demographic change. The idea that immigrants just assimilate into the existing culture is false, they bring their own preferences with them and can easily change the political culture given sufficient numbers.
    Ethnic voting (for parties which favour immigrant interests) by immigrant communities is a well-attested phenomenon.
    You’ve been reading and commenting on this site for two years…why are you still such a normie?

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  156. Dmitry says:
    @reiner Tor

    California has Democratic Soil…

    That’s not a very good theory, then.

    A very confused comment from you, to be polite.

    No-one has proposed “California has always voted Democratic” or that “California has Democratic Soil.”

    California has been Democrat in elections which have occurred after 1988. So your argument is that Reagan was elected in 1984?

    We don’t have information for how Hindus voted in 1984 (I could not find it now), probably as they are significant enough numbers of Hindus in California then.

    The information we have is simply that Hindus vote the same as the other nationalities in California in the years we have date for.

    For example, if white has the “deepest roots” in California, they also vote for Clinton .

    This will be even stronger when the Republican parts of California are mostly areas when no Hindus live.

  157. Dmitry says:
    @German_reader

    was a solidly Republican state until it was permanently flipped over to the Democrats

    Perhaps if you import a lot of Latino immigrants who want larger government and more welfare, you could flip Orange Country, which I believe has occurred.

    Orange Country is previously a centre of bourgeois Republicans, who wanted low taxes. And now there are enough Latino immigrants, that it is voting Democrat.

    But you won’t flip educated people in Silicon Valley or Los Angeles to vote for Trump. Romney was cognitive enough for a majority of also white Californians, but Trump was not.


    Hindus have the highest education level of every group in America (48% have a postgraduate degree).

    So you have people with postgraduate degree in almost all the households, living in Silicon Valley and Los Angeles.

    And they are going to vote for Trump (who markets for low IQ voters)? Regardless of their viewpoint to Christians or their depth of roots, there is also a cognitive barrier there.

    You’ve been reading and commenting on this site for two years…why are you still such a normie?

    This is not a very good argument.

    If on this website it says that it is going to be a sunny, then I will bring an umbrella.

    On the other hand, there is a whole world of information available to you. You can research all this yourself and report back.

    For example, the fact 48% of Hindus have a post-graduate degree. How could expect these people to vote for Trump?

    Germans and English with postgraduate degree would vote for Trump in lower numbers than American Hindus.

  158. Dmitry says:
    @German_reader

    extremely shallow roots

    Also note this argument about depth of roots implying there should be support for Republican Party, seems to not generalize very well across the country, especially when you look at the oldest and most bourgeois parts of America.

    The highest proportion of white population and one of the deepest “European roots” states in America can vote for Democrat.

    Here is the state in America which has the highest proportion of white population: Vermont (96.2% white population)

    Here is what politics is like for Vermont, the state with the highest proportion of white population in America.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2016_United_States_presidential_election_in_Vermont

    Clinton has 21 percent point advantage compared to Trump, while Democrats (including write-in vote) have a 26 percent point advantage compared to Trump.

    In terms of roots, Vermont’s public will have have deep roots by USA standards (they are quite developed in the 18th century).
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Vermont

    • Replies: @songbird
  159. utu says:
    @German_reader

    “You’re from Sweden…” – Maybe yes or maybe not. His preoccupation with India makes me think he is one of several crypto-Indians here. Do you remember AaronB? Who was very vague about his Jewishnes and kept dissimulate it by adopting position of Eastern religion and philosophy and then after his visit to Asia (or visit by his handler) he adopted a full blown Jewish supremacist persona. No more Mr. Nice Guy.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  160. Dmitry says:
    @utu

    I like him and found him interesting to write to, and also you know his nationality. I showed to you already about a few weeks ago.

    http://www.unz.com/akarlin/brussels-impressions/?highlight=sevilla#comment-2235506

  161. Gerard2 says:
    @Philip Owen

    Baring Vostok executives are still in jail for want, in any other country, would be a civil case.

    Fraud and Embezzlement are civil cases in “any other country” are they now Phillip?

  162. @Thulean Friend

    https://caravanmagazine.in/reportage/unholy-alliance-india-white-supremacy

    Outside the Anglosphere, sure.

    Inside it, they don’t really get that they weren’t really all that in the “Raj”
    Its romanticization forms the core of their ethnic identity and they
    will not give up on race baiting Indians.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  163. @Gabru_Ak47

    Its romanticization forms the core of their ethnic identity

    Romanticization of the Raj is the core of “Anglo” ethnic identity????
    Sounds bizarre, it’s not even clear that the empire was that important for the self-conception of the mass of the British population in the 19th/early 20th centuries, and in any case, it’s long gone.

    • Replies: @Gabru_Ak47
  164. @German_reader

    Forms the core of how they view Indians rather.
    As an unfinished civilizing project.

    British media is heavily, heavily anti-Indian and North America is not much different.

    http://www.chakranews.com/major-media-outlets-like-wapo-vice-torstar-cbc-nyt-cnn-bbc-hinduphobia-problem/5745/

    http://www.chakranews.com/why-does-hinduphobia-and-bigotry-against-hindus-get-a-free-pass/4632/

    Much of this is simply due to the Monotheist vs Polytheist paradigm.
    One true path to civilization, absolutist doctrine requires everyone to be off-whites. Etc.

  165. songbird says:
    @Dmitry

    In terms of roots, Vermont’s public will have have deep roots by USA standards (they are quite developed in the 18th century).

    Vermont’s modern politics aren’t its traditional politics. Bernie Sanders was elected by people who moved to the state. Many of them came from New York, like he did. Many of them were hippies who moved there for SWPL reasons and Vermont’s rural small-town and village atmosphere, its old houses, and its kitschy arts and crafts scene, but they don’t vote like old Vermonters.

    New Hampshire, which has a somewhat similar rural/mountain geography, has the same problem with people moving there from Massachusetts. Many move there to escape the high cost of housing around Boston, or the higher taxes in Massachusetts, but then they vote for Democrats.

    Also, I will add that I often pass through very rural parts of New Hampshire – and it is really scary – each time I see more blacks. So, I hope people in Europe really take this to heart: nowhere is safe.

  166. Gerard2 says:
    @AP

    This came from a single source: a Soviet journalist writing during Soviet times.

    Lololololololololololololol………….!!!

    That brainless nonsense is like saying Churchill was a “Soviet politician”, Stalin was a Nazi leader, the church of Christ the Redeemer is a “Darwinist” building, Golda Meir was a PLO-era politician and Solzhenitsyn was a Soviet writer.

    “Soviet journalist” is both a misdirection and a lie….”writing during Soviet times” is just a shameless lie – almost certainly a pitiful attempt for a deranged maniac troll account as yourself trying to occupy your time and trying discredit the excellent Insomniac blogger

    The author, Galina Gordasevich was a typical Khokhol nutjob pseudo nationalist bitch from Lvov you idiot. The book was published AFTER the fall of the Soviet Union . At best, she only started researching to write it near the end of the glasnost period. As it is , her claim is fully authoritative because it is from a Ukrop nationalist, known writer and ex-MPwho is supposed to be a fan of him. Even fans writing his cat torturing as true is pretty authoritative

    Going further into your nonsensical “soviet” claims – the obvious clues to the contrary are:

    1. the fact the book originally published in “Ukrainian” language
    2. The title of the book ,you d**khead, which pretty clearly make obvious the direction that the book is going to go in favour or this sadist

    That you have dishonestly madeup all these misdirections, even though you must have read Insomniacs post (i.e that she was a fan of him) ..is yet again, disturbing.

    This came from a single source

    LOL…..it is a single source, which makes this pro-Bandera BS more credible in it’s claim of cat torturing because not many historians want to touch this swine, she is definitely not biased against him and a lack of other historians writing about him enhances the profile of her writings.
    Were you expecting Herodotus or one of his contemplates to have done a biography on him you cretin?Writing a biography about the scumbag Bandera it would be best , of course, having a writer who has lived through the soviet times .

    Even funnier than your insecure lies on that issue, are your ( and the authors) braindead lies and absurd revisionism trying to explain away his cat torturing:

    If the incident with cats really took place, it was not out of an inborn tendency toward sadism, but out of a boyish and perhaps not so smart wish to test oneself, would he be able to kill another being? Since on the path of revolution, that Stepan Bandera has chosen, he would have to kill ennemies

    Lol…….Let me see…if you have a known psychopathic scumbag, one of the worlds most evil men , famous for carrying out the sadist mass killing, rape and torture ( most notably mass eye-gouging and burning alive ) of elderly and women and children ….. then it it is logically infinitely easier to link the psychopathic animal torture in youth to these heinous mass acts of evil in adulthood then it is to NOT link them you cretin. Any psychiatrist could and has done it.

    Bandera was a bastard whether or not he killed cats, of course

    Which makes artificial ukrop “nationalism” worship of this POS more disgusting and laughable – although he is far from the only sadist, historical loser and scumbag associated with the “movement”.

    There is a reasons why these UPA failure freaks are recalled as infamous sadists , equal and even surpassing the Nazis despite their much smaller number, whilst the many other nations as Hungary, Romania, Italy, the Baltics and Finland even though they participated in despicable acts and war crimes and ultimately are on the wrong side of history…..are not even close in type and scale of sadist war crime acts as these galician fucktards( such as Finland who participated in the Siege of Leningrad and the Italians who sent over 200000+ soldiers into the USSR)

    • Replies: @AP
  167. @German_reader

    “Hindus supported EU”

    To me that is the most bizarre thing that non EU and non western “immigrants” are against Brexit because the UK is far more likely to liberalize non European immigration if it leaves and oddly enough many Brexiters are among the most pro immigrant out there Farage and Johnson being the most painfully annoying examples on the subject. That may well be the reason Richard Spencer is against Brexit because he knows it means more non white immigration to the EU and on that he is correct. The eastern countries joining the EU destroyed the argument that we need them for “jobs”. I honestly thing the main reason Blair increased non EU immigration to the EU was because he was losing sleep at night thinking the UK may become more white as a result of the eastern countries joining.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  168. Dmitry says:
    @songbird

    It looks like it happens dramatically 1992, Vermont go wildly to the Democrat side (it is now a completely unipartisan state, where Democrats win by 20 or more percent points each election).

    The craziest might be in its 2004 election.

    Democrats defeat Republicans by 20 percent points in Vermont – even though the Republicans won the 2004 Presidential Election in America.

    So Vermont is wildly to the Democrat side.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2004_United_States_presidential_election_in_Vermont

    If you compare California, it is still very biased for the Democrat side, but the difference is half of Vermont.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2004_United_States_presidential_election_in_California

    And then Democrats defeat Republicans in 2008 by 37 percent points.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2008_United_States_presidential_election_in_Vermont

  169. @songbird

    Its not as simple as that. Vermont republicans were very liberal. 1964 was the first election that Vermont ever voted against the GOP candidate and it did bigtime being one of Johnson’s best states(and coincidentally enough it was the first time Georgia ever voted Republican). Vermont was one of Nixon’s best states in 1960 and not to bad in 68. Vermont republicans were a phenomenon very similar to the solid south but with the parties and ideologies reversed.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  170. EldnahYm says:
    @Dmitry

    The correlations you notice are obviously real, but it’s unclear your conclusions are merited. Just because London is more pro-EU doesn’t necessarily mean people who move to London become more pro-EU. It might be that people with certain types of views wish to move to London.

    In the U.S. case it would be particularly odd if Hindu voting preferences are caused by geographic location. Indian Americans tend to rank low in most measures of assimilation, it would be curious if their voting patterns are an exception to this.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  171. Dmitry says:
    @Anarcho-Supremacist

    Is there is any connection why the most white state in America (Vermont) has the second largest margin of victory for the Democrat party in the USA in recent elections (after Massachusetts)?

    I guess – there is nothing very interesting connecting. It’s just a very bourgeois state, where prices are too high to allow black immigration (?).

    Looking at Vermont on YouTube, it looks like stereotype of liberals in South Park.

    (There is actually a brown girl at 1 minute)

    • Replies: @Gerard2
    , @songbird
  172. AP says:
    @Gerard2

    The author, Galina Gordasevich…The book was published AFTER the fall of the Soviet Union

    You fail even harder than usual.

    And again demontrate that you can’t read eastern Slavic languages.

    Here is the book:

    http://history.org.ua/LiberUA/978-617-538-377-3/978-617-538-377-3.pdf

    Claim is on page 18.

    Source for the claim (page 18) is is not Halyna Hordasevich but Володимир Бєляєв, a Sovok journalist and writer who won the Stalin prize in 1952 and died in 1990. He moved to Lviv in 1944 with Sovok forces and stayed there until moving to Moscow in 1960.

    So a Sovok journalist said something bad about Bandera during Soviet times. LOL as to this claim’s veracity. Halyna the Bandera fangirl wrote that even if this claim was true, Bandera was still a cool guy.

    Remind us again, failure, about the Russian word for watch that you do not even know? Or the Ukrainian word for “world” that you do not even know?

    🙂

    So once again – Buzyna was dishonest in presenting this Sovok-era claim by a Sovok “journalist” as solid information, Insomniac Resurrected was a gullible fool for believing it. I gues we can wonder, if you are dishonest, or a gullible fool?

    • Replies: @Gerard2
  173. Dmitry says:
    @EldnahYm

    It might be that people with certain types of views wish to move to London.

    I’m not sure Hindus are choosing London for any specific reasons, but had rather just been living there after their arrival.

    Also the local effect is not just sorting of personalities – London benefits from the EU for economic reasons (e.g. financial services industry).

    However, against this argument, in the map Indian areas, they do not match perfectly with “Leave” vote of local population in some parts of West London


    Indian areas of London.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_community_of_London

    In the U.S. case it would be particularly odd if Hindu voting preferences are caused by geographic location.

    Hindus in America live in locations where all nationalities voted for Democrat or Clinton in the 2016 election, so there was no way to test if they would go against the consensus if they lived in different areas – unless someone has found information of how Hindus vote in Alabama, if there are any?

    This vote is too causally overdetermined. Hindus live in Silicon Valley, Los Angeles and New York. Also 48% of Hindus in America have a postgraduate degree.

    So within all nationalities in America, their location/education profile on its own would determine a strong vote for Democrats in 2016 election. On the other hand, whether they would vote for Reagan in 1984 is another question (did people with postgraduate degrees vote for Reagan? And what was the vote of Silicon Valley region in the 1980s, to an extent it had emerged with a distinct demographic profile by then?).

    • Replies: @Anarcho-Supremacist
  174. AP says:

    Mostly correct about Vermont but with some nuances. Vermont remains very gun friendly. Those hippies discovered it is fun to shoot and/or that fresh venison is a sustainable organic food product.

    Also, New Hampshire has been much less infested by liberals from big cities moving there. It has a lot of bearded guys in pickups who vote Republican. There is no state income tax in New Hampshire. It foes attract people form the Boston area but these are Republicans fleeing high taxes.

    In 2016 Hillary won Vermont 56.7% to 30.3%. She won New Hampshire 47% to 46.6%.

    Look at the electoral map of 2016 in New England:

    Big difference between Vermont and New Hampshire.

    A nice article about the two states:

    http://notesfromthenorthcountry.com/2016/01/the-difference-between-vermont-and-new-hampshire-2/

    [MORE]

    The narrative goes like this: Vermont is a left-wing hippie commune. New Hampshire is a libertarian income-tax shelter. Vermont has green, pastoral mountains. New Hampshire’s state symbol is a giant piece of granite. Vermont is peace, love, and Bernie Sanders. New Hampshire is “Live Free or Die.” People are drawn to Vermont for the unspoiled beauty. People are drawn to New Hampshire because taxes got too high in Massachusetts. Vermont banned billboards in 1968. New Hampshire has billboards advertising billboard design. Vermont or New Hampshire? People are instinctively drawn to one or the other.

    Me? I was a Vermonter. I was born there. I went to college and fell in love and started a career there. Then, two years ago, a job prospect pulled me across the border. I wasn’t looking forward to it.

    I’ll admit: I was a Vermont snob. I’d spent the past few years drinking Heady Topper and skiing at Mad River Glen and indulging my map addiction at Outdoor Gear Exchange on Church Street in Burlington and hiking the Long Trail and thinking life didn’t get any better than the Green Mountain State.

    We Vermonters can be smug. We think, Vermont is intelligent. Vermont is hip. Vermont is craft beer and locally sourced food. Our mountains are picturesque, our politics progressive, our ski towns are world famous: Stowe, Killington, Stratton. Even our companies (Ben and Jerry’s) and our colleges (Bennington) are subversive and cool.

    Now I had been to New Hampshire, of course. I had skied Tuckerman’s Ravine, hiked the Franconia Ridge, and kayaked almost every river in the White Mountains. I had spent a good number of nights hanging out at Dartmouth when I was in college (none of which I remember). I liked to visit New Hampshire, but that didn’t mean that I actually wanted to live there.

    If Vermont was paradise, New Hampshire was sort of . . . wild. Where Vermont has nice, green, lush mountains, New Hampshire is home of the world’s worst weather: Mt. Washington, where 100 mile per hour winds, temperatures of 40 below zero, and honest-to-god avalanches are routine. Every year hapless souls set out to hike Mount Washington on sunny, 70 degree summer days, only to find themselves digging snow caves to survive some freak August snowstorm that plunges the temperature into the low single digits. You drive around New Hampshire and look up at these giant granite protrusions — most of which make Vermont’s mountains look like sand castles — and notice eight-ton blocks of stone cantilevered straight out over your car a thousand feet up and hope it’s not too windy. The state’s rock slides — including the famous Old Man of the Mountain, which plunged to the ground in the middle of the night in 2003 — are legendary, resulting in the many slides and scars that cover the mountains.

    Everyone I know who has hiked or skied or climbed in New Hampshire has some riveting survival story involving once-a-generation winds, or of huddling for shelter above treeline as lightning bolts strike in the same ten-foot radius for twelve hours, or of taking a wrong turn hiking and wandering around subsisting on roots and insects for weeks in one of the county-sized tracts of uninhabited land that cover the Whites and which support the kinds of search and rescue teams that have multiple helicopters and a staff with paid dental benefits. In Vermont, it’s mostly idiots trying to ski the backcountry who wind up getting lost on the backside of Stowe or Killington and calling for directions on their cell phones. In New Hampshire, there are whole books devoted to gruesome wilderness deaths and disasters.

    Not to mention that the towns in New Hampshire — at least in the White Mountains — aren’t so much towns as revenue streams: waterparks, funparks, candy counters, ice castles, the Hobo Railroad, even a trained bear show — all of it aimed at tourists. And billboards — lots and lots of billboards.

    Without further ado, The List . . .

    Taxes

    New Hampshire is one of nine states in the U.S. not to have an income tax. We’re one of five without a sales tax. This is all part of the state’s lauded “live free or die” ethos. We keep the government off our hard-earned paycheck here in New Hampshire. Except, of course, when it comes to any kind of fee whatsoever. The cost to renew my car this year: $435. And don’t forget property taxes: New Hampshire’s are the third-highest in the United States.

    Still, we’re not as bad as Vermont. In a measurement of overall “tax burden” (the sum total of all taxes), Vermont has the ninth highest rate in the country: 10.5%. New Hampshire? Seventh lowest: 8%. If you make $50,000, you’ll have an extra $1,250 in your pocket in the Granite State.

    Advantage: New Hampshire

    Fast Food Crap and Big Box Stores

    Having done a 180 since I was in college, I am generally unable to set foot in any fast-food restaurants (I was traumatized by the documentary “Supersize Me,” I think). Meanwhile, Vermonters are ideologically opposed to not only chain restaurants, but big box stores. Vermont has just four WalMarts: the fewest in the nation. New Hampshire, by contrast, has 26. Vermont also has zero Dairy Queens. (And with Ben and Jerry’s, who cares?) Montpelier residents take pride in being the only state capital without a MacDonald’s. Concord, New Hampshire’s capital, has three.

    Advantage: Vermont

    Health

    A win-win here. Both states are some of the most active, least obese, and least heart attack-prone in the country. The 2015 United Health Foundation’s annual measurement ranked New Hampshire the fifth healtiest state in the United States. Vermont? Second.

    Very slight advantage: Vermont

    Colleges

    Vermont is home to my alma mater, Middlebury, but New Hampshire has Dartmouth, which, from what I can piece together from bleary memories of hanging out at the Ledyard Canoe Club in the early 2000s, is not a whole lot different than Midd.

    Both New Hampshire and Vermont have pretty respectable flagship state universities, and while Burlington surely gets the nod as a great place to live, nowadays you have a better chance of getting into UVM if you’re from New Jersey and your father owns a pharmaceutical company than if you’re from the Northeast Kingdom and your father owns a dairy farm. Sixty-six percent of UVM students are from out of state. At UNH? Just 40%. Not surprising given that while in-state tuition is similar at both (around $28,000), out of state tuition at UVM is $50,000, while at UNH it’s just $41,000. Whether the mass of non-residents at UVM paying top dollar represents either a money-grab or just a reflection of Vermont’s tiny population, I’m not sure. But I do know that as a Vermont teacher, UVM is definitely not on the radar anymore for a lot of our kids that it should be.

    Meanwhile, the rest of Vermont’s state college system ranges from solid (Castleton) to less-than-solid. New Hampshire has a fairly robust state college system, with several strong options (Plymouth, Keene), one that’s not even part of the state system, although it sounds like it is (SNHU), and of course Granite State College (based on the name, I’m guessing that they don’t coddle you there).

    Advantage (slight): New Hampshire

    Attention From Presidential Candidates

    In the past six months, my town of Littleton, New Hampshire (population 5,928) has been visited by almost every major presidential candidate: Hillary Clinton, Lindsey Graham, Rand Paul, Bernie Sanders, Carly Fiorina, Jeb Bush, Chris Christie, and even John McCain (stumping for Graham).

    Meanwhile, Burlington, Vermont (population 42,284) has been visited by exactly one candidate. President Obama, who Vermont elected by a wider margin in 2012 than anywhere else except his home state, didn’t even bother setting foot in Vermont until 2012 — after he’d been elected for a second term.

    And that’s not unusual. How many times did Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush each visit Vermont? Just once. Carter, Reagan and George W. Bush never visited at all. In Vermont, your vote is taken for granted. In New Hampshire, it’s courted.

    Major Advantage: New Hampshire

    Best Hike

    In Vermont, that would undoubtedly be Sunset Ridge on Mount Mansfield: a gorgeous spine up the west side of Vermont’s tallest peak, Mount Mansfield. Sunset Ridge gets you above treeline reasonably quickly — a rarity in Vermont — and in the evenings is an ideal place to watch the sun disappear behind the Adirondack Mountains in the distance.

    But everything great about Sunset Ridge could be folded quite comfortably into the first half of New Hampshire’s best hike. The Franconia Ridge is a dramatic, alpine traverse across a blade-thin ridge line with soaring views in all directions. It’d be like walking from Mt. Mansfield to Camel’s Hump — except a lot higher in the air, and not quite as far. Sunset Ridge is arguably the best hike in Vermont. Franconia Ridge is arguably the best hike in the eastern United States.

    And that’s just day hikes. Some might call the 20+ mile wilderness tour of the Bonds the best hike in New Hampshire. This trip through the Pemigewasset Wilderness summits three wildly isolated four-thousand foot peaks: Mount Bond, West Bond, and the iconic Bondcliff.

    • Replies: @S
    , @songbird
  175. @Dmitry

    Urban elites that leave India can easily be refilled, with other Indians

    That is a very liberal, and in many ways a very Western-Enlightenment, interpretation. Caste is strongly anchored in India. If you lose a nontrivial portion of your best and brightest of the upper-castes, I am far from convinced that lower-castes, especially the so-called “shudras”, will so effortlessly replace these cognitive classes.

    There’s a lot about Indian genetics we still do not know, as Razib Khan likes to remind us, so we should all tread on humble ground, but from what I understand caste also has a genetic component due to millenia of selective reproduction. So much so that some hard-right Indians even talk of there being different ‘races’ because there seem to be hard biological cognitive barriers between the upper and lower castes. You seem to take the view that caste is almost like a cultural marker, and not a cognitive one, which is not my reading of the situation. From what I gather, it is both. Therefore, easily replacing those who left is not on the cards, because the group of cognitive elites is getting smaller as a proportion of the population with significant emigration.

    Not many people are aware that India has an even more aggressive affirmative action system than even the US, and the lower castes do not seem to do better because of it either, just as blacks don’t in the US.

  176. @German_reader

    Indians may be nutcase nationalists in their own country, but abroad their interest is obviously for Western countries to be as open as possible.

    I both agree and disagree. I agree that the diaspora has an interest in keeping Western countries open. But it is important to separate the diaspora from the country here. The diaspora, mainly comprising of elites, has fooled its own government that massive brain drain is in India’s interest, which it manifestly is not. We’re never going to ally with Indians living in the West and I do not want large numbers of them here, either. Not because I have anything personally against Indians, but simply because I want Western countries to be… well, Western.

    As long as the Indian government remains in thrall with the delusion that significant brain drain is in India’s national interest, then there will be a hard limit to any possible alliance, as I mentioned, but if that ever changes then it opens up a world of possibilities.

    I disagree on Indians being “nutcaste nationalists” in India. There’s nothing nutty about reclaiming your own country. We should be inspired by that, not look down on them. For all the problems that India has, it is still in a much better shape culturally and demographically than almost any western country. We often make fun of them for their poverty and whatnot but in the long run (50+ years), I’d be more optimistic about India remaining a place dominated by dharmic faiths and peoples than I’d be about the West being Western in character, at least as things currently stand. I think we would do well to end the dismissive and paternalistic attitude many of us have towards them.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  177. Hail says: • Website
    @German_reader

    people who’ve done work outside of politics and don’t have degrees in subversive subjects like political science or sociology

    Comparing Hoecke to this definition shows he is a suitable candidate for politics, mostly.

    Bjoern Hoecke was born in Apr. 1972 in West Germany — but to a father (and mother?) of Heimatvertriebene origin (i.e., German expellees from the east in/after 1945) (side note: The descendants of the expellees do seem greatly overrepresented in the ranks of nationalists in the BRD, even two and three generations later — I wonder if the Germans reading this share that impression).

    By the mid 1990s, Hoecke was a university student majoring in Sports Science and History (at the same time? Or a change of majors?), the aim of the latter major being to teach history at a Gymnasium, rather than doing scholarship on his own.

    Then in 2003 to 2005, he earned a Master’s degree in School Management. In these years he was working at a Gymnasium, as planned..

    He never “worked in politics” until the mid 2010s (his mid 40s), by which time he was successfully married with 4 children and had earned his own way for years (teacher).

    When he arrived in formal party politics, it was just as Merkel was preparing to go temporarily insane. Hoecke looked destiny in the eye and did not blink. It takes a lot to have done what he did (and anyone doing so seriously risks being jailed by the BRD regime). He has my respect.

    • Replies: @AP
  178. @German_reader

    it’s an outgrowth of the long history of wars and ethnic conflicts between different European nationalities (which existed well before the Enlightenment, even if one should beware of 19th century nationalist narratives with their stories of eternal, unchanging enmity). You’re from Sweden which hasn’t fought a war for 200 years, so this might be somewhat abstract for you. It’s less abstract when your own ancestors and other relatives participated in the world wars, the second of which was fought as a racial war in Eastern Europe.

    The spin one usually hears is that lack of war and too much peace has made Europe soft. Your take is interesting: too much wars have made Europeans distrustful of each other and unwilling to extend solidarity.

    If you can’t trust your neighbours and you frequently quarrel with them, would that not boost rather than stifle nationalism? If you can’t trust anyone but your own people, the logical conclusion would not be more liberalism (with its emphasis on “we’re all the same” individualism). I don’t think that explanation convincing.

    I agree that wars did lead to liberalism but not for the reasons you outline. The main reason was the religious wars and extremism that was so common in Europe. Germany’s own, frankly genocidal, civil religious war between catholics and protestants was a major, though not the only, catalyst. Many liberal thinkers obviously understood that religious fanaticism was tearing Europe apart and there had to be new social forms of organisations to prevent this. That is why so many of the earlier Enlightenment philosophers stressed religious tolerance.

    The French so-called ‘Sun King’, Loius XIV, made persecution of proteststants one of his highest national priorities in an outright effort to completely purge or convert them. Even among protestant countries, many smaller denominations were so harshly treated that they found no way to live in their host countries. That is how America was founded, by religious refugees fleeing from a tyrannical Europe with extreme intolerance.

    All of this had to have a response, so liberal thinkers went to work. How do we manage significant differences and yet live with each other? It is very hard for us today, in a largely secularised Europe, to imagine how strongly our ancestors felt about their faiths, including large parts of the elite. But it was far from a settled or obvious question. Yet, I do not think wars in of themselves are drivers of this. The ideas are.

    Europe could have gone on being a religious extremist hothouse and been at war with itself for longer, in many ways the middle east is today. There is nothing automatic about these ideas. They arose out of European intellectual classes and they did solve a very pressing problem and allowed Europe to, while not ending wars, at least lessen the religious fanaticism and this had many intellectual dividiens, such as freeing up intellectuals, scientists and artists to freely explore ideas and concepts without fear of reprisals from a strong church the way Galileo had to endure, and this had profound effects on the West’s intellectual growth which in turn led to our eventual dominance. But you can always go too far in one direction based on a set of ideas, and we have done that now.

    The hard part now is now to throw the baby with the bathwater, there are still many valuable ideas from the Enlightenment, while still moderating the underlying concepts. Unfortunately, humans tend to be black-and-white, so the danger exists that we’ll go too far in the other way and lose some of the useful ideas of tolerance and moderate individualism. That worries me greatly.

  179. Ghak says: • Website

    Is there any fringe benefit from the Chinese government basically cutting off its people from what is basically bthe entire English language internet? Yes they can use VPN, but that is another hoop to jump through, and a lot of Chinese people who do not speak English might just choose to not bother to jump.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  180. AP says:
    @Hail

    Bjoern Hoecke was born in Apr. 1972 in West Germany — but to a father (and mother?) of Heimatvertriebene origin (i.e., German expellees from the east in/after 1945) (side note: The descendants of the expellees do seem greatly overrepresented in the ranks of nationalists in the BRD, even two and three generations later — I wonder if the Germans reading this share that impression).

    In the USA, I went to school with someone whose parents were expellees from East Prussia (they were old when he was born). The parents were fossils of 1940s Germany – proud Nazis, swastikas in the house, Mein Kampf, taught their German-speaking kids to read Gothic script, etc. They liked blacks (saw them as victims of the Jews) and Arabs and Muslims (likewise) and cheered 9-11. I suspect that they would think that Europe without National Socialism deserves Islamification, but haven’t been in touch since the early 90s and this wasn’t an issue back then. They never said anything about Slavs in my presence. They hosted a German exchange student (very lefty) whom they utterly and hilariously horrified. Nazism is a loathsome ideology, but to me these people were an interesting anthropological case.

  181. @Anarcho-Supremacist

    Voters are not deep thinkers, they just go with their impressions. And their impression is overwhelmingly likely to be that Leave is dominated by “racists,” both because of personal interactions and, more importantly, media portrayals.

  182. @Thulean Friend

    There’s nothing nutty about reclaiming your own country.

    Some of the stuff those Hindutva types believe is pretty nutty, their refusal of the Aryan invasion thesis is quite comical imo.
    I sympathize with their anti-Islamic views though.

    I think we would do well to end the dismissive and paternalistic attitude

    I don’t feel dismissive or paternalistic towards them and would actually even agree with your argument that their society is in some ways healthier than ours are. Being decadent, deluded and weak is worse than being poor.

    • Replies: @Gabru_Ak47
    , @Gabru_Ak47
  183. @reiner Tor

    At the time Jews were establishing themselves in America, New York was solidly Republican. The GOP won seven out of eight elections between 1896 and 1928 (only losing in 1912 because of Teddy Roosevelt’s 3rd party run). That’s why Jews themselves became solidly Republican.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    , @Korenchkin
  184. @Dmitry

    White man is a category not different to brown man, the yellow man and the black men. General racial categories (as opposed to specific nationalities) rarely include internal solidarity, but more often the opposite.

    That’s true, but thanks to mass immigration and globalization, whites are finding out that other races generally have it in for them. We live are living in an increasingly normatively anti-white, pro-black culture. People who are both non-white and non-black side with blacks against whites and say nice things about blacks (whether they believe them or not) and support black political aspirations.

    I would rather live in a normatively pro-white, anti-black culture, in which people side with whites against blacks, say nice things about whites, and support white political aspirations.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  185. @German_reader

    It would already help to select people who’ve done work outside of politics and don’t have degrees in subversive subjects like political science or sociology

    I don’t regard political science as notably subversive. Sociology is incomparably more leftarded. The two are not in the same class.

    • Replies: @Hail
  186. Hail says: • Website
    @AP

    Good point, AP.

    I’d add here that the Linke party of today is not a hardcore, old-line Communist party — even though it does have a direct line of descent from the Sozialistische Einheitspartei (SED), the East German regime party. The SED is an anachronism. Major support for it faded dramatically beginning in the mid-1980s (on which, see note at * below), so it’s history not politics.

    It’s easy to polemically attack Linke as neo-communist, as the SED successor party — which indeed I did above — but not entirely fair.

    The SED’s reorganization in the 1990s, and evolution in the 2000s brought changes from mergers with other political forces and by the simple passage of time (which bring certain cultural/demographic shifts leading to organic changes in party orientation).

    I see the Linke party, as it exists today, as really a coalition of three elements:

    – (1) a small, ideological-core ‘true believer’ Marxist wing,
    – (2) an extremist ‘Antifa’ wing, and
    – (3) an old, basically “conservative” wing of East Germans in their 50s, 60s, 70s, and up, some of whom were regime loyalists with close ties to the party in 1989, but more usually are simply normal people who grew up there and are nostalgic for the days of their relative youth, and are comfortable with what they knew growing up. This should not surprise anyone.

    The strength of (3) is how Bodo Ramelow, of Thuringia, ended up the first Linke head of a state in the BRD in 2014, a position he is set to continue into the 2020s, one way or another, with Linke‘s strong showing this week.

    This is all to say that the CDU (and this goes for the SPD, too, if it’s still around) today, even at its most desperate, would only ever be willing to cooperate with (3), not with (1) or (2). If the CDU thought Bodo was a (1), like a communist from the early or mid 20th century,** I doubt it would ever be open for talks. There are figures associated with Linke and its predecessors who are a lot more like (1)’s, but that is not Bodo’s image, and that is not his voter support base.

    ___________

    * – note on how the East German regime fell and dating its loss of support:

    [MORE]

    Everyone is familiar with the story that the East German regime, and the SED political apparatus that ruled it, frayed at the seams and broke apart in the months beginning in September 1989 (or earlier, if you prefer; anyway, the daily Leipzig marches against the government began in September; the Genscher speech in Prague was also a major turning point, occurring Sept. 30; the decision to NOT fire on the protesters, as the Chinese had done in June, was also a turning point but harder to date or attribute). The state known as the German Democratic Republic ceased to exist 12 months later (Oct. 1990).

    When did the East German regime’s support really erode?

    Contrary to some people’s belief that the regime never had any broad support, a later-discovered collection of internal polls of, iirc, Freie Deutsche Jugend (the regime’s youth group) that I’ve seen suggests that regime support was more-or-less firm as of the early 1980s, but down by, iirc, 1987 already. In 1987 and 1988, the discontent had not yet manifested in public (and the pent-up nature thereof is what caused the dramatic crowd scenes of so many thousands chanting, “Gorbi! Gorbi!” [Gorbachev], and more famously, “Wir sind das Volk.”

    Dating the loss of support for the regime to the mid-1980s, as of 2020 it will be nearing 35 years since the fall in political support for the East German regime.

    ** – In the 1920s and 1930s, needless to say, the German Communist Party (KPD) was a (1) — not to mention (afaik) aligned with Moscow/Stalin directly — with a large dose of (2) (“Antifa”), and not much of anything like a (3).

    In terms of (2), it was KPD streetfighters who killed Horst Wessel in an ambush in Feb. 1930; many other NS activists were killed by KPD-supporter, proto-Antifas in street fighting (and vice versa), but for whatever reason the Nazis chose Wessel as the martyr figure, and made a fight song in his honor.

  187. Hail says: • Website
    @silviosilver

    Who are some right-wing nationalist figures who were Political Science majors?

    Here is one:

    Matteo Salvini [b.1973]… attended the University of Milan where he first studied political science and then moved to history; however, he interrupted his studies in order to start his political career and never graduated

  188. Yevardian says:
    @songbird

    Some of these rules would probably be derived from HBD. Like, perhaps men would need to have a certain level of T, or characteristics uncommon in pedophiles or gays. I wonder if this could really be one of the secrets of success for the Sikhs who conquered the Punjab, even though they were only 1/7 the population there. Beards would be an indication of T.

    Except Indians are often quite hairy, yet have the lowest levels of testosterone of any major ethnic group, if I remember my forays into the online world of HBD autism correctly.

    Probably a big factor today in the continual decline in the T-juice of politicians is there’s very little likelihood in getting killed whilst on, or making it to, the job anymore. It would also have the non-intended bonus of removing women from politics almost entirely. A real shame.

    • Replies: @Gabru_Ak47
  189. S says:
    @AP

    Interesting commentary about Vermont.

    As an aside Vermont apparently had English colonists as early as the 1600’s who along with the rest of the British North American colonies routinely used Spanish silver coinage minted in South and Central America (in particular Mexico City) as currency due to the local shortage of English specie.

    There’s a fellow on YouTube who with a metal detector digs up old cellers from long abandoned Vermont British colonial settlements in the hills there who fairly regularly will find these old Spanish coins (typically those corresponding in size to our modern US dimes, though on occasion larger Spanish denominations are found) in his digging.

    Reading about it in history books is one thing but seeing it first hand (albeit through a camera lens) is quite another. It also indicates just how powerful the influence of Spain was in this hemisphere during the 17th and 18th century that their coinage would be an accepted form of currency in British colonies so far to the north of Spain’s Central and South American colonies.

  190. This is pretty significant.

    Indians have smaller brains, reveals study

    Researchers at the International Institute of Information Technology, Hyderabad (IIIT-H) have created the first-ever Indian Brain Atlas.

    The study has revealed that the Indian brain, on an average, is smaller in height, width and volume when compared to Western and other eastern populations

    While I was taught in school that skull and brain-measuring was nazi hoax science, modern HBD researchers have proven time and again that brain size does indeed correlate with intelligence. The largest brains are those of East Asians. Of course, there are other factors at play other than size wrt to intelligence, but size does indeed matter.

    This is also a piece of the puzzle of Indian genetics. For a very long time, many have struggled to come up with a reasonable estimate of Indian IQ. Many point to very high disease load and malnourishment in India as a counter-argument as to why India’s IQ is not as low as often presented, as environmental factors hinder “true IQ” to emerge. But this is a biological finding.

    Nevertheless, the puzzle is still not completely solved. In Singapore, for instance, most Indians are ancestors of indentured servants and not high caste (and thus high IQ) offspring. Yet Indians outearn every other racial group, including Chinese, in Singapore. So perhaps Indian IQ is still quite high. Or they are just much better at making money than their IQ would indicate. The puzzle just got more interesting!

    • Replies: @AP
    , @Daniel Chieh
    , @John Arthur
  191. S says:

    In the United States the steady drum beat against Russia continues though most US citizenry are rather indifferent to Russia one way or the other.

    Alexei Leonov, the Russian cosmonaut who made history by being the first man to do a space walk recently passed away at 85 years of age. Accordingly, he was featured rather prominently in the US media.

    Typically on US AM radio stations at the start of each hour there is three to four minutes dedicated to national and international news. This is divided into 15 and 30 second segments. If it’s something exceptional maybe a full minute is dedicated to the subject.

    On the day of Leonov’s death the particular AM station I happened to be listening to dedicated an extraordinary solid three minutes (at least) to his passing, about the longest I’ve ever heard on a single subject on one of these news briefs with the exception of 911 and the killing of Bin Laden.

    One might of thought Leonov’ s passing would of been the time to leave politics aside and simply say some nice words about him and give condolences to his family and to his nation.

    Not so.

    Instead his death was shamelessly and cynically used as a convenient platform to attack Russia instead. For every nice word about Leonov there were two or more words bashing Russia attached, ie nice job being the first man to walk in space but the Russian hardware (ie the space ship that got him there) was engineering crap and Leonov himself barely returned to the ship alive due to a malfunctioning (over inflating) space suit. The nice guy Leonov wanted to warn the US astronauts about this danger of over inflating space suits but was stopped by his evil Russian superiors from doing so almost tragically resulting in the deaths of US astronauts who had similar space suit issues.

    On and on in this fashion the news story went about Leonov’s passing until (mercifully) the account of his death ended.

    Was looking at some DVD’ s recently at a local store and mixed in amongst them was one entitled ‘Heros Never Die’, sold as a ‘true’ account of the battle for Donetsk Airport. ‘Heros’ in the 2017 movie’s title is a reference to the Ukranians who fought there as the video’s cover description made plain.

    Meanwhile, would be US president Hillary Clinton has publically accused current presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard of being a ‘Russian agent’ much to the latter’s indignation.

  192. S says:
    @Matra

    Spanish leftists have always had a ghoulish streak.

    Not ‘just’ Spanish leftist in that regard though perhaps they went further than most others.

    In Germany some radical animal right’s leftists dug up the body of a German research director’s recently deceased daughter. The corpse was to be held hostage until the professor would stop his university’s use of animal’s in medical research.

    During Mao’s ‘cultural revolution’ in 1960’s China the Red Guards dug up corpses of multiple Chinese historic figures and put them on public display.

    Have also seen footage from what is termed ‘Russia’s Civil War’ where Reds dug up of corpses from old Russian cemeteries.

    Should the United States experience a Red October 2.0 type of an event followed by it’s own Russian style ‘Civil War’ I could very easily see the Red types here digging up corpses (ie past Confederate leaders such as Jefferson and Lee, amongst other sorts) for abuse and public display.

    Their soul destroying all consuming hatreds combined with their totalitarian mindset makes such things possible.

    • Agree: utu
  193. @German_reader

    Why should Indians indulge white racial fantasies?

    Aryan invasion as a cultural theorem is that the
    White Aryans, White Greeks & White British form
    the nexus and core of Indian culture.

    https://www.brownpundits.com/2019/10/13/the-clearly-evident-out-of-india-migration-from-ancient-dna/

    IVC DNA was spread out into the Caspian Sea and beyond.
    Traditional Indic Sphere of Influence is also until Black Sea or are you ignoring the 32 Indian cities which fought against Gregory of Armenia?

    Steppe tribes have integrated into NW India even into the time of Scythians and Huns.
    When a nomadic people encounter an agricultural civilization, they integrate not vice-versa.

    The Dravidians as the pre-IVC people has already been disproven, they took a Southern Route along the coast of Balochistan.

    Every half educated white on the internet wants to imagine himself some great, ancient conqueror while he rings groceries at a Tesco.

  194. @German_reader

    Why should Indians indulge white racial fantasies?

    Aryan invasion as a cultural theorem is that the
    White Aryans, White Greeks & White British form
    the nexus and core of Indian culture.

    https://www.brownpundits com/2019/10/13/the-clearly-evident-out-of-india-migration-from-ancient-dna/

    IVC DNA was spread out into the Caspian Sea and beyond.
    Traditional Indic Sphere of Influence is also until Black Sea or are you ignoring the 32 Indian cities which fought against Gregory of Armenia?

    Steppe tribes have integrated into NW India even into the time of Scythians and Huns.
    When a nomadic people encounter an agricultural civilization, they integrate not vice-versa.

    The Dravidians as the pre-IVC people has already been disproven, they took a Southern Route along the coast of Balochistan.

    Every half educated white on the internet wants to imagine himself some great, ancient conqueror while he rings groceries at a Tesco.

  195. The US is dropping the final pretenses of “liberal democracy” before our eyes as it reveals itself to be a thuggish neoliberal oligarchy persecuting any dissidents.

    Max is usually a brave journalist doing good work, but he should not be a coward by staying silent when nationalists and right-wingers get thrown into jail for their opinions. It always starts with the nationalist right but it never ends there. Something he has now learned the hard way. And his 2 days in jail pales in comparison to what the guys from the RAM (rise above movement) had to endure.

  196. @reiner Tor

    Manosphere ideas capture a very small share of the population. In reality, most men adjust to the sexual market as it exists. Hence why single mothers, old maids, fat women, and other assorted undesirable females are usually able to find partners. Historically men have also turned to miscegenation (explorers, shipwrecked sailors, etc.) or even homosexuality in the absence of better alternatives.

    That said you are a high value man you have a lot more options, and in that case setting higher expectations for yourself is more reasonable. A high value man would be making an error in coupling with Butina.

    The problem is when someone, male or female, has expectations which exceed reality. And certainly you can find some low value but manosphere influenced men like that. MGTOWs and incels come to mind. While not exactly low value, one also sees the issue of spoiled players who are unable to find a suitable partner because every woman is flawed and they find this unacceptable.

  197. AP says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Brain size, like height, reflects genetics but also is affected by things such as malnutrition.

  198. songbird says:
    @German_reader

    No, it’s an outgrowth of the long history of wars and ethnic conflicts between different European nationalities

    My take on it is that it is primarily a cultural phenomenon – that explains the long shelf-life. Of course, history creates the culture, but it is more directly attributable to the arts and media – one group of elites fearing another – than the memories of veterans.

    Another problem is that diversity is a harder target, since it doesn’t have as specific a label. Say “a Frenchman” and one can mentally conjure a Frenchman. It is less easy to understand the idea of a coalition.

  199. Dmitry says:
    @silviosilver

    Until Franklin Roosevelt, Republicans has policy platform more similar to Democrats today, and Democrats were more similar to Republicans today.

    So overall political preference of New York has not changed, as the two parties switched sides at the same time as Democrat start winning elections in New York (1920s).

    Jews voted Republican in 1920. However, there is mismatch between Jews (Jews vote Democrat for every election after 1920) and New York in these elections.

    1924 is the strange one. In other elections where Republicans win – they do not win New York City, but rather just countryside areas around it.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1924_United_States_presidential_election_in_New_York

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1928_United_States_presidential_election_in_New_York

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1948_United_States_presidential_election_in_New_York

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1972_United_States_presidential_election_in_New_York

    Strangely, even Reagan could not win Manhattan (how does this even make sense with Wallstreet?).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1980_United_States_presidential_election_in_New_York

    • Replies: @German_reader
    , @Gerard2
  200. Gerard2 says:
    @Dmitry

    Is there is any connection why the most white state in America (Vermont) has the second largest margin of victory for the Democrat party in the USA in recent elections (after Massachusetts)?

    Not just Massachusetts but Maryland, D.C, California and Hawaii having larger margins of victory…with New York having a big percentage of Democrat voters, which is interesting in that parochialism is normally high in America and this was a shootout with Clinton as former Senator there and Trump a native of New York

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  201. songbird says:
    @AP

    Also, New Hampshire has been much less infested by liberals from big cities moving there.

    It is a difference of degree, but not of direction. While there are many right-leaning people who have moved to New Hampshire, including the Free Staters, the overall direction is leftwards, and things will continue to move leftwards and would from non-white immigration alone.

    There’s also no sales tax in NH, but local property taxes seem to be growing.

    A lot of the previous governors in NH, like Shaheen (D woman), Lynch (D), and Hassan (D woman) wouldn’t have been elected except for people moving to the state. Shaheen and Hassan are both US senators now.

    • Replies: @AP
  202. Dmitry says:
    @silviosilver

    whites are finding out that other races generally have it in for them.

    Wide racial categories usually hate within each other as much as across each other – this seems quite universal.

    Yellows can hate other yellows the most – Korean/Chinese most hate Japanese.

    Browns hate other browns – Arabs most hate Jews, Pakistanis most hate Indians, etc.

    Blacks hate other blacks – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xenophobia_in_South_Africa

    Solidarity within the racial category usually requires creation of nationality (if not common religion) – e.g. Japanese don’t hate Japanese, Chinese don’t Chinese.

    At some time, America was successful for constructing a common nationality from English, Germans, Swedish, etc.

    But clearly this was not possible for America, across different categories, or with too divergent nationalities like African-American, Hindu-American, etc.

    Something surprising I read is how little the African-American intermarry with other nationalities.

    “In 2007, 4.6% of all married Blacks in the United States were wed to a White partner, and 0.4% of all Whites were married to a Black partner.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interracial_marriage_in_the_United_States#Black_and_White

    So Americans can assume, African-Americans will never dissolve into the population, and will still be here in the 22nd century.

    By comparison, Jews-Americans have an intermarriage rate of 58% (unlike African-Americans, the Jews will dissolve in America in a couple of generations).
    https://www.pewforum.org/2013/10/01/chapter-2-intermarriage-and-other-demographics/

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  203. songbird says:
    @Dmitry

    You have found one of the big reasons that I forgot to include for leftists moving to Vermont: many are attracted by organic farming and the possibilities of buying local produce.

    If I had to speculate on one reason Vermont has remained somewhat whiter, I would say lack of urban centers. It has basically none to speak off. The biggest city is Burlington, with a population of about 42,000. This contrasts with New Hampshire, which is in some ways its geographic twin, which has Manchester with 110,000 and Nashua with 86,000.

    Your normal model for the diffusion of blacks is that they head first for the cities and then gradually diffuse into the suburbs, in an ever-increasing radius, blocked only by the housing prices in some areas. Of course, this model of rural areas being relatively safe is changing now, partly because the federal government is taking an active hand in targeting white areas for conversion.

    With California, I think a lot of conservative whites are leaving, so that is another, although smaller, influence on politics there.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  204. @Thulean Friend

    Higher caste Indians have incredible verbal skill and clannishness, and we know that brain size itself doesn’t prevent a lot of function by the fact that people with missing brain structures can still operate within reason:

    https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/03/16/392789753/a-man-s-incomplete-brain-reveals-cerebellum-s-role-in-thought-and-emotion

  205. Dmitry says:
    @songbird

    I haven’t been there, but was entertained last night looking at Google’s photographs of Vermont.

    Housing there looks like it would difficult to access or buy, which might be the barrier of living there? – there is almost no mass housing, just single wooden houses (which are carefully painted).

    It’s a lot of “organic coffee shops”. Also you need a car to access their cities, which will be another barrier to stop entry of poor people.

    • Agree: songbird, AP
  206. Dmitry says:
    @Gerard2

    For example, for Obama’s election – Vermont was the second largest victory as a proportion of voters (only Massachusetts had a higher proportion of votes for Obama than Vermont).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2008_United_States_presidential_election_in_Vermont

    Vermont was the second most Democrat supportive state for Obama.

    In terms of local politics, it seems like a stereotype of liberals from South Park?

    Here is the kind of politics you can see on YouTube if you search about Vermont:

  207. Gerard2 says:
    @AP

    You fail even harder than usual.

    And again demontrate that you can’t read eastern Slavic languages.

    Here is the book:
    ….

    Remind us again, failure, about the Russian word for watch that you do not even know? Or the Ukrainian word for “world” that you do not even know?

    Hahahahahaha!!!!……..so I see you have been squirming in agony about my jibes on your “language skills”…then you have proceeded to do your usual idiotic tactic of projecting your own failings and my own accurate accusations against you ..onto myself ( illogically), in the hope a third-party reader will misunderstand and go along with your BS

    Any mistake I made ( and I don’t think I have, you are merely BSing again – but still BSing into some leeway I have lazily given you) would be from ENGLISH language misunderstandings you cretin. You claimed Buzina was quoting from a Soviet journalist – I took this as indicating your thinking of Gordasevich as “Soviet journalist” (I reckon a good percentage of people reading that would make the same conclusion)….. exacerbated by the bitch then trying to rationalise why he would have tortured cats. My English understanding is that she could be the only one quoting from the “Soviet journalist ” Belyev and Buzina could be the only one quoting from her.

    So nothing to apologise for – though I will admire the part of the post where I observe how Italian, Romanian, Hungarian, Finnish troops fighting against USSR – ( that must be 1 million+ men) commited despicable war crimes and acts against the Russian world……but with nowhere near the same level of sadism, sick-freak savagery as Banderatards in the UPA – that even the Nazi’s thought were despicable. So that is a few thousand savages dwarfing in crimes over 1 million+ other fighters!!!

    I suppose when people are from a blackhole of an area – an unwanted reject in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, unwanted reject in Polish “Empire”, useless and unwanted reject in the Russian/USSR – then no surprise the only thing they can produce is vermin with no positive contribution to humanity whatsoever.

    • Replies: @AP
  208. @silviosilver

    Democratic and Republican party switched places sometime mid 20th Century
    The Republican party fought in the past to free the slaves

  209. @Dmitry

    Until Franklin Roosevelt, Republicans has policy platform more similar to Democrats today

    That’s a gross over-simplification imo, despite the changes of the 1960s there are some continuities. As I understand it, even in the late 19th century the Republicans were the more pro-business party and identified with white Protestants (outside the South), whereas the Democrats were the party of non-Protestant immigrants in the urban North (plus white Southerners, due to the legacy of the civil war).
    Maybe American commenters can explain it in greater detail.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    , @Dmitry
  210. @Korenchkin

    Republicans also brought about the 1924 immigration act…whereas Emanuel Celler, one of the most determined (and in the end successful) opponents was a New York Democrat (and Jewish).
    It seems to me Republicans have traditionally been the party of what one could call core Americans (outside of the South), that is white Protestants of British or northwest European origin; the realignment of the mid-20th century mostly affected white “ethnics” and blacks (who switched their respective party affiliation) and the special case of white Southerners.
    If that’s wrong, I welcome corrections by Americans.

    • Replies: @songbird
  211. Dmitry says:
    @Korenchkin

    Yes, Republicans and Democrats switched with each other, their political positions, during the 20th century.

    In economic policy, the switch happens in 1924-1933, with a transition of Coolidge for Republicans and Franklin Roosevelt the Democrats.

    Before Franklin Roosevelt, the Democrats supported government, lower taxes/spending. Before Coolidge, the Republicans had supported higher taxes.

    In terms of civil rights for African Americans, the switch is only in the epoch 1948-1964 (?)

    And Southern conservatives states were the most Democrat centres, until Eisenhower, according to Wikipedia:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_Democrats#1933-1980

  212. Dmitry says:
    @German_reader

    The switch for in economic policies is a little earlier for Republicans, with Coolidge. For Democrats, with Franklin Roosevelt.

    Coolidge – it looks like Reagan’s economic policy already.

    If you look a bit earlier at the policies of Woodrow Wilson, there is some slightly mixed policy. He supporter of free trade and eliminates tariffs, which are perceived as a form of tax (which Republicans had supported), while replacing it with federal income tax. Republicans has introduced higher tariffs and taxes during the American Civil War. However, he was supported in 1912 by trade-unions for the first time for Democrats (although they do not support consistently Democrats until 1930).

  213. Dmitry says:
    @German_reader

    there are some continuities. As I understand it, even in the late 19th century the Republicans were the more pro-business party

    You have a good point that it is not so completely simple, after reading a little more.

    Republicans had introduced and supported tariffs and higher taxes in the American Civil War, and to the 1870s.

    However, Democrats re-introduce income tax in the 1894 – although for Democrats it is as a compromise to eliminate tariffs.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilson%E2%80%93Gorman_Tariff_Act

    Later Republican, Theodore Roosevelt supports income tax partly to increase military spending. There is then a split of the Republican Party, with Theodore Roosevelt founding Progressive Party in 1912 (which splits the Republican vote in the election).
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_Party_(United_States,_1912)

  214. Gerard2 says:
    @Dmitry

    What is interesting is that whilst in US and UK the more leftist parties as Democrats and Labour are supposed to have always had the traditional jewish vote ( socialist leaning, loyalty to leftist parties from having come-up through urban, working-class background when settling in the country) …in terms of top serving Jewish people in power , it seems to me that the Democrats and Republicans are about even in Jewish representation ….and in Britain the more right wing Conservative party has had by far the most Jewish representation in positions of power

    The Conservatives had Disraili ( twice ) as leader of the country in the 19th century, in Thatchers government they had Jewish Finance Minister and Home Secretary. In the 90’s they had a jewish foreign minister and Home Secretary ( Rifkind and Howard) at the same time . As far as I know , the Labour party hasn’t had any high profile Jewish member.

    US had Goldwater as Republican President candidate, Democrats had Lieberman as VP, and Ginsberg as Supreme Court Judge, Republicans had Kissinger as Secretary of State….and in terms of donors they have been about even in terms of Jewish patronage.

    Until after JFK there was always a WASP v Catholic antipathy in American politics (even Prohibition had this element to it) – a Jewish or Muslim or Catholic President of the US were as equally unlikely as eachother until well into the 20th century

    • Replies: @German_reader
    , @Dmitry
  215. @Gerard2

    As far as I know , the Labour party hasn’t had any high profile Jewish member.

    Then you don’t know much, even about recent history:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ed_Miliband

    • Replies: @Gerard2
    , @Yevardian
  216. songbird says:
    @German_reader

    The meme of the two parties switching is essentially a laughable Leftist counter-tactic, to the even more laughable boomer “conservative” tactic of calling Dems “the real racists.” It is the type of question Dinesh D’Souza and other members of Conservative, Inc. would consider as the existential question.

    In terms of comparison of old platforms to today, there really isn’t any direct, historical value in attempting to trace the parties, through the decades. They are both too different today, not really the close ideological successors – both more like Eugene Deb’s socialist party, than each’s past iteration.

    What is the value in comparing to a time before the income tax, or before women had the vote? Or before desegregation? We might as well talk about Democrat-Republicans and Whigs.

    The historical parties had concerns based on broad, regional divisions within the US. People of diverse psychology were swept up in these divisions. Sometimes directly, sometimes just because the local political apparatus, which they sought to subvert, was of one party.

    What we are seeing today is a better and better sorting of the parties into two broad groups based on evolutionary psychology – genes that influence the brain.

  217. @Dmitry

    So Americans can assume, African-Americans will never dissolve into the population, and will still be here in the 22nd century.

    “Never” is a lot longer than the 22nd century. In the very long run, the assumption must be that different races occupying a given territory will eventually mix, so that none of the original types remain. It’s just a question of how long this will take. Of course, that spells death for white racial existence — regardless of how friendly the other races are — so it is reason enough to favor racial separation.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  218. Gerard2 says:
    @German_reader

    Then you don’t know much, even about recent history:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ed_Miliband

    Ok that ‘s a dumb mistake by myself – his brother was foreign minister also. In my defense I would say Ed Milliband was leader of the opposition, not leader of the country. Peter Mendelssohn also had a big role ( more sort of architect role)

    My general point, despite that big error, still stands though. Even now , there is a Conservative Foreign Minister ( Raab) , the speaker in Parliament ( just checked) is a jewish Conservative, there was also a jewish health minister for the conservatives ( Currie) 20 years ago..Labour still nowhere near this level of high position representation of Jews despite traditionally being the party best representing them. Yes the Milliband brothers – but essentially not much in the top of the hierarchy from 1920’s upto the 2000’s.

  219. @Korenchkin

    The Democrats began to orient themselves towards left-liberal positions around the turn of the 20th century. Prior to this, in the last few decades of the 19th century, they were dominated by pro-business and classical liberal interests. Mass immigration and the 1890s depression saw the so-called “Bourbon Democrats” overthrown, and the party embraced the populist “free silver” position and began to target the immigrant vote. This set the foundations for the Democrats eventually adopting a pro-labor, interventionist, and welfarist economic philosophy, which they have to a greater or lesser degree maintained ever since.

    The only real switch of significance was the slow abandonment of the Democrats by southern whites, as a result of civil rights agitation. This enabled Republicans to appeal to southerners in terms of conservative arguments, which they began doing from the mid-1960s. The transition was much slower than some seem to think. Democrats continued to dominate congressional races in the south well into the 1980s and remained competitive in the 1990s. It has only been since 2000 that southern whites can be described as overwhelming Republican bloc voters.

  220. Indians aren’t just coming to the West though.
    They form a majority in much of the gulf, and work around the Middle East & SE Asia.

    China has diaspora communities as well. You guys look at it through IQ which is not the lens India works on.

    Every caste is competing among itself,

  221. Dmitry says:
    @Gerard2

    There’s something similar with Indians in the USA.

    I was looking for Indian American politicians last night, and they are only some right-wing ones.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_Jindal

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikki_Haley

    US and UK the more leftist parties

    There is some kind of inversion between Jews of these two countries.

    In the USA, Jews are one of the most leftist religious groups.

    In the UK, Jews are the most rightist religious group

    Here is for the USA.
    While for the UK, it is the opposite voting preference for Jews.

    I think one difference is that in the UK, the Conservative Party is more similar to Romney or Reagan than Trump (i.e. can attract more educated people).

    • Replies: @Matra
  222. @Thulean Friend

    The gross hourly wage in Germany €28, whereas in Poland it is just €8.

    Interesting.

    I suppose this is a consequence of O-Ring theory. Easy migration to richer countries can inflate local wages in the short-term, but it’s not as sustainable as building your own hi-tech economy.

  223. @AP

    If you think about it Russia/Ukraine-Belarus differential is somewhat like Spain/Portugal differential – constant ~2x differential, despite comparable human capital.

    Spain has some strong O-Ring sectors (e.g. high speed train manufacturing, and Santander is one of the world’s biggest banks). Portugal – can’t think of any. I suppose never had the economies of scale for them to form, and too many talented workers being sucked up by France, Germany and London.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  224. Matra says:
    @Dmitry

    According to Robert Wistrich Jews made up a staggering 10% of all Labour MPs in the 1970s. Wistrich says they only started to turn against Labour when the “hard Left” gained more influence within Labour ranks, pushing it in an anti-Zionist direction. With today’s Conservative Party completely cucked on nationalist issues and pro-Israel it’s unsurprising British Jews would be more open to the party. Pretty ridiculous to say they are right wing though. If it weren’t for Corbyn’s views on Israel/Palestine there would be virtually nothing in Labour’s party platform that British Jews would find disagreeable

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  225. Dmitry says:
    @silviosilver

    In multinational marriage, usually the minority nationality is ruthlessly eaten, swallowed and dissolved by a majority nationality they marry.

    For example, in the 20th century – a large part of Jewish demographics were swallowed by Russians/Ukrainians, as a result of marriage. Marriage with Russians/Ukrainians (and some other nationalities), has just swallowed a large part of the Jews in quite a ruthless way.

    In the 21st century – a similar process is with Tatars. Tatars will just be swallowed by intermarriage. (In Tatar forums, you can already read Tatars discussing how they know their nationality’s demographics will be swallowed in the next couple of generations).

    Looking at the statistics for America, it seems like the Jews will be swallowed as a separate race at some time in the 21st century in a similar way as they were in the USSR (how long will they survive intermarriage rate of 58% and below replacement fertility?). Probably there is a similar situation for the Italian Americans, and the other minority races.

    Of course, that spells death for white racial existence

    White Americans have 6 times larger population than black Americans.

    Also the intermarriage rate of white Americans with black Americans is very low (In 2007, 0.4% of all Whites were married to a Black partner).

    So the white nationalities in America are not swallowing the blacks at all. Latinos seem to have a much higher rate of marriage with whites.

    I guess what will happen in the next decades, will be Latinos dissolve into a white population?
    https://www.pewresearch.org/hispanic/2017/12/20/hispanic-identity-fades-across-generations-as-immigrant-connections-fall-away/

    • Replies: @Gabru_Ak47
    , @silviosilver
  226. Dmitry says:
    @Matra

    nothing in Labour’s party platform

    There must be something. Before Corbyn, in 2015 election, British Jews also have by far the most right-wing (or Conservative) voting distribution of the religions.

    April 7, 2015 (This is before the 2015 election)

    “69 per cent of Jewish voters said they would support the Tories. Only 22 per cent said they would vote Labour”

    https://www.thejc.com/news/uk-news/huge-majority-of-british-jews-will-vote-tory-jc-poll-reveals-1.66001

    “Tories” refers to Conservatives. This difference for the 2015 election is crazy. It is a 47 percent point difference.

    • Replies: @Matra
  227. Dmitry says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    I don’t see how the salary difference could be so high between Portugal and Spain.

    People said to me, that salaries are very low in Spain. Spanish engineers (who work for a multinational company and over 25 years old) have said to me that their salary in Spain is only around 3000 euros each month.

    At the same time, Spain is very cheap for Western Europe, so the salary could buy more perhaps. Prices similar to Russia in many types of thing.

    • Replies: @Europa Nationalist
  228. Jayce says:

    When the “Russian equivalent of a MAGA movement” strikes

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
  229. @Jayce

    What’s even better is that the Tessa meme was largely promoted by a Russian-American Russian nationalist called Robert Wright.

  230. AP says:
    @Gerard2

    Hahahahahaha!!!!……..so I see you have been squirming in agony about my jibes on your “language skills”

    Projection. Your lengthy diatribes tells us the only one in agony is you.

    It is funny that you don’t even know the Russian work for clock, however.

    Any mistake I made ( and I don’t think I have, you are merely BSing again – but still BSing into some leeway I have lazily given you) would be from ENGLISH language

    Source is in Ukrainian:

    http://history.org.ua/LiberUA/978-617-538-377-3/978-617-538-377-3.pdf

    Page 18.

    You claimed Buzina was quoting from a Soviet journalist – I took this as indicating your thinking of Gordasevich as “Soviet journalist”

    The mistake here is that you tried to think. Bad idea. Let those better than you do things like that.

    I wrote quite clearly: “This came from a single source: a Soviet journalist writing during Soviet times. Buzina was dishonest to present it as a solid claim and Insomniac Resurrected was gullible to repeat it as such.”

    Source is obviously identified in Hordasevich’s book. Right when she describes the claim she identifies the source of that claim – Soviet journalist Володимир Бєляєв. She writes:

    Володимир Бєляєв, згадуючи про цей період життя Степана Бандери, писав, що той, б’ючись об заклад, на очах у ровесників однією рукою душив котів «для зміцнення волі». Ці два останні слова в Бєляєва взято в «лапки», що, як відомо, робиться, коли слова вживаються в іронічному тоні або в протилежному значенні.

    Here is his wiki page. It is written in Russian, so of course you will have trouble reading it:

    https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%91%D0%B5%D0%BB%D1%8F%D0%B5%D0%B2,_%D0%92%D0%BB%D0%B0%D0%B4%D0%B8%D0%BC%D0%B8%D1%80_%D0%9F%D0%B0%D0%B2%D0%BB%D0%BE%D0%B2%D0%B8%D1%87

    It is quite clear.

    Remember how I explained that in the Soviet union smart people studied hard sciences or military technology while dumb ones, like you, studied civil engineering?

    This discussion between us is a perfect illustration of that. Thank you for your participation.

    The rest of your post is a bunch of butthurt because Galicians defeated Sovoks in the struggle for Ukraine. Well, you have Donbas lol.

  231. AP says:
    @songbird

    It is a difference of degree, but not of direction. While there are many right-leaning people who have moved to New Hampshire, including the Free Staters, the overall direction is leftwards,

    Trump did better in NH than did Romney. It was a razor-thin victory for Hillary in NH. It wasn’t close in 2012.

    I agree there is a leftward trend but the state is very different from Vermont.

    • Replies: @songbird
  232. @Dmitry

    Hindus live in areas were whites are still conservative and still vote Republican like Fort Bend county and west Houston. Maybe not as much now because of never Trump but still significant. Now southern whites may be differant but orange county voted 50/50 and I bet you Republicans got almost all of the vote from whites.

  233. @Dmitry

    In the hypothetical example I mentioned, I had in mind a situation in which the various races existed on that territory in roughly equal proportions. Obviously in a situation in which one race outnumbers the other 100:1 there will be no noticeable impact.

    In America, whites have historically outnumbered blacks about 5:1. At such proportions, it’s only by “one-drop rule” that the resultant mix could be considered black. However, that mix would not be considered white, at least by any traditional notions.

    Of course, today America consists of much more than just whites and blacks, and the proportion of non-whites is so great that if everybody mixed indiscriminately — as everything in the media, entertainment and education industries encourages them to — then there would be no more whiteness found in America than is found in India. Europe, too, is on the same course, only lagging by a few decades.

    From the perspective of white racial self-preservation, the status quo is terminal.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  234. Yevardian says:
    @German_reader

    Miliband’s only legacy stands as one of the least effective Labour leaders in the party’s history, it’s forgivable enough to forget him.

  235. Nodwink says:

    Here’s my opinion on Franco & his papist friends.

  236. songbird says:
    @AP

    I think it is interesting to compare the two state mottoes:

    Vermont: Freedom and Unity
    New Hampshire: Live Free or Die

    Now, I think that the differences between the two states are explained by other factors, but I do wonder if NH’s motto qualifies as what I would call a low-grade, political Kryptonite against Leftists. What I mean is, could it be possible that it even prevented only 1000 liberals from moving there? Or suppose it only encouraged the Free Staters to move there, which some urbanite liberals read about and were scared off?

    I think it is an interesting idea to play around with, whether you could create a society that would be resistant to the decay we are now seeing, just by trying to be unappealing to Leftist psychology, for instance: naming your international airport Enoch Powell Airport. I don’t think it would be a foolproof system, by itself, but maybe it would help, just a little bit.

    Actually, though New Hampshire has its flaws, I think that one of the most important factors that make it different is the fact that state legislators only get paid $100/year. They need to have other jobs, or effectively be working people.

    • Replies: @Nodwink
    , @anonymous coward
  237. Nodwink says:
    @songbird

    I did not know about New Hampshire’s motto. It sounds like something a biker would have on the back of their jacket, but that probably makes NH seem cooler than it actually is.

    • Replies: @songbird
    , @utu
  238. @songbird

    You think ‘living free’ is unappealing to leftist psychology?? Really? Serious question, are you nuts?

    • Replies: @songbird
    , @AP
  239. songbird says:
    @anonymous coward

    You think ‘living free’ is unappealing to leftist psychology?? Really? Serious question, are you nuts?

    I’m not saying leftists don’t like the word “free” or “freedom.” I’m talking specifically about the combination: “Live Free, or Die” Do you really think that is appealing to leftist psychology? More so than “Freedom and Unity”?

    Or Hawaii’s rainbow license plate, captioned “Aloha State”? And its official state motto: “Ua Mau ke Ea o ka ‘Āina i ka Pono;” native Hawaiian translating as “The life of the land is perpetuated in righteousness.”

    Obviously, if any state license plate or motto is actually even slightly unappealing to leftist psychology it is New Hampshire’s. Possibly Virginia’s motto “Sic Semper Tyrannis”, but that is nowhere near as visible, not being on license plates.

  240. songbird says:
    @Nodwink

    NH is popular with bikers. One reason is that you are not required to wear a helmet, but you see the motto everywhere on the road since it is on license plates.

    I used to really like Daniel Webster’s old quote about NH:

    Men hang out their signs indicative of their respective trades; shoemakers hang out a gigantic shoe; jewelers a monster watch, and the dentist hangs out a gold tooth; but in the mountains of New Hampshire, God Almighty has hung out a sign to show that there He makes men.

    Too bad the Old Man in the Mountain collapsed.

    • Replies: @Nodwink
  241. AP says:
    @anonymous coward

    Clueless as usual. In the context of the USA this is a rightwing thing. It’s something Mel Gibson would scream.

    • Replies: @anonymous coward
  242. Nodwink says:
    @songbird

    Hard to imagine a State with a ‘no helmets’ policy in 2019, very much against the zeitgeist. Interesting place. (I’m Australian, never been to the US)

    • Replies: @songbird
  243. Matra says:
    @Dmitry

    From the link you provided:

    Around 73 per cent of Jews said the political parties’ attitudes to Israel were “very” or “quite” important in influencing how they would vote.

    The polling revealed that Mr Miliband’s approach to Israel and the Middle East is seen as toxic within the Jewish community. Just 10 per cent of people said he had the best approach, compared to 65 per cent who favoured Mr Cameron’s stance.

    The Labour party itself fared worse than its leader, with its Israel policy attracting only eight per cent of Jewish voters.

    Most of the 73% who said parties’ attitudes to Israel were important to them were pro-Israel thus supporting Cameron’s Tories. Whether the Tories are up against New Labourish Miliband or Old Labourish Corbyn British Jews prefer the party that doesn’t have supposedly toxic anti-Israel people and are, seemingly, unconcerned about economic or other policy differences between New/Old Labour.

    So my original point stands: Labour’s overall policy platform is of little concern to most British Jews as long as they perceive Labour to not be pro-Israel enough. Now if the Tories were to become a genuine nationalist party (lol) I think that would lead to Jews bolting from the party or, more likely, staging an internal rebellion as they have done under Corbyn.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  244. @AP

    Point is that there is nobody in the USA who isn’t a leftist. (Except for some recent immigrants from the Middle East and Africa, I guess.)

    And yes, Mel Gibson is absolutely a leftist.

    “Rightwing” and “USA” in one sentence is an oxymoron.

    • Replies: @songbird
  245. I liked this article about Oulu, the modest Finnish town of 200K which at Nokia’s peak supplied 15,000 employees to the company. Then 2008 happened and a huge chunk of the employee base was let go. Today, Oulu has bounced back spectacularly and has become a surprising start-up hub with a huge concentration of talent. Some even speak of Nokia’s partial demise as a blessing in disguise, as it sucked up all the local talent, leaving little space for others. At the worst nadir of the crash, Oulu’s unemployment rate reached a staggering 16%. Today is thriving like few cities in Finland, or indeed perhaps the world.

    There’s something very Nordic about the story. First, instead of being seen as disposable, Nokia invested huge amount of time and resources into a so-called “bridge program” to make sure employees found other jobs. Well over 80% did. This is part of how we do things here, but Nokia’s program went beyond the call of duty. Second, the Finnish welfare state went to work and supplied a huge floor of comfort for unemployed families. The benefits in the US would be only a third of what the Finns got.

    The reporter at times laments that the town is “sleepy”, and expresses surprise how it can be so innovative given the huge amount of leisure time people get compared to an American, for example. To me, this part of the Nordic charm. You don’t need to be a workaholic with a broken or non-existent family life and you can still innovate at a world class level. In many other countries, that is not a possible combination where the work culture is toxic. No wonder the Nordic countries have some of the highest rates of life satisfaction.

  246. songbird says:
    @anonymous coward

    And yes, Mel Gibson is absolutely a leftist.

    Did you see Braveheart, where the gay courtier gets defenstrated? He directed that. He is against Vatican II, and goes to a Latin mass. He has nine kids. He’s known for throwing around the word “Hymie”, and made the second most successful Christian-themed movie of all time, after Ben Hur.

    Is he a perfectly moral human being? No, but I would classify him as a conservative with a fast life history, or at least as much as a conservative as you can get in Hollywood.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @anonymous coward
  247. songbird says:
    @Nodwink

    Hard to imagine a State with a ‘no helmets’ policy in 2019

    If I had to try to explain it, I would say NH became a destination for bikers, both for its scenery, and for its rural roads, as well as a bit for its traditional political spirit. This helped created a special-interest group of bikers and businessmen, who made money of it being a biker destination (there is a “Bike Week”), and this helped perpetuate the policy against outside pressures.

  248. Dmitry says:
    @Matra

    Matra – everything you say about Conservative is the same for Republicans in America, just to a far greater extent. (Republicans are supporting Israel to a greater extent, want to lower taxes to a greater extent, support free-market, etc).

    However, the political behaviour of the same demographic (Jews) is the opposite in America, where they vote against Republicans.

    There is 47 percent point difference in the 2015 election (so they are the most Conservative voting religion of the UK and the least supportive of Labour, before Corbyn). Again in 2015 (which was before Corbyn) they are the religion voting least for Labour and most for Conservative.

    So they are behaving in an opposite way with their voting in UK and in the USA. (If you inferred from the UK, you would Jews would vote Republican in the USA; if you inferred from the USA, you would expect Jews should vote Labour of the UK).

    • Replies: @German_reader
    , @Matra
  249. Dmitry says:
    @silviosilver

    in a situation in which one race outnumbers the other 100:1 there will be no noticeable impact.

    With multinational marriage of a minority to a majority – there is a deceptive dynamic, where it will will seem like the minority population increases in the second generation, but then its demographic situation suddenly collapses in the 3rd or 4th generation.

    For example, if a race like Jews (or Italians, Tatar, etc) marries with whites. The half-Jewish children (or half-Italian, half-Tatar, etc), will usually identify with their minority nationality, and appear as completely Jewish people (or completely-Tatar people, etc).

    Mixed marriage therefore might seem to almost double reproductive potential of the minority group in the second generation. If two Italians marry each other, and have 2 children, then there will be 2 Italians in the second generation. However, if 2 Italians instead of marrying each other, marry to WASPS, and have two children each, then there will be up to 4 Italians in the second generation.

    However, in the 3rd generation of marriage, the demographics of the minority usually collapses. People who are 1/4 Jew or 1/4 Tatar, find it difficult to maintain their minority identity, and are “flipped” into identifying with the majority.

    In the case of blacks, it could be one generation later compared to nationalities like Jews or Tatars? Dumas was grandson of an African slave – perhaps he could still identity as black. But Pushkin was great-grandson of an African (nobleman), and despite the fame of his black ancestor, it probably would be absurd if he had written poetry about being black. (Similar to absurdity of Elizabeth Warren claiming to be Native Indian American).

    Also I don’t think you can study “Pushkin” in the “black literature”in Harvard.

    America consists of much more than just whites and blacks, and the proportion of non-whites is so great that if everybody mixed indiscriminately

    White Americans marry with black Americans only very rarely. So black Americans will stay mainly black, if present trends continue.

    However, rate of intermarriage of white Americans with Latino Americans is much higher.

    25% of Latinos marry to non-Latinos. Although in this process, it seems the Latinos lose their identity. https://www.pewresearch.org/hispanic/2017/12/20/hispanic-identity-fades-across-generations-as-immigrant-connections-fall-away/

    So future in American demographics by the middle of this century, will include with a lot of people with partially Latino descent (but yet cannot speak Spanish).

    Europe, too, is on the same course, only lagging by a few decades.

    This might sound funny.

    But white Americans themselves seem like they have become a new race, from marrying between different European nationalities.

    If you look the population of Vermont (which is the most white state in the USA), for example, and try to identify “white American population” with specific European nationalities? I think I could guess their faces are “American” even if was a “blind test”.

  250. Most of the people here probably know the outline of this story, but there is still plenty of detailed information in the article. Solid reporting you won’t read in the MSM.

  251. Dmitry says:
    @Anarcho-Supremacist

    There are some Hindus living in Texas, for example. The vast majority of Hindus though are in San Francisco Bay area, Los Angeles, and New York area. And then Texas. (Although my knowledge is just from Wikipedia – I assume Wikipedia is posting the correct information).

    I could not find any information for how Hindus of Texas will vote.

  252. utu says:
    @Nodwink

    You ain’t no Australian. You are just another Bolshevik.

    • Replies: @Nodwink
  253. @Dmitry

    Anti-Israel sentiment has only lately gained some (limited) traction among the American Democrats with people like Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib; before that there wasn’t that much difference between Democrats and Republicans in pro-Zionist attitudes (the president most critical of Israel in recent decades was probably the elder Bush, a Republican).
    Anyway, Matra’s point was that Jews vote on perceived Jewish interests, that is pro-Jewish nationalism (that’s what Zionism is after all, even though there’s somehow always the pretense that it’s special and more legitimate, not like other nationalisms), against the nationalism of everybody else.

    • Replies: @songbird
    , @Dmitry
  254. songbird says:
    @German_reader

    Anti-Israel sentiment has only lately gained some (limited) traction among the American Democrats with people like Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib

    I think Jews represent about 10% of the Senate and 7% of the House. In theory, the House would be the leading indicator of demographic change.

    It is an interesting question, whether Jews will be able to keep up the influence they have on American politics. I tend to think so because they seem to be good at buying influence, and I don’t think the majority of Muslims really care about Palestine, though they might not like Middle Eastern wars. Of course, America’s relative power is declining so it might not be worth as much, going forward.

    I believe Bernie Sanders was popular in the area of Flint. I wonder if they knew he was Jewish. The commercials I recall seeing advertised his parents as being “Polish” or some such.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  255. Matra says:
    @Dmitry

    Matra – everything you say about Conservative is the same for Republicans in America, just to a far greater extent. (Republicans are supporting Israel to a greater extent, want to lower taxes to a greater extent, support free-market, etc).

    However, the political behaviour of the same demographic (Jews) is the opposite in America, where they vote against Republicans.

    You conveniently left out one obviously important difference between US Republicans and British Tories: The former continues to push (cynically, but apparently convincingly) social conservatism, whilst the latter has purged virtually all social conservatives, despite at least 30-35% of Brits being social conservatives – depending how it is defined. IOW Britain’s Conservative Party hierarchy is in agreement with the left wing social values of the Labour Party that British Jews once had such disproportionate influence within. (Note: Many, if not most, of the ordinary Labour voters of the 60s and 70s did not support this move to social liberalism which Jewish Labour MPs successfully promoted). So the pro-Israel majority of British Jews can continue to vote Conservative knowing that they are not voting for genuine nationalists or Christian conservatives, whereas their American cousins still smell the stench of the GOP’s low class flag-waving Bible-thumping Christian proles.

    This gets us back to where this conversation started: British Jews don’t care about the minor differences between the Conservative and Labour parties on domestic issues so they vote in massive numbers for pro-Israel Conservative Party against the perceived (but not really) anti-Zionist Labour Party. If the GOP dropped social conservatives and BDS types took over the Democrats you would see a similar change in Jewish voting behaviour in the US.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  256. Dmitry says:
    @German_reader

    Matra’s point was that

    He was responding to my point.

    Jews in the USA and Jews in the UK are voting in opposite ways.

    In 2015 before Corbyn, in the UK election, Labour is not anti-Israel. However, Jews are the most Conservative supporting voters in 2015, with 47 percent points above Labour.

    In the USA, Jews vote in the opposite way (actually it looks like they match voting preferences of Muslims in the UK, and opposite of Jews in the UK).

    For example, Ronald Reagan wins the majority of votes across America, however, by far most Jews voted for Jimmy Carter (in 1980s) and then for Walter Mondale (in 1984).

    On the other hand, Margaret Thatcher has the same ideology as Ronald Reagan, and majority of UK Jews vote for Margaret Thatcher in her elections.

    Is there is difference in the attitude of Reagan and Thatcher to Israel that can explain this? No, they both support Israel.

    Is there is difference in the economic policy or political philosophy of Reagan and Thatcher? No, they both quite similar ideologically.

    So, the difference is with the political preference of the Jews in the difference countries (which is predictable, because you can expect cultural differences to emerge in two groups on different countries).

    that is pro-Jewish nationalism (that’s what Zionism is after all, even though there’s somehow always the pretense that it’s special and more legitimate

    To be supporting Israel – which is the only positive or good thing about some Jewish voters – is not what I usually think about “nationalist voters”. It’s more like “pro-American voters” – i.e. people who support a particular country. However, Israel is a bit nicer and less crazy (i.e. more rational to support) than America.

    When we talk about nationalist vote in Russia, I would associated like people at “Russian March”. It’s not generally support for a country, but support for a particular political/social position. Ideological like “Russia for Russians” – I think is an acceptable or ration position. But these groups often relates to interest in fascism, belief in conspiracy theories, support for Nazis in the Second World War .

    So if Jews in the UK vote to support Israel – this is not equivalent to “nationalists” in the sense the word we used for local politics. On the other hand, if Jews support “Lehava” (far-right equivalent group in Israel) then they will be very similar.

    There is something very implausible where you write above as if it is the same to support nationalist in Europe and just to support Israel as a general country (although I know the media in Western Europe has portrayed to support Israel is like supporting Nazi Germany, which feels quite strange when you visit Tel Aviv).

    • Replies: @German_reader
  257. In case someone missed it, Solovyov interviews Butina on returning home to Russia (with English subtitles):

  258. Russians seem very Jewed to me, at least as much as Western Europeans if not more so. Yes there has been a few anti-Jewish voices from Russia, most famously Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, but does he really represent the views of the average Russian any more than David Irving represents the views of the average British person? I don’t think so, both those people are dissidents and represent fringe views in their own countries.

    Most Russians seem to be either indifferent to Jews or have a positive opinion of them. Most just seem to perceive rich Jewish oligarchs as simply rich Russians, the fact that many if not most oligarchs are Jewish is not something that seems to concern the average Russian. What I’m saying is that the average Russian does not seem any more Jew-aware than the average Westerner, in fact maybe even less so in some cases.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    , @Anatoly Karlin
  259. @Dmitry

    To be supporting Israel – which is the only positive or good thing about some Jewish voters – is not what I usually think about “nationalist voters”. It’s more like “pro-American voters” – i.e. people who support a particular country.

    Nonsensical comparison. People who are pro-American will usually justify their stance by referring to America’s universal values, like democracy, the free market, the American way of life etc. The US isn’t an ethnic state. Israel is, it’s a state that was specifically founded as a nation state for a particular ethno-religious group (which also necessitated the expulsions of large numbers of the previous inhabitants). Zionism is a nationalist movement, Jews in Western countries who lobby for Israel do so out of concern for Jewish national interests. That shouldn’t even be controversial as a statement of fact.

    although I know the media in Western Europe has portrayed to support Israel is like supporting Nazi Germany

    Massive exaggeration, there’s lots of “conservative” media in Europe which is still strongly pro-Israel (I don’t really read British newspapers nowadays, but the Daily Telegraph seemed like that to me when I read its website a few years ago; the Springer media conglomerate in Germany even has its employees sign contracts that they’ll be pro-Israel in their reporting).

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  260. Dmitry says:
    @Matra

    vote Conservative knowing that they are not voting for genuine nationalists or Christian conservatives, whereas their American cousins still smell the stench

    Mitt Romney was the candidate in the 2012 election.

    Mitt Romney is elite, venture capitalist, social liberal, who has no smell of proletariat – lost almost by 20 percent points of Jewish votes in 2012. On the other hand, David Cameron, wins by 47 percent points of the UK Jewish votes in 2015.

    Similarly, Margaret Thatcher is more rightwing in areas like immigration than Reagan. Reagan is a Hollywood actor, who loves Israel, and supports a same ideology as Thatcher.

    However, majority of Jews in UK vote for Margaret Thatcher, but Jews in the USA hate Reagan. They support Walter Mondale in 1984 by 26 percent points, even though Reagan wins the election by 18 percent points.

    So in 1984 election, Jews in the USA, vote for Ronald Reagan is 44 percent points less than the normal American vote for Reagan. (Again, if there was any similarity of preferences, why are UK Jews majority voting Thatcher, but USA Jews completely hate Reagan? USA Jews hate Reagan in 1984 more than any religion I could see data for).

    still smell the stench of the GOP’s low class flag-waving Bible-thumping Christian proles.

    This doesn’t match the timeline. In the USA, Jews are voting for Democrats since 1924 – i.e. they are aligned with the most low class South America voting preferences until Eisenhower, or later.

    As for “Bible-thumping Christian” support of Republican Party, Evangelicals only become locked to Republican Party in the 1980s. (So this cannot explain Jews for Democrats and against Republicans since 1924). Moreover, Jews are relatively more friendly to Evangelical Christians in the USA (probably because of the support for Israel).
    https://www.pewforum.org/2017/02/15/americans-express-increasingly-warm-feelings-toward-religious-groups/pf_17-02-15_feelingthermometer_selfrating640px/

    Also “Bible-thumping Christian” is not synonymous with proles. Evangelical includes a large a middle class profile, if you look at the white churches. For example, Evangelical Lutheran Church (i.e. majority of white Evangelical) has a higher income than other American Christian groups, apart from Episcopalian and Presbyterian.

    Evangelicals actually include a large bourgeois segment, and those are the ones with more power in Republican politics (they support tax cuts, etc).

    • Replies: @German_reader
  261. Dmitry says:
    @German_reader

    Nonsensical comparison. People who are pro-American will usually justify their stance by referring to

    How is support for a country, a nonsensical comparison? It is the only similar comparison here.

    Of course, people who support Israel, it’s usually similar viewpoint as support for America.

    Actually the two are very aligned – for example, in Russia, liberal bourgeois people very often support Israel.

    At the same time, in these same people, you will find a high correlation of support for Israel, support for USA (although there is some more disenchantment with the USA recently, as even liberals see many of problems there), and support for Margaret Thatcher, Ronald Reagan, etc.

    exaggeration, there’s lots of “conservative” media in Europe which is still strongly pro-Israel

    Sure, there is Daily Telegraph in UK and Le Figaro in France. And maybe some others which are more normal about the topic, from what I could read of them.

    But the main prestigious media of Western Europe, like BBC, El Pais, Le Monde – it will portray Israel as if it some fascist ethnonationalist country (basically opposite of reality of suicidal liberal Israel, that we know from visiting there).

    In El Pais, even classical liberals like Vargas Llosa are writing about the fascism of Israel, etc.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  262. @Dmitry

    Mainland Italians are white Europeans — genetically more so, on average, than many Russians. So it is wrong to talk about Italians marrying whites. You mean FELLOW whites.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  263. @Dmitry

    For example, Evangelical Lutheran Church

    Lutherans aren’t evangelicals, they belong to the so-called mainline Protestant denominations in the US, like Episcopalians and Presbyterians (state churches in England and Scotland, like Lutherans in Germany and Scandinavia; by contrast evangelicals could maybe in some way be seen as the descendants of the radical sects which mostly were successfully exterminated in Europe):
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mainline_Protestant

    • Replies: @utu
  264. @Dmitry

    for example, in Russia, liberal bourgeois people very often support Israel.

    At the same time, in these same people, you will find a high correlation of support for Israel, support for USA (although there is some more disenchantment with the USA recently, as even liberals see many of problems there), and support for Margaret Thatcher, Ronald Reagan, etc.

    Putin should reopen the gulag for such people.
    imo you’re remarkably obtuse when it comes to the topic of pro-Israeli lobbyism, but we’ve had this discussion before, no point to repeating it.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  265. utu says:
    @German_reader

    “Lutherans aren’t evangelicals” – Apparently you haven’t met Lutherans from Missouri Synod.

    “The LCMS bars its clergy from worshiping with other faiths, holding “that church fellowship or merger between church bodies in doctrinal disagreement with one another is not in keeping with what the Bible teaches about church fellowship.”[61] In practice of this, a Connecticut LCMS pastor was asked to apologize by the president of the denomination, and did so, for participating in an interfaith prayer vigil for the 26 children and adults killed at a Newtown elementary school, and an LCMS pastor in New York was suspended for praying at an interfaith vigil in 2001, 12 days after the September 11 attacks.” – Wiki

    As far as their support of Israel they seem to be somewhat conflicted or more nuanced than American Evangelicals.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    , @AnonFromTN
  266. Dmitry says:
    @Europa Nationalist

    Antisemitism and Judeophobia is existing in Russia, just as much as in America.

    Difference is it is always more “top-down” view (from government) in Russia. In the USSR, it moderate antisemitism was encouraged like it was a semi-official social position. In the same way, but in the opposite direction, that philosemitism is encouraged now as if it is a semi-official social position by the current government.

    In America, I believe antisemitism (or hysteria about it) is encouraged to an extent, by Jews (or official Jews) themselves, as a reaction to rapidly losing their identity and merging with a general population. Antisemitism is used as a kind of brake on the dissolution of a Jewish community (which have 58% marriage to non-Jews, as well as one of the lowest fertility rates).

  267. Dmitry says:
    @RadicalCenter

    Well, we could talk about Mormons marrying to Amish in the example.

    Italians are usually very distinctive from English people (and the nationalities which was the majority in America).

    Whatever are the distinctive characteristic of the minority nationality, the dynamic is similar. In the second generation of the multinational marriage, it will seems like “there are a lot more Italians”, as there is possibly of the population doubling – but in the third generation of mixed marriage, this will collapse as they “flip” to a majority identity.

  268. @utu

    The LCMS bars its clergy from worshiping with other faiths

    Nothing wrong with that, at least they still seem to be serious about their doctrines.
    As irreligious as I am, imo this is much preferable to something like this:
    https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/italian-bishops-mission-org-publishes-prayer-to-pachamama-in-official-booklet

  269. Dmitry says:
    @German_reader

    Putin should reopen the gulag for such people.

    I’m not talking about some loud anti-Putin journalist like Yulia Latynina.

    I mean in general, bourgeois segment of liberal people who read newspapers like Vedomosti. As a stereotype, they will support Western European culture, they support Israel, they have proAmerican ideology, they like Reagan and Thatcher.

    These are definitely correlated ideologically positions.

    In this kind of segment, there will include a lot of family of Putin’s friends, if you look on social media, so don’t imagine there is opposition to him specifically included in these views (although on average this segment is now unhappy with him).

    remarkably obtuse when it comes to the topic of pro-Israeli

    You are saying Jews in UK or USA support Israel for more ethnoreligious, than rational, reasons. This is likely for a significant proportion (although there will be others who visit Israel and like it for that reason ).

    But I don’t understand how you claim they are equivalent of (far-right?) nationalist political groups in Europe.

    If Ukrainian-American AP and Mr Hack, support Ukraine with the moderate Zelensky as President – then they would not be analogous to people who support KKK or Richard Spencer in America? They condemn the Neo-Nazi groups in Ukraine, so I do not see a connection.

    It’s an different motivation and no ideological connection, and usually very different types of people (even in terms of their social class, etc).

    As for “strongest” support for countries in general – I think it usually happens after you visit them. I fall in love with Japan, after I visit there; I fall in love with Israel even more, after I visit there – before I had visited I didn’t know anything about it.

    Again, there is no analogy to how support for nationalist groups emerges. Support for nationalist groups in Europe usually either a rational response to being invaded many brown people, or irrational from belief in certain conspiracy theories.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  270. @Europa Nationalist

    One can write an entire article about this, but I don’t care about Jews that much, so a couple of sentences should do.

    As concerns actual average people, the Murican Bear is one of the most philo-Semitic characters in the world. Russia – typical by East European standards. Just ask the ADL: http://global100.adl.org/#map/eeurope

    What is true is that Russian nationalists are far less obsessed with Jews. Why? For the very banal reason that there is no significant Jewish Lobby in Russia (if anything Armenians are more powerful). There is no “ZOG” in Russia as there is in America.

    • Replies: @Anon 2
    , @Dmitry
  271. @Dmitry

    they like Reagan and Thatcher.

    That’s terrible anyway, people who still do that in 2019 should just hurry up and die imo.
    Seems even more bizarre for Russians tbh, I thought such naive sentiments had mostly evaporated by the end of the 1990s.

    But I don’t understand how you claim they are equivalent of (far-right?) nationalist political groups in Europe.

    You’ve got it wrong, it’s just the opposite, but I suppose that’s understandable, since much of the mainstream media and pro-Israeli lobby groups push out the same propaganda message for the consumption of normies like you. The evil “far right”, “facist”, “neo-Nazi” or whatever parties in Europe (e.g. Lega in Italy, AfD in Germany, Rassemblement national in France) actually limit themselves mostly to demand an end to or restriction of the ongoing mass immigration and repatriation of recent illegal immigrants…more extreme measures are maybe thought or talked about in secret, but they aren’t official programmes of any kind. By contrast in Israel a major politician like Netanyahu can openly state his political goals include the unilateral annexation of territory inhabited by another population, which presumably won’t be granted equal political rights. That’s a lot closer to the expansionism of historical fascism than anything “far right” parties in Europe are proposing.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  272. DeepMind claims breakthrough as AI masters Starcraft II game.

    Under the radar of most people, AI is continually progressing rapidly, putting any follies about “industrial malthusianism” squarely in the dustbin.

    • Replies: @anonymous coward
  273. @songbird

    A “conservative” is a leftist who wants the leftist values that were popular during his youth; thus, it is not a moral stance, it’s a nostalgic feeling.

    And yes, all “conservatives” are leftists.

    Not being a leftist means being at peace with God and his creation, which is basically nobody at all in 2019. (And has nothing to do with being ‘perfectly moral’, whatever that means.)

    That said, yes, under different circumstances Gibson would have shed his ‘conservatism’ and become a normal human being.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    , @songbird
  274. Tokyo 2020 Olympics set to have “celebrate diversity” banners just as Japan is begginging to invite foreign workers
    Another Notch on the Anglo-American belt

  275. @Thulean Friend

    “AI” is just statistics, if you expect a magic box that solves your problems for you, you’ll be sorely disappointed.

    That said, we’ve only scratched to surface of statistics and probability theory, many wonderful discoveries about the Universe are still ahead of us.

  276. @Dmitry

    3,000 Euros a month is considered a low salary in Spain? In the UK that would be considered a perfectly reasonable salary for a professional, there are plenty of professionals in the UK on significantly less than that.

    That’s about £31,000 a year and a quick bit of research shows that the average salary of an engineer in the UK is about £30,000.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  277. @anonymous coward

    And yes, all “conservatives” are leftists.

    They are not, and and you lack the authority to so glibly redefine established terms.

    • Disagree: TheTotallyAnonymous
  278. @AP

    Bandera was a bastard whether or not he killed cats, of course.

    Amazingly true. Have to agree with you, for a change.

  279. Dreadilk says:

    Zrada all day long for AP.

    https://colonelcassad.livejournal.com/5386970.html Polish Congress turning more anti Ukrainian in make up.

    Also something about the Dutch approving North Stream.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @Korenchkin
  280. Anon 2 says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    The reason is very simple: demographics. The dislike of Jews increases with
    their historic percentage in the population. For example, in the 1930s, Poland
    was 10% Jewish (once the percentage approaches 10%, the problems of
    ethnic minorities become unsolvable – look at the American blacks), Hungary
    – 5%, whereas in both the Soviet Union and Germany the Jews constituted
    a tiny minority, under 1%. Russia proper, as distinguished from the Russian
    Empire, has had very little experience with Jews, e.g., Jews were not
    allowed to settle in Moscow, SPB, etc. After their expulsions from Western
    Europe, Jews mostly settled in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth
    so much so that by 1550 about 90% of the Ashkenazi Jews lived in the
    Polish-ruled Rzeczpospolita (Republic). Hence the Jews left a lot of bad
    memories (as all large minorities do) primarily in Poland, western
    Ukraine, Belarus, Lithuania, and Hungary. If the Jewish percentage in
    these countries had been under 1%, the Jewish minority would not
    have been a problem. For example, in Sweden, Denmark, Germany,
    Italy, etc the Jewish percentages are typically 0.1-0.3%, not a problem
    at all – they are forced to assimilate rather than constitute a country
    within a country. The problems of minorities increase exponentially with
    their percentage.

    I should add that not all memories of Jews are bad – they contributed
    to science, etc

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
  281. Anon 2 says:

    I should add that it’s not solely Jews – all market-dominant minorities
    create a lot of problems everywhere they go because they behave like
    colonialists: Jews in Europe and North America, the Chinese and East
    Indians in Asia and Africa. Note: none of the three market-dominant
    minorities are Christian.

    • Replies: @AP
  282. @silviosilver

    established terms

    “The whole modern world has divided itself into Conservatives and Progressives. The business of Progressives is to go on making mistakes. The business of Conservatives is to prevent mistakes from being corrected. Even when the revolutionist might himself repent of his revolution, the traditionalist is already defending it as part of his tradition.”

    – G.K. Chesterton, 1924.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  283. @silviosilver

    He has the authority to state the obvious
    Conservatives haven’t conserved shit

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  284. @utu

    A bit off-top. Here is a joke about Lutherans I’ve heard on public radio in the US a few years ago.
    How do we know that Adam was a Lutheran? Only a Lutheran, standing next to a naked woman, can be tempted by a bit of fruit.

    • LOL: RadicalCenter
  285. Dmitry says:
    @Europa Nationalist

    Beginning salary for engineer in a multinational, beginning the graduate program, in the UK should be £30,000, from what I can see of the graduate programs. Equivalent position as Spanish will be over £40,000++.

    So in this example, it should be definitely more than 1/3+ higher salary in the UK, for the same senior level, multinational, industry, etc.

    3,000 Euros a month is considered a low salary in Spain?

    Of course, this is high for Spain. This is an engineer, in late-20s, working in a multinational (very large) company.

    This is a high salary for Spain, but they are paying less (the same companies) for the same workers than they do in other countries in Europe.

  286. Dmitry says:
    @German_reader

    same propaganda message for the consumption of normies

    What nonsense – I know a thousand times more about this topic than you. I know Israel personally.

    I don’t need to consume much propaganda on this topic, as I can study the topic independently, and can cross-reference to personal experience and knowledge of friends there.

    In your position, there is the great effect of propaganda/media bias,etc, as I assume there are not other sources of information to you.

    Just as if I was going to talk about political situation of Bavaria, I would have to rely on what is stated in the media, and might repeat some opinions from El Pais, Le Monde, or BBC.

    normies like you.

    “Normies” refers to what autistic people call the normal people in a society (in particular it refers to neurotypical people). So it’s kind of strange that you seem to perceive as a negative thing.

    I don’t propose that you just follow mass opinion. However, when you look at other peoples’ view – then in politics generally the accuracy of the judgement is following the wisdom of crowds I.e. general opinion on average is more accurate than randomly selected individual’s view.

  287. Dmitry says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    ADL website you link to does not seem to measure antisemitism in an interesting way however. (I guess it is actually kind of fraud to encourage people/governments to give a lot of money to ADL, rather than academic research).

    For example, this question “Jews have too much power in the business world” – asked in Russia?

    Of course, Jews have proportionally too much power in the business world in Russia, so it does not require unjustifiable or irrational antisemitism to answer “yes”. Most people who look at billionaires in the country, can say “yes” to this question.

    On the other hand, if you ask the question to wealthy public of Norway, and they say “yes”, then it could more indicate irrational antisemitism (perhaps it would measure some people who believe conspiracy theories about Norway being controlled by secret Jews).

    Similarly, this question “Jews have too much control over the global media”.

    If you live in Sweden or Spain, where media is very anti-Israel and without Jews, then people who answer “yes” to this question will be like antisemitic conspiracy theorists, who believe that Jews are controlling their media, even though it will be difficult to find any.

    On the other hand, if you live in Russia where television content contains philosemitic propaganda, random interviews with rabbis, Ivan Urgant, etc, then “yes” for this question is even true from a viewpoint of normal taste.

    • Replies: @Korenchkin
  288. @Dmitry

    In your position, there will be some effect of propaganda/media bias,

    Did Netanyahu state that annexation of large chunks of the occupied territories is a political goal or didn’t he ?
    Sure, Israel is far from the worst state in existence, by world historical standards its imperialism is rather small-scale and tame. But I really don’t see how one can deny that there’s a strong segment in Israeli politics which is steadily advancing the goal of territorial expansion. Which is a lot more “far right” than anything right-wing parties in Europe are proposing.
    imo you’re blinded about this issue by your personal sympathies.

  289. AP says:
    @Anon 2

    Chinese are often Christians. And Armenians, MAronites, and Chaldeans were market-dominant minority in their regions.

    • Replies: @Anon 2
  290. AP says:
    @Dreadilk

    Zrada all day long for AP.

    https://colonelcassad.livejournal.com/5386970.html Polish Congress turning more anti Ukrainian in make up.

    So much wishful thinking, as usual. With over 50% Law and Justice doesn’t need to be in coalition with the far right.

    Also something about the Dutch approving North Stream.

    This was the Danes. I t was probably inevitable anyways.

    • Replies: @Dreadilk
  291. Bloomberg is out with a ranking of countries best adapted to a coming storm of troubles. Their perspective is fundamentally pessimist: climate change, populism, protectionism and automation all combine into a perfect storm to prevent most countries from climbing the ladder of prosperity. Some rich countries may even fall out of the rich club. Here’s the top 15.

    Sweden’s high position does not surprise me. We’re ranked number two in the most prestigious innovation index, right after Switzerland. We have our share of problems, but when compared to most other countries in the world, there are very few places I’d rather be.

    • Replies: @anonymous coward
  292. @Thulean Friend

    climate change, populism, protectionism and automation

    I’d rather be “poor” (whatever the hell that means) if being “rich” means having to endure totalitarian globalism and doomsday cult idiocy.

    P.S. Also, thanks for living up to stereotypes. Apparently, Sweden “Yes” for all varieties of Swedish political thought.

  293. songbird says:
    @anonymous coward

    I actually prefer the words “conservative” and “liberal’ to Left and Right. At least, there is some humor in hearing a man like David Brooks being styled a conservative.

    That said, categorization on a single political axis seems to be mostly useful for subversion. It makes the center into a moral cause, but what does the center do, but preside over the decline? It also encourages people to make bad alliances that always end in betrayal, since a lot of people on the so-called Right, punch Right, whereas people on the Left, don’t punch Left.

    Some have sought the answer to this categorization problem in more complexity, by using double or even triple axis. But how many of these plots really make sense either? If anything they just turn it into an academic matter instead of a civilizational matter.

    The only useful categorization, IMO, is Boolean: cuck/noncuck,

    • Replies: @anonymous coward
  294. Anon 2 says:
    @AP

    According to Wikipedia only 3-5% of the mainland Chinese are Christian,
    although the numbers are growing. Among the Chinese-Americans though
    it seems the numbers of Christians are minuscule. On the other hand,
    a high percentage of Korean Americans are Christian, typically
    Protestant.

    I’d like more Asians to become Christians because it would provide them with
    moral brakes on greed. At least in Catholicism we follow the Aristotelian/Buddhist
    rule of moderation in all things: avoid poverty but also avoid the pursuit of
    wealth because both interfere with the essential pursuit of holiness
    (or enlightenment if you like). Hence Austria has been a slightly nicer
    country than Germany – its Catholicism put limits on the Germanic tendency
    of always going to extremes, extreme violence or extreme nationalism
    or the current extreme self-abasement in rejecting nationalism. The rule of
    the golden mean in my view applies to all things, e.g., countries should be
    neither too large nor too small (e.g., I think Russia is too large, it would be
    better off if it were limited to its European part, okay they could keep the
    oil wells in western Siberia), and similarly, cities shouldn’t be too large or you
    lose contact with nature, 3-5 million is large enough.

    • Replies: @AP
  295. @songbird

    …since a lot of people on the so-called Right, punch Right, whereas people on the Left, don’t punch Left.

    Like I said, you should have figured out by now that the so-called “Right” is simply the Left after they got a job. They’re not your friends or your allies.

    Any political party or ideology is inherently leftist, because a real “right-wing” person would be part of a God-given hierarchy with a monarch who answers to God at the top.

    No such thing, obviously, in 2019, so everyone is a leftist today.

    • Replies: @songbird
  296. @Dmitry

    I don’t propose that you just follow mass opinion. However, when you look at other peoples’ view – then in politics generally the accuracy of the judgement is following the wisdom of crowds I.e. general opinion on average is more accurate than randomly selected individual’s view.

    Democracy is a pathetic belief in the collective wisdom of individual ignorance.
    – H. L. Mencken

  297. @Dmitry

    On the other hand, if you live in Russia where television content contains philosemitic propaganda, random interviews with rabbis

    Russian TV seems more Islamophilic then Judeophilic to me

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  298. Curious says:

    Someone mentioned O-ring economy theory. To bring home the point, just watch this video. ASML is a Dutch company which is world leading in semiconductor tooling. Their EUV tools are used in TSMC, Samsung and Intel’s foundries. If you want to be truly rich, this kind of stuff is what you need to be able to produce.

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
    , @Dmitry
  299. AP says:
    @Anon 2

    A lot of the Chinese in SE Asia are Christians; I suspect most of the ones in Malaysia are.

    Agree with the rest of your comment.

  300. @Curious

    And at one time I supplied them with superluminescent diodes (a kind of small laser) from Russia. We even won a joint prize for technical innovation. Then the US Department of Defence became rather obnoxious about ASML buying a US company so the contract was dropped.

    Your core point stands. These are very complex systems requiring multiple skills and outreach.

  301. Dmitry says:
    @Curious

    Well, Qatar, UAE, Saudi Arabia, Norway, Tyumen, et al, can disagree.

    But, in general it seems plausible, although maybe measure such as “economic complexity index”, seems to predict something more like “economic resilience”? A country with high complexity, will also be quite diversified in their industries, so they will be more resilient in the downturn for any one industry?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economic_Complexity_Index

  302. Dmitry says:
    @Korenchkin

    Foreign Muslims can be criticized quite a lot, but to an extent they are living in the West, and symptomatic of a decaying West. On the other hand for local Muslims, it is Islamophilic attitudes.

    E.g. typical reversal in attitude when it reports about London.

    • Replies: @Korenchkin
  303. Hail says: • Website

    Any Germans/others have thoughts/info on the expulsion of Wolfgang Gedeon from the AfD for anti-Semitism (“anti-Semitic conspiracy theories”)?

  304. @Korenchkin

    That is a very different point. By claiming conservatives are all leftists, he is essentially defining conservatives out of existence.

    • Replies: @Korenchkin
  305. @Dmitry

    You are fixated on the relatively short term. I am looking at a much longer term time frame in which, frankly, the things you mention in this post will be long forgotten and cease to matter.

    Of course, in the short term the changes in racial attitudes that accompany racial mixing do matter, and it’s quite likely that some people might begin to identify with whites more than is the case today. However, this only exacerbates the rate of mixing (ie white erasure).

    In these circles you sometimes hear people point out “the only the thing worse than a multiculturalism that doesn’t work is a multiculturalism that does.” Now you know why.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  306. @anonymous coward

    I guess Chesterton would disagree with you then. He distorts the nature of the difference between conservatives and progressives, but he agrees there is a difference.

  307. @Dmitry

    To be fair, Moscow is in a lot better shape then London or Paris
    Caucasians and C.Asians seem to be less destructive then Pakis and Algerians

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
    , @AP
    , @Dmitry
  308. songbird says:
    @anonymous coward

    a real “right-wing” person would be part of a God-given hierarchy with a monarch who answers to God at the top.

    I am glad you are endorsing my plan to use Harry’s brood to facilitate resource extraction in Africa.

  309. Matra says:

    Going back to the earlier topic of British Jews and the Conservative Party. Though it is clear that Jews moved over from Labour to Tories largely due to their Zionism – everyone agrees on that – there may have also been an unconscious bias towards the new form of conservatism under Thatcher. Prior to Thatcher Toryism was seen as vaguely aristocratic and traditional, but after her it became associated with social climbing middle class people. One can see how the newer form of conservatism would appeal to Jews.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  310. @Korenchkin

    Moscow is in a remarkably good shape, a lot better than it ever was in the USSR: clean and beautifully lighted at night streets (miles and miles of those), lots of parks with impressive monuments, well-kept buildings, renovated old and new, also inventively lighted at night, lots of eateries of all kinds, from cheap Uzbek “Chaihona” to expensive ones open essentially 24/7, all serving tasty food (thanks to sanctions, no imported crap now), amazingly beautiful and efficient metro system, which is rapidly expanding (adds 5-7 new stations every year), etc.
    London and Paris don’t even come close. Not to mention that much of London now looks like Karachi, whereas much of Paris now looks like Dakar. BTW, you don’t see many Caucasians and Central Asians in the streets in Moscow, although they are certainly present: taxi driver who took us from railway station to our hotel was Georgian, whereas the one who took us from the hotel to the airport at midnight was from Tajikistan.

  311. @silviosilver

    Given how routed they’ve been in the culture war thus far, they might aswell not exist

  312. Dmitry says:
    @Matra

    The behaviour of UK Jews in that change to Thatcher, is a direct politically opposite of how US Jews behave.

    American Jews particularly hate Reagan in 1984, just as all the middle class of America was voting for him.

    US Jews like Reagan 44 percent points less than the normal American vote.

    While UK Jews like Thatcher more than the average UK vote.

    Thatcher and Reagan at the same time are marketing for exactly the same type of voter, with the same ideology, and the same demographic profile of support.

    it is clear that Jews moved over from Labour to Tories largely due to their Zionism

    This doesn’t quite explain the 2015 result, however, as Labour are not anti-Israel as Corbyn in 2015, but there is a 47 percent point more voting for Tories (some crazy majority).

    Moreover, does it explain why a majority of UK Jews vote for Tory in 2010?

    Sensitivity to Israel, – would be a direct of US Jews’s behaviour.

    There is no move of Jews, to Republican, despite great divergence of alignment in relation to Israel since the 1990s. Since this divergence in relation to Israel, there is a move of more votes to Democrats.

    • Replies: @songbird
  313. AP says:
    @Korenchkin

    To be fair, Moscow is in a lot better shape then London or Paris
    Caucasians and C.Asians seem to be less destructive then Pakis and Algerian

    There are also far fewer of them relative to the general population in Moscow. If Moscow were 30% or 40% Central Asian and Caucasian it might not be much better than Paris or London.

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
  314. Dmitry says:
    @Korenchkin

    Main problem is terrorism/jihadism and radicalization, and while it will be small in Russia, there is also greater “cause” for attack because of the political history and combination with the nationalist situation in Dagestan and Chechnya.

    Some would like to say there is more state capacity in Russia for preventing jihadists. (There are constant operations against radicalization and against jihadist groups).

    However, Bataclan theatre attack, was preceded by the Nord-Ost theatre attack (in Moscow).

    Bombing in the metro in London and Brussels, has been preceded and succeeded by bombings in metro in Moscow, Saint-Petersburg.

    Bombing of the airport in Turkey, was preceded by bombing of Domodedovo.

    And there are some other types of terrorism which have not been prevented in Russia – bombing of apartment buildings, hostages in a school, bombing of moving trains, have not happened yet in Western Europe/London.

    While, more recently, 3 bombings of the bus, trolleybus and station in Volgograd – it’s really in the style of Second Intifada suicide bombings in Israel. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/December_2013_Volgograd_bombings

    Caucasians and C.Asians seem to be less destructive then Pakis and Algerians

    Central Asians are usually good people. There is a problem of third world immigrants in general (regardless of nationality, it will be annoying – even too many first world immigrants could be), and also in relation to Islam, specifically, of radicalization.

    For example, Reina Nightclub attack in Istanbul, was an Uzbek.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2017_Istanbul_nightclub_shooting

    • Replies: @JL
  315. Dmitry says:
    @silviosilver

    There is also quite another extrapolation of present trends for the USA, which is if inter race relations became more like Latin America.

    In Latin America, there is a European (actually Mediterranean/brown, so white is not quite the correct description) elite, and then an Indian (Native American) proletariat.

    These European elite are quite separate and not marrying the Indians much, and keep as a separate race for centuries.

    If you consume Latin American media and pop culture, this is a typical theme, where some native Indian gangster is trying with an upper-class European girl, and the family is stopping them

    “the only the thing worse than a multiculturalism that doesn’t work is a multiculturalism that does.” Now you know why.

    The problem of multicultural (by its own aims) is that it results in a jumble of parallel nationalities, with no coherent relation to a single culture.

    “Melting pot” model which America used for assimilation of European immigrants of different nationalities, in the 19th century, required to impose a “monocultural model”, where the immigrants lose their original identity, and should aspire to be culturally like WASPs.

    If you want to preserve “racially pure” the nationalities of the immigrants in America, you would use a multicultural model, where different races remain in parallel cultures, without too much interaction between each other, or aspirational assimilation to some American monoculture.

  316. Mr. Hack says:

    The video clip is reminiscent of the output of Bollywood. Correct me if I’m wrong (and I probably am), but it appears that a Middle-Eastern dance club party helps to alleviate any permanent friction already in play between the representatives of the “Mediterranean” clique and the uppity “native Indian” one? Pass the hookah, Amigo. 🙂

  317. @AP

    In fairness, I don’t see how it can get there, even in the worst case open borders scenario. Pakistan’s population is 3x bigger than UK’s. Maghreb is as populated as France. I am not even going to go into the Sub-Saharan Africa timebomb. Central Asia has 50% of Russia’s population, South Korea is now competing for their migrant labor, and probably China will also start doing that by the 2030s. Dags and Chechens have already long emptied out, as have Armenians; Azeris will stay in their own country as they have oil (moreover, Kazakhstan itself is a significant sponge of Uzbek/Tajik labor); Kazakhs and Kyrgyz are basically ok; Uzbeks and Tajiks can be very problematic, but they have just 40M people between them.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @Dmitry
  318. songbird says:
    @Dmitry

    I would say US Jews also hate Thatcher, which seems kind of weird to me. Except for the demographic issue, I am mostly agnostic about UK politics, even though I have relatives living there.

    Interesting question would be, how do UK Jews feel about Reagan?

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  319. AP says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    I agree. I can see no circumstance in which Moscow will become another London or Paris. At worst, totally open borders with Central Asia would only make Moscow 20% Muslim (it is currently probably around 10% Muslim). But this isn’t likely.

    Sometimes Muscovites complain and state that it might get that way, but this reminds me of Canadians complaining about how bad their crime rate is getting. It’s innocent “spoiled” people not knowing how good they have it relative to most other places.

    • Replies: @Denis
  320. Dmitry says:
    @songbird

    Jews seem to be the wealthiest per capita religion in UK/London for 2010 data.

    And UK Jews have no (or almost zero) unemployed people. So therefore, they should oppose welfare spending for unemployed people.

    https://www.trustforlondon.org.uk/news/inequalities-and-disadvantage-london-focus-religion-and-belief/

    So their support for Thatcher aligns with self-interest, as the Labour proposal of election against Thatcher were based on increasing taxes on higher incomes, property, increasing welfare for unemployed, etc.

    By comparison, Thatcher supports lowering taxes and reducing welfare for unemployed.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/election-2017-39872189

    However, US Jews are behaving against their economic interest, when their negative attitude to Reagan was 44 percent points lower than the normal American voter.

    Region does not quite explain negative voting of US Jews to Reagan in 1984, because Reagan wins in areas where many Jews like New Jersey.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1984_United_States_presidential_election_in_New_Jersey

    And Reagan wins all areas in Florida.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1984_United_States_presidential_election_in_Florida

    • Replies: @Curious
  321. Dmitry says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    Varlamov was saying this week that in Austria he has personally seen a lot of Uzbek construction workers who have now moved from projects in Russia to work in Austria instead (so we can expect a deterioration of Austrian building quality soon).

  322. Curious says:
    @Dmitry

    However, US Jews are behaving against their economic interest, when their negative attitude to Reagan was 44 percent points lower than the normal American voter.

    I disagree. First of all, US democrats are a neoliberal party. Maybe not as much as the GOP but still overwhelmingly so. UK labour by contrast is much, much more leftist by comparison. John McDonnell, their shadow treasury secretary, openly quotes Marx approvingly. They are talking about worker’s councils inside of companies and forcible transfers of equity to workers. This would all be a non-starter in the Democratic party.

    If you look at Labour under Blair, which was a neoliberal (and pro-Zionist) party leader, then Jewish support for Labour skyrocketed. Jews prefer liberal/leftist parties for cultural reasons. They don’t quite trust the white majority and feel constantly anxious about its motivations. They are willing to make small economic concessions in order to have open borders and cultural degeneracy in play.

    By the same token, Jewish support for UK Tories would plummet if they ever took on a more traditional conservative social profile. Right now they are essentially neoliberals on economics and liberals (in all but name) in cultural issues. Gay marriage was passed under a Tory government with a parliamentary majority. It was hailed by virtually all senior Tory leaders. Tories are not “conservative”. They are essentially the US democratic party equivalent in an UK context in their actual positions.

    Jews vote according to their racial and ethnic interests. They are not irrational voters in either the UK or the US.

  323. Curious says:

    BTW grindr greg has been arrested in Norway. The guy running Counter Currents. Can’t say I was ever much of a fan, barely read his site, but nevertheless an indication of rising panic in the establishment.

    The past week or so has been engulfed in a debate over the mainstream right in the US. Charlie Kirk of TPUSA got wrecked by Nick Fuentes and others. Immediately the calls for censorship began – often by the same people who bemoan conservatives getting censored on twitter! – to ban him off social media platforms.

    The mainstream right knows it is extremely weak and the only thing saving them is ever-increasing and ever more repressive censorship, regardless of its public pretense that it cares. Absent censorship, they would be bleeding to death to far more radical voices. You see this in Europe, too. The membership is usually far more radical than the leadership.

  324. JL says:
    @Dmitry

    bombing of moving trains, have not happened yet in Western Europe/London.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2004_Madrid_train_bombings

  325. Wikipedia entries about Russia are rather outdated
    The page about alcoholism in Russia uses stats from 2001 and 2006
    Suicide in Russia page uses the 2006 report too

    The Immigration to Russia page says “Russia maintains one of the world’s most liberal immigration policies” which is just bizarre

    • Replies: @Denis
  326. @Thulean Friend

    Maybe the belarussians and Ukrainians in Germany should get together and forcibly resist the Islamic invaders there. Let the Muslims know not to bother trying to rob, intimidate, harass, or rape Slavs in Germany or anywhere else.

    If the Germans won’t be men, perhaps they can import Slavs to do the fighting and cleanup that needs to be done.

    • Replies: @AP
  327. @songbird

    Typical deception from a Jewish person pretending to be part of the host population.

    Take a genetic test, “Bernie”, you inbred fugly old crook. Let’s see those proud “polish” genes.

    The only major european part of you will be the ITALIAN genes that Ashkenazi “Jews” typically have in such plenty.

    • Replies: @songbird
  328. Dreadilk says:
    @AP

    It’s not wishfully thinking when Ukrainian svidomi crying zrada.

    • Replies: @AP
  329. AP says:
    @Dreadilk

    I haven’t heard a lot of complaints about the Polish election from actual Ukrainians. Presence of the far right and potential dangers are noted but the ruling party that steadfastedly supports Ukraine, opposes Nordstream-2, cooperates militarily, etc. has over 50% which is a good thing for Ukraine.

    Typical commentary about Polish election results from Ukrainian nationalist sources:

    https://www.eurointegration.com.ua/articles/2019/10/14/7101853/

    Idea that this has caused a lot of Ukrainians to be upset or is somehow a catastrophe seems to be primarily a Russian blogger news item made for the consumption of gullible people living in fantasy-land, like you.

    So, good job yet again confirming the obvious about yourself.

    • Replies: @Dreadilk
  330. AP says:
    @RadicalCenter

    So Slavs will play the role in Germany that Mexicans do in California?

    • Agree: Korenchkin
    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  331. Denis says:
    @AP

    That Muscovites complain is a very good sign, it shows that they at least have some awareness of the potential negative consequences, and are willing to voice them. Better that they complain now than wait for the city to become Paris.

    As for Canadians complaining, I wonder if their complaints about supposedly rising crime are merely a publically acceptable way of complaining that what crime there is is increasingly committed by non-whites, in urban areas anyways.

  332. Denis says:
    @Korenchkin

    The Immigration to Russia page says “Russia maintains one of the world’s most liberal immigration policies” which is just bizarre

    Russia takes in a very large number of immigrants, legal and illegal, it’s just that a large chunk of them have been Russians and Ukrainians.

    • Replies: @Korenchkin
  333. @Denis

    Right, but compared to policies of Sweden or Canada, calling Russia’s immigration policy “the most liberal” is a bit of a stretch

  334. songbird says:
    @RadicalCenter

    I tend to think that the trace Ashkenazi results a lot of Europeans seem to get on genetic tests are probably just Italian and other European genes that the Ashkenazim have. Ashkenazim being relatively inbred and probably more interested in their roots than average, probably skews the interpretation.

    Of course, I don’t rule out the possibility that it is done intentionally.

  335. @Hail

    Alberta is only 70% white (2016 census) and dropping fast.

    1996: 85.3% White, 10.1% Visible Minority, 4.6% Aboriginal
    2001: 83.7% White, 11.2% Visible Minority, 5.1% Aboriginal
    2006: 80.5% White, 13.9% Visible Minority, 5.6% Aboriginal

    2016: 70% White, 23.5% Visible Minority, 6.5% Aboriginal

    Demographic decline of Whites in Alberta is bad and the trend is increasing nearly exponentially. Keep in mind, a good chunk of whites in Alberta are migrant workers themselves, coming in from the poor East Coast to work in the oil jobs.

    So… yeah separation ain’t happening. The “visible minorities” only care about 1) hating whitey 2) looking and acting like Drake and 3) bringing more of their own kind over. Alberta separating doesn’t help them achieve those goals.

    • Replies: @songbird
  336. @Gabru_Ak47

    I can’t tell if the Conservatives’ problems are due to them not being right-wing enough, and some of their base stays home – or if there simply are not very many people in Canada who have any kind of conservative values anymore – or if immigrants all vote Liberal now. Trump for instance went off the safe right wing script, and ended up winning even though demographics said he could not.

    I remember during the Harper years, many immigrants voted Conservative.

    Immigrants might have something to do with voting for the left wing parties so strongly, but at the same time I know hundreds of young white people, all NPCs, shilling for diversity, mass immigration, etc. so I’m not sure if it is due to immigrants (visible minorities) or not. The polling companies do not break down the vote by immigration status or visible minority status.

    What are your thoughts? You seem to be an immigrant living in Canada. Maybe you’re more connected with them.

    Either way, Canada will be a dump in the next 20 years.

  337. @Anarcho-Supremacist

    Fort Bend flipped to D in 2016 for the first time since 1964.

    The population is also growing by over 50% per decade.

    Non-whites do not vote Republican, right wing, nationalist, or traditional. Even a whiff turns them off.

  338. @AP

    You’re so eager to cast some snark at Americans, or American nationalists, that you use an analogy that’s exactly backwards.

    My point was quite simple, for others.

    I said that the Slavs would resist and fight immivaders, which the native white European people won’t do.

    The Mexicans ARE the immivaders. In fact, they are the largest single group of immivaders that my pussy countrymen and our rulers are allowing to colonize us.

    • Replies: @AP
  339. AP says:
    @RadicalCenter

    You’re so eager to cast some snark at Americans, or American nationalists, that you use an analogy that’s exactly backwards.

    No. American elites bring in Mexicans to deal with blacks, something whites don’t do.

    You are suggesting that Germany bring in Slavs to deal with Africans and Muslims, something Germans don’t do.

    • Replies: @songbird
  340. songbird says:
    @LoutishAngloQuebecker

    I think any sort of voter-based political movement to save parts of the US or Canada would require an absolute explosion of white fertility. Not necessarily impossible in itself, but the trouble is that white areas, even white rural areas, are being actively targeted, and diversity acts as a block on fertility all by itself, without reference to other factors.

    • Replies: @LoutishAngloQuebecker
  341. songbird says:
    @AP

    American elites bring in Mexicans to deal with blacks, something whites don’t do.

    IMO, the pacification of urban centers by Latinos was not planned. Otherwise, they would not be bringing in Somalis and Dominicans, etc. The future supply of Latinos is heading towards a decrease, while Africa is exploding, which means that they should be switching policies right now, if they planned it.

    • Replies: @LoutishAngloQuebecker
  342. @songbird

    I would love to see a white fertility explosion, but there is no evidence to suggest such a thing might occur.

    The non-white fertility is actually lower than white fertility, in Ontario at least. Whites seem to have a TFR of around 1.6 while non-whites are around 1.3-1.4. This number is even lower in Vancouver. Natives have a fertility of over 3, which is fucked (but they get heavy gibs). Of course, a differential of 0.3 makes almost no impact long term when there are literally billions of aliens available to pour in.

    I disagree that diversity acts as a block on fertility. Canada was not very diverse in the 1970s, 80s and even 90s, during which fertility was still quite low. It’s actually higher now than it was. I believe that as white alienation increases, it basically leaves family formation as the last thing they can do – now that there is no community, no nothing, you might as well start a family.

    Given that the white fertility seems to be converging worldwide between 1.4 and 1.6, I don’t think it’s a realistic hope. The yellow tide will be receding in about 10 years (Chinese people will be relatively rare) but the brown tide is just beginning and will last a long time.

    • Replies: @Korenchkin
  343. @songbird

    In the 1980s, the TFR of Mexico was around 4; in the 70s it was between 5 and 6. The white USA was below replacement for most of this time. With a fertility difference that large, its really not surprising that Mexicans ended up spilling into the USA. Now, Mexico is below replacement and not much higher than the USA. Puerto Rico fertility is around 1.

    Yes, get ready for mass Negro influx soon.

    • Replies: @songbird
  344. @LoutishAngloQuebecker

    I would love to see a white fertility explosion

    Well the Mormons seem to got it figured out, imagine if it was done with milennium old institutions like the Orthodox or Catholic churches

    • Replies: @songbird
  345. songbird says:
    @Korenchkin

    Well the Mormons seem to got it figured out, imagine if it was done with milennium old institutions like the Orthodox or Catholic churches

    I wonder about this though. Isn’t their fertility declining?

    Anyway, say the US was India, with the population density of India (it might be headed in that direction, with the way immigration has been made sacred), would they still have replacement fertility? The Sikhs don’t. (Heck, I don’t know if the Amish would) And there is actually some similarity between them and the Mormons, they both have what is often mocked as “magic underwear” – not that I’m necessarily scornful of it myself. IMO, any attempt at sex prohibition is much more logical than food prohibitions.

    • Replies: @AP
  346. AP says:
    @songbird

    Well the Mormons seem to got it figured out, imagine if it was done with milennium old institutions like the Orthodox or Catholic churches

    I wonder about this though. Isn’t their fertility declining?

    Utah has a declining fertility rate but it’s still well above replacement. Also, the decline right reflect an influx of non-Mormons into the state. FWIW, there is a Mormon family at one of my kid’s school in the northeastern USA. Educated, upper middle class couple, and they have 5 kids.

    • Agree: songbird
  347. songbird says:
    @LoutishAngloQuebecker

    Now, Mexico is below replacement and not much higher than the USA.

    This is what annoys me so much about Hispanics. They love open borders and call anyone who is against them, even purely on the level of rhetoric, a Nazi. Obviously, it is a personal thing – they hate the idea that unlimited Hispanic immigration might not be desirable to whites.

    Frankly, I don’t desire it, but I could even live with some sort of union with Mexico, as long as the border was shut down, to Africans, etc. Right now, however, it seems as though Latin America might also be drown in a sea of blacks. Not that I have the Schaden Freue to desire it. Flawed as they are, I always thought of Argentina and Chile as possible escape hatches. But both of them seem to be developing their own immigration problems.

  348. Dreadilk says:
    @AP

    NS2 also got approved.

  349. @Thulean Friend

    Dravidians tend to have smaller brains, but they are more intelligent than the more bigger brained more European northern Indian populations.
    Indians also do extremely good in South Africa as well, despite being derived from the lower castes.
    Indians also have a higher average income than Chinese in Britain, despite most of them hailing from the bottom castes that made their way to Africa.
    My guess is that Indians are *highly* sensitive to environmental pressures than most others. In contrast the Chinese, as Ron Unz seems to put it, have immunity from such deprivation.
    That’s why Indians can’t build good countries from poverty yet, while doing extremely well in the rich countries as they get inoculation from the environmental problems that plague their people back home.
    Who knows, AI and Gene Editing will make this question irrelevant.

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